WSR 98-24-096

PERMANENT RULES

DEPARTMENT OF

LABOR AND INDUSTRIES

[Filed December 1, 1998, 3:20 p.m., effective March 1, 1999]



Date of Adoption: December 1, 1998.

Purpose: The purpose of this rule adoption is to address four issues:

1. Adopt the legislature's expanded definition of agriculture as required by the 1997 SB 5530;

2. Adopt rules related to electricity and food storage and handling in temporary labor camps as required by 2SSB 6168, chapter 37, Laws of 1998;

3. Make corrections to field sanitation rules as required by two letters from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA); and

4. Make a variety of nonsubstantive corrections and clarifications.



NEW SECTIONS



Agriculture, chapter 296-307 WAC:

WAC 296-307-16004 What electricity must be provided for temporary labor camps? Legislative-initiated amendments to meet the requirements of 2SSB 6168, chapter 37, Laws of 1998, are adopted to require electricity in temporary labor camps.

WAC 296-307-18005 How must fan blades be guarded? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to move requirements to guard fan blades from Part P, Guarding power transmission machinery, to Part M, Guarding tools and equipment; farm shops; material handling.

WAC 296-307-18010 How must constant-running drives be guarded? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to move requirements to guard constant-running drives from Part P, Guarding power transmission machinery, to Part M, Guarding tools and equipment; farm shops; material handling.

WAC 296-307-18015 What training must an employer provide for employees who use agricultural equipment? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to move requirements to train employees from Part P, Guarding power transmission machinery, to Part M, Guarding tools and equipment; farm shops; material handling.

WAC 296-307-18020 What requirements apply to machine controls? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to move requirements regarding machine controls from Part P, Guarding power transmission machinery, to Part M, Guarding tools and equipment; farm shops; material handling.

WAC 296-307-18025 How must steam pipes be guarded?

State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to move requirements to guard steam pipes from Part P, Guarding power transmission machinery, to Part M, Guarding tools and equipment; farm shops; material handling.

Temporary labor camps, chapter 296-24 WAC:

WAC 296-24-12504 What electricity must be provided for temporary labor camps? Legislative-initiated amendments to meet the requirement of 2SSB 6168, chapter 37, Laws of 1998, are adopted to require electricity in temporary labor camps.



REPEALED SECTIONS



Agriculture, chapter 296-307 WAC:

WAC 296-307-28008 What training must an employer provide for employees who use agricultural equipment? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to move requirements to train employees from Part P, Guarding power transmission machinery, to Part M, Guarding tools and equipment; farm shops; material handling.

WAC 296-307-28010 What requirements apply to machine controls? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to move requirements regarding machine controls from Part P, Guarding power transmission machinery, to Part M, Guarding tools and equipment; farm shops; material handling.

WAC 296-307-28012 What requirements apply to guarding steam pipes? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to move requirements to guard steam pipes from Part P, Guarding power transmission machinery, to Part M, Guarding tools and equipment; farm shops; material handling.



AMENDED SECTIONS



Agriculture, chapter 296-307 WAC:

WAC 296-307-006 What does this chapter cover? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Provide additional guidance on other safety and health rules that may apply.

Clarify the definition of "agricultural operations."

Legislative-initiated amendments are adopted to meet the requirement of SB 5530, 1997, expanding the scope of the definition of "agricultural operations."

WAC 296-307-009 What definitions apply to this chapter? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to clarify that references to "the department" refer to WISHA staff.

WAC 296-307-015 What must an employer do if a serious injury occurs? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to clarify how an employer must report a serious injury.

WAC 296-307-018 What are the employer's responsibilities?

State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to provide additional guidance on other safety and health rules that may apply.

WAC 296-307-024 How does an employer apply for a variance?

State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to correct the address to write to for a variance application.

WAC 296-307-030 What are the required elements of an accident prevention program? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Clarify that an accident prevention program must be in writing.

Specify where the requirement to develop an emergency action plan is found.

WAC 296-307-07013 What rules apply to vehicles used to transport employees? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to clarify that all vehicles used to transport employees must be equipped with first-aid supplies, two blankets, and a fire extinguisher.

WAC 296-307-09503 What does this section cover? Federal-initiated amendments to address a letter from OSHA dated July 20, 1998, which identified areas in the agriculture rules that are not as effective as OSHA rules, are adopted to eliminate the field sanitation exemption for production of seeds.

WAC 296-307-09509 What orientation must employers provide for field sanitation? Federal-initiated amendments to address issues identified in a letter from OSHA dated July 30, 1997, which identified areas in the agriculture rules that are not as effective as OSHA rules, are adopted to:

Specify the good hygiene practices necessary to minimize exposure to hazards in the field.

Clarify that nonpotable water cannot be used for sanitation purposes.

WAC 296-307-107 Federal worker protection standards--Washington state department of agriculture. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to change the word "chapter" to "part."

WAC 296-307-11005 Definitions--Worker protection standards--40 CFR, 170.3. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Delete the note referring to WAC 296-306A-010, which does not exist.

WAC 296-307-12040 Pesticide safety training--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.130. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Merge all pesticide safety training requirements into one subsection to eliminate confusion.

WAC 296-307-13045 Personal protective equipment--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.240. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC and correct another WAC reference.

WAC 296-307-16001 What requirements apply to camp sites? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to eliminate requirements for closing temporary labor camps that address public health issues over which we have no jurisdiction.

WAC 296-307-16003 How must camp shelters be constructed? Legislative-initiated amendments are adopted to meet the requirement of 2SSB 6168, chapter 37, Laws of 1998, deleting requirements for cooking facilities that have been moved to WAC 296-307-16017.

WAC 296-307-16013 What lighting must an employer provide in camp buildings? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to clarify light level requirements in other rooms.

Legislative-initiated amendments are adopted to meet the requirement of 2SSB 6168, chapter 37, Laws of 1998, deleting the phrase "where electric service is available."

WAC 296-307-16017 How must kitchens, dining halls, and feeding facilities be constructed? Legislative-initiated amendments are adopted to meet the requirement of 2SSB 6168, chapter 37, Laws of 1998, requiring facilities for cooking and food handling.

Part M--Guarding tools; farm shops; materials handling, state-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to include equipment guarding in the part title to better reflect the contents of the part.

WAC 296-307-18503 What general requirements apply to powered saws? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Move requirements that apply to specific kinds of saws to the sections that cover those saws.

Clarify that push sticks or blocks must be used.

Clarify that improper dadoing is prohibited.

WAC 296-307-18506 How must band saws be guarded?

State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-307-18509 How must radial arm saws be guarded?

State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Allow the option of alternative protection equivalent to a blade guard.

Bring in requirements previously found in general saw requirements that only apply to radial arm saws.

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-307-18512 How must table saws be guarded?

State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Bring in requirements previously found in general saw requirements that only apply to table saws.

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-307-190 Guarding bench grinders and abrasive wheels.

State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to add "and portable grinders" to the section title to better reflect the content of the section.

WAC 296-307-19009 What are the use, mounting, and guarding rules for abrasive wheels? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted, moving an existing requirement (mistakenly located in flanges requirements) that applies to abrasive wheels into this section.

WAC 296-307-19012 What requirements apply to flanges? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted, moving a requirement that does not apply to flanges to WAC 296-307-19009.

WAC 296-307-22012 What rules apply to walk-behind rotary mowers? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Clarify that deadman controls are required.

WAC 296-307-22509 What rules apply to the operation and maintenance of jacks? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to clarify that jacks alone are not a sufficient support method when working under the load.

WAC 296-307-232 What requirements apply to conveyors? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Clarify what the emergency conditions are when walking on a roller-type conveyor.

Clarify the location of the emergency stopping device for a conveyor.

WAC 296-307-25015 What protection must an employer provide for open-sided floors, platforms, and runways? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Correct a WAC reference.

WAC 296-307-28006 What general requirements apply to machine guarding? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Move requirements for constant-running drives to Part M.

WAC 296-307-28060 What materials must be used for guardrails and toeboards? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Clarify that these guardrail requirements only apply to guarding power transmission machinery.

WAC 296-307-30009 How must other power transmission components of farmstead equipment be guarded? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Replace specifications for power transmission components guarding with a reference to the rules on power transmission guarding.

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-307-34006 Who is exempt from the requirements of this section? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Specify in the note which sections require portable fire extinguishers.

WAC 296-307-35015 What are the requirements for an emergency action plan? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to specify which section requires the emergency action plan.

WAC 296-307-35018 What are the requirements for a fire prevention plan? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to specify which section requires a fire prevention plan.

WAC 296-307-37801 What does this section cover?

State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Correct a WAC reference.

WAC 296-307-40005 What general requirements apply to the storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to clarify that gloves and goggles are required and a face shield may also be used.

WAC 296-307-45001 What general requirements apply to hazardous materials and flammable and combustible liquids? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to clarify that the storage requirements apply to other flammable and combustible liquids.

WAC 296-307-52003 What is a "powered industrial truck"? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to delete the farm vehicles exclusion inadvertently left during adoption of previous changes to chapter 296-306A WAC.

WAC 296-307-52005 What manufacturer's requirements apply to powered industrial trucks? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to replace "shall" with "must."

WAC 296-307-52009 What must a user consider before choosing a powered industrial truck? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Correct the chapter reference to chapter 296-307 WAC.

Replace "shall" with "must."

WAC 296-307-52011 What requirements determine which trucks to use in specific hazardous environments? State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to delete the tables that users find more confusing than helpful.

Correcting references. State-initiated amendments to the following sections are adopted to correct references from chapter 296-306A WAC to chapter 296-307 WAC. No other changes are adopted.

WAC 296-307-003 How is this chapter divided?

WAC 296-307-05507 What other requirements apply to ladders?

WAC 296-307-076 How must farm field equipment be guarded?

WAC 296-307-08003 Which agricultural tractors are covered by this section?

WAC 296-307-08009 What requirements apply to the testing and performance of ROPS used on agricultural tractors?

WAC 296-307-08012 What requirements apply to seatbelts used with ROPS on agricultural tractors?

WAC 296-307-08018 What employee training requirements apply to ROPS used on agricultural tractors?

WAC 296-307-08021 What other requirements apply to ROPS used on agricultural tractors?

WAC 296-307-085 When must ROPS be provided for material handling equipment?

WAC 296-307-09506 What definitions apply to this section?

WAC 296-307-11010 General duties and prohibited actions--Worker protection standards--40 CFR, 170.7.

WAC 296-307-120 Applicability of this section--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.102.

WAC 296-307-12010 Exemptions--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.104.

WAC 296-307-12015 Restrictions associated with pesticide applications--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.110.

WAC 296-307-12020 Entry restrictions--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.112.

WAC 296-307-12025 Notice of applications--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.120.

WAC 296-307-12030 Providing specific information about applications--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.122.

WAC 296-307-12050 Decontamination--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.150.

WAC 296-307-130 Applicability of this section--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.202.

WAC 296-307-13005 Exemptions--Standards for handlers--40 CFR, 170.204.

WAC 296-307-13015 Providing specific information about applications--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.222.

WAC 296-307-13025 Pesticide safety training--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.230.

WAC 296-307-15003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-18515 How must circular fuel-wood saws be guarded?

WAC 296-307-19006 What rules apply to guarding abrasive wheels?

WAC 296-307-20505 What requirements apply to guarding portable powered tools?

WAC 296-307-230 What are the general requirements for materials handling and storage?

WAC 296-307-24003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-25012 What protection must an employer provide for wall openings and holes?

WAC 296-307-26003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-26030 What requirements apply to railings and handrails on fixed stairs?

WAC 296-307-26033 What requirements apply to alternating tread-type stairs?

WAC 296-307-27010 What requirements apply to using aerial manlift equipment?

WAC 296-307-28002 What power transmission belts are covered by this section?

WAC 296-307-28014 What requirements apply to prime-mover guards?

WAC 296-307-28016 What requirements apply to guarding shafting?

WAC 296-307-28018 What requirements apply to guarding pulleys?

WAC 296-307-28020 What requirements apply to guarding horizontal belt, rope, and chain drives?

WAC 296-307-28022 What requirements apply to guarding overhead horizontal belt, rope, and chain drives?

WAC 296-307-28024 What requirements apply to guarding vertical and inclined belts?

WAC 296-307-28030 What requirements apply to guarding gears, sprockets, and chains?

WAC 296-307-28040 What requirements apply to guarding clutches, cutoff couplings, and clutch pulleys?

WAC 296-307-28042 What requirements apply to guarding belt shifters, clutches, shippers, poles, perches, and fasteners?

WAC 296-307-28048 What requirements apply to disk, shield, and U-guards?

WAC 296-307-28052 When may wood guards be used?

WAC 296-307-29005 What requirements apply to auger conveying equipment?

WAC 296-307-30003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-30018 What requirements apply to electrical control for maintaining and servicing farmstead equipment?

WAC 296-307-32001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-32003 When does this section not apply?

WAC 296-307-32009 How does an employer determine when to use lockout vs. tagout?

WAC 296-307-32017 How often must the energy control procedure be inspected?

WAC 296-307-32035 What requirements apply to testing and positioning machines and equipment?

WAC 296-307-32039 What requirements apply to group lockout or tagout?

WAC 296-307-34003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-34503 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-35003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-35012 What are the operation and maintenance requirements for exit routes?

WAC 296-307-36005 What does this part cover?

WAC 296-307-36230 What access and working space must be provided for electrical equipment over 600 volts, nominal?

WAC 296-307-36636 How must high voltage systems be grounded?

WAC 296-307-36803 Does this section apply to factory-assembled equipment?

WAC 296-307-37203 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-37209 What equipment, wiring methods, and installations may be used in hazardous locations?

WAC 296-307-37603 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-37606 Who may work on energized parts?

WAC 296-307-37612 What requirements apply to qualified persons working near overhead lines?

WAC 296-307-37615 What requirements apply to vehicles and mechanical equipment near overhead lines?

WAC 296-307-37803 How must employees be trained on safety practices?

WAC 296-307-37807 What work practices must be followed for work on exposed deenergized parts?

WAC 296-307-37809 Must an employer have a written copy of lockout-tagout procedures?

WAC 296-307-37825 What safety-related work practices relate to flammable materials?

WAC 296-307-38006 What requirements apply to general protective equipment and tools?

WAC 296-307-38012 What electrical requirements apply to electrical protective devices?

WAC 296-307-38015 What workmanship and finish requirements apply to electrical protective devices?

WAC 296-307-40001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-40007 What requirements apply to systems mounted on farm wagons (implements of husbandry) for the transportation of ammonia?

WAC 296-307-40009 What requirements apply to systems mounted on farm wagons (implements of husbandry) for the application of ammonia?

WAC 296-307-40013 What requirements apply to the construction, original test, and requalification of nonrefrigerated containers?

WAC 296-307-40015 How must nonrefrigerated containers and systems (other than DOT containers) be marked?

WAC 296-307-40021 What requirements apply to piping, tubing, and fittings?

WAC 296-307-40023 What specifications must hoses meet?

WAC 296-307-40025 What requirements apply to safety-relief devices?

WAC 296-307-40033 What requirements apply to tank car unloading points and operations?

WAC 296-307-40039 What requirements apply to electrical equipment and wiring?

WAC 296-307-41001 What does this part cover?

WAC 296-307-41017 Where must containers be located?

WAC 296-307-41025 What requirements apply to safety devices?

WAC 296-307-41027 How must indirect fired vaporizers be constructed and installed?

WAC 296-307-41031 How must direct gas-fired vaporizers be constructed and installed?

WAC 296-307-41039 What requirements apply to LP-gas in buildings?

WAC 296-307-41041 What requirements apply to transfer of liquids?

WAC 296-307-41047 What electrical requirements apply to LP-gas installations?

WAC 296-307-41049 What requirements apply to liquid-level gauging devices?

WAC 296-307-41501 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-41507 What additional requirements apply to cylinder systems installed outdoors?

WAC 296-307-41513 What requirements apply to safety devices for cylinder systems?

WAC 296-307-42001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-42007 What additional requirements apply to safety devices for non-DOT containers?

WAC 296-307-42013 How must non-DOT containers be installed?

WAC 296-307-42023 What other requirements apply to non-DOT containers?

WAC 296-307-42501 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-42503 What general requirements apply to LP-gas used as a motor fuel?

WAC 296-307-42519 What is the maximum container capacity allowed?

WAC 296-307-42521 What requirements apply to stationary engines used indoors?

WAC 296-307-42523 What requirements apply to portable engines used indoors?

WAC 296-307-43001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-43501 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-43503 How must containers be constructed?

WAC 296-307-43509 What requirements apply to valves and accessories?

WAC 296-307-43511 What requirements apply to safety devices?

WAC 296-307-43515 What requirements apply to enclosures and mounting?

WAC 296-307-44001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-44007 What requirements apply to safety devices?

WAC 296-307-45003 What requirements apply to dip tanks containing flammable or combustible liquids?

WAC 296-307-45009 What general requirements apply to the construction of dip tanks?

WAC 296-307-45017 What measures must an employer take to prevent hazards from electrical and other ignition sources?

WAC 296-307-45021 What requirements must fire extinguishing systems meet?

WAC 296-307-45023 What requirements apply to hardening and tempering tanks?

WAC 296-307-45027 What requirements apply to electrostatic apparatus?

WAC 296-307-48023 What requirements apply to fuel-gas manifolds?

WAC 296-307-48027 What requirements apply to low pressure oxygen manifolds?

WAC 296-307-48029 What requirements apply to manifolding portable outlet headers?

WAC 296-307-48031 What operating procedures apply to cylinder manifolds?

WAC 296-307-48033 How must service piping systems be designed?

WAC 296-307-48501 What general requirements apply to resistance welding equipment?

WAC 296-307-48505 What requirements apply to flash welding equipment?

WAC 296-307-49005 How must arc welding equipment be designed?

WAC 296-307-49007 How must arc welding equipment be installed?

WAC 296-307-49009 How must arc welding equipment be grounded?

WAC 296-307-49011 What requirements apply to supply connections and conductors?

WAC 296-307-49013 How must arc welding equipment be operated?

WAC 296-307-49501 What basic fire prevention precautions must be taken?

WAC 296-307-49503 What special fire prevention precautions must be taken?

WAC 296-307-50005 What protective clothing must welders wear?

WAC 296-307-50009 What employee protection must be provided in confined spaces?

WAC 296-307-50011 What general requirements apply to welding ventilation?

WAC 296-307-50013 What ventilation must be provided for general welding and cutting?

WAC 296-307-50019 What requirements apply to welding fluorine compounds?

WAC 296-307-50021 What requirements apply to welding zinc?

WAC 296-307-50023 What requirements apply to welding lead?

WAC 296-307-50027 What requirements apply to welding cadmium?

WAC 296-307-52001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-52013 In what environments may converted trucks be used?

WAC 296-307-52015 What requirements apply to overhead safety guards?

WAC 296-307-52017 What requirements apply to load backrests?

WAC 296-307-52047 What requirements apply to maintaining powered industrial trucks?

WAC 296-307-53001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-53005 What training must an employer provide for employees who service rim wheels?



Temporary labor camps, chapter 296-24 WAC:

WAC 296-24-12501 Site. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "What requirements apply to camp sites?"

Eliminate requirements for closing temporary labor camps that address public health issues over which we have no jurisdiction.

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-24-12503 Shelter. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "How must camp shelters be constructed?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

Legislative-initiated amendments are adopted to meet the requirement of 2SSB 6168, chapter 37, Laws of 1998, moving the requirements for cooking facilities to WAC 296-24-12517.

WAC 296-24-12505 Water supply. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "What requirements apply to the water supply?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-24-12507 Toilet facilities. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "Must an employer provide toilet facilities for the camp?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-24-12509 Sewage disposal facilities. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "Must sewer lines connect to public sewers?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-24-12511 Laundry, handwashing, and bathing facilities. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "What facilities must an employer provide for laundry, handwashing, and bathing?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-24-12513 Lighting. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "What lighting must an employer provide in camp buildings?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

Legislative-initiated amendments are adopted to meet the requirement of 2SSB 6168, chapter 37, Laws of 1998:

Delete the phrase "where electric service is available."

Clarify light level requirements in other rooms.

WAC 296-24-12515 Refuse disposal. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "What requirements apply to refuse disposal?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-24-12517 Construction and operation of kitchens, dining hall, and feeding facilities. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to change the title to "What cooking and food-handling facilities must be provided in temporary labor camps?"

Legislative-initiated amendments are adopted to meet the requirement of 2SSB 6168, chapter 37, Laws of 1998, requiring facilities for cooking and food handling.

WAC 296-24-12519 Insect and rodent control. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "Must an employer provide insect and rodent control?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-24-12521 First aid. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "What first-aid facilities must be available in the camp?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.

WAC 296-24-12523 Reporting communicable disease. State-initiated amendments that do not add new requirements are adopted to:

Change the title to "When must an employer report communicable diseases in a camp?"

Rewrite for clarity using plain language.



Citation of Existing Rules Affected by this Order:



REPEALED SECTIONS



Agriculture, chapter 296-307 WAC:

WAC 296-307-28008 What training must an employer provide for employees who use agricultural equipment?

WAC 296-307-28010 What requirements apply to machine controls?

WAC 296-307-28012 What requirements apply to guarding steam pipes?



AMENDED SECTIONS



Agriculture, chapter 296-307 WAC:

WAC 296-307-003 How is this chapter divided?

WAC 296-307-006 What does this chapter cover?

WAC 296-307-009 What definitions apply to this chapter?

WAC 296-307-015 What must an employer do if a serious injury occurs?

WAC 296-307-018 What are the employer's responsibilities?

WAC 296-307-024 How does an employer apply for a variance?

WAC 296-307-030 What are the required elements of an accident prevention program?

WAC 296-307-05507 What other requirements apply to ladders?

WAC 296-307-07013 What rules apply to vehicles used to transport employees?

WAC 296-307-076 How must farm field equipment be guarded?

WAC 296-307-08003 Which agricultural tractors are covered by this section?

WAC 296-307-08009 What requirements apply to the testing and performance of ROPS used on agricultural tractors?

WAC 296-307-08012 What requirements apply to seatbelts used with ROPS on agricultural tractors?

WAC 296-307-08018 What employee training requirements apply to ROPS used on agricultural tractors?

WAC 296-307-08021 What other requirements apply to ROPS used on agricultural tractors?

WAC 296-307-085 When must ROPS be provided for material handling equipment?

WAC 296-307-09503 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-09506 What definitions apply to this section?

WAC 296-307-09509 What orientation must employers provide for field sanitation?

WAC 296-307-107 Federal worker protection standards--Washington state department of agriculture.

WAC 296-307-11005 Definitions--Worker protection standards--40 CFR, 170.3.

WAC 296-307-11010 General duties and prohibited actions--Worker protection standards--40 CFR, 170.7.

WAC 296-307-120 Applicability of this section--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.102.

WAC 296-307-12010 Exemptions--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.104.

WAC 296-307-12015 Restrictions associated with pesticide applications--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.110.

WAC 296-307-12020 Entry restrictions--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.112.

WAC 296-307-12025 Notice of applications--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.120.

WAC 296-307-12030 Providing specific information about applications--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.122.

WAC 296-307-12040 Pesticide safety training--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.130.

WAC 296-307-12050 Decontamination--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.150.

WAC 296-307-130 Applicability of this section--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.202.

WAC 296-307-13005 Exemptions--Standards for handlers--40 CFR, 170.204.

WAC 296-307-13015 Providing specific information about applications--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.222.

WAC 296-307-13025 Pesticide safety training--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.230.

WAC 296-307-13045 Personal protective equipment--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.240.

WAC 296-307-15003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-16001 What requirements apply to camp sites?

WAC 296-307-16003 How must camp shelters be constructed?

WAC 296-307-16013 What lighting must an employer provide in camp buildings?

WAC 296-307-16017 How must kitchens, dining halls, and feeding facilities be constructed?

Part M Guarding tools; farm shops; materials handling.

WAC 296-307-18503 What general requirements apply to powered saws?

WAC 296-307-18506 How must band saws be guarded?

WAC 296-307-18509 How must radial arm saws be guarded?

WAC 296-307-18512 How must table saws be guarded?

WAC 296-307-18515 How must circular fuel-wood saws be guarded?

WAC 296-307-190 Guarding bench grinders and abrasive wheels.

WAC 296-307-19006 What rules apply to guarding abrasive wheels?

WAC 296-307-19009 What are the use, mounting, and guarding rules for abrasive wheels?

WAC 296-307-19012 What requirements apply to flanges?

WAC 296-307-20505 What requirements apply to guarding portable powered tools?

WAC 296-307-22012 What rules apply to walk-behind rotary mowers?

WAC 296-307-22509 What rules apply to the operation and maintenance of jacks?

WAC 296-307-230 What are the general requirements for materials handling and storage?

WAC 296-307-232 What requirements apply to conveyors?

WAC 296-307-24003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-25012 What protection must an employer provide for wall openings and holes?

WAC 296-307-25015 What protection must an employer provide for open-sided floors, platforms, and runways?

WAC 296-307-26003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-26030 What requirements apply to railings and handrails on fixed stairs?

WAC 296-307-26033 What requirements apply to alternating tread-type stairs?

WAC 296-307-27010 What requirements apply to using aerial manlift equipment?

WAC 296-307-28002 What power transmission belts are covered by this section?

WAC 296-307-28006 What general requirements apply to machine guarding?

WAC 296-307-28014 What requirements apply to prime-mover guards?

WAC 296-307-28016 What requirements apply to guarding shafting?

WAC 296-307-28018 What requirements apply to guarding pulleys?

WAC 296-307-28020 What requirements apply to guarding horizontal belt, rope, and chain drives?

WAC 296-307-28022 What requirements apply to guarding overhead horizontal belt, rope, and chain drives?

WAC 296-307-28024 What requirements apply to guarding vertical and inclined belts?

WAC 296-307-28030 What requirements apply to guarding gears, sprockets, and chains?

WAC 296-307-28040 What requirements apply to guarding clutches, cutoff couplings, and clutch pulleys?

WAC 296-307-28042 What requirements apply to guarding belt shifters, clutches, shippers, poles, perches, and fasteners?

WAC 296-307-28048 What requirements apply to disk, shield, and U-guards?

WAC 296-307-28052 When may wood guards be used?

WAC 296-307-28060 What materials must be used for guardrails and toeboards?

WAC 296-307-29005 What requirements apply to auger conveying equipment?

WAC 296-307-30003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-30009 How must other power transmission components of farmstead equipment be guarded?

WAC 296-307-30018 What requirements apply to electrical control for maintaining and servicing farmstead equipment?

WAC 296-307-32001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-32003 When does this section not apply?

WAC 296-307-32009 How does an employer determine when to use lockout vs. tagout?

WAC 296-307-32017 How often must the energy control procedure be inspected?

WAC 296-307-32035 What requirements apply to testing and positioning machines and equipment?

WAC 296-307-32039 What requirements apply to group lockout or tagout?

WAC 296-307-34003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-34006 Who is exempt from the requirements of this section?

WAC 296-307-34503 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-35003 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-35012 What are the operation and maintenance requirements for exit routes?

WAC 296-307-35015 What are the requirements for an emergency action plan?

WAC 296-307-35018 What are the requirements for a fire prevention plan?

WAC 296-307-36005 What does this part cover?

WAC 296-307-36230 What access and working space must be provided for electrical equipment over 600 volts, nominal?

WAC 296-307-36636 How must high voltage systems be grounded?

WAC 296-307-36803 Does this section apply to factory-assembled equipment?

WAC 296-307-37203 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-37209 What equipment, wiring methods, and installations may be used in hazardous locations?

WAC 296-307-37603 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-37606 Who may work on energized parts?

WAC 296-307-37612 What requirements apply to qualified persons working near overhead lines?

WAC 296-307-37615 What requirements apply to vehicles and mechanical equipment near overhead lines?

WAC 296-307-37801 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-37803 How must employees be trained on safety practices?

WAC 296-307-37807 What work practices must be followed for work on exposed deenergized parts?

WAC 296-307-37809 Must an employer have a written copy of lockout-tagout procedures?

WAC 296-307-37825 What safety-related work practices relate to flammable materials?

WAC 296-307-38006 What requirements apply to general protective equipment and tools?

WAC 296-307-38012 What electrical requirements apply to electrical protective devices?

WAC 296-307-38015 What workmanship and finish requirements apply to electrical protective devices?

WAC 296-307-40001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-40005 What general requirements apply to the storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia?

WAC 296-307-40007 What requirements apply to systems mounted on farm wagons (implements of husbandry) for the transportation of ammonia?

WAC 296-307-40009 What requirements apply to systems mounted on farm wagons (implements of husbandry) for the application of ammonia?

WAC 296-307-40013 What requirements apply to the construction, original test, and requalification of nonrefrigerated containers?

WAC 296-307-40015 How must nonrefrigerated containers and systems (other than DOT containers) be marked?

WAC 296-307-40021 What requirements apply to piping, tubing, and fittings?

WAC 296-307-40023 What specifications must hoses meet?

WAC 296-307-40025 What requirements apply to safety-relief devices?

WAC 296-307-40033 What requirements apply to tank car unloading points and operations?

WAC 296-307-40039 What requirements apply to electrical equipment and wiring?

WAC 296-307-41001 What does this part cover?

WAC 296-307-41017 Where must containers be located?

WAC 296-307-41025 What requirements apply to safety devices?

WAC 296-307-41027 How must indirect fired vaporizers be constructed and installed?

WAC 296-307-41031 How must direct gas-fired vaporizers be constructed and installed?

WAC 296-307-41039 What requirements apply to LP-gas in buildings?

WAC 296-307-41041 What requirements apply to transfer of liquids?

WAC 296-307-41047 What electrical requirements apply to LP-gas installations?

WAC 296-307-41049 What requirements apply to liquid-level gauging devices?

WAC 296-307-41501 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-41507 What additional requirements apply to cylinder systems installed outdoors?

WAC 296-307-41513 What requirements apply to safety devices for cylinder systems?

WAC 296-307-42001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-42007 What additional requirements apply to safety devices for non-DOT containers?

WAC 296-307-42013 How must non-DOT containers be installed?

WAC 296-307-42023 What other requirements apply to non-DOT containers?

WAC 296-307-42501 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-42503 What general requirements apply to LP-gas used as a motor fuel?

WAC 296-307-42519 What is the maximum container capacity allowed?

WAC 296-307-42521 What requirements apply to stationary engines used indoors?

WAC 296-307-42523 What requirements apply to portable engines used indoors?

WAC 296-307-43001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-43501 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-43503 How must containers be constructed?

WAC 296-307-43509 What requirements apply to valves and accessories?

WAC 296-307-43511 What requirements apply to safety devices?

WAC 296-307-43515 What requirements apply to enclosures and mounting?

WAC 296-307-44001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-44007 What requirements apply to safety devices?

WAC 296-307-45001 What general requirements apply to hazardous materials and flammable and combustible liquids?

WAC 296-307-45003 What requirements apply to dip tanks containing flammable or combustible liquids?

WAC 296-307-45009 What general requirements apply to the construction of dip tanks?

WAC 296-307-45017 What measures must an employer take to prevent hazards from electrical and other ignition sources?

WAC 296-307-45021 What requirements must fire extinguishing systems meet?

WAC 296-307-45023 What requirements apply to hardening and tempering tanks?

WAC 296-307-45027 What requirements apply to electrostatic apparatus?

WAC 296-307-48023 What requirements apply to fuel-gas manifolds?

WAC 296-307-48027 What requirements apply to low pressure oxygen manifolds?

WAC 296-307-48029 What requirements apply to manifolding portable outlet headers?

WAC 296-307-48031 What operating procedures apply to cylinder manifolds?

WAC 296-307-48033 How must service piping systems be designed?

WAC 296-307-48501 What general requirements apply to resistance welding equipment?

WAC 296-307-48505 What requirements apply to flash welding equipment?

WAC 296-307-49005 How must arc welding equipment be designed?

WAC 296-307-49007 How must arc welding equipment be installed?

WAC 296-307-49009 How must arc welding equipment be grounded?

WAC 296-307-49011 What requirements apply to supply connections and conductors?

WAC 296-307-49013 How must arc welding equipment be operated?

WAC 296-307-49501 What basic fire prevention precautions must be taken?

WAC 296-307-49503 What special fire prevention precautions must be taken?

WAC 296-307-50005 What protective clothing must welders wear?

WAC 296-307-50009 What employee protection must be provided in confined spaces?

WAC 296-307-50011 What general requirements apply to welding ventilation?

WAC 296-307-50013 What ventilation must be provided for general welding and cutting?

WAC 296-307-50019 What requirements apply to welding fluorine compounds?

WAC 296-307-50021 What requirements apply to welding zinc?

WAC 296-307-50023 What requirements apply to welding lead?

WAC 296-307-50027 What requirements apply to welding cadmium?

WAC 296-307-52001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-52003 What is a "powered industrial truck"?

WAC 296-307-52005 What manufacturer's requirements apply to powered industrial trucks?

WAC 296-307-52009 What must a user consider before choosing a powered industrial truck?

WAC 296-307-52011 What requirements determine which trucks to use in specific hazardous environments?

WAC 296-307-52013 In what environments may converted trucks be used?

WAC 296-307-52015 What requirements apply to overhead safety guards?

WAC 296-307-52017 What requirements apply to load backrests?

WAC 296-307-52047 What requirements apply to maintaining powered industrial trucks?

WAC 296-307-53001 What does this section cover?

WAC 296-307-53005 What training must an employer provide for employees who service rim wheels?



Temporary labor camps, chapter 296-24 WAC:

WAC 296-24-12501 Site.

WAC 296-24-12503 Shelter.

WAC 296-24-12505 Water supply.

WAC 296-24-12507 Toilet facilities.

WAC 296-24-12509 Sewage disposal facilities.

WAC 296-24-12511 Laundry, handwashing, and bathing facilities.

WAC 296-24-12513 Lighting.

WAC 296-24-12515 Refuse disposal.

WAC 296-24-12517 Construction and operation of kitchens, dining hall, and feeding facilities.

WAC 296-24-12519 Insect and rodent control.

WAC 296-24-12521 First aid.

WAC 296-24-12523 Reporting communicable disease.

Statutory Authority for Adoption: RCW 49.17.040.

Adopted under notice filed as WSR 98-16-100 on August 5, 1998.

Changes Other than Editing from Proposed to Adopted Version: As a result of written and oral comments received, the following section is being withdrawn:

WAC 296-307-061 What requirements apply to working around bins, bunkers, hoppers, tanks, pits, and trenches? As a result of written and oral comments received, the following sections are being changed as indicated:

WAC 296-307-006 What does this chapter cover?

The phrase "all operations necessary to" is deleted to be identical to the legislation.

The reference to "in-field processing" is deleted.

The conflicting reference is deleted.

The subsections are renumbered.

The reference to tasks outside the scope of the chapter is replaced with more substantive guidance on when other chapters may apply.

WAC 296-307-018 What are the employer's responsibilities? The reference to chainsaw use is deleted.

WAC 296-307-030 What are the required elements of an accident prevention program? The requirements for an emergency action plan are rewritten for clarity.

WAC 296-307-07013 What rules apply to vehicles used to transport employees?

The reference to vehicles used as first-aid stations is deleted.

The existing requirement for first-aid supplies and blankets is made more explicit.

WAC 296-307-09509 What orientation must employers provide for field sanitation?

The description of the hazards of field work is deleted.

The requirement to inform employees of the importance of drinking water and handwashing are made explicit.

WAC 296-307-13045 Personal protective equipment--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.240. References to WAC 296-62-071 are changed to chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E.

WAC 296-307-16017 How must kitchens, dining halls, and feeding facilities be constructed? The requirement for cooking surfaces is changed to one for every two occupants.

WAC 296-24-12517 Construction and operation of kitchens, dining hall, and feeding facilities. The requirement for cooking surfaces is changed to one for every two occupants.

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Comply with Federal Statute: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0; Federal Rules or Standards: New 0, amended 2, repealed 0; or Recently Enacted State Statutes: New 2, amended 6, repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted at Request of a Nongovernmental Entity: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted on the Agency's Own Initiative: New 5, amended 196, repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Clarify, Streamline, or Reform Agency Procedures: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted Using Negotiated Rule Making: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0; Pilot Rule Making: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0; or Other Alternative Rule Making: New 7, amended 202, repealed 3.

Effective Date of Rule: March 1, 1999.

December 1, 1998

Gary Moore

Director

OTS-2341.2

AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12501  ((Site.)) What requirements apply to camp sites? (((1) All sites used for camps shall be adequately drained. They shall not be subject to periodic flooding, nor located within 200 feet of swamps, pools, sink holes, or other surface collections of water unless such quiescent water surfaces can be subjected to mosquito control measures. The camp shall be located so the drainage from and through the camp will not endanger any domestic or public water supply. All sites shall be graded, ditched, and rendered free from depressions in which water may become a nuisance.

(2) All sites shall be adequate in size to prevent overcrowding of necessary structures. The principal camp area in which food is prepared and served and where sleeping quarters are located shall be at least 500 feet from any area in which livestock is kept.

(3) The grounds and open areas surrounding the shelters shall be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition free from rubbish, debris, waste paper, garbage, or other refuse.

(4) Whenever the camp is closed for the season or permanently, all garbage, manure, and other refuse shall be collected and so disposed of as to prevent nuisance. All abandoned privy pits shall be filled with earth and the grounds and buildings left in a clean and sanitary condition. If privy buildings remain, they shall be locked or otherwise secured to prevent entrance.)) (1) You must ensure that all sites used for temporary labor camps are adequately drained. The site must be free from periodic flooding, and located at least two hundred feet from a swamp, pool, sink hole, or other surface collection of water unless the water surface can be subject to mosquito control. Drainage from and through the camp must not endanger any domestic or public water supply. All sites must be free from depressions in which water may become a nuisance.

(2) All sites must be large enough to prevent overcrowding of necessary structures. The principal camp area for sleeping and for food preparation and eating must be at least five hundred feet from where livestock are kept.

(3) The grounds and open areas surrounding the shelters must be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12501, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12501, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12503  ((Shelter.)) How must camp shelters be constructed? (((1) Every shelter in the camp shall be constructed in a manner which will provide protection against the elements.

(2) Each room used for sleeping purposes shall contain at least 50 square feet of floor space for each occupant. At least a 7-foot ceiling shall be provided.

(3) Beds, cots, or bunks, and suitable storage facilities such as wall lockers for clothing and personal articles shall be provided in every room used for sleeping purposes. Such beds or similar facilities shall be spaced not closer than 36 inches both laterally and end to end, and shall be elevated at least 12 inches from the floor. If double-deck bunks are used, they shall be spaced not less than 48 inches both laterally and end to end. The minimum clear space between the lower and upper bunk shall be not less than 27 inches. Triple-deck bunks are prohibited.

(4) The floors of each shelter shall be constructed of wood, asphalt, or concrete. Wooden floors shall be of smooth and tight construction. The floors shall be kept in good repair.

(5) All wooden floors shall be elevated not less than 1 foot above the ground level at all points to prevent dampness and to permit free circulation of air beneath.

(6) Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit "banking" with earth or other suitable material around the outside walls in areas subject to extreme low temperatures.

(7) All living quarters shall be provided with windows the total of which shall be not less than one-tenth of the floor area. At least one-half of each window shall be so constructed that it can be opened for purposes of ventilation.

(8) All exterior openings shall be effectively screened with 16-mesh material. All screen doors shall be equipped with self-closing devices.

(9) Each dwelling unit shall have at least 70 square feet of floor space for the first occupant and at least 50 square feet of floor space for each additional occupant. A separate sleeping area shall be provided for the husband and wife in all family units in which one or more children over six years of age are housed.

(10) In camps where cooking facilities are used in common, stoves (in ratio of one stove to 10 persons or one stove to two families) shall be provided in an enclosed and screened shelter. Sanitary facilities shall be provided for storing and preparing food.

(11) If a camp is used during cold weather, adequate heating equipment shall be provided.



Note: All heating, cooking, and water heating equipment shall be installed in accordance with state and local ordinances, codes, and regulations governing such installations.))

(1) You must ensure that every shelter in the camp is constructed to provide protection against the elements.

(2) Each room used for sleeping purposes must have at least fifty square feet of floor space for each occupant. The room must have at least a seven-foot ceiling.

(3) You must provide beds, cots, or bunks, and suitable storage facilities such as wall lockers for clothing and personal articles in every sleeping room.

(a) Beds must be at least thirty-six inches apart, both laterally and end to end, and the frame must keep mattresses at least twelve inches off the floor.

(b) Double-deck bunks must be spaced at least forty-eight inches apart, both laterally and end to end.

(c) The minimum clear space between lower and upper bunks must be at least twenty-seven inches.

(d) Triple-deck bunks are prohibited.

(4) The floors of each shelter must be constructed of wood, asphalt, or concrete. Wooden floors must be smooth and tight. The floors must be kept in good repair.

(5) All wooden floors must be elevated at least one foot above ground level at all points to prevent dampness and to permit free air circulation.

(6) You may "bank" around outside walls with earth or other suitable material to guard against extreme low temperatures.

(7) All living quarters must have windows covering a total area equal to at least one-tenth of the floor area. You must ensure that at least one-half of each window can be opened for ventilation.

(8) All exterior openings must be screened with sixteen-mesh material. All screen doors must have self-closing devices.

(9) You must ensure that each dwelling unit has at least seventy square feet of floor space for the first occupant and at least fifty square feet of floor space for each additional occupant. In a family unit, the husband and wife must have a separate sleeping area whenever living with one or more children over six years old.

(10) If a camp is used during cold weather, you must provide adequate heating equipment.



Note: All heating, cooking, and water heating equipment must be installed according to state and local ordinances, codes, and regulations governing such installations.





[Order 73-5, 296-24-12503, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12503, filed 5/7/73.]



NEW SECTION



WAC 296-24-12504  What electricity must be provided for temporary labor camps? (1) A labor camp operator must supply electricity to all dwelling units, kitchen facilities, shower/bathroom facilities, common areas, and laundry facilities.

(2) All electrical wiring and electrical equipment in labor camps must meet the electric standards of applicable building codes.



[]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12505  ((Water supply.)) What requirements apply to the water supply? (((1) An adequate and convenient water supply, approved by the appropriate health authority, shall be provided in each camp for drinking, cooking, bathing, and laundry purposes.

(2) A water supply shall be deemed adequate if it is capable of delivering 35 gallons per person per day to the campsite at a peak rate of 2 1/2 times the average hourly demand.

(3) The distribution lines shall be capable of supplying water at normal operating pressures to all fixtures for simultaneous operation. Water outlets shall be distributed throughout the camp in such a manner that no shelter is more than 100 feet from a yard hydrant if water is not piped to the shelters.

(4) Where water under pressure is available, one or more drinking fountains shall be provided for each 100 occupants or fraction thereof. The construction of drinking fountains shall comply with ANSI Standard Specifications for Drinking Fountains, Z4.2-1942. Common drinking cups are prohibited.)) (1) In each camp, you must provide an adequate and convenient water supply for drinking, cooking, bathing, and laundry purposes. The water supply must be approved by the appropriate health authority.

"Adequate water supply" means a water supply that is capable of delivering thirty-five gallons per person per day to the campsite at a peak rate of two and one-half times the average hourly demand.

(2) You must ensure that the distribution lines are able to supply water at normal operating pressures to all fixtures for simultaneous operation. If water is not piped to the shelters, water outlets must be distributed throughout the camp so that no shelter is more than one hundred feet from a yard hydrant.

(3) Where water under pressure is available, you must provide one or more drinking fountains for each one hundred occupants or fraction thereof. The construction of drinking fountains must comply with ANSI Standard Specifications for Drinking Fountains, Z4.2-1942. Common drinking cups are prohibited.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12505, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12505, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12507  ((Toilet facilities.)) Must an employer provide toilet facilities for the camp? (((1) Toilet facilities adequate for the capacity of the camp shall be provided.

(2) Each toilet room shall be located so as to be accessible without any individual passing through any sleeping room. Toilet rooms shall have a window not less than 6 square feet in area opening directly to the outside area or otherwise be satisfactorily ventilated. All outside openings shall be screened with 16-mesh material. No fixture, water closet, chemical toilet, or urinal shall be located in a room used for other than toilet purposes.

(3) A toilet room shall be located within 200 feet of the door of each sleeping room. No privy shall be closer than 100 feet to any sleeping room, dining room, lunch area, or kitchen.

(4) Where the toilet rooms are shared, such as in multi-family shelters and in barracks type facilities, separate toilet rooms shall be provided for each sex. These rooms shall be distinctly marked "for men" and "for women" by signs printed in English and in the native language of the persons occupying the camp, or marked with easily understood pictures or symbols. If the facilities for each sex are in the same building, they shall be separated by solid walls or partitions extending from the floor to the roof or ceiling.

(5) Where toilet facilities are shared, the number of water closets or privy seats provided for each sex shall be based on the maximum number of persons of that sex which the camp is designed to house at any one time, in the ration of one such unit to each 15 persons, with a minimum of two units for any shared facility.

(6) Urinals shall be provided on the basis of one unit or 2 linear feet of urinal trough for each 25 men. The floor from the wall and for a distance not less than 15 inches measured from the outward edge of the urinals shall be constructed of materials impervious to moisture. Where water under pressure is available, urinals shall be provided with an adequate water flush. Urinal troughs in privies shall drain freely into the pit or vault and the construction of this drain shall be such as to exclude flies and rodents from the pit.

(7) Every water closet installed after the effective date of these standards shall be located in a toilet room.

(8) Each toilet room shall be lighted naturally, or artificially at all hours of the day and night as specified in WAC 296-24-12513.

(9) An adequate supply of toilet paper shall be provided in each privy, water closet, or chemical toilet compartment.

(10) Privies and toilet rooms shall be kept in a sanitary condition. They shall be cleaned at least daily.)) (1) You must provide toilet facilities adequate for the camp capacity.

(2) You must ensure that no one has to pass through a sleeping room to reach a toilet room. Toilet rooms must either have a window of at least six square feet opening directly to the outside, or be satisfactorily ventilated. All outside openings must be screened with sixteen-mesh material. No fixture, water closet, chemical toilet, or urinal must be located in a room used for other than toilet purposes.

(3) A toilet room must be within two hundred feet of the door of each sleeping room. An outhouse must be at least one hundred feet away from any sleeping room, dining room, lunch area, or kitchen.

(4) Where toilet rooms are shared, such as in multifamily shelters and in barracks-type facilities, you must provide separate toilet rooms for each sex. These rooms must be distinctly marked "men" and "women" by signs printed in English and in the native language of the persons occupying the camp, or marked with easily understood pictures or symbols. If the facilities for each sex are in the same building, they must be separated by solid walls or partitions extending from the floor to the roof or ceiling.

(5) Where toilet facilities are shared, you must provide water closets or outhouses for each sex, based on the maximum number of persons of that sex that the camp is designed to house at any one time. Water closets or outhouses must be provided in the ratio of one unit for each fifteen persons, and a minimum of two units for any shared facility.

(6) You must provide one urinal or two linear feet of urinal trough for each twenty-five men. The floor from the wall and out at least fifteen inches from the outer edge of the urinals must be constructed of materials impervious to moisture. Where water under pressure is available, urinals must have an adequate water flush. Urinal troughs in outhouses must drain freely into the pit or vault and the drain must be constructed to exclude flies and rodents from the pit.

(7) Every water closet installed after the effective date of these standards must be located in a toilet room.

(8) Each outhouse, water closet, or chemical toilet compartment must have an adequate supply of toilet paper.

(9) Toilet rooms must be kept in a sanitary condition and be cleaned at least daily.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12507, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12507, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12509  ((Sewage disposal facilities.)) Must sewer lines connect to public sewers? ((In camps where public sewers are available, all sewer lines and floor drains from buildings shall be connected thereto.)) All sewer lines and floor drains from buildings must be connected to public sewers when sewers are available.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12509, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12509, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 94-07, filed 7/20/94, effective 9/20/94)



WAC 296-24-12511  ((Laundry, handwashing, and bathing facilities.)) What facilities must an employer provide for laundry, handwashing, and bathing? (((1) Laundry, handwashing, and bathing facilities shall be provided in the following ratio:

(a) Handwash basin per family shelter or per six persons in shared facilities.

(b) Shower head for every 10 persons.

(c) Laundry tray or tub for every 30 persons.

(d) A "deepwell" type sink in each building used for laundry, hand washing, and bathing.

(2) Floors shall be of smooth finish but not slippery materials; they shall be impervious to moisture. Floor drains shall be provided in all shower baths, shower rooms, or laundry rooms to remove waste water and facilitate cleaning. All junctions of the curbing and the floor shall be coved. The walls and partitions of shower rooms shall be smooth and impervious to the height of splash.

(3) An adequate supply of hot and cold running water shall be provided for bathing and laundry purposes. Facilities for heating water shall be provided.

(4) Every service building shall be provided with equipment capable of maintaining a temperature of at least 70F. during cold weather.

(5) Facilities for drying clothes shall be provided.

(6) All service buildings shall be kept clean.)) (1) Laundry, handwashing, and bathing facilities must be provided in the following ratio:

(a) One handwash basin per family shelter or per six persons in shared facilities.

(b) One shower head for every ten persons.

(c) One laundry tray or tub for every thirty persons.

(d) One "deepwell" type sink in each building used for laundry, handwashing, and bathing.

(2) Floors must be moisture-resistant and smooth but not slippery. All junctions of the curbing and the floor must be coved. The walls and partitions of shower rooms must be smooth and moisture-resistant to the height of splash. All shower baths, shower rooms, or laundry rooms must have floor drains to remove waste water and facilitate cleaning.

(3) An adequate supply of hot and cold running water must be provided for bathing and laundry purposes. Facilities for heating water must be provided.

(4) Every service building must be provided with equipment capable of maintaining a temperature of at least 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

(5) Facilities for drying clothes must be provided.

(6) All service buildings must be kept clean.



[Statutory Authority: Chapter 49.17 RCW. 94-15-096 (Order 94-07), 296-24-12511, filed 7/20/94, effective 9/20/94; Order 73-5, 296-24-12511, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12511, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12513  ((Lighting.)) What lighting must an employer provide for camp buildings? ((Where electric service is available, each habitable room in a camp shall be provided with at least one ceiling-type light fixture and at least one separate floor- or wall-type convenience outlet. Laundry and toilet rooms and rooms where people congregate shall contain at least one ceiling- or wall-type fixture. Light levels in toilet and storage rooms shall be at least 20 foot-candles 30 inches from the floor. Other rooms, including kitchens and living quarters, shall be at least 30 foot-candles 30 inches from the floor.)) Each habitable room in a camp must have at least one ceiling-type light fixture and at least one separate floor-type or wall-type convenience outlet. Laundry and toilet rooms and rooms where people congregate must have at least one ceiling-type or wall-type fixture. Light levels in toilet and storage rooms must be at least twenty foot-candles thirty inches from the floor. The light level in other rooms, including kitchens and living quarters, must be at least thirty foot-candles thirty inches from the floor.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12513, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12513, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12515  ((Refuse disposal.)) What requirements apply to refuse disposal? (((1) Fly-tight, rodent-tight, impervious, cleanable or single service containers, approved by the state board of health shall be provided for the storage of garbage. At least one such container shall be provided for each family shelter and shall be located within 100 feet of each shelter on a wooden, metal, or concrete stand.

(2) Garbage containers shall be kept clean.

(3) Garbage containers shall be emptied when full, but not less than twice a week.)) (1) Cleanable or single service containers that can be securely closed, approved by the state board of health, must be provided for garbage storage. At least one such container must be provided for each family shelter and must be located within one hundred feet of each shelter on a wooden, metal, or concrete pad.

(2) Garbage containers must be kept clean.

(3) Garbage containers must be emptied when full, and at least twice a week.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12515, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12515, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12517  ((Construction and operation of kitchens, dining hall, and feeding facilities.)) What cooking and food-handling facilities must be provided in temporary labor camps? (((1) In all camps where central dining or multiple family feeding operations are permitted or provided, the food handling facilities shall comply with the requirements of the "Food Service Sanitation Ordinance and Code," Part V of the Food Service Sanitation Manual, U.S. Public Health Service Publication 934 (1965).

(2) A properly constructed kitchen and dining hall adequate in size, separate from the sleeping quarters of any of the workers or their families, shall be provided in connection with all food handling facilities. There shall be no direct opening from living or sleeping quarters into a kitchen or dining hall.

(3) No person with any communicable disease shall be employed or permitted to work in the preparation, cooking, serving, or other handling of food, foodstuffs, or materials used therein, in any kitchen or dining room operated in connection with a camp or regularly used by persons living in a camp.)) A labor camp operator must provide enclosed and screened cooking and food-handling facilities for all occupants.

(1) If cooking facilities are located in dwelling units, the operator must provide:

(a) An operable cook stove or hot plate with at least one cooking surface for every two occupants;

(b) A sink with hot and cold running potable water under pressure;

(c) Food storage areas and nonabsorbent, easily cleanable food preparation counters situated off the floor;

(d) Mechanical refrigeration able to maintain a temperature of 45 degrees Fahrenheit or below, with enough space to store perishable food items for all occupants;

(e) Fire-resistant, nonabsorbent, nonasbestos, and easily cleanable wall coverings adjacent to cooking areas;

(f) Nonabsorbent, easily cleanable floors;

(g) At least one ceiling or wall light fixture; and

(h) Lighting of thirty foot-candles measured thirty inches from the floor; and

(i) Adequate ventilation for cooking facilities.

(2) In common food-handling facilities, the operator must provide:

(a) A room or building, adequate in size, separate from any sleeping quarters;

(b) No direct openings to living or sleeping areas from the common food-handling facility;

(c) An operable cook stove or hot plate with at least one cooking surface for every two occupants;

(d) Sinks with hot and cold running potable water under pressure;

(e) Food storage areas and nonabsorbent, easily cleanable food preparation counters situated off the floor;

(f) Mechanical refrigeration able to maintain a temperature of 45 degrees Fahrenheit or below, with enough space to store perishable food items for all occupants;

(g) Fire-resistant, nonabsorbent, nonasbestos, and easily cleanable wall coverings adjacent to cooking areas;

(h) Nonabsorbent, easily cleanable floors;

(i) At least one ceiling or wall light fixture; and

(j) Lighting of thirty foot-candles measured thirty inches from the floor;

(k) Adequate ventilation for cooking facilities.

(3) The operator must ensure that dining hall facilities:

(a) Comply with chapter 246-215 WAC, Food service;

(b) Are in a room or building, adequate in size, separate from any sleeping quarters;

(c) Have no direct openings to living or sleeping areas from the dining hall facility;

(d) Have fire-resistant, nonabsorbent, nonasbestos, and easily cleanable wall coverings adjacent to cooking areas;

(e) Have nonabsorbent, easily cleanable floors;

(f) Have at least one ceiling or wall light fixture; and

(g) Have available lighting of thirty foot-candles measured thirty inches from the floor.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12517, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12517, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12519  ((Insect and rodent control.)) Must an employer provide insect and rodent control? ((Effective measures shall be taken to prevent infestation by and harborage of animal or insect vectors or pests.)) You must take effective measures to prevent and control insect and rodent infestation.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12519, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12519, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12521  ((First aid.)) What first-aid facilities must be available in the camp? (((1) Adequate first-aid facilities approved by a health authority shall be maintained and made available in every labor camp for the emergency treatment of injured persons.

(2) Such facilities shall be in charge of a person trained to administer first aid and shall be readily accessible for use at all times.)) (1) In every camp, you must provide and maintain adequate first-aid facilities, approved by a health authority, for emergency treatment.

(2) A first-aid trained person must be in charge of first-aid facilities.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12521, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12521, filed 5/7/73.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending Order 73-5, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, filed 5/7/73)



WAC 296-24-12523  ((Reporting communicable disease.)) When must an employer report communicable diseases in a camp? (((1) It shall be the duty of the camp superintendent to report immediately to the local health officer the name and address of any individual in the camp known to have or suspected of having a communicable disease.

(2) Whenever there shall occur in any camp a case of suspected food poisoning or an unusual prevalence of any illness in which fever, diarrhea, sore throat, vomiting, or jaundice is a prominent symptom, it shall be the duty of the camp superintendent to report immediately the existence of the outbreak to the local health officer or state board of health by telegram or telephone.)) (1) You must report immediately to the local health officer the name and address of any individual in the camp known to have or suspected of having a communicable disease.

(2) Whenever suspected food poisoning or an unusual prevalence of fever, diarrhea, sore throat, vomiting, or jaundice occurs, the camp superintendent must report immediately the outbreak to the local health officer or state board of health.



[Order 73-5, 296-24-12523, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, 296-24-12523, filed 5/7/73.]

OTS-2337.3

AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-003  How is this chapter divided? The first three digits of the WAC (296) are the title. The second three digits are the chapter (((306A))) (307). The third number group is the section, which may have three or five digits. The fourth and fifth digits are treated as if there were a decimal point after the third digit.

For example: Section 330 of this chapter includes all five-digit sections whose number begins with 330.

Sections may be further divided as indicated below.

Title-Chapter-Section ((296-306A-330)) 296-307-330
((296-306A-33003)) 296-307-33003
Subsection (1)
(2)
Subdivision (a)
(b)
Item (i)
(ii)

Note: The chapter is also divided into "parts" according to subject, to make it easier for you to find the information you need.



[Recodified as 296-307-003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-006  What does this chapter cover? (1) Chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC applies to all agricultural operations with one or more employees covered by the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA), chapter 49.17 RCW.

"Agricultural operations" ((are all operations necessary to)) means farming and ranching, including ((equipment and machinery maintenance, and planting, cultivating, growing or raising, keeping for sale, harvesting, or transporting on the farm or to the first place of processing any tree, plant, fruit, vegetable, animal, fowl, fish, or insects or products)), but not limited to:

(a) Cultivating and tilling the soil;

(b) Dairy farming;

(c) Producing, cultivating, growing, and harvesting of any agricultural or horticultural commodity;

(d) Raising livestock, bees, fur-bearing animals, or poultry; and

(e) Any practices performed by a farmer or on a farm, incident to or in connection with such farming operations, including but not limited to preparation for market and delivery to:

(i) Storage;

(ii) Market; or

(iii) Carriers for transportation to market. Agricultural operations include, but are not limited to, all employers in one or more of the following standard industrial classification (SIC) codes:



0111 Wheat
0115 Corn
0119 Cash grains not elsewhere classified, barley, peas, lentils, oats, etc.
0133 Sugar cane and sugar beets
0134 Irish potatoes--all potatoes except yams
0139 Field crops--hay, hops, mint, etc.
0161 Vegetables and melons, all inclusive
0171 All berry crops
0172 Grapes
0173 Tree nuts
0175 Deciduous tree fruits
0179 Tree fruits or tree nuts not elsewhere classified
0181 Ornamental floriculture and nursery products
0182 Food crops grown under cover
0191 General farms, primarily crops
0211 Beef cattle feedlots
0212 Beef cattle except feedlots--cattle ranches
0213 Hogs
0214 Sheep and goats
0219 General livestock except dairy and poultry
0241 Dairy farms
0251 Broiler, fryer, and roaster chickens
0252 Chicken eggs
0253 Turkeys and turkey eggs
0254 Poultry hatcheries
0259 Poultry and eggs not elsewhere classified
0271 Fur bearing animals and rabbits
0272 Horses
0273 Animal aquaculture
0279 Animal specialties not elsewhere classified
0291 General farms, primarily livestock and animal specialties
0711 Soil preparation services
0721 Crop planting, cultivating, and protecting
0722 Crop harvesting, primarily by machine
0751 Livestock services, except veterinary
0761 Farm labor contractors
0811 Timber tracts, Christmas tree growing, tree farms
0831 Forest nurseries
0851 Forestry services--reforestation


(("In-field" processing operations directly related to agricultural operations are covered under this chapter.))

"Agricultural operations" do not include a farmer's processing for sale or handling for sale a commodity or product grown or produced by a person other than the farmer or the farmer's employees.

(2) ((If rules in this chapter conflict with rules in another chapter of Title 296 WAC, this chapter prevails.

(3) When you assign employees to perform tasks other than those directly related to agricultural operations, the proper chapter of Title 296 WAC applies instead of this chapter.

For example: Employees working in fruit and vegetable packing houses are covered by the general safety and health standards in chapter 296-24 WAC. Employees working on logging and sawmill activities are covered by the appropriate chapter of Title 296 WAC.)) Chapter 296-24 WAC does not apply to agricultural operations.

(3) All agricultural operations are also covered by the requirements of chapter 296-62 WAC, general occupational health rules.

(4) Occasionally, employees engaged in agricultural operations may also be covered by the safety standards of other industries. Following are excerpts from four industry standards that may help you determine if these other standards also apply:

Chapter 296-54 WAC Safety standards--Logging operations

WAC 296-54-501 Scope and application.

This standard establishes safety practices, means, methods and operations for all types of logging, regardless of the end use of the wood. These types of activities include, but are not limited to, pulpwood and timber harvesting and the logging of sawlogs, veneer bolts, poles, pilings and other forest products. The requirements herein contained do not apply to log handling at sawmills, plywood mills, pulp mills or other manufacturing operations governed by their own specific safety standards.

Chapter 296-99 WAC Safety standards for grain handling facilities

WAC 296-99-015 What grain-handling operations does this chapter cover?

(1) WAC 296-99-010 through 296-99-070 apply to:

Dry grinding operations of soycake;

Dry corn mills;

Dust pelletizing plants;

Feed mills;

Flour mills;

Flat storage structures;

Grain elevators;

Rice mills; and

Soybean flaking operations.

(2) WAC 296-99-075, 296-99-080, and 296-99-085 apply only to grain elevators.

(3) Chapter 296-99 WAC does not apply to alfalfa storage or processing operations if they do not use grain products.

Chapter 296-78 WAC Safety standards for sawmills and woodworking operations

WAC 296-78-500 Foreword.

The chapter 296-78 WAC shall apply to and include safety requirements for all installations where the primary manufacturing of wood building products takes place. The installations may be a permanent fixed establishment or a portable operation. These operations shall include but are not limited to log and lumber handling, sawing, trimming and planing, plywood or veneer manufacturing, canting operations, waste or residual handling, operation of dry kilns, finishing, shipping, storage, yard and yard equipment, and for power tools and affiliated equipment used in connection with such operation. WAC 296-78-450 shall apply to shake and shingle manufacturing. The provisions of WAC 296-78-500 through 296-78-84011 are also applicable in shake and shingle manufacturing except in instances of conflict with the requirements of WAC 296-78-705.

Chapter 296-155 WAC Safety standards for construction work

WAC 296-155-005 Purpose and scope.

The standards included in this chapter apply throughout the state of Washington, to any and all work places subject to the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (chapter 49.17 RCW), where construction, alteration, demolition, related inspection, and/or maintenance and repair work, including painting and decorating, is performed. These standards are minimum safety requirements with which all industries must comply when engaged in the above listed types of work.

(5) If rules in this chapter conflict with rules in another chapter of Title 296 WAC, this chapter prevails.



[Recodified as 296-307-006. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-006, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-009  What definitions apply to this chapter? "Approved" means approved by the director of the department of labor and industries, or by another organization designated by the department. Also means listed or approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory.

"Authorized person" means someone you have approved to perform specific duties or to be at a specific location on the job site.

"Department" means the department of labor and industries. When this chapter refers to "we" or "us," it means ((the department)) labor and industries staff responsible for enforcing the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA).

"Director" means the director of the department of labor and industries, or a designated representative.

"Employee" means someone providing personal labor in the business of the employer, including anyone providing personal labor under an independent contract.

"Employer" means a business entity having one or more employees. Also, any person, partnership, or business entity with no employees but having industrial insurance coverage is both an employer and an employee. When this chapter refers to "you," it means the employer or a designated representative.

"Hazard" means a condition that can cause injury, death, or occupational disease.

"Listed" means listed by a nationally recognized testing laboratory.

"Must" means mandatory.

"Nationally recognized testing laboratory" See 29 CFR 1910.7 (federal OSHA requirements).

"Pesticide" means:

Any substance intended to prevent, destroy, control, repel, or mitigate any insect, rodent, snail, slug, fungus, weed, and any other form of plant or animal life or virus, except virus on or in a living person or other animal which is normally considered to be a pest or which the director may declare to be a pest;

Any substance or mixture of substances intended to be used as a plant regulator, defoliant or desiccant; and

Any spray adjuvant, such as a wetting agent, spreading agent, deposit builder, adhesive, emulsifying agent, deflocculating agent, water modifier, or similar agent with or without toxic properties of its own, intended to be used with any pesticide as an aid to its application or effect, and sold in a package or container separate from that of the pesticide with which it is to be used.

"Safety factor" means the ratio of the ultimate breaking strength of a piece of material or equipment to the actual working stress or safe load when in use.

"Should" or "may" means recommended.

"Standard safeguard" means a device designed and constructed to remove a hazard related to the machine, appliance, tool, building, or equipment to which it is attached.

"Working day," for appeals and accident reporting, means a calendar day, except Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays as defined by RCW 1.16.050. To compute the time within which an act is to be completed, exclude the first working day and include the last.



[Recodified as 296-307-009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-015  What must an employer do if a serious injury occurs? (1) You must report to us within eight hours of an incident that:

Causes a fatal or possibly fatal injury;

Involves acute injury or illness from exposure to pesticides; or

Causes injury requiring in-patient hospitalization of any employee.

To report, you ((may)) must contact your nearest labor and industries office by phone ((us)) or ((report)) in person, or ((you may use)) call the OSHA toll-free ((central telephone number)) hotline, 1-800-321-6742.





EXCEPTION: If you do not learn of a reportable incident when it happens, you must report it within eight hours of learning about the incident.



(a) Your report must include:

Establishment name;

Location of the incident;

Time of the incident;

Number of fatalities, hospitalized employees, or pesticide exposures;

Contact person;

Phone number; and

Brief description of the incident.

(b) Fatalities or hospitalizations that occur within thirty days of an incident must also be reported.

(2) If a department investigator asks for assistance, you must assign the employees that the investigator requests.

(3) Do not move any equipment involved in the incident until we complete an investigation.





EXCEPTION: You may move equipment to prevent additional incidents, or to remove the victim.





[Recodified as 296-307-015. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-015, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-018  What are the employer's responsibilities? You must:

(1) Provide a safe and healthful working environment.

(2) Ensure that employees do not use defective or unsafe tools and equipment, including tools and equipment that may be furnished by the employee.

(3) Implement a written accident prevention program as required by these standards.

(4) Implement a hazard communication program as required by chapter 296-62 WAC, Part C.

(5) Establish a system for reporting and recording accidents on the OSHA 200 log. (See chapter 296-27 WAC.)

(6) Provide safety education and training programs.

(7) Implement the requirements of WAC 296-62-074 through 296-62-07451 to ensure the safety of employees who are exposed to cadmium in the workplace.

(8) Implement the requirements of WAC 296-62-145 through 296-62-14529 to ensure the safety of employees who are exposed to confined spaces in the workplace.



[Recodified as 296-307-018. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-018, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-024  How does an employer apply for a variance? (1) If you find that it is impractical for you to comply with specific requirements of this standard, we may permit a variation from the requirements. However, you must still provide equal protection by substitute means and comply with the requirements of chapter 49.17 RCW and chapter 296-350 WAC, variances.

(2) On the variance application you must certify that you have posted a copy of the written application in a place reasonably accessible to your employees. You must also mail a copy of the application to any authorized employee representative. The notice must advise employees of their right to request us to conduct a hearing on the variance application. You must notify employees before you apply.



Note: To request a permanent or temporary variance, you may write to: Department of Labor and Industries, ((Consultation and Compliance)) WISHA Services, PO Box ((44620)) 44648, Olympia, WA 98504-((4620)) 4648. We will mail you an application form and instruction sheet. We will also send a copy of chapter 296-350 WAC, Variances, if you request it.





[Recodified as 296-307-024. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-024, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-030  What are the required elements of an accident prevention program? (1) You must instruct all employees in safe working practices at the beginning of employment. Your instruction must be tailored to the types of hazards to which employees are exposed.

(2) You must develop ((an)) a written accident prevention program tailored to the needs of your agricultural operation and to the types of hazards involved.

(3) Your accident prevention program must contain at least the following elements:

(a) How, when, and where to report injuries and illnesses, and the location of first-aid facilities.

(b) How to report unsafe conditions and practices.

(c) The use and care of personal protective equipment.

(d) What to do in emergencies. See WAC 296-307-35015 for emergency action plan requirements.

(e) Identification of hazardous chemicals or materials and the instruction for their safe use.

(f) An on-the-job review of the practices necessary to perform job assignments in a safe and healthful manner.

(4) ((Your accident prevention program must be outlined in writing.

(5))) At least once a month, you must conduct a walk-around safety inspection of active job sites, the materials and equipment involved, and operating procedures. A representative chosen by employees must be invited and allowed to accompany you.



[Recodified as 296-307-030. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-030, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-05507  What other requirements apply to ladders? (1) Ladders made by fastening cleats across a single rail are prohibited.

(2) Wood ladders, when not in use, should be stored where they will not be exposed to the elements, but where there is good ventilation. They must be stored away from radiators, stoves, steam pipes, or other excessive heat or dampness.

(3) Wooden ladders should be kept coated with a suitable protective material. Painted ladders are acceptable if the ladders are carefully inspected prior to painting by competent and experienced inspectors acting for, and responsible to, the purchaser, and if the ladders are not for resale.

(4) A ladder must have feet that are appropriate for the surface on which it will be used.

For example: A ladder used on a slippery surface must have steel points or other nonslip material on its feet.

(5) Ladders must not be placed in front of doors opening toward the ladder unless the door is blocked open, locked, or guarded.

(6) Ladder safety devices may be used on tower, water tank and chimney ladders over twenty feet long in place of cage protection. No landing platform is required in these cases. All ladder safety devices such as lifebelts, friction brakes, and sliding attachments must meet the design requirements of the ladders that they serve.

(7) See chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part K for requirements related to working near overhead lines.



[Recodified as 296-307-05507. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-05507, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-07013  What rules apply to vehicles used to transport employees? You must ensure that motor vehicles used regularly to transport employees meet the following requirements:

(1) The vehicles are well equipped, covered against the weather, and maintained in good mechanical condition at all times.

(2) A sufficient number of properly secured seats are provided in each vehicle to accommodate the number of employees transported. When emergency conditions make it necessary to transport more employees than the seating capacity can accommodate, all employees must ride within the vehicle. No employee may ride on fenders or running boards of the vehicle.

(3) No employees may ride in or on any vehicle with their legs hanging over the end or sides. All trucks without tail gates should have safety bars.

(4) The vehicles have storage strong enough to retain sharp tools that could present a hazard to employees being transported.

(5) All dump-trucks used to transport employees have an adequate safety chain or locking device to ensure that the body of the truck is not raised while employees are riding in it.

(6) Explosives or highly inflammable materials are not carried in or on the vehicle while it is used to transport employees.

(7) Exhaust systems are installed and maintained in proper condition, and are designed to eliminate the employee exposure to exhaust gases and fumes.

(8) Within the cab, crew trucks must carry only the number of passengers for which they are designed. In any seating arrangement, the driver must be able to maintain full freedom of motion. The driver's normal vision must be free from obstruction by passengers or the seating arrangement.

(9) All enclosed crew trucks have an emergency exit in addition to the regular entrance.

(10) Trucks used for hauling gravel may be used as crew trucks if they meet the following requirements:

(a) Steps in proper places;

(b) Wooden floors;

(c) Securely fastened seats;

(d) Truck is properly covered; and

(e) Compliance with all other general regulations covering crew trucks.

(11) Half-ton vehicles must haul no more than six persons including driver. Three-quarter-ton vehicles must haul no more than eight persons including driver.

(12) ((A vehicle used as a first-aid station has stretchers and fire extinguishers.

(13))) The vehicle is equipped with the first-aid supplies required by WAC 296-307-042, two blankets, and a fire extinguisher.

(13) Heating units with open fires are not used in vehicles transporting crews.



[Recodified as 296-307-07013. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-07013, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-076  How must farm field equipment be guarded? "Farm field equipment" means tractors or implements, including self-propelled implements, used in agricultural operations.

(1) All power transmission components must be guarded according to WAC ((296-306A-280)) 296-307-280.

(2) The manufacturer's instruction manual, if published by the manufacturer and currently available, must be the source of information for the safe operation and maintenance of field equipment.

(3) You must ensure that all power takeoff shafts, including rear, mid-mounted or side-mounted shafts, are guarded by a master shield, as follows:

(a) The rear power takeoff has a master shield. The master shield is strong enough to prevent permanent deformation of the shield when a 250-pound operator mounts or dismounts the tractor using the shield as a step.

(b) Power takeoff driven equipment is guarded to prevent employee contact with rotating members of the power drive system. When the tractor master shield must be removed to use specific power takeoff driven equipment, the equipment must provide protection from the part of the tractor power takeoff shaft that protrudes from the tractor.

(c) Signs are placed at prominent locations on the tractor and on power takeoff driven equipment requiring that safety shields are kept in place.

(4) The following functional components must be shielded to a degree consistent with the intended function and operator's vision of the component.

Snapping or husking rolls;

Straw spreaders and choppers;

Cutterbars;

Flail rotors;

Rotary beaters;

Mixing augers;

Feed rolls;

Conveying augers;

Rotary tillers; and

Similar units that must be exposed for proper function

(5) Where removing a guard or access door will expose an employee to any component that continues to rotate after the power is disengaged, you must provide, in the immediate area:

(a) A safety sign warning the employee to look and listen for evidence of rotation and to wait until all components have stopped before removing the guard or access door.

(b) A readily visible or audible warning of rotation on equipment manufactured after October 25, 1976.

(6) If the mounting steps or ladder and the handholds of the propelling vehicle are made inaccessible by installation of other equipment, other steps and handholds must be provided on the equipment.

(7) You must ensure that the operator's steps and platform have a slip-resistant covering to minimize the possibility of slipping.

(8) Powered machines not driven by an individual motor must have a clutch or other effective means of stopping.

(9) All friction clutches must have sufficient clearance and be kept adjusted to prevent drag or creeping when disengaged.



[Recodified as 296-307-076. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-076, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-08003  Which agricultural tractors are covered by this section? All agricultural tractors manufactured after October 25, 1976, must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-080)) 296-307-080. An agricultural tractor manufactured on or before October 25, 1976, must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-080)) 296-307-080 if:

(1) The tractor was built or sold with rollover protective structures (ROPS) as an optional accessory; or

(2) According to the manufacturer, the tractor was designed to accommodate the addition of ROPS.



[Recodified as 296-307-08003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-08003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-08009  What requirements apply to the testing and performance of ROPS used on agricultural tractors? You must provide a rollover protective structure (ROPS) for each employee-operated tractor that is covered by WAC ((296-306A-080)) 296-307-080. ROPS used on wheel-type tractors must meet the test and performance requirements of OSHA 1928.52 CFR, Protective Frames for Wheel Type Agricultural Tractors, and ROPS used on track-type tractors must meet the test and performance requirements of SAE Standard J334a (July 1970) and the portions of SAE Standard J167 (1971) pertaining to overhead protection requirements.



[Recodified as 296-307-08009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-08009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-08012  What requirements apply to seatbelts used with ROPS on agricultural tractors? (1) Where ROPS are required by WAC ((296-306A-080)) 296-307-080, you must:

(a) Provide each tractor with a seatbelt;

(b) Require that each employee use the seatbelt while the tractor is moving; and

(c) Require that each employee tighten the seatbelt sufficiently to confine the employee to the ROPS protected area.

(2) Each seatbelt and seatbelt anchorage must meet the requirements of ANSI/SAE J800 April 1986, Motor Vehicle Seat Belt Assemblies.

(a) Where a suspended seat is used, the seatbelt must be fastened to the movable portion of the seat.

(b) The seatbelt webbing material must be at least as resistant to acids, alkalis, mildew, aging, moisture and sunlight as untreated polyester fiber.



[Recodified as 296-307-08012. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-08012, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-08018  What employee training requirements apply to ROPS used on agricultural tractors? (1) You must ensure that every employee who operates an agricultural tractor is informed of the operating practices listed below and of any other practices dictated by the work environment. You must provide the information at the time of initial assignment and at least annually thereafter.



exhibit a

employee operating instructions



1. Securely fasten your seat belt if the tractor has a ROPS.

2. Where possible, avoid operating the tractor near ditches, embankments and holes.

3. Reduce speed when turning, crossing slopes and on rough, slick or muddy surfaces.

4. Stay off slopes too steep for safe operation.

5. Watch where you are going, especially at row ends, on roads and around trees.

6. Passengers, other than persons required for instruction or machine operation, shall not be permitted to ride on equipment unless a passenger seat or other protective device is provided.

7. Operate the tractor smoothly--no jerky turns, starts, or stops.

8. Hitch only to the drawbar and hitch points recommended by tractor manufacturers.

9. When tractor is stopped, set brakes securely and use park lock if available.



(2) You must ensure that every employee who operates an agriculture tractor is trained specifically in the operation of the tractor to be used. The training must include an orientation of the operator to the topographical features of the land where the tractor will be operated. Training must emphasize safe operating practices to avoid rollover.

(3) The tractor training program must be described in the written accident prevention program required by WAC ((296-306A-030)) 296-307-030.



[Recodified as 296-307-08018. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-08-051A, 296-306A-08018, filed 3/31/97, effective 5/1/97; 96-22-048, 296-306A-08018, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-08021  What other requirements apply to ROPS used on agricultural tractors? (1) You must ensure that batteries, fuel tanks, oil reservoirs, and coolant systems are constructed and located or sealed to ensure that no spillage comes in contact with the operator in the event of an upset.

(2) All sharp edges and corners at the operator's station must be designed to minimize operator injury in the event of an upset.

(3) When ROPS are removed, they must be remounted to meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-080)) 296-307-080.

(4) You must ensure that each ROPS has a label, permanently affixed to the structure, that states:

(a) Manufacturer's or fabricator's name and address;

(b) ROPS model number, if any;

(c) Tractor makes, models, or series numbers that the structure is designed to fit; and

(d) That the ROPS model was tested in accordance with the requirements of this section.



[Recodified as 296-307-08021. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-08021, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-085  When must ROPS be provided for material handling equipment? (1) This section applies to the following types of material handling equipment: Rubber-tired, self-propelled scrapers; rubber-tired front-end loaders; rubber-tired dozers; wheel-type agricultural and industrial tractors; crawler tractors; crawler-type loaders; and motor graders, with or without attachments, that are used in agricultural work. This section does not apply to side-boom pipelaying tractors.

(2) You must ensure that material handling equipment manufactured on or after October 25, 1976, is equipped with ROPS that meet the minimum performance standards of WAC ((296-306A-08009)) 296-307-08009.

(3) ROPS and supporting attachments must meet the minimum performance standards of OSHA 1928.52 CFR, Protective Frames for Wheel Type Agricultural Tractors, or must be designed, fabricated, and installed in a manner that will support, based on the ultimate strength of the metal, at least two times the weight of the prime mover applied at the point of impact.

(a) The ROPS must be designed to minimize the likelihood of a complete overturn and to minimize the possibility of the operator being crushed in a rollover.

(b) The design must provide a vertical clearance of at least fifty-two inches from the work deck to the ROPS at the entrance.

(4) When ROPS are removed, they must be remounted so as to meet the requirements of this section.

(5) Each ROPS must have a label, permanently affixed to the structure, that states:

(a) Manufacturer's or fabricator's name and address;

(b) ROPS model number, if any;

(c) Tractor makes, models, or series numbers that the structure is designed to fit; and

(d) That the ROPS model was tested in accordance with the requirements of this section.



[Recodified as 296-307-085. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-085, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-09503  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-095)) 296-307-095 applies to any agricultural employer with one or more employees engaged in any hand-labor operations in the field.





EXCEPTION: WAC ((296-306A-09515)) 296-307-09515 (handwashing facilities) and ((296-306A-09518)) 296-307-09518 (toilet facilities) do not apply if your employees:

(1) Are engaged in field activities for the production of grains, ((seeds,)) livestock, or livestock feed; or

(2) Use vehicles, machinery, or animals as part of their field activities and, when needed, can transport themselves to and from toilet and handwashing facilities.





[Recodified as 296-307-09503. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-09503, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-09506  What definitions apply to this section? "Accessible" means a maximum of one-quarter mile or five minutes travel time from the worksite.

"Hand-labor operations" means agricultural operations performed by hand or with hand tools.

For example: The hand cultivation, weeding, planting or harvesting of vegetables, nuts, fruit, seedlings or other crops, including mushrooms, and hand packing into containers.





EXCEPTION: Hand-labor does not include logging operations, the care or feeding of livestock, or hand-labor operations in permanent structures (e.g., canning facilities or packing houses).



"Handwashing facility" means a facility that meets the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-09515)) 296-307-09515 and is approved by the local health authority.

"Toilet" means a fixed or portable facility designed for the purpose of adequate collection and containment of both defecation and urination. "Toilet" includes biological, chemical, flush, and combustion toilets, or sanitary outhouses.



[Recodified as 296-307-09506. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-09506, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-09509  What orientation must employers provide for field sanitation? You must provide each employee with verbal orientation on field sanitation facilities. The orientation must be understandable to each employee and must include:

(1) The location of potable water supplies and the importance of drinking water frequently, especially on hot days;

(2) Identification of all nonpotable water at the worksite and prohibition of the use of nonpotable water for sanitation purposes with an explanation of the hazards associated with using nonpotable water;

(3) The location of handwashing facilities ((with an explanation of when and how they should be used and the hazards associated with not using them)) and the importance of handwashing:

(a) Before and after using the toilet; and

(b) Before eating and smoking; and

(4) The location of toilet facilities; an explanation that facilities are for employee convenience and health considerations; the necessity to keep them sanitary; and that using the fields, orchards, or forests is not an option.



[Recodified as 296-307-09509. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-09509, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-107  Federal worker protection standards--Washington state department of agriculture. This ((chapter)) part contains the federal Environmental Protection Agency worker protection standards as listed in 40 CFR, Part 170. Revisions to the federal language have been incorporated into this chapter in order to be consistent with other requirements of Washington state law. These rules are adopted in conjunction with rules adopted by the Washington state department of agriculture in chapter 16-233 WAC.



[Recodified as 296-307-107. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-107, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-11005  Definitions--Worker protection standards--40 CFR, 170.3. Terms used in this part have the same meanings they have in the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as amended. In addition, the following terms, when used in this part, shall have the following meanings:

"Agricultural emergency" means a sudden occurrence or set of circumstances which the agricultural employer could not have anticipated and over which the agricultural employer has no control, and which requires entry into a pesticide treated area during a restricted-entry interval, when no alternative practices would prevent or mitigate a substantial economic loss.

"Agricultural employer" means any person who hires or contracts for the services of workers, for any type of compensation, to perform activities related to the production of agricultural plants, or any person who is an owner of or is responsible for the management or condition of an agricultural establishment that uses such workers.



Note: This definition does not conflict with the definition of employer in WAC ((296-306A-012)) 296-307-012.



"Agricultural establishment" means any farm, forest, nursery, or greenhouse.



((Note: This applies to all the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes listed in WAC 296-306A-010.))



"Agricultural plant" means any plant grown or maintained for commercial or research purposes and includes, but is not limited to, food, feed, and fiber plants; trees; turfgrass; flowers, shrubs; ornamentals; and seedlings.

"Animal premise" means the actual structure used to house, cage or confine animals such as: Barns, poultry houses, mink sheds, corrals, or structures used for shelter.

"Chemigation" means the application of pesticides through irrigation systems.

"Commercial pesticide handling establishment" means any establishment, other than an agricultural establishment, that:

Employs any person, including a self-employed person, to apply on an agricultural establishment, pesticides used in the production of agricultural plants.

Employs any person, including a self-employed person, to perform on an agricultural establishment, tasks as a crop advisor.

"Crop advisor" means any person who is assessing pest numbers or damage, pesticide distribution, or the status or requirements of agricultural plants and who holds a current Washington state department of agriculture commercial consultant license in the agricultural areas in which they are advising. The term does not include any person who is performing hand labor tasks.

"Early entry" means entry by a worker into a treated area on the agricultural establishment after a pesticide application is complete, but before any restricted-entry interval for the pesticide has expired.

"Farm" means any operation, other than a nursery or forest, engaged in the outdoor production of agricultural plants.

"Forest" means any operation engaged in the outdoor production of any agricultural plant to produce wood fiber or timber products.

"Fumigant" means any pesticide product that is a vapor or gas, or forms a vapor or gas on application, and whose method of pesticidal action is through the gaseous state.

"Greenhouse" means any operation engaged in the production of agricultural plants inside any structure or space that is enclosed with nonporous covering and that is of sufficient size to permit worker entry. This term includes, but is not limited to, polyhouses, mushroom houses, rhubarb houses, and similar structures. It does not include such structures as malls, atriums, conservatories, arboretums, or office buildings where agricultural plants are present primarily for aesthetic or climatic modification.

"Hand labor" means any agricultural activity performed by hand or with hand tools that causes a worker to have substantial contact with surfaces (such as plants, plant parts, or soil) that may contain pesticide residues. These activities include, but are not limited to, harvesting, detasseling, thinning, weeding, topping, planting, sucker removal, pruning, disbudding, roguing, and packing produce into containers in the field. Hand labor does not include operating, moving, or repairing irrigation or watering equipment or performing the tasks of crop advisors.

"Handler" means any person, including a self-employed person:

Who is employed for any type of compensation by an agricultural establishment or commercial pesticide handling establishment to which WAC ((296-306A-130)) 296-307-130 applies and who is:

Mixing, loading, transferring, or applying pesticides.

Disposing of pesticides or pesticide containers.

Handling opened containers of pesticides.

Acting as a flagger.

Cleaning, adjusting, handling, or repairing the parts of mixing, loading, or application equipment that may contain pesticide residues.

Assisting with the application of pesticides.

Entering a greenhouse or other enclosed area after the application and before the inhalation exposure level listed in the labeling has been reached or one of the ventilation criteria established by WAC ((296-306A-12015 (3)(c))) 296-307-12015 (3)(c) or in the labeling has been met:

To operate ventilation equipment.

To adjust or remove coverings used in fumigation.

To monitor air levels.

Entering a treated area outdoors after application of any soil fumigant to adjust or remove soil coverings such as tarpaulins.

Performing tasks as a crop advisor:

During any pesticide application.

Before the inhalation exposure level listed in the labeling has been reached or one of the ventilation criteria established by WAC ((296-306A-12015)) 296-307-12015 (3)(c) or in the labeling has been met.

During any restricted-entry interval.

The term does not include any person who is only handling pesticide containers that have been emptied or cleaned according to pesticide product labeling instructions or, in the absence of such instructions, have been subjected to triple-rinsing or its equivalent.

"Handler employer" means any person who is self-employed as a handler or who employs any handler, for any type of compensation.

"Immediate family" includes only spouse, children, stepchildren, foster children, parents, stepparents, foster parents, brothers, and sisters.

"Nursery" means any operation engaged in the outdoor production of any agricultural plant to produce cut flowers and ferns or plants that will be used in their entirety in another location. Such plants include, but are not limited to, flowering and foliage plants or trees; tree seedlings; live Christmas trees; vegetable, fruit, and ornamental transplants; and turfgrass produced for sod.

"Owner" means any person who has a present possessory interest (fee, leasehold, rental, or other) in an agricultural establishment covered by this chapter. A person who has both leased such agricultural establishment to another person and granted that same person the right and full authority to manage and govern the use of such agricultural establishment is not an owner for purposes of this part.

"Restricted-entry interval" means the time after the end of a pesticide application during which entry into the treated area is restricted.

"Substantial economic loss" means a loss in profitability greater than that which would be expected based on the experience and fluctuations of crop yields in previous years. Only losses caused by the agricultural emergency specific to the affected site and geographic area are considered. The contribution of mismanagement cannot be considered in determining the loss.

"Treated area" means any area to which a pesticide is being directed or has been directed.

"Worker" means any person, including a self-employed person, who is employed for any type of compensation and who is performing activities relating to the production of agricultural plants on an agricultural establishment to which WAC ((296-306A-120)) 296-307-120 applies. While persons employed by a commercial pesticide handling establishment are performing tasks as crop advisors, they are not workers covered by the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-120)) 296-307-120.



[Recodified as 296-307-11005. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-11005, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-11010  General duties and prohibited actions--Worker protection standards--40 CFR, 170.7. (1) General duties. The agricultural employer or the handler employer, as appropriate, shall:

(a) Assure that each worker subject to WAC ((296-306A-120)) 296-307-120 or each handler subject to WAC ((296-306A-130)) 296-307-130 receives the protections required by this part.

(b) Assure that any pesticide to which WAC ((296-306A-130)) 296-307-130 applies is used in a manner consistent with the labeling of the pesticide, including the requirements of this part.

(c) Provide, to each person who supervises any worker or handler, information and directions sufficient to assure that each worker or handler receives the protections required by this part. Such information and directions shall specify which persons are responsible for actions required to comply with this part.

(d) Require each person who supervises any worker or handler to assure compliance by the worker or handler with the provisions of this part and to assure that the worker or handler receives the protections required by this part.

(2) Prohibited actions. The agricultural employer or the handler employer shall not take any retaliatory action for attempts to comply with this part or any action having the effect of preventing or discouraging any worker or handler from complying or attempting to comply with any requirement of this part.



[Recodified as 296-307-11010. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-11010, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-120  Applicability of this section--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.102. Requirement. Except as provided by WAC ((296-306A-12005)) 296-307-12005 and ((296-306A-12010)) 296-307-12010, WAC ((296-306A-120)) 296-307-120 applies when any pesticide product is used on an agricultural establishment in the production of agricultural plants.



[Recodified as 296-307-120. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-120, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-12010  Exemptions--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.104. The workers listed in this section are exempt from the specified provisions of WAC ((296-306A-120)) 296-307-120.

(1) Owners of agricultural establishments.

(a) The owner of an agricultural establishment is not required to provide to himself/herself or members of his/her immediate family who are performing tasks related to the production of agricultural plants on their own agricultural establishment the protections of:

(i) WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 296-307-12020 (3)(e) through (i);

(ii) WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 296-307-12020 (3)(e) through (i); as referenced in WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 296-307-12020 (4)(b)(iii) and (5);

(iii) WAC ((296-306A-12025)) 296-307-12025;

(iv) WAC ((296-306A-12030)) 296-307-12030;

(v) WAC ((296-306A-12040)) 296-307-12040;

(vi) WAC ((296-306A-12045)) 296-307-12045;

(vii) WAC ((296-306A-12050)) 296-307-12050;

(viii) WAC ((296-306A-12055)) 296-307-12055.

(b) The owner of the agricultural establishment must provide the protections listed in (a)(i) through (viii) of this subsection to other workers and other persons who are not members of his/her immediate family.

(2) Crop advisors.

(a) Provided that the conditions of this section are met, a person who is certified or licensed as a crop advisor by a program acknowledged as appropriate in writing by EPA or a State or Tribal lead agency for pesticide enforcement, and persons performing crop advising tasks under such qualified crop advisor's direct supervision, are exempt from the provisions of:

(i) WAC ((296-306A-12050)) 296-307-12050.

(ii) WAC ((296-306A-12055)) 296-307-12055.

A person is under the direct supervision of a crop advisor when the crop advisor exerts the supervisory controls set out in (b)(iii) and (iv) of this subsection. Direct supervision does not require that the crop advisor be physically present at all times, but the crop advisor must be readily accessible to the employees at all times.

(b) Conditions of exemption.

(i) The certification or licensing program requires pesticide safety training that includes, at least, all the information in WAC ((296-306A-13025)) 296-307-13025 (3)(d).

(ii) Applies only when performing crop advising tasks in the treated area.

(iii) The crop advisor must make specific determinations regarding the appropriate PPE, appropriate decontamination supplies, and how to conduct the tasks safely. The crop advisor must convey this information to each person under his direct supervision in a language that the person understands.

(iv) Before entering a treated area, the certified or licensed crop advisor must inform, through an established practice of communication, each person under his/her direct supervision of the pesticide product and active ingredient(s) applied, method of application, time of application, the restricted entry interval which tasks to undertake, and how to contact the crop advisor.



[Recodified as 296-307-12010. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-12010, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-12015  Restrictions associated with pesticide applications--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.110. (1) Farms and forests. During the application of any pesticide on a farm or in a forest, the agricultural employer shall not allow or direct any person, other than an appropriately trained and equipped handler, to enter or to remain in the treated area.

(2) Nurseries. In a nursery, during any pesticide application described in column A of Table 1 of this section, the agricultural employer shall not allow or direct any person, other than an appropriately trained and equipped handler, to enter or to remain in the area specified in column B of Table 1 of this section. After the application is completed, until the end of any restricted-entry interval, the entry-restricted area is the treated area.



Table 1.--Entry-Restricted Areas in Nurseries During

Pesticide Applications





A. During Application of a Pesticide:


B. Workers are Prohibited in:


(1)(a) Applied:

(i) Aerially, or

(ii) In an upward direction, or

(iii) Using a spray pressure greater than 150 psi, or



Treated area plus 100 feet in all directions on the nursery


(b) Applied as a:

(i) Fumigant, or

(ii) Smoke, or

(iii) Mist, or

(iv) Fog, or

(v) Aerosol.



(2)(a) Applied downward using:

(i) A height of greater than 12 inches from the planting medium, or

(ii) A fine spray, or

(iii) A spray pressure greater than 40 psi and less than 150 psi.



Treated area plus 25 feet in all directions on the nursery


(b) Not as in 1 or 2(a) above but for which a respiratory protection device is required for application by the product labeling.


(3) Applied otherwise.


Treated area


(3) Greenhouses.

(a) When a pesticide application described in column A of Table 2 under (d) of this subsection takes place in a greenhouse, the agricultural employer shall not allow or direct any person, other than an appropriately trained and equipped handler, to enter or to remain in the area specified in column B of Table 2 until the time specified in column C of Table 2 has expired.

(b) After the time specified in column C of Table 2 under (d) of this subsection has expired, until the expiration of any restricted-entry interval, the agricultural employer shall not allow or direct any worker to enter or to remain in the treated area as specified in column D of Table 2 under (d) of this subsection, except as provided in WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 296-307-12020.

(c) When column C of Table 2 under (d) of this subsection specifies that ventilation criteria must be met, ventilation shall continue until the air concentration is measured to be equal to or less than the inhalation exposure level the labeling requires to be achieved. If no inhalation exposure level is listed on the labeling, ventilation shall continue until after:

(i) Ten air exchanges are completed; or

(ii) Two hours of ventilation using fans or other mechanical ventilating systems; or

(iii) Four hours of ventilation using vents, windows or other passive ventilation; or

(iv) Eleven hours with no ventilation followed by one hour of mechanical ventilation; or

(v) Eleven hours with no ventilation followed by two hours of passive ventilation; or

(vi) Twenty-four hours with no ventilation.

(d) The following Table 2 applies to (a), (b) and (c) of this subsection.



Table 2.--Greenhouse Entry Restrictions Associated With

Pesticide Applications





A. When a Pesticide

is Applied:



B. Workers are

Prohibited in:



C. Until:


D. After the Expiration of Time in Column C Until the Restricted-Entry Interval Expires, the Entry-Restricted Area is:


(1) As a fumigant


Entire greenhouse plus any adjacent structure that cannot be sealed off from the treated area


The ventilation criteria of (c) of this subsection are met


No entry restrictions after criteria in column C are met


(2) As a:


Entire enclosed area


The ventilation criteria of (c) of this subsection are met


Entire enclosed area is the treated area
(i) Smoke, or

(ii) Mist, or

(iii) Fog, or

(iv) Aerosol

(3) Not in 1 or 2 above, and for which a respiratory protection device is required for application by the product labeling Entire enclosed area The ventilation criteria of (c) of this subsection are met Treated area


(4) Not in 1, 2, or 3 above,

and:



Treated area plus 25 feet in all directions in the enclosed area


Application is complete


Treated area
(i) From a height of greater than 12 in. from the planting medium, or

(ii) As a fine spray, or

(iii) Using a spray pressure greater than 40 psi





















(5) Otherwise


Treated area


Application is complete


Treated area




[Recodified as 296-307-12015. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-12015, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-12020  Entry restrictions--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.112. (1) General restrictions.

(a) After the application of any pesticide on an agricultural establishment, the agricultural employer shall not allow or direct any worker to enter or to remain in the treated area before the restricted-entry interval specified on the pesticide labeling has expired, except as provided in this section.

(b) Entry-restricted areas in greenhouses are specified in column D in Table 2 under WAC ((296-306A-12015)) 296-307-12015 (3)(d).

(c) When two or more pesticides are applied at the same time, the restricted-entry interval shall be the longest of the applicable intervals.

(d) The agricultural employer shall assure that any worker who enters a treated area under a restricted-entry interval as permitted by subsections (3), (4), and (5) of this section uses the personal protective equipment specified in the product labeling for early entry workers and follows any other requirements on the pesticide labeling regarding early entry.

(2) Exception for activities with no contact. A worker may enter a treated area during a restricted-entry interval if the agricultural employer assures that both of the following are met:

(a) The worker will have no contact with anything that has been treated with the pesticide to which the restricted-entry interval applies, including, but not limited to, soil, water, air, or surfaces of plants; and

(b) No such entry is allowed until any inhalation exposure level listed in the labeling has been reached or any ventilation criteria established by WAC ((296-306A-12015)) 296-307-12015 (3)(c) or in the labeling have been met.

(3) Exception for short-term activities. A worker may enter a treated area during a restricted-entry interval for short-term activities if the agricultural employer assures that the following requirements are met:

(a) No hand labor activity is performed.

(b) The time in treated areas under a restricted-entry interval for any worker does not exceed one hour in any twenty-four-hour period.

(c) No such entry is allowed for the first four hours following the end of the application, and no such entry is allowed thereafter until any inhalation exposure level listed in the labeling has been reached or any ventilation criteria established by WAC ((296-306A-12015)) 296-307-12015 (3)(c) or in the labeling have been met.

(d) The personal protective equipment specified on the product labeling for early entry is provided to the worker. Such personal protective equipment shall conform to the following standards:

(i) Personal protective equipment (PPE) means devices and apparel that are worn to protect the body from contact with pesticides or pesticide residues, including, but not limited to, coveralls, chemical-resistant suits, chemical-resistant gloves, chemical-resistant footwear, respiratory protection devices, chemical-resistant aprons, chemical-resistant headgear, and protective eyewear.

(ii) Long-sleeved shirts, short-sleeved shirts, long pants, short pants, shoes, socks, and other items of work clothing are not considered personal protective equipment for the purposes of this section and are not subject to the requirements of this section, although pesticide labeling may require that such work clothing be worn during some activities.

(iii) When "chemical-resistant" personal protective equipment is specified by the product labeling, it shall be made of material that allows no measurable movement of the pesticide being used through the material during use.

(iv) When "waterproof" personal protective equipment is specified by the product labeling, it shall be made of material that allows no measurable movement of water or aqueous solutions through the material during use.

(v) When a "chemical-resistant suit" is specified by the product labeling, it shall be a loose-fitting, one-piece or two-piece, chemical-resistant garment that covers, at a minimum, the entire body except head, hands, and feet.

(vi) When "coveralls" are specified by the product labeling, they shall be a loose-fitting, one-piece or two-piece garment, such as a cotton or cotton and polyester coverall, that covers, at a minimum, the entire body except head, hands, and feet. The pesticide product labeling may specify that the coveralls be worn over a layer of clothing. If a chemical-resistant suit is substituted for coveralls, it need not be worn over a layer of clothing.

(vii) Gloves shall be of the type specified by the product labeling. Gloves or glove linings made of leather, cotton, or other absorbent materials must not be worn for early entry activities unless these materials are listed on the product labeling as acceptable for such use. If chemical-resistant gloves with sufficient durability and suppleness are not obtainable for tasks with roses or other plants with sharp thorns, leather gloves may be worn over chemical-resistant liners. However, once leather gloves have been worn for this use, thereafter they shall be worn only with chemical-resistant liners and they shall not be worn for any other use.

(viii) When "chemical-resistant footwear" is specified by the product labeling, it shall be one of the following types of footwear: Chemical-resistant shoes, chemical-resistant boots, or chemical-resistant shoe coverings worn over shoes or boots. If chemical-resistant footwear with sufficient durability and a tread appropriate for wear in rough terrain is not obtainable for workers, then leather boots may be worn in such terrain.

(ix) When "protective eyewear" is specified by the product labeling, it shall be one of the following types of eyewear: Goggles; face shield; safety glasses with front, brow, and temple protection; or a full-face respirator.

(x) When "chemical-resistant headgear" is specified by the product labeling, it shall be either a chemical-resistant hood or a chemical-resistant hat with a wide brim.

(e) The agricultural employer shall assure that the worker, before entering the treated area, either has read the product labeling or has been informed, in a manner that the worker can understand, of all labeling requirements related to human hazards or precautions, first aid, symptoms of poisoning, personal protective equipment specified for early entry, and any other labeling requirements related to safe use.

(f) The agricultural employer shall assure that:

(i) Workers wear the personal protective equipment correctly for its intended purpose and use personal protective equipment according to manufacturer's instructions.

(ii) Before each day of use, all personal protective equipment is inspected for leaks, holes, tears, or worn places, and any damaged equipment is repaired or discarded.

(iii) Personal protective equipment that cannot be cleaned properly is disposed of in accordance with any applicable federal, state, and local regulations.

(iv) All personal protective equipment is cleaned according to manufacturer's instructions or pesticide product labeling instructions before each day of reuse. In the absence of any such instructions, it shall be washed thoroughly in detergent and hot water.

(v) Before being stored, all clean personal protective equipment is dried thoroughly or is put in a well-ventilated place to dry.

(vi) Personal protective equipment contaminated with pesticides is kept separately and washed separately from any other clothing or laundry.

(vii) Any person who cleans or launders personal protective equipment is informed that such equipment may be contaminated with pesticides, of the potentially harmful effects of exposure to pesticides, and of the correct way(s) to handle and clean personal protective equipment and to protect themselves when handling equipment contaminated with pesticides.

(viii) All clean personal protective equipment is stored separately from personal clothing and apart from pesticide-contaminated areas.

(ix) Each worker is instructed how to put on, use, and remove the personal protective equipment and is informed about the importance of washing thoroughly after removing personal protective equipment.

(x) Each worker is instructed in the prevention, recognition, and first aid treatment of heat-related illness.

(xi) Workers have a clean place(s) away from pesticide-storage and pesticide-use areas for storing personal clothing not in use; putting on personal protective equipment at the start of any exposure period; and removing personal protective equipment at the end of any exposure period.

(g) When personal protective equipment is required by the labeling of any pesticide for early entry, the agricultural employer shall assure that no worker is allowed or directed to perform the early entry activity without implementing, when appropriate, measures to prevent heat-related illness.

(h) During any early entry activity, the agricultural employer shall provide a decontamination site in accordance with WAC ((296-306A-12050)) 296-307-12050.

(i) The agricultural employer shall not allow or direct any worker to wear home or to take home personal protective equipment contaminated with pesticides.

(4) Declaration of an agricultural emergency.

(a) The director of the Washington state department of agriculture may declare the existence of circumstances causing an agricultural emergency on a particular establishment or establishments.

(b) The director may declare an agricultural emergency based on the reasonably expected certainty of circumstances occurring based on weather or other forecasts that would create conditions that would normally be anticipated to cause an agricultural emergency.

(c) The agricultural employer may determine if the establishment under his/her control is subject to the agricultural emergency declared by the director.

(d) Emergency repair of equipment that is in use and sited within a pesticide treated area under a restricted-entry interval, such as frost protection devices, shall be considered to be an agricultural emergency. The conditions in WAC 16-228-655 shall be met.

(e) Activities that require immediate response such as fire suppression, relocation of greenhouse plants due to power failure, and similar conditions, shall be considered to be agricultural emergencies. The conditions in WAC 16-228-655 shall be met.

(5) Agricultural activities permitted under an agricultural emergency.

(a) A worker may enter a pesticide treated area under a restricted-entry interval in an agricultural emergency to perform tasks, including hand labor tasks, necessary to mitigate the effects of the agricultural emergency if the agricultural employer assures that all the following requirements are met:

(i) No entry is permitted for the first four hours after the pesticide application or the minimum reentry interval allowed by EPA for that product, whichever is less;

(ii) The personal protective equipment specified on the product labeling for early entry is provided to the worker;

(iii) The agricultural employer shall assure that the worker, before entering the treated area, either has read the product labeling or has been informed, in a manner the worker can understand, of all labeling requirements related to human hazards or precautions, first aid, symptoms of poisoning, personal protective equipment specified for early entry, and any other labeling requirements related to safe use;

(iv) The agricultural employer shall assure that the worker wears the proper PPE and that the PPE is in operable condition and that the worker has been trained in its proper use;

(v) The agricultural employer shall assure that measures have been taken, when appropriate, to prevent heat-related illness;

(vi) A decontamination site has been provided in accordance with EPA regulations;

(vii) The agricultural employer shall not allow or direct any worker to wear home or take home personal protective equipment contaminated with pesticides.

(b) If the agricultural emergency is due to equipment failure, then the agricultural employer shall assure that all the requirements in subsection (1) of this section are met plus the following additional requirement. The only permitted activity until the restricted-entry interval has elapsed is equipment repair that would mitigate the effect of the equipment failure.

(6) Recordkeeping required for agricultural emergencies.

(a) If the employer declares that his/her establishment is affected by an agricultural emergency and that activities regulated by the worker protection standard have been performed, the employer shall keep the following records for seven years from the date of the agricultural emergency:

(i) Date of the agricultural emergency;

(ii) Time of the agricultural emergency, start and end;

(iii) Reason for the agricultural emergency, such as frost, fire, equipment failure, etc.;

(iv) Crop/site;

(v) Pesticide(s) - name, EPA number, REI;

(vi) Name, date, time of entry and exit of early entry person(s);

(vii) Estimated potential of economic loss which would have occurred had no early entry been allowed.

(b) Records shall be completed within twenty-four hours of the early entry exposure and be available to the department and/or department of health and/or medical facility or treating physician if requested by the above or the employee.

(7) Exception to entry restrictions requiring EPA approval. EPA may in accordance with 40 CFR, Part 170.112(e) grant an exception from the requirements of this section. A request for an exception must be submitted to the Director, Office of Pesticide Programs (H-7501C), Environmental Protection Agency, 401 "M" Street SW, Washington, DC 20460 and must be accompanied by two copies of the information specified in 40 CFR, Part 170.112(e).



[Recodified as 296-307-12020. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-12020, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-12025  Notice of applications--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.120. (1) Notification to workers of pesticide applications in greenhouses. The agricultural employer shall notify workers of any pesticide application in the greenhouse in accordance with this subsection.

(a) All pesticide applications shall be posted in accordance with subsection (3) of this section.

(b) If the pesticide product labeling has a statement requiring both the posting of treated areas and oral notification to workers, the agricultural employer shall also provide oral notification of the application to the worker in accordance with subsection (4) of this section.

(c) Notice need not be given to a worker if the agricultural employer can assure that one of the following is met:

(i) From the start of the application until the end of the application and during any restricted-entry interval, the worker will not enter, work in, remain in, or pass through the greenhouse; or

(ii) The worker applied (or supervised the application of) the pesticide for which the notice is intended and is aware of all information required by subsection (4)(a) through (c) of this section.

(2) Notification to workers on farms, in nurseries, or in forests of pesticide applications. The agricultural employer shall notify workers of any pesticide application on the farm or in the nursery or forest in accordance with this subsection.

(a) If the pesticide product labeling has a statement requiring both the posting of treated areas and oral notification to workers, the agricultural employer shall post signs in accordance with subsection (3) of this section and shall provide oral notification of the application to the worker in accordance with subsection (4) of this section.

(b) For any pesticide other than those for which the labeling requires both posting and oral notification of applications, the agricultural employer shall give notice of the application to the worker either by the posting of warning signs in accordance with subsection (3) of this section or orally in accordance with subsection (4) of this section, and shall inform the workers as to which method of notification is in effect.

(c) Notice need not be given to a worker if the agricultural employer can assure that one of the following is met:

(i) From the start of the application until the end of the application and during any restricted-entry interval, the worker will not enter, work in, remain in, or pass through on foot the treated area or any area within one-quarter mile of the treated area; or

(ii) The worker applied (or supervised the application of) the pesticide for which the notice is intended and is aware of all information required by subsection (4)(a) through (c) of this section.

(3) Posted warning signs. The agricultural employer shall post warning signs in accordance with the following criteria:

(a) The warning sign shall have a background color that contrasts with red. The words "danger" and "peligro," plus "pesticides" and "pesticidas," shall be at the top of the sign, and the words "keep out" and "no entre" shall be at the bottom of the sign. Letters for all words must be clearly legible. A circle containing an upraised hand on the left and a stern face on the right must be near the center of the sign. The inside of the circle must be red, except that the hand and a large portion of the face must be in a shade that contrasts with red. The length of the hand must be at least twice the height of the smallest letters. The length of the face must be only slightly smaller than the hand. Additional information such as the name of the pesticide and the date of application may appear on the warning sign if it does not detract from the appearance of the sign or change the meaning of the required information. A black and white example of a warning sign meeting these requirements, other than the size requirements, follows:



(WAC 296-307-12025, Illus. 1) Place illustration here.


(b) The standard sign shall be at least fourteen inches by sixteen inches with letters at least one inch in height. Farms and forests shall use the standard size sign unless a smaller sign is necessary because the treated area is too small to accommodate a sign of this size. In nurseries and greenhouses, the agricultural employer may, at any time, use a sign smaller than the standard size sign. Whenever a small sign is used on any establishment, there are specific posting distances depending on the size of the lettering and symbol on the sign. If a sign is used with danger and peligro in letters at least 7/8 inch in height and the remaining letters at least 1/2 inch and a red circle at least three inches in diameter containing an upraised hand and a stern face, the signs shall be no further than fifty feet apart. If a sign is used with danger and peligro in letters at least 7/16 inch in height and the remaining letters at least 1/4 inch in height and a red circle at least 1 1/2 inches in diameter containing an upraised hand and stern face, the signs shall be no further than twenty-five feet apart. A sign with danger and peligro in letters less than 7/16 inch in height or with any words in letters less than 1/4 inch in height, or a red circle smaller than 1 1/2 inches in diameter containing an upraised hand and a stern face will not satisfy the requirements of the rule. All signs must meet the requirements of (a) of this subsection.

(c) The employer may replace the Spanish portion of the warning sign with a non-English language read by the largest group of workers who do not read English. The replacement sign must be in the same format as the original sign and must be visible and legible.

(d) On farms and in forests and nurseries, the signs shall be visible from all usual points of worker entry to the treated area, including at least each access road, each border with any labor camp adjacent to the treated area, and each footpath and other walking route that enters the treated area. When there are no usual points of worker entry, signs shall be posted in the corners of the treated area or in any other location affording maximum visibility.

(e) In greenhouses, the signs shall be posted so they are visible from all usual points of worker entry to the treated area including each aisle or other walking route that enters the treated area. When there are no usual points of worker entry to the treated area, signs shall be posted in the corners of the treated area or in any other location affording maximum visibility.

(f) The signs shall:

(i) Be posted no sooner than twenty-four hours before the scheduled application of the pesticide.

(ii) Remain posted throughout the application and any restricted-entry interval.

(iii) Be removed within three days after the end of the application and any restricted-entry interval and before agricultural-worker entry is permitted, other than entry permitted by WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 296-307-12020.

(g) The signs shall remain visible and legible during the time they are posted.

(h) When several contiguous areas are to be treated with pesticides on a rotating or sequential basis, the entire area may be posted. Worker entry, other than entry permitted by WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 196-307-12020, is prohibited for the entire area while the signs are posted.

(4) Oral warnings. The agricultural employer shall provide oral warnings to workers in a manner that the worker can understand. If a worker will be on the premises during the application, the warning shall be given before the application takes place. Otherwise, the warning shall be given at the beginning of the worker's first work period during which the application is taking place or the restricted-entry interval for the pesticide is in effect. The warning shall consist of:

(a) The location and description of the treated area.

(b) The time during which entry is restricted.

(c) Instructions not to enter the treated area until the restricted-entry interval has expired.



[Recodified as 296-307-12025. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-12025, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-12030  Providing specific information about applications--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.122. When workers are on an agricultural establishment and, within the last thirty days, a pesticide covered by this part has been applied on the establishment or a restricted-entry interval has been in effect, the agricultural employer shall display, in accordance with this section, specific information about the pesticide.

(1) Location, accessibility, and legibility. The information shall be displayed in the location specified for the pesticide safety poster in WAC ((296-306A-12045)) 296-307-12045(4) and shall be accessible and legible, as specified in WAC ((296-306A-12045)) 296-307-12045 (4) and (6).

(2) Timing.

(a) If warning signs are posted for the treated area before an application, the specific application information for that application shall be posted at the same time or earlier.

(b) The information shall be posted before the application takes place, if workers will be on the establishment during application. Otherwise, the information shall be posted at the beginning of any worker's first work period.

(c) The information shall continue to be displayed for at least thirty days after the end of the restricted-entry interval (or, if there is no restricted-entry interval, for at least thirty days after the end of the application) or at least until workers are no longer on the establishment, whichever is earlier.

(3) Required information. The information shall include:

(a) The location and description of the treated area.

(b) The product name, EPA registration number, and active ingredient(s) of the pesticide.

(c) The time and date the pesticide is to be applied.

(d) The restricted-entry interval for the pesticide.



[Recodified as 296-307-12030. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-12030, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-12040  Pesticide safety training--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.130. (1) General requirement.

(a) Agricultural employer assurance. The agricultural employer shall assure that each worker, required by this section to be trained, has been trained according to this section during the last five years, counting from the end of the month in which the training was completed.



Note: In addition to the training required by this section, the agricultural employer shall assure without exception, that all employees are trained in accordance with WAC 296-62-054 through 296-62-05427, Hazard communication.



(b) Requirement for workers performing early entry activities. Before a worker enters a treated area on the agricultural establishment during a restricted-entry interval to perform early entry activities permitted by WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 296-307-12020 and contacts anything that has been treated with the pesticide to which the restricted-entry interval applies, including but not limited to, soil, water, or surfaces of plants, the agricultural employer shall assure that the worker has been trained.

(c) Requirements for other agricultural workers.

(i) Information before entry. Except as provided in (b) of this subsection, before a worker enters any areas on the agricultural establishment where, within the last thirty days a pesticide to which this part applies has been applied or the restricted-entry interval for such pesticide has been in effect, the agricultural employer shall assure that the worker has been provided the pesticide safety information specified in subsection (3) of this section, in a manner that agricultural workers can understand, such as by providing written materials or oral communication or by other means. The agricultural employer must be able to verify compliance with this requirement.

(ii) Training before the start of a work period. The agricultural employer shall assure that a worker has been trained before the worker enters any areas on the agricultural establishment where, within the last thirty days a pesticide to which this chapter applies has been applied or a restricted-entry interval for such pesticide has been in effect, the agricultural employer shall assure that the worker has been trained.

(2) Exceptions. The following persons need not be trained under this section:

(a) A worker who is currently certified as an applicator of restricted-use pesticides under chapter 17.21 RCW.

(b) A worker who satisfies the training requirements of chapter 17.21 RCW.

(c) A worker who satisfies the handler training requirements of WAC ((296-306A-13025)) 296-307-13025(3).

(d) A worker who is certified or licensed as a crop advisor by the Washington state department of agriculture under RCW 15.58.230: Provided, That a requirement for such certification or licensing is pesticide safety training that includes all the information set out in WAC ((296-306A-13025)) 296-307-13025 (3)(d).

(3) ((Pesticide safety information. The pesticide safety information required by subsection (1)(c)(i) of this section shall be presented to workers in a manner that the workers can understand. At a minimum, the following information shall be provided:

(a) Pesticides may be on or in plants, soil, irrigation water, or drifting from nearby applications.

(b) Prevent pesticides from entering your body by:

(i) Following directions and/or signs about keeping out of treated or restricted areas.

(ii) Washing before eating, drinking, using chewing gum or tobacco, or using the toilet.

(iii) Wearing work clothing that protects the body from pesticide residues.

(iv) Washing/showering with soap and water, shampoo hair, and put on clean clothes after work.

(v) Washing work clothes separately from other clothes before wearing them again.

(vi) Washing immediately in the nearest clean water if pesticides are spilled or sprayed on the body. As soon as possible, shower, shampoo, and change into clean clothes.

(4))) Training programs.

(a) General pesticide safety information shall be presented to workers either orally from written materials or audiovisually. The information must be presented in a manner that the workers can understand (such as through a translator) using nontechnical terms. The presenter also shall respond to workers' questions.

(b) The person who conducts the training shall meet at least one of the following criteria:

(i) Be currently certified as an applicator of restricted-use pesticides under chapter 17.21 RCW; or

(ii) Be currently designated as a trainer of certified applicators or pesticide handlers by the Washington state department of agriculture in accordance with chapters 15.58 and 17.21 RCW; or

(iii) Have completed a pesticide safety train-the-trainer program approved by the Washington state department of agriculture in accordance with chapters 15.58 and 17.21 RCW; or

(iv) Satisfy the training requirements in WAC ((296-306A-13025)) 296-307-13025(3).

(c) Any person who issues a Washington state department of agriculture-approved Worker Protection Standard worker training card must assure that the worker who receives the training card has been trained in accordance with subsection (4)(d) of this section.

(d) The training materials shall convey, at a minimum, the following information:

(i) Where and in what form pesticides may be encountered during work activities.

(ii) Hazards of pesticides resulting from toxicity and exposure, including acute and chronic effects, delayed effects, and sensitization.

(iii) Routes through which pesticides can enter the body, including information on wearing work clothing that protects the body from pesticide residues.

(iv) Signs and symptoms of common types of pesticide poisoning.

(v) Emergency first aid for pesticide injuries or poisonings.

(vi) How to obtain emergency medical care.

(vii) Routine and emergency decontamination procedures, including ((emergency eyeflushing techniques)) preventing pesticides from entering the body by:

emergency eyeflushing techniques;

washing work clothes separately from other clothes before wearing them again;

washing before eating, drinking, using chewing gum or tobacco, or using the toilet;

washing/showering with soap and water, shampooing hair, and putting on clean clothes after work; and

washing immediately in the nearest clean water if pesticides are spilled on the body. As soon as possible shower, shampoo, and change into clean clothes.

(viii) Hazards from chemigation and drift.

(ix) Hazards from pesticide residues on clothing.

(x) Warnings about taking pesticides or pesticide containers home.

(xi) Requirements of this part designed to reduce the risks of illness or injury resulting from workers' occupational exposure to pesticides, including application and entry restrictions, the design of the warning sign, posting of warning signs, oral warnings, the availability of specific information about applications, and the protection against retaliatory acts.

(((5))) (4) Verification of training.

(a) Except as provided in subsection (((5))) (4)(b) of this section, if the agricultural employer assures that a worker possesses a Washington state department of agriculture-approved Worker Protection Standard worker training card, then the requirements of subsection (1) of this section will have been met.

(b) If the agricultural employer is aware or has reason to know that a Washington state department of agriculture-approved Worker Protection Standard worker training card has not been issued in accordance with this section, or has not been issued to the worker bearing the card, or the training was completed more than five years before the beginning of the current month, a worker's possession of that certificate does not meet the requirements of subsection (1) of this section.



[Recodified as 296-307-12040. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-12040, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-12050  Decontamination--Standards for workers--40 CFR, 170.150. (1) Requirements. The agricultural employer must provide decontamination supplies for workers in accordance with this section whenever:

(a) Any worker on the agricultural establishment is performing an activity in the area where a pesticide was applied or a restricted-entry interval (REI) was in effect within the last thirty days; and

(b) The worker contacts anything that has been treated with the pesticide including but not limited to soil, water, plants, plant surfaces, and plant parts;

(c) Exception. The thirty-day time period established in (a) of this subsection shall not apply if the only pesticides used in the treated area are products with an REI of four hours or less on the label (but not a product without an REI on the label). When workers are in such treated areas, the agricultural employer shall provide decontamination supplies for not less than seven days following the expiration of any applicable REI.

(2) General conditions.

(a) The agricultural employer shall provide workers with adequate water for routine washing and emergency eyeflushing. At all times when the water is available to workers, the employer shall assure that it is of a quality and temperature that will not cause illness or injury when it contacts the skin or eyes or if it is swallowed.

(b) When water stored in a tank is to be used for mixing pesticides, it shall not be used for decontamination or eyeflushing, unless the tank is equipped with properly functioning valves or other mechanisms that prevent movement of pesticides into the tank.

(c) The agricultural employer shall provide soap and single-use towels in quantities sufficient to meet workers' needs.

(d) To provide for emergency eyeflushing, the agricultural employer shall assure that at least one pint of water is immediately available to each worker who is performing early entry activities permitted by WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 296-307-12020 and for which the pesticide labeling requires protective eyewear. The eyeflush water shall be carried by the early entry worker, or shall be on the vehicle the early entry worker is using, or shall be otherwise immediately accessible.

(3) Location.

(a) The decontamination supplies shall be located together and shall be reasonably accessible to and not more than one-quarter mile from where workers are working.

(b) For worker activities performed more than one-quarter mile from the nearest place of vehicular access:

(i) The soap, single-use towels, and water may be at the nearest place of vehicular access.

(ii) The agricultural employer may permit workers to use clean water from springs, streams, lakes, or other sources for decontamination at the remote work site, if such water is more accessible than the water located at the nearest place of vehicular access.

(c) The decontamination supplies shall not be in an area being treated with pesticides.

(d) The decontamination supplies shall not be maintained in an area that is under a restricted-entry interval, unless the workers for whom the decontamination supplies are provided are performing early entry activities permitted by WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 296-307-12020 and involving contact with treated surfaces and the decontamination supplies would otherwise not be reasonably accessible to those workers.

(4) Decontamination after early entry activities. At the end of any exposure period for workers engaged in early entry activities permitted by WAC ((296-306A-12020)) 296-307-12020 and involving contact with anything that has been treated with the pesticide to which the restricted-entry interval applies, including, but not limited to, soil, water, air, or surfaces of plants, the agricultural employer shall provide, at the site where the workers remove personal protective equipment, soap, clean towels, and a adequate amount of water so that the workers may wash thoroughly. At least ten gallons of water for one employee and twenty gallons of water for two or more employees shall be provided at early entry sites that do not have running water.



[Recodified as 296-307-12050. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-12050, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-130  Applicability of this section--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.202. (1) Requirement. Except as provided by subsection (2) of this section, WAC ((296-306A-130)) 296-307-130 applies when any pesticide is handled for use on an agricultural establishment.

(2) Exceptions. WAC ((296-306A-130)) 296-307-130 does not apply when any pesticide is handled for use on an agricultural establishment in the following circumstances:

(a) For mosquito abatement, Mediterranean fruit fly eradication, or similar wide-area public pest control programs sponsored by governmental entities.

(b) On livestock or other animals, or in or about animal premises.

(c) On plants grown for other than commercial or research purposes, which may include plants in habitations, home fruit and vegetable gardens, and home greenhouses.

(d) On plants that are in ornamental gardens, parks, and public or private lawns and grounds and that are intended only for aesthetic purposes or climatic modification.

(e) In a manner not directly related to the production of agricultural plants, including, but not limited to, structural pest control, control of vegetation along rights-of-way and in other noncrop areas, and pasture and rangeland use.

(f) For control of vertebrate pests.

(g) As attractants or repellents in traps.

(h) On the harvested portions of agricultural plants or on harvested timber.

(i) For research uses of unregistered pesticides.

(j) Exemptions. Except as provided by WAC ((296-306A-130)) 296-307-130 and ((296-306A-13005)) 296-307-13005, WAC ((296-306A-130)) 296-307-130 applies when a pesticide is handled for an agricultural establishment.



[Recodified as 296-307-130. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-130, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-13005  Exemptions--Standards for handlers--40 CFR, 170.204. The handlers listed in this section are exempt from the specified provisions of this part.

(1) Owners of agricultural establishments.

(a) The owner of an agricultural establishment is not required to provide to himself or members of his immediate family who are performing handling tasks on their own agricultural establishment the protections of:

(i) WAC ((296-306A-13010)) 296-307-13010 (2) and (3).

(ii) WAC ((296-306A-13015)) 296-307-13015.

(iii) WAC ((296-306A-13025)) 296-307-13025.

(iv) WAC ((296-306A-13030)) 296-307-13030.

(v) WAC ((296-306A-13035)) 296-307-13035.

(vi) WAC ((296-306A-13040)) 296-307-13040.

(vii) WAC ((296-306A-13045)) 296-307-13045 (5) through (7).

(viii) WAC ((296-306A-13050)) 296-307-13050.

(ix) WAC ((296-306A-13055)) 296-307-13055.

(b) The owner of the agricultural establishment must provide the protections listed in subsection (1)(a)(i) through (ix) of this section to other handlers and other persons who are not members of his immediate family.

(2) Crop advisors.

(a) Provided that the conditions of (b) of this subsection are met, a person who is certified or licensed as a crop advisor by the Washington state department of agriculture under RCW 15.58.230, and persons performing crop advising tasks under such qualified crop advisor's direct supervision, are exempt from the provisions of:

(i) WAC ((296-306A-13030)) 296-307-13030.

(ii) WAC ((296-306A-13045)) 296-307-13045.

(iii) WAC ((296-306A-13050)) 296-307-13050.

(iv) WAC ((296-306A-13055)) 296-307-13055.

A person is under the direct supervision of a crop advisor when the crop advisor exerts the supervisory controls set out in (b)(iv) and (v) of this subsection. Direct supervision does not require that the crop advisor be physically present at all times, but the crop advisor must be readily accessible to the employees at all times.

(b) Conditions of exemption.

(i) The certification or licensing program requires pesticide safety training that includes, at least, all the information in WAC ((296-306A-13025)) 296-307-13025 (3)(d).

(ii) No entry into the treated area occurs until after application ends.

(iii) Applies only when performing crop advising tasks in the treated area.

(iv) The crop advisor must make specific determinations regarding the appropriate PPE, appropriate decontamination supplies, and how to conduct the tasks safely. The crop advisor must convey this information to each person under his direct supervision in a language that the person understands.

(v) Before entering a treated area, the certified or licensed crop advisor must inform, through an established practice of communication, each person under his direct supervision of the pesticide products and active ingredient(s) applied, method of application, time of application, the restricted-entry interval, which tasks to undertake, and how to contact the crop advisor.

(c) Applies only when the persons are performing crop advising tasks in the treated area.

(d) The crop advisor must make specific determinations regarding the appropriate PPE, appropriate decontamination supplies, and how to conduct the tasks safely. The crop advisor must convey this information to each person under his direct supervision in a language that the person understands.



[Recodified as 296-307-13005. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-13005, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-13015  Providing specific information about applications--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.222. When handlers (except those employed by a commercial pesticide handling establishment) are on an agricultural establishment and, within the last thirty days, a pesticide covered by this part has been applied on the establishment or a restricted-entry interval has been in effect, the handler employer shall display, in accordance with this section, specific information about the pesticide.

(1) Location, accessibility, and legibility. The information shall be displayed in the same location specified for the pesticide safety poster in WAC ((296-306A-13040)) 296-307-13040(4) and shall be accessible and legible, as specified in WAC ((296-306A-13040)) 296-307-13040 (5) and (6).

(2) Timing.

(a) If warning signs are posted for the treated area before an application, the specific application information for that application shall be posted at the same time or earlier.

(b) The information shall be posted before the application takes place, if handlers (except those employed by a commercial pesticide handling establishment) will be on the establishment during application. Otherwise, the information shall be posted at the beginning of any such handler's first work period.

(c) The information shall continue to be displayed for at least thirty days after the end of the restricted-entry interval (or, if there is no restricted-entry interval, for at least thirty days after the end of the application) or at least until the handlers are no longer on the establishment, whichever is earlier.

(3) Required information. The information shall include:

(a) The location and description of the treated area.

(b) The product name, EPA registration number, and active ingredient(s) of the pesticide.

(c) The time and date the pesticide is to be applied.

(d) The restricted-entry interval for the pesticide.



[Recodified as 296-307-13015. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-13015, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-13025  Pesticide safety training--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.230. (1) Requirement. Before any handler performs any handling task, the handler employer shall assure that the handler has been trained in accordance with this section during the last five years, counting from the end of the month in which the training was completed.



Note: In addition to the training required by this section, the agricultural employer shall assure, without exception, that all employees are trained in accordance with WAC 296-62-054 through 296-62-05427, Hazard communication.



(2) Exceptions. The following persons need not be trained under this section:

(a) A handler who is currently certified as an applicator of restricted-use pesticides under chapter 17.21 RCW.

(b) A handler who is certified or licensed as a crop advisor by the Washington state department of agriculture under RCW 15.58.230: Provided, That a requirement for such certification or licensing is pesticide safety training that includes all the information set out in WAC ((296-306A-13025)) 296-307-13025 (3)(d).

(3) Training programs.

(a) General pesticide safety information shall be presented to handlers either orally from written materials or audiovisually. The information must be presented in a manner that the handlers can understand (such as through a translator). The presenter also shall respond to handlers' questions.

(b) The person who conducts the training shall meet at least one of the following criteria:

(i) Be currently certified as an applicator of restricted-use pesticides under chapter 17.21 RCW; or

(ii) Be currently designated as a trainer of certified applicators or pesticide handlers by the Washington state department of agriculture under chapters 15.58 or 17.21 RCW; or

(iii) Have completed a pesticide safety train-the-trainer program approved by a state, federal, or tribal agency having jurisdiction.

(c) Any person who issues a Washington state department of agriculture-approved Worker Protection Standard handler training card must assure that the handler who receives the training card has been trained in accordance with (d) of this subsection.

(d) The pesticide safety training materials must convey, at a minimum, the following information:

(i) Format and meaning of information contained on pesticide labels and in labeling, including safety information such as precautionary statements about human health hazards.

(ii) Hazards of pesticides resulting from toxicity and exposure, including acute and chronic effects, delayed effects, and sensitization.

(iii) Routes by which pesticides can enter the body.

(iv) Signs and symptoms of common types of pesticide poisoning.

(v) Emergency first aid for pesticide injuries or poisonings.

(vi) How to obtain emergency medical care.

(vii) Routine and emergency decontamination procedures.

(viii) Need for and appropriate use of personal protective equipment.

(ix) Prevention, recognition, and first-aid treatment of heat-related illness.

(x) Safety requirements for handling, transporting, storing, and disposing of pesticides, including general procedures for spill cleanup.

(xi) Environmental concerns such as drift, runoff, and wildlife hazards.

(xii) Warnings about taking pesticides or pesticide containers home.

(xiii) Requirements of this part that must be followed by handler employers for the protection of handlers and other persons, including the prohibition against applying pesticides in a manner that will cause contact with workers or other persons, the requirement to use personal protective equipment, the provisions for training and decontamination, and the protection against retaliatory acts.

(4) Verification of training.

(a) Except as provided in (b) of this subsection, if the handler employer assures that a handler possesses a Washington state department of agriculture-approved Worker Protection Standard handler training card, then the requirements of subsection (1) of this section will have been met.

(b) If the handler employer is aware or has reason to know that a Washington state department of agriculture-approved Worker Protection Standard handler training card has not been issued in accordance with this section, or has not been issued to the handler bearing the card, or the handler training was completed more than five years before the beginning of the current month, a handler's possession of that card does not meet the requirements of subsection (1) of this section.



[Recodified as 296-307-13025. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-13025, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-13045  Personal protective equipment--Standards for pesticide handlers--40 CFR, 170.240. (1) Requirement. Any person who performs tasks as a pesticide handler shall use the clothing and personal protective equipment specified on the labeling for use of the product.

(2) Definition.

(a) Personal protective equipment (PPE) means devices and apparel that are worn to protect the body from contact with pesticides or pesticide residues, including, but not limited to, coveralls, chemical-resistant suits, chemical-resistant gloves, chemical-resistant footwear, respiratory protection devices, chemical-resistant aprons, chemical-resistant headgear, and protective eyewear.

(b) Long-sleeved shirts, short-sleeved shirts, long pants, short pants, shoes, socks, and other items of work clothing are not considered personal protective equipment for the purposes of this section and are not subject to the requirements of this section, although pesticide labeling may require that such work clothing be worn during some activities.

(3) Provision. When personal protective equipment is specified by the labeling of any pesticide for any handling activity, the handler employer shall provide the appropriate personal protective equipment in clean and operating condition to the handler.

(a) When "chemical-resistant" personal protective equipment is specified by the product labeling, it shall be made of material that allows no measurable movement of the pesticide being used through the material during use.

(b) When "waterproof" personal protective equipment is specified by the product labeling, it shall be made of material that allows no measurable movement of water or aqueous solutions through the material during use.

(c) When a "chemical-resistant suit" is specified by the product labeling, it shall be a loose-fitting, one-piece or two-piece chemical-resistant garment that covers, at a minimum, the entire body except head, hands, and feet.

(d) When "coveralls" are specified by the product labeling, they shall be a loose-fitting, one-piece or two-piece garment, such as a cotton or cotton and polyester coverall, that covers, at a minimum, the entire body except head, hands, and feet. The pesticide product labeling may specify that the coveralls be worn over another layer of clothing.

(e) Gloves shall be of the type specified by the product labeling. Gloves or glove linings made of leather, cotton, or other absorbent material shall not be worn for handling activities unless such materials are listed on the product labeling as acceptable for such use.

(f) When "chemical-resistant footwear" is specified by the product labeling, one of the following types of footwear must be worn:

(i) Chemical-resistant shoes.

(ii) Chemical-resistant boots.

(iii) Chemical-resistant shoe coverings worn over shoes or boots.

(g) When "protective eyewear" is specified by the product labeling, one of the following types of eyewear must be worn:

(i) Goggles.

(ii) Face shield.

(iii) Safety glasses with front, brow, and temple protection.

(iv) Full-face respirator.

(h) When a "chemical-resistant apron" is specified by the product labeling, an apron that covers the front of the body from mid-chest to the knees shall be worn.

(i) When a respirator is specified by the product labeling, it shall be appropriate for the pesticide product used and for the activity to be performed. The handler employer shall assure that the respirator fits correctly by using the procedures consistent with ((WAC 296-62-071)) chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E. If the label does not specify the type of respirator to be used, it shall meet the requirements of ((WAC 296-62-071)) chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E. The respiratory protection requirements of the general occupational health standards, ((WAC 296-62-071)) chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E, shall apply.

(j) When "chemical-resistant headgear" is specified by the product labeling, it shall be either a chemical-resistant hood or a chemical-resistant hat with a wide brim.

(4) Exceptions to personal protective equipment specified on product labeling.

(a) Body protection.

(i) A chemical-resistant suit may be substituted for "coveralls," and any requirement for an additional layer of clothing beneath is waived.

(ii) A chemical-resistant suit may be substituted for "coveralls" and a chemical-resistant apron.

(b) Boots. If chemical-resistant footwear with sufficient durability and a tread appropriate for wear in rough terrain is not obtainable, then leather boots may be worn in such terrain.

(c) Gloves. If chemical-resistant gloves with sufficient durability and suppleness are not obtainable, then during handling activities with roses or other plants with sharp thorns, leather gloves may be worn over chemical-resistant glove liners. However, once leather gloves are worn for this use, thereafter they shall be worn only with chemical-resistant liners and they shall not be worn for any other use.

(d) Closed systems. If handling tasks are performed using properly functioning systems that enclose the pesticide to prevent it from contacting handlers or other persons, and if such systems are used and are maintained in accordance with that manufacturer's written operating instructions, exceptions to labeling-specified personal protective equipment for the handling activity are permitted as provided in (d)(i) and (ii) of this subsection.

(i) Persons using a closed system to mix or load pesticides with a signal word of danger or warning may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, socks, chemical-resistant apron, and any protective gloves specified on the labeling for handlers for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment.

(ii) Persons using a closed system to mix or load pesticides other than those in (d)(i) of this subsection or to perform other handling tasks may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment.

(iii) Persons using a closed system that operates under pressure shall wear protective eyewear.

(iv) Persons using a closed system shall have all labeling-specified personal protective equipment immediately available for use in an emergency.

(e) Enclosed cabs. If handling tasks are performed from inside a cab that has a nonporous barrier which totally surrounds the occupants of the cab and prevents contact with pesticides outside of the cab, exceptions to personal protective equipment specified on the product labeling for that handling activity are permitted as provided in (e)(i) through (iv) of this subsection.

(i) Persons occupying an enclosed cab may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment. If a respiratory protection device is specified on the pesticide product labeling for the handling activity, it must be worn.

(ii) Persons occupying an enclosed cab that has a properly functioning ventilation system which is used and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's written operating instructions and which is declared in writing by the manufacturer and by the Washington state department of labor and industries to provide respiratory protection equivalent to or greater than a dust/mist filtering respirator may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment. If a respiratory protection device other than a dust/mist-filtering respirator is specified on the pesticide product labeling, it must be worn.

(iii) Persons occupying an enclosed cab that has a properly functioning ventilation system which is used and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's written operating instructions and which is declared in writing by the manufacturer and by the Washington state department of labor and industries to provide respiratory protection equivalent to or greater than the vapor-removing or gas-removing respirator specified on pesticide product labeling may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment. If an air-supplying respirator or a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) is specified on the pesticide product labeling, it must be worn.

(iv) Persons occupying an enclosed cab shall have all labeling-specified personal protective equipment immediately available and stored in a chemical-resistant container, such as a plastic bag. They shall wear such personal protective equipment if it is necessary to exit the cab and contact pesticide-treated surfaces in the treated area. Once personal protective equipment is worn in the treated area, it must be removed before reentering the cab.

(f) Aerial applications.

(i) Use of gloves. Chemical-resistant gloves shall be worn when entering or leaving an aircraft contaminated by pesticide residues. In the cockpit, the gloves shall be kept in an enclosed container to prevent contamination of the inside of the cockpit.

(ii) Open cockpit. Persons occupying an open cockpit shall use the personal protective equipment specified in the product labeling for use during application, except that chemical-resistant footwear need not be worn. A helmet may be substituted for chemical-resistant headgear. A visor may be substituted for protective eyewear.

(iii) Enclosed cockpit. Persons occupying an enclosed cockpit may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for labeling-specified personal protective equipment.

(g) Crop advisors. Crop advisors entering treated areas while a restricted-entry interval is in effect may wear the personal protective equipment specified on the pesticide labeling for early entry activities instead of the personal protective equipment specified on the pesticide labeling for handling activities, provided:

(i) Application has been completed for at least four hours.

(ii) Any inhalation exposure level listed in the labeling has been reached or any ventilation criteria established by WAC ((296-306A-12015)) 296-307-12015 (3)(c) or in the labeling have been met.

(5) Use of personal protective equipment.

(a) The handler employer shall assure that personal protective equipment is used correctly for its intended purpose and is used according to the manufacturer's instructions.

(b) The handler employer shall assure that, before each day of use, all personal protective equipment is inspected for leaks, holes, tears, or worn places, and any damaged equipment is repaired or discarded.

(6) Cleaning and maintenance.

(a) The handler employer shall assure that all personal protective equipment is cleaned according to the manufacturer's instructions or pesticide product labeling instructions before each day of reuse. In the absence of any such instructions, it shall be washed thoroughly in detergent and hot water.

(b) If any personal protective equipment cannot be cleaned properly, the handler employer shall dispose of the personal protective equipment in accordance with any applicable federal, state, and local regulations. Coveralls or other absorbent materials that have been drenched or heavily contaminated with an undiluted pesticide that has the signal word danger or warning on the label shall be not be reused.

(c) The handler employer shall assure that contaminated personal protective equipment is kept separately and washed separately from any other clothing or laundry.

(d) The handler employer shall assure that all clean personal protective equipment shall be either dried thoroughly before being stored or shall be put in a well ventilated place to dry.

(e) The handler employer shall assure that all personal protective equipment is stored separately from personal clothing and apart from pesticide-contaminated areas.

(f) The handler employer shall assure that when dust/mist filtering respirators are used, the filters shall be replaced:

(i) When breathing resistance becomes excessive.

(ii) When the filter element has physical damage or tears.

(iii) According to manufacturer's recommendations or pesticide product labeling, whichever is more frequent.

(iv) In the absence of any other instructions or indications of service life, at the end of each day's work period.

(g) The handler employer shall assure that when gas-removing or vapor-removing respirators are used, the gas-removing or vapor-removing canisters or cartridges shall be replaced:

(i) At the first indication of odor, taste, or irritation.

(ii) According to manufacturer's recommendations or pesticide product labeling, whichever is more frequent.

(iii) In the absence of any other instructions or indications of service life, at the end of each day's work period.

(h) The handler employer shall inform any person who cleans or launders personal protective equipment:

(i) That such equipment may be contaminated with pesticides.

(ii) Of the potentially harmful effects of exposure to pesticides.

(iii) Of the correct way(s) to clean personal protective equipment and to protect themselves when handling such equipment.

(i) The handler employer shall assure that handlers have a clean place(s) away from pesticide storage and pesticide use areas where they may:

(i) Store personal clothing not in use.

(ii) Put on personal protective equipment at the start of any exposure period.

(iii) Remove personal protective equipment at the end of any exposure period.

(j) The handler employer shall not allow or direct any handler to wear home or to take home personal protective equipment contaminated with pesticides.

(7) Heat-related illness. When the use of personal protective equipment is specified by the labeling of any pesticide for the handling activity, the handler employer shall assure that no handler is allowed or directed to perform the handling activity unless appropriate measures are taken, if necessary, to prevent heat-related illness.



[Recodified as 296-307-13045. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, 296-306A-13045, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-15003  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-150)) 296-307-150 does not apply to the construction, reconstruction, operation, or maintenance of overhead electrical conductors (and their supporting structures and associated equipment) by authorized and qualified electrical employees. It also does not apply to authorized and qualified employees engaged in the construction, reconstruction, operations and maintenance of overhead electrical circuits or conductors (and their supporting structures and associated equipment) of rail transportation systems, or electrical generating, transmission, distribution, and communication systems.



[Recodified as 296-307-15003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-15003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-16001  What requirements apply to camp sites? (1) You must ensure that all sites used for temporary labor camps are adequately drained. The site must be free from periodic flooding, and located at least 200 feet from a swamp, pool, sink hole, or other surface collection of water unless the water surface can be subject to mosquito control. Drainage from and through the camp must not endanger any domestic or public water supply. All sites must be free from depressions in which water may become a nuisance.

(2) All sites must be large enough to prevent overcrowding of necessary structures. The principal camp area for sleeping and for food preparation and eating must be at least 500 feet from where livestock are kept.

(3) The grounds and open areas surrounding the shelters must be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition.

(((4) Whenever the camp is closed for the season or permanently, all garbage, manure, and other refuse must be collected and disposed of to prevent nuisance. All abandoned toilet pits must be filled with earth, and the grounds and buildings left in a clean and sanitary condition. If outhouse buildings remain, they must be locked or otherwise secured to prevent entrance.))



[Recodified as 296-307-16001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-16001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-16003  How must camp shelters be constructed? (1) You must ensure that every shelter in the camp is constructed to provide protection against the elements.

(2) Each room used for sleeping purposes must have at least 50 square feet of floor space for each occupant. The room must have at least a 7-foot ceiling.

(3) You must provide beds, cots, or bunks, and suitable storage facilities such as wall lockers for clothing and personal articles in every sleeping room.

(a) Beds must be at least 36 inches apart, both laterally and end to end, and the frame must keep mattresses at least 12 inches off the floor.

(b) Double-deck bunks must be spaced at least 48 inches apart, both laterally and end to end.

(c) The minimum clear space between lower and upper bunks must be at least 27 inches.

(d) Triple-deck bunks are prohibited.

(4) The floors of each shelter must be constructed of wood, asphalt, or concrete. Wooden floors must be smooth and tight. The floors must be kept in good repair.

(5) All wooden floors must be elevated at least 1 foot above ground level at all points to prevent dampness and to permit free air circulation.

(6) You may "bank" around outside walls with earth or other suitable material to guard against extreme low temperatures.

(7) All living quarters must have windows covering a total area equal to at least one-tenth of the floor area. You must ensure that at least one-half of each window can be opened for ventilation.

(8) All exterior openings must be screened with 16-mesh material. All screen doors must have self-closing devices.

(9) You must ensure that each dwelling unit has at least 70 square feet of floor space for the first occupant and at least 50 square feet of floor space for each additional occupant. In a family unit, the husband and wife must have a separate sleeping area whenever living with one or more children over six years old.

(10) ((In camps with common cooking facilities, you must provide stoves in an enclosed and screened shelter. You must provide sanitary facilities for storing and preparing food. You must provide one stove for every 10 people or one stove for every two families.

(11))) If a camp is used during cold weather, you must provide adequate heating equipment.



Note: All heating, cooking, and water heating equipment must be installed according to state and local ordinances, codes, and regulations governing such installations.





[Recodified as 296-307-16003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-08-051A, 296-306A-16003, filed 3/31/97, effective 5/1/97; 96-22-048, 296-306A-16003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



NEW SECTION



WAC 296-307-16004  What electricity must be provided for temporary labor camps? (1) A labor camp operator must supply electricity to all dwelling units, kitchen facilities, shower/bathroom facilities, common areas, and laundry facilities.

(2) All electrical wiring and electrical equipment in labor camps must meet the electric standards of applicable building codes.



[]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-16013  What lighting must an employer provide in camp buildings? ((Where electric service is available,)) Each habitable room in a camp must have at least one ceiling-type light fixture and at least one separate floor-type or wall-type convenience outlet. Laundry and toilet rooms and rooms where people congregate must have at least one ceiling-type or wall-type fixture. Light levels in toilet and storage rooms must be at least 20 foot-candles 30 inches from the floor. The light level in other rooms, including kitchens and living quarters, must be at least 30 foot-candles 30 inches from the floor.



[Recodified as 296-307-16013. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-08-051A, 296-306A-16013, filed 3/31/97, effective 5/1/97; 96-22-048, 296-306A-16013, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-16017  ((How must kitchens, dining halls, and feeding facilities be constructed?)) What cooking and food-handling facilities must be provided in temporary labor camps? (((1) In all camps where central dining or multiple family feeding operations are permitted or provided, the food handling facilities must comply with the requirements of the "Food Service Sanitation Ordinance and Code," Part V of the Food Service Sanitation Manual, U.S. Public Health Service Publication 934 (1965).

(2) You must provide a properly constructed kitchen and dining hall, adequate in size, and separate from the sleeping quarters, in connection with all food handling facilities. There must be no direct opening from living or sleeping quarters into a kitchen or dining hall.

(3) No person with any communicable disease may work in food handling, in any kitchen or dining room operated in connection with a camp or regularly used by persons living in a camp.)) A labor camp operator must provide enclosed and screened cooking and food-handling facilities for all occupants.

(1) If cooking facilities are located in dwelling units, the operator must provide:

(a) An operable cook stove or hot plate with at least one cooking surface for every two occupants;

(b) A sink with hot and cold running potable water under pressure;

(c) Food storage areas and nonabsorbent, easily cleanable food preparation counters situated off the floor;

(d) Mechanical refrigeration able to maintain a temperature of forty-five degrees Fahrenheit or below, with enough space to store perishable food items for all occupants;

(e) Fire-resistant, nonabsorbent, nonasbestos, and easily cleanable wall coverings adjacent to cooking areas;

(f) Nonabsorbent, easily cleanable floors;

(g) At least one ceiling or wall light fixture; and

(h) Lighting of thirty foot-candles measured thirty inches from the floor; and

(i) Adequate ventilation for cooking facilities.

(2) In common food-handling facilities, the operator must provide:

(a) A room or building, adequate in size, separate from any sleeping quarters;

(b) No direct openings to living or sleeping areas from the common food-handling facility;

(c) An operable cook stove or hot plate with at least one cooking surface for every two occupants;

(d) Sinks with hot and cold running potable water under pressure;

(e) Food storage areas and nonabsorbent, easily cleanable food preparation counters situated off the floor;

(f) Mechanical refrigeration able to maintain a temperature of forty-five degrees Fahrenheit or below, with enough space to store perishable food items for all occupants;

(g) Fire-resistant, nonabsorbent, nonasbestos, and easily cleanable wall coverings adjacent to cooking areas;

(h) Nonabsorbent, easily cleanable floors;

(i) At least one ceiling or wall light fixture; and

(j) Lighting of thirty foot-candles measured thirty inches from the floor;

(k) Adequate ventilation for cooking facilities.

(3) The operator must ensure that dining hall facilities:

(a) Comply with chapter 246-215 WAC, Food service;

(b) Are in a room or building, adequate in size, separate from any sleeping quarters;

(c) Have no direct openings to living or sleeping areas from the dining hall facility;

(d) Have fire-resistant, nonabsorbent, nonasbestos, and easily cleanable wall coverings adjacent to cooking areas;

(e) Have nonabsorbent, easily cleanable floors;

(f) Have at least one ceiling or wall light fixture; and

(g) Have available lighting of thirty foot-candles measured thirty inches from the floor.



[Recodified as 296-307-16017. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-16017, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



NEW SECTION



WAC 296-307-18005  How must fan blades be guarded? You must guard the blades of a fan located less than seven feet above the floor or working level. The guard must have maximum openings of one-half inch.



[]



NEW SECTION



WAC 296-307-18010  How must constant-running drives be guarded? Shields, guards, and access doors that will prevent accidental contact with rotating machine parts on constant-running drives must be in place when the machine is running.





EXCEPTION: This requirement does not apply to combines when guards could create fire hazards.



"Constant-running drives" means drives that continue to rotate when the engine is running and all clutches are disengaged.



[]



NEW SECTION



WAC 296-307-18015  What training must an employer provide for employees who use agricultural equipment? At the time of initial assignment and at least annually thereafter, you must instruct every employee in the safe operation and servicing of all equipment that the employee will use, including at least the following:

(1) Keep all guards in place when the machine is in operation.

(2) Only persons required for instruction or machine operation may ride on equipment, unless a passenger seat or other protective device is provided.

(3) Stop engine, disconnect the power source, and wait for all machine movement to stop before servicing, adjusting, cleaning, or unclogging the equipment.





EXCEPTION: When the machine must be running to be properly serviced or maintained, you must instruct employees in the steps and procedures necessary to safely service or maintain the equipment.



(4) Make sure everyone is clear of machinery before starting the engine, engaging power, or operating the machine.

(5) Lock out electrical power before performing maintenance or service on farmstead equipment.



[]



NEW SECTION



WAC 296-307-18020  What requirements apply to machine controls? (1) If machine operation requires the presence of an operator on the machine, a "stop button" must be provided on the machine within reach of the operator.

(2) Power control devices must be marked to indicate the function and machine they control. "On" and "off" must be marked.

(3) "Stop" buttons must be red or orange. Each machine must have one or more stop buttons according to the working position of the operators.

(4) Power control devices must be located or guarded to prevent unexpected or accidental movement of the control. "Start" buttons must be recessed.



[]



NEW SECTION



WAC 296-307-18025  How must steam pipes be guarded? (1) All steam pipes or pipes hot enough to burn a person (other than coil pipes, radiators for heating rooms or buildings, or pipes on portable steam engines and boilers) must be guarded with a standard safeguard, unless guarded by location.

(2) All exposed hot pipes within seven feet of the floor or working platform, or within fifteen inches measured horizontally from stairways, ramps, or fixed ladders, must be covered with insulating material or be guarded to prevent contact.



[]



PART M

GUARDING TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT;

FARM SHOPS; MATERIALS HANDLING



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-18503  What general requirements apply to powered saws? (1) You must ensure that all cracked saw blades are removed from service, except as indicated in WAC ((296-306A-18515)) 296-307-18515(6).

(2) Inserting a wedge between a saw disk and its collar to form a "wobble saw" for rabbeting or dadoing is prohibited.





EXCEPTION: This does not apply to properly designed adjustable rabbeting blades.



(3) ((You must ensure that any saw used for ripping has anti-kick-back fingers on each side and a spreader.

(4) You must ensure that ripping and ploughing are permitted only against the direction in which the saw turns. Mark the direction of saw rotation on the hood, and attach a permanent warning sign to the rear of the guard that prohibits ripping or ploughing from that position.

(5))) You must provide and ensure that employees use push sticks or push blocks in sizes and types suitable for the work to be done.



[Recodified as 296-307-18503. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-18503, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-18506  How must band saws be guarded? (1) You must ensure that all band wheels are completely encased or guarded on both sides. Guards must be constructed of ((not less than)) at least No. 14 U.S. gauge metal, nominal two-inch wood material, or mesh or perforated metal of ((not less than)) at least U.S. gauge No. 20 with maximum openings ((not greater than)) of three-eighths inch.

(2) You must ensure that all nonworking portions of the band saw blade are enclosed or guarded ((except the working side of the blade between the guide and the table)). The working side of the blade between the guide and the table may be left open to work on the stock.

(3) You must ensure that the guard for the portion of the blade between the sliding guide and the upper-saw-wheel guard protects the saw blade at the front and outer side.



[Recodified as 296-307-18506. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-18506, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-18509  How must radial arm saws be guarded? (1) You must ensure that the upper hood completely encloses the upper portion of the blade, including the end of the saw arbor. The upper hood must be constructed to protect the operator from flying material, and to deflect sawdust. The sides of the lower exposed portion of the blade must be guarded to the full diameter of the blade by a device that will automatically adjust itself to the thickness of the stock and remain in contact with stock. You may use an alternative lower blade guard if it provides equivalent protection.

(2) You must provide ((a mechanism to prevent the leading edge of the saw from passing the front edge of the table or roll case)) an adjustable stop to prevent the forward travel of the blade beyond the position necessary to complete the cut.

(3) You must equip a radial arm-saw((s)) with a mechanism to return the saw and keep it in position at the back of the table or behind the rip fence.

For example: You may use a counter-weight or a saw retractor device, or tilt the ((arm sufficiently to maintain the saw at the back when)) front of the radial arm saw unit up enough to maintain the blade at the back of the table or behind the rip fence when the pull handle is released by the operator.

(4) You must ensure that ripping and ploughing are permitted only against the direction in which the saw turns. Mark the direction of the saw rotation on the hood, and attach a permanent warning sign to the rear of the guard that prohibits ripping or ploughing from that position. (Where the blade teeth exit the upper hood when set up for ripping would be the rear of the saw in this case.) Each radial arm saw used for ripping must be provided with antikickback fingers or dogs to prevent the saw from throwing the material or stock back at the operator.



[Recodified as 296-307-18509. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-18509, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-18512  How must table saws be guarded? (1) You must ensure that each circular ((crosscut)) blade table saw used for ripping or crosscutting is guarded by a standard hood that covers the saw ((at all times at least to the depth of the teeth)) blade above the material completely at all times during the cut. The hood must adjust itself automatically to the thickness of, and must remain in contact with, the material being cut.





EXCEPTION: When finished surfaces of stock may be marred by the guard, it may be raised slightly to avoid contact. The hood must be designed to protect the operator from flying material.



(2) You must ensure that any table saw used for ripping has antikickback fingers or dogs and a spreader.

(3) While used ((in performing)) for rabbeting, ploughing, grooving or ((dado operations they)) dadoing a table saw may be used without an antikickback device and a spreader((, but)). Upon completion ((of such operations)), the antikickback device and spreader must be replaced immediately.

(((3))) (4) You must ensure that the part of the table saw that is beneath the table is fully guarded to prevent employee contact with the portion of the blade below the table.

(((4))) (5) Power transmission components of table saws must be guarded according to WAC ((296-306A-280)) 296-307-280.



[Recodified as 296-307-18512. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-18512, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-18515  How must circular fuel-wood saws be guarded? (1) You must ensure that fuel-wood saws are guarded by a standard guard that completely encloses the blade to the depth of the teeth, except for the area where material is fed into the blade.

(2) You must ensure that the tables of fuel-wood saws is constructed so that material being sawed is supported on both sides of the blade.

(3) You must provide a mechanism that will prevent the leading edge of the saw from passing the front edge of the table or roll case.

(4) You must provide tilting tables of fuel-wood saws with a backrest for the full length of the table. The backrest must extend upward from the table platform at least to the height of the saw opening. An opening in a backrest must be a maximum of two inches. The backrest frame and filler must be constructed of material strong and rigid enough to prevent distortion under normal use.

(5) Power transmission components of fuel-wood saws must be guarded according to WAC ((296-306A-280)) 296-307-280.

(6) When a circular fuel-wood saw blade develops a crack, you must discontinue its use until properly repaired, according to the following measurements.



Length of

crack

Diameter of saw

in inches



1/2"


12"
1" 24"
1-1/2" 36"




[Recodified as 296-307-18515. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-18515, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-190  Guarding bench grinders ((and)), abrasive wheels, and portable grinders.





[Recodified as 296-307-190. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-190, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-19006  What rules apply to guarding abrasive wheels? (1) Abrasive wheels must be used only on machines provided with safety guards.





EXCEPTION: This requirement does not apply to the following:

(a) Wheels used for internal work while the wheel is within the work being ground.

(b) Mounted wheels 2 inches and smaller in diameter, used in portable operations.

(c) Types 16, 17, 18, 18R, and 19 cones, plugs, and threaded hole pot balls where the work offers protection.

(d) Specially shaped "sickle grinding" wheels mounted in mandrel-type bench or floor stands.



(2) The safety guard must cover the spindle end, nut, and flange projections.





EXCEPTIONS:

(a) When the work provides protection to the operator, the spindle end, nut, and outer flange may be exposed. When the work entirely covers the side of the wheel, the side covers of the guard may be omitted.

(b) The spindle end, nut, and outer flange may be exposed on portable machines designed for, and used with, type 6, 11, 27, and 28 abrasive wheels, cutting off wheels, and tuck pointing wheels.

(c) The spindle end, nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as portable saws.



(3) The guard must cover the sides and periphery of the wheel.





EXCEPTIONS:

(a) Bench and floor stands;

(i) The maximum permissible angle of exposure is 90. This exposure must begin at a point not more than 65 above the horizontal plane of the wheel spindle.

(ii) Wherever the nature of the work requires contact with the wheel below the horizontal plane of the spindle, the exposure must not exceed 125. This exposure must begin at a point not more than 65 above the horizontal plane of the wheel spindle.

(b) Swing-frame grinders may only be exposed on the bottom half; the top half of the wheel must be enclosed at all times.

(c) Where the work is applied to the top of the wheel, the exposure of the grinding wheel periphery must not exceed 60.

(d) When the work entirely covers the side of the wheel, the side covers of the guard may be omitted.



(4) The safety guard must be mounted to maintain proper alignment with the wheel, and the strength of the fastenings must exceed the strength of the guard.

(5) Take care to see that the safety guard is properly positioned before starting the mounted wheel.

(6) Abrasive wheel machinery guards must meet the design specifications of ANSI B7.1-1970.

(7) Exception: WAC ((296-306A-19006)) 296-307-19006 does not apply to natural sandstone wheels and metal, wooden, cloth, or paper discs, with a layer of abrasive on the surface.



[Recodified as 296-307-19006. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-19006, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-19009  What are the use, mounting, and guarding rules for abrasive wheels? (1) Immediately before mounting, the operator must closely inspect and sound (ring test) all wheels to make sure they are not damaged. Before mounting the wheel, the operator must check the spindle speed of the machine to be certain that it does not exceed the maximum operating speed marked on the wheel.

"Ring test" means to tap the wheel gently with a light nonmetallic implement, such as the handle of a screwdriver for light wheels, or a wooden mallet for heavier wheels.

(2) Grinding wheels must fit freely on the spindle and remain free under all grinding conditions. The wheel hole must be made suitably oversized to ensure that heat and pressure do not create a hazard.

(3) All contact surfaces of wheels, blotters, and flanges must be flat and free of foreign matter.

(4) Bushings used in the wheel hole must not exceed the width of the wheel and must not contact the flanges.

(5) On offhand grinding machines, work rests must be used to support the work. The work rest must be rigid and adjustable to compensate for wheel wear. Work rests must be kept adjusted closely to the wheel with a maximum opening of one-eighth inch to prevent the work from jamming between the wheel and the rest. The work rest must be securely clamped after each adjustment and shall not be adjusted with the wheel in motion.

(6) Goggles or face shields must be used when grinding.

(7) Nonportable grinding machines must be securely mounted on substantial floors, benches, foundations, or other adequate structures.

(8) After mounting, abrasive wheels must be run at operating speed with the safety guard in place and properly adjusted, or in a protected enclosure for at least one minute before applying work. During this time, no one may stand in front of or in line with the wheel.

(9) Grinders or abrasive wheels that vibrate or are out of balance must be repaired before use.

(10) Abrasive wheels not designed for the machine or guard must not be mounted on a grinder.

(11) Side grinding must only be performed with wheels designed for this purpose.



Note: Light grinding on the side of straight wheels is permitted only when very delicate pressure is applied.



(12) Where the operator may stand in front of the opening, safety guards must be adjustable to compensate for wheel wear. The distance between the wheel periphery and the adjustable tongue or the guard above the wheel must not exceed one-quarter inch.



[Recodified as 296-307-19009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-19009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-19012  What requirements apply to flanges? (1) Grinding machines must have flanges.

(2) All abrasive wheels must be mounted between flanges that are at least one-third the diameter of the wheel. Regardless of flange type used, the wheel must always be guarded. Blotters must be used according to this section.

(3) Design and material requirements include:

(a) Flanges must be designed to transmit the driving torque from the spindle to the grinding wheel.

(b) Flanges must be made of steel, cast iron, or other material of equal or greater strength and rigidity.

(4) An abrasive wheel that is designed to be held by flanges must not be operated without them. Except for those types requiring flanges of a special design, flanges must be at least one-third the diameter of the wheel.

(5) Facings of compressible material (blotters) must be inserted between the abrasive wheel and flanges to ensure uniform distribution of flange pressure.

(6) All flanges must be maintained in good condition. When the bearing surfaces become damaged, they should be trued or refaced. When refacing or truing, exercise care to make sure that proper relief and rigidity is maintained before starting the wheel.

(((7) Where the operator may stand in front of the opening, safety guards must be adjustable to compensate for wheel wear. The distance between the wheel periphery and the adjustable tongue or the guard above the wheel must not exceed one-quarter inch.))



[Recodified as 296-307-19012. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-19012, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-20505  What requirements apply to guarding portable powered tools? (1) All portable, power-driven circular saws with a blade diameter greater than 2 inches must have guards above and below the base plate or shoe.

(a) The upper guard must cover the saw to the depth of the teeth, except for the minimum arc required to permit the base to be tilted for bevel cuts.

(b) The lower guard must cover the saw to the depth of the teeth, except for the minimum arc required to allow proper retraction and contact with the work.

(c) When the tool is withdrawn from the work, the lower guard must automatically and instantly return to covering position.

(2) Portable belt sanding machines must have guards at each nip point where the sanding belt runs onto a pulley. These guards must prevent the hands or fingers of the operator from coming in contact with the nip points. The unused run of the sanding belt must be guarded against accidental contact.

(3) Portable electric powered tools must meet the electrical requirements of chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T.



[Recodified as 296-307-20505. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-20505, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-22012  What rules apply to walk-behind rotary mowers? (1) The horizontal angle of the grass discharge opening(s) in the blade enclosure must not contact the operator area.

(2) There must be one of the following at all grass discharge openings:

(a) A minimum of 3 inches between the end of the discharge chute and the blade tip circle; or

(b) A rigid bar fastened across the discharge opening, secured to prevent removal without the use of tools. The bottom of the bar must be no higher than the bottom edge of the blade enclosure.

(3) The highest point(s) on the blade enclosure front, except discharge-openings, must be a maximum of 1-1/4 inches above the lowest blade position. Mowers with a swingover handle are considered to have no front in the blade enclosure and therefore must comply with WAC ((296-306A-22009)) 296-307-22009(1).

(4) The mower handle must be fastened to the mower to prevent loss of control by unintentional uncoupling while in operation.

(5) Mower handles must be locked in the normal operating position(s) so that they cannot be accidentally disengaged during normal mower operation.

(6) A swingover handle must meet the requirements of this section.

(7) Wheel drive disengaging controls, except deadman controls, must move opposite to the direction of the vehicle motion in order to disengage the drive. Deadman controls may operate in any direction to disengage the drive.

(8) You must ensure that each walk-behind rotary mower has a positive constant-pressure device that requires the operator to hold the device in the "on" position to operate the mower. Using rope or string or other material to tie the constant pressure device in the "on" position is prohibited.



[Recodified as 296-307-22012. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-22012, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-22509  What rules apply to the operation and maintenance of jacks? (1) If the foundation is not firm, you must block the base of the jack. If the cap might slip, you must place a block in between the cap and the load.

(2) The operator must watch the stop indicator, which must be kept clean, in order to determine the limit of travel. The indicated limit must not be overrun.

(3) After the load has been raised, it must immediately be cribbed, blocked, or otherwise secured. Working under a load raised only with jacks is prohibited.

(4) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures must be supplied with an adequate antifreeze liquid.

(5) All jacks must be properly lubricated at regular intervals. The lubricating instructions of the manufacturer should be followed, and only lubricants recommended by the manufacturer should be used.

(6) You must ensure that each jack is thoroughly inspected according to the service conditions and at least:

(a) For constant or intermittent use at one locality, once every 6 months;

(b) For jacks sent out of shop for special work, when sent out and when returned;

(c) For a jack subjected to abnormal load or shock, immediately before and immediately thereafter.

(7) Repair or replacement parts must be examined for possible defects.

(8) Jacks that are out of order must be tagged, and not be used until repaired.



[Recodified as 296-307-22509. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-22509, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-230  What are the general requirements for materials handling and storage? (1) Safe clearances of three feet must be allowed for aisles, loading docks, doorways, and wherever turns or passage must be made. Passageways must be kept clear and in good repair, with no obstructions.

(2) Bags, bales, boxes, and other containers stored in tiers must be made secure against sliding or collapse.

(3) Storage areas must be kept free from any accumulation of materials that could cause tripping, fire, or explosion.

(4) Employees must be instructed in proper lifting or moving techniques and methods. Mechanical devices or assistance in lifting must be used when moving heavy objects.

(5) When removing material stored in piles, employees must remove material in a manner that maintains the stability of the pile and prevents collapse.

(6) Storage areas must have proper drainage.

(7) You must provide clearance signs to warn of clearance limits.

(8) For powered industrial truck (forklift) requirements, see WAC ((296-306A-520)) 296-307-520.



[Recodified as 296-307-230. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-230, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-232  What requirements apply to conveyors? Conveyors must be constructed, operated, and maintained according to ANSI B 20.1-1957.

(1) When the return strand of a conveyor operates within seven feet of the floor, there must also be a trough strong enough to carry the weight resulting from a broken chain.

(2) If the strands are over a passageway, a means must be provided to catch and support the ends of the chain in the event of a break.

(3) When the working strand of a conveyor crosses within three feet of the floor level in passageways, a bridge must be provided for employees to cross over the conveyor.

(4) Whenever conveyors pass adjacent to or over working areas or passageways, protective guards must be installed. These guards must be designed to catch and hold any load or materials that may fall off or dislodge and injure an employee.

(5) Employees must be prohibited from walking on the rolls of roller-type conveyors((, except in an emergency)). If employees must walk on roller-type conveyors because of an emergency, the conveyor must be shut off first.

(6) Guards, screens, or barricades that are strong enough to prevent material from falling must be installed on all sides of the shaftway of elevator-type conveyors except at openings where material is loaded or unloaded. Automatic shaftway gates or suitable barriers must be installed at each floor level where material is loaded or unloaded from the platform.

(7) Conveyors must have an emergency stopping device that can be reached from the conveyor. The device must be located near the material entrance to each chopper, mulcher, saw, or similar equipment. The device must be located so that it can stop the conveyor before an employee enters the point of operation of the machine fed by the conveyor.





EXCEPTION: The emergency stopping device is not required where the conveyor leading into the equipment is under constant control of an operator with full view of the material entrance and the conveyor is located where the operator cannot fall onto it.



(8) Where conveyors are over seven feet high, means must be provided to safely permit essential inspection and maintenance operations.

(9) Any part showing signs of significant wear must be inspected carefully and replaced before it creates a hazard.

(10) Replacement parts must be equal to or exceed the manufacturer's specifications.



[Recodified as 296-307-232. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-232, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-24003  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-240)) 296-307-240 covers sanitation for employees who normally work in fixed, indoor places of agricultural employment.

A "fixed, indoor workplace" is one where the employees perform a majority of their duties at that site.

This does not cover field employees who only occasionally enter a shop or other farm building as part of their normal duties. Field employees are covered by the field sanitation requirements of WAC ((296-306A-095)) 296-307-095.

This section does not cover measures for the control of toxic materials.



[Recodified as 296-307-24003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-24003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-25012  What protection must an employer provide for wall openings and holes? (1) Every wall opening from which there is a drop of more than 4 feet must be guarded by one of the following:

(a) A rail, roller, picket fence, half door, or equivalent barrier.

The guard may be removable but should be hinged or mounted so it can be easily replaced. When employees working below the opening are exposed to falling materials, a removable toeboard or the equivalent must also be provided. When the opening is unused, the guard must be kept in position even with a door on the opening. In addition, a grab handle must be provided on each side of the opening with its center approximately 4 feet above floor level and of standard strength and mounting.

(b) An extension platform onto which materials can be hoisted for handling, and that has side rails or equivalent guards of standard specifications.

(2) Every chute wall opening from which there is a drop of more than 4 feet must be guarded according to subsection (1) of this section or as required by the conditions.

(3) Every window wall opening at a stairway landing, floor, platform, or balcony, from which there is a drop of more than 4 feet, and where the bottom of the opening is less than 3 feet above the platform or landing, must be guarded by standard slats, standard grillwork according to WAC ((296-306A-25042)) 296-307-25042(3), or a standard railing.

Where the window opening is below the landing, or platform, a standard toeboard must be provided.

(4) Every temporary wall opening must have adequate guards that may be of less than standard construction.

(5) Where there is a hazard of materials falling through a wall hole, and the lower edge of the near side of the hole is less than 4 inches above the floor, and the far side of the hole is more than 5 feet above the next lower level, the hole must be protected by a standard toeboard or a solid enclosing screen, or according to WAC ((296-306A-25042)) 296-307-25042(3).



[Recodified as 296-307-25012. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-25012, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-25015  What protection must an employer provide for open-sided floors, platforms, and runways? (1) Every open-sided floor or platform 4 feet or more above an adjacent floor or ground level must be guarded by a standard railing (or the equivalent according to WAC ((296-306A-10003(3))) 296-307-25027) on all open sides, except where there is an entrance to a ramp, stairway, or fixed ladder. The railing must have a toeboard wherever, beneath the open sides:

(a) A person can pass; or

(b) There is moving machinery; or

(c) Materials falling onto equipment would create a hazard.

(2) Every runway must be guarded by a standard railing (or the equivalent according to WAC ((296-306A-25027)) 296-307-25027) on all open sides that are 4 feet or more above floor or ground level. Wherever tools, machine parts, or materials are likely to be used on the runway, a toeboard must also be provided on each exposed side.

Runways used exclusively for special purposes (such as oiling, shafting, or filling tank cars) may have the railing on one side omitted when operating conditions require, if the hazard is minimized by using a runway at least 18 inches wide. Where people entering runways become exposed to machinery, electrical equipment, or hazards other than from falling, additional guarding may be necessary.

(3) Regardless of height, all open-sided floors, walkways, platforms, or runways above or adjacent to dangerous equipment, pickling or galvanizing tanks, degreasing units, or similar hazardous equipment, must be guarded with a standard railing and toeboard.

(4) Tools and loose materials must not be left on overhead platforms and scaffolds.



[Recodified as 296-307-25015. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-25015, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-26003  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-260)) 296-307-260 covers the safe design and construction of fixed general industrial stairs. Fixed general industrial stairs includes interior and exterior stairs around machinery, tanks, and other equipment, and stairs leading to or from floors, platforms, or pits.

This section does not apply to stairs used for fire exits, to construction operations, to private buildings or residences, or to articulated stairs that are installed on floating roof tanks or on dock facilities, where the angle changes with the rise and fall of the base support.

Stairs of public and private buildings at loading or receiving docks, in maintenance areas, etc., or stairs that are used exclusively by employees, are considered "fixed industrial steps" and must meet these requirements.



[Recodified as 296-307-26003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-26003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-26030  What requirements apply to railings and handrails on fixed stairs? Standard railings must be provided on the open sides of all exposed stairways and stair platforms. Handrails must be provided on at least one side of closed stairways, preferably on the right side descending. Stair railings and handrails must be installed according to WAC ((296-360A-250)) 296-307-250.



[Recodified as 296-307-26030. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-26030, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-26033  What requirements apply to alternating tread-type stairs? "Alternating tread-type stairs" means stairs with a series of steps between 50 and 70 degrees from horizontal, attached to a center support rail in an alternating manner so that a user of the stairs never has both feet at the same level at the same time.

(1) Alternating tread-type stairs must be designed, installed, used, and maintained according to the manufacturer's specifications, and must have the following:

(a) Stair rails on all open sides;

(b) Handrails on both sides of enclosed stairs;

(c) Stair rails and handrails that provide an adequate handhold for a user grasping it to avoid a fall;

(d) A minimum of 17 inches between handrails;

(e) A minimum width of 22 inches overall;

(f) A minimum tread depth of 8 inches;

(g) A minimum tread width of 7 inches; and

(h) A maximum rise of 9 1/2 inches to the tread surface of the next alternating tread.

(2) Alternating tread-type stairs must have a maximum 20-foot continuous rise. Where more than a 20-foot rise is necessary to reach the top of a required stair, one or more intermediate platforms must be provided according to WAC ((296-306A-26027)) 296-307-26027.

(3) Stairs and platforms must be installed so the top landing of the alternating tread stair is flush with the top of the landing platform.

(4) Stair design and construction must sustain a load of at least five times the normal live load, and be at least strong enough to carry safely a moving concentrated load of 1,000 pounds.

(5) Treads must have slip-resistant surfaces.

(6) Where a platform or landing is used, the width must be at least as wide as the stair and at least 30-inches deep in the direction of travel. Stairs must be flush with the top of the landing platform.



[Recodified as 296-307-26033. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-26033, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-27010  What requirements apply to using aerial manlift equipment? (1) The manufacturer's instructional manual, if any, must be used to establish the proper operational sequences and maintenance procedures. If there is no manual, you must develop instructions. The instructions must be available for reference by operators.

(2) The assigned operator must make a daily visual inspection and perform the tests recommended by the manufacturer.

(3) Only employees qualified by training or experience may operate aerial manlifts.

(4) Employees must report defective aerial manlift equipment to you as soon as identified. Using defective equipment is prohibited when the defect may cause an accident.

(5) When moving to and from the job site, the basket of the manlift must be in the low position.

(6) Unsafe practices are prohibited, such as, sitting or standing on the basket edge, standing on material placed across the basket, or working from a ladder set inside the basket.

(7) The basket must not be rested on a fixed object so that the weight of the boom is supported by the basket.

(8) The employee and the aerial manlift equipment must maintain distance from high voltage lines according to WAC ((296-306A-150)) 296-307-150.



[Recodified as 296-307-27010. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-27010, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28002  What power transmission belts are covered by this section? WAC ((296-306A-280)) 296-307-280 covers all types and shapes of power transmission belts.





EXCEPTION: The following power transmission belts are exempt from WAC ((296-306A-280)) 296-307-280 when operating at 250 feet per minute or less:

(1) Flat belts that are one inch wide or less.

(2) Flat belts that are 2" wide or less and are free from metal lacings or fasteners.

(3) Round belts that are 1/2" in diameter or less.

(4) Single strand V-belts that are 13/32" wide or less.





[Recodified as 296-307-28002. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28002, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28006  What general requirements apply to machine guarding? (1) All power transmission components must be guarded according to the requirements of this section.

(2) You must protect employees from coming into contact with moving machinery parts by:

(a) A guard or shield or guarding by location; or

(b) A guardrail or fence whenever a guard or shield or guarding by location is infeasible.

(3) Strength and design of guards.

(a) Guards must be designed and located to prevent inadvertent contact with the hazard.

(b) Unless otherwise specified, each guard and its supports must be strong enough to withstand the force that a 250 pound person would exert leaning on or falling against the guard.

(c) Guards must be securely fastened to the equipment or building.

(4) ((Shields, guards, and access doors that will prevent accidental contact with rotating machine parts on constant-running drives must be in place when the machine is running.



Exception: This requirement does not apply to combines when guards could create fire hazards.



"Constant-running drives" means drives that continue to rotate when the engine is running and all clutches are disengaged.

(5))) A guard or shield on stationary equipment must be provided at the mesh point or pinch point where the chain or belt contacts the sprocket or pulley.

(((6))) (5) Machines that will throw stock, material, or objects must be covered or provided with a device designed and constructed to minimize this action. (Machines such as rip saws, rotary mowers and beaters, rotary tillers are included in this classification.)

(((7) When the periphery of the blades of a fan is less than 7 feet above the floor or working level, the blades must be guarded. The guard must have openings no larger than 1/2 inch.

(8))) (6) For requirements relating to the control of hazardous energy (lockout-tagout) see WAC ((296-306A-320)) 296-307-320.



[Recodified as 296-307-28006. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28006, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28014  What requirements apply to prime-mover guards? "Flywheels" include flywheels, balance wheels, and flywheel pulleys mounted and revolving on crankshaft of engine or other shafting.

"Prime movers" include steam, gas, oil, and air engines, motors, steam and hydraulic turbines, and other equipment used as a source of power.

(1) Unless guarded by location, flywheels must be guarded according to the following requirements:

(a) Guard enclosures are made of sheet, perforated, or expanded metal, or woven wire.

(b) Guard rails are between 15 and 20 inches from the rim. When a flywheel extends into a pit or is within 12 inches of the floor, a standard toeboard is provided.

(c) When the upper rim of a flywheel extends through a working floor, it is surrounded by a guardrail and toeboard.

(d) Exception: When a flywheel with a smooth rim 5 feet or less in diameter cannot be guarded by the above methods, you must guard by meeting the following requirements:

On the exposed side, cover the flywheel spokes with a disk that makes a smooth surface and edge, and provides for inspection. You may leave an open space, less than 4 inches wide, between the outside edge of the disk and the rim of the wheel, to turn the wheel over. If you use a disk, keys or other projections left uncovered by the projections shall be cut off or covered.



Note: This exception does not apply to flywheels with solid web centers.



(e) At the flywheel of a gas or oil engine, you may provide an adjustable guard for starting the engine or for running adjustment. A slot opening for a jack bar is permitted.

(f) For flywheels above working areas, you must install guards that are strong enough to hold the weight of the flywheel if the shaft or wheel mounting fails.

(2) Cranks and connecting rods, when exposed to contact, must be guarded according to WAC ((296-306A-28046)) 296-307-28046 and ((296-306A-28048)) 296-307-28048, or by a guardrail according to WAC ((296-306A-28060)) 296-307-28060.

(3) Tail rods or extension piston rods must be guarded according to WAC ((296-306A-28046)) 296-307-28046 and ((296-306A-28048)) 296-307-28048, or by a guardrail on the sides and end, with a clearance of between 15 and 20 inches when rod is fully extended.



[Recodified as 296-307-28014. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28014, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28016  What requirements apply to guarding shafting? Revolving shafts must be guarded by a standard safeguard unless guarded by location.

(1) All shafting must be secured against excessive end movement.

(2) Guarding horizontal shafting.

(a) Unless guarded by location, all exposed parts of horizontal shafting, must be enclosed in a guard that covers the shafting completely or by a trough that covers the sides and top or sides and bottom of the shafting as location requires.

(b) Shafting under bench machines must be enclosed by a guard that covers the shafting completely or by a trough that covers the sides and top or sides and bottom of the shafting as location requires. The sides of the trough must extend to at least 6 inches from the underside of table. If shafting is near the floor, the trough must extend to at least 6 inches from the floor. In every case, the sides of trough must extend at least 2 inches beyond the shafting or projection.



Exception: Maintenance runways are exempt from this requirement. "Maintenance runway" means any permanent runway or platform used for oiling, maintenance, running adjustment, or repair work, but not for passageway.



(3) Unless guarded by location, vertical and inclined shafting must be enclosed according to WAC ((296-306A-28046)) 296-307-28046 and ((296-306A-28050)) 296-307-28050 through WAC ((296-306A-28060)) 296-307-28060.



Exception: Maintenance runways are exempt from this requirement.



(4) Projecting shaft ends.

(a) Projecting shaft ends must have a smooth edge and end and must not project more than one-half the diameter of the shaft unless guarded by nonrotating caps or safety sleeves.

(b) Unused keyways must be filled up or covered.



[Recodified as 296-307-28016. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28016, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28018  What requirements apply to guarding pulleys? (1) Unless guarded by location, pulleys must be guarded according to WAC ((296-306A-28046)) 296-307-28046 and ((296-306A-28050)) 296-307-28050 through WAC ((296-306A-28060)) 296-307-28060. Pulleys serving as balance wheels (e.g., punch presses) on which the point of contact between belt and pulley is more than 6 feet 6 inches from the floor or platform may be guarded with a disk covering the spokes.

(2) If the distance to the nearest fixed pulley, clutch, or hanger is equal to or less than the width of the belt, then you must provide a guide to prevent the belt from leaving the pulley on the side where insufficient clearance exists.

(3) Where there are overhanging pulleys on line, jack, or countershafts with no bearing between the pulley and the outer end of the shaft, you should provide a guide to prevent the belt from running off the pulley.

(4) Pulleys with cracks, or pieces broken out of rims are prohibited.

(5) Pulleys must be designed and balanced for the operating speed.

(6) Composition or laminated wood pulleys must not be installed where they are likely to deteriorate.



[Recodified as 296-307-28018. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28018, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28020  What requirements apply to guarding horizontal belt, rope, and chain drives? "Belts" include all power transmission belts, such as flat belts, round belts, V-belts, etc., unless otherwise specified.

(1) Where both runs of horizontal belts are 7 feet or less from the floor level, the guard must extend to at least 15 inches above the belt or to a standard height. (See Table P-1.)



Exception: Where both runs of a horizontal belt are 42 inches or less from the floor, the belt must be fully enclosed according to WAC ((296-306A-28046)) 296-307-28046 and ((296-306A-28050)) 296-307-28050 through WAC ((296-306A-28060)) 296-307-28060.



(2) In power development rooms, a guardrail may be used instead of the guard.



[Recodified as 296-307-28020. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28020, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28022  What requirements apply to guarding overhead horizontal belt, rope, and chain drives? (1) Unless guarded by location, overhead horizontal belts must be guarded on the sides and bottom according to WAC ((296-306A-28054)) 296-307-28054.

(2) Unless guarded by location, horizontal overhead belts must be guarded for their entire length when:

(a) Located over passageways or work places and traveling 1,800 feet or more per minute.

(b) The center to center distance between pulleys is 10 feet or more.

(c) The belt is 8 inches wide or more.

(3) Where the upper and lower runs of horizontal belts are located so that employees can pass between them, the passage must be either:

(a) Completely barred according to WAC ((296-306A-28046)) 296-307-28046 and ((296-306A-28050)) 296-307-28050 through WAC ((296-306A-28060)) 296-307-28060; or

(b) In a passage that employees must use, there must be a platform over the lower run guarded on either side by a railing that is completely filled in with wire mesh or other filler, or by a solid barrier. The upper run must be guarded to prevent contact by the employee or by objects carried by the employee.

(4) Overhead chain and link belt drives must be guarded according to the same requirements as overhead horizontal belts.

(5) American or continuous system rope drives located where the condition of the rope (particularly the splice) cannot be constantly and conveniently observed, must have an alarm (preferably electric-bell type) that will warn when the rope begins to fray.



[Recodified as 296-307-28022. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28022, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28024  What requirements apply to guarding vertical and inclined belts? (1) Vertical and inclined belts must be guarded according to WAC ((296-306A-28044)) 296-307-28044 and ((296-306A-28050)) 296-307-28050 through WAC ((296-306A-28060)) 296-307-28060.

(2) All guards for inclined belts must provide a minimum clearance of 7 feet between belt and floor at any point outside of the guard.

(3) A vertical or inclined belt may be guarded with a nip-point belt and pulley guard, if it is:

(a) 2-1/2 inches wide or less;

(b) Running at a speed of less than one thousand feet per minute; and

(c) Free from metal lacings or fastenings.

"Nip-point belt and pulley guard" means a device that encloses the pulley and has rounded or rolled edge slots through which the belt passes.

(4) Vertical belts running over a lower pulley more than seven feet above floor or platform must be guarded according to the same requirements as horizontal overhead belts, if the belt is:

(a) Located over passageways or work places and traveling 1,800 feet or more per minute;

(b) Eight inches wider or more.



[Recodified as 296-307-28024. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28024, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28030  What requirements apply to guarding gears, sprockets, and chains? (1) Gears must be guarded by one of the following methods:

(a) A complete enclosure; or

(b) A standard guard according to WAC ((296-306A-28050)) 296-307-28050 through ((296-306A-28060)) 296-307-28060, at least 7 feet high extending 6 inches above the mesh point of the gears; or

(c) A band guard covering the face of gear. The guard must have flanges extended inward beyond the root of the teeth on the exposed side or sides. If a part of the train of gears guarded by a band guard is less than 6 feet from the floor, the gear must be guarded by a disk guard or by a complete enclosure at least 6 feet tall.

(2) Hand-operated gears used only to adjust hand-powered machine parts may be unguarded. However, we recommend guarding these gears.

(3) Unless guarded by location, all sprocket wheels and chains must be enclosed. Where the drive extends over other machine or working areas, you must provide protection against falling parts.



Exception: This section does not apply to manually operated sprockets.



(4) When gears require frequent oiling, you must provide openings with hinged or sliding self-closing covers. All points not readily accessible must have oil feed tubes if lubricant is added while machinery is in motion.



[Recodified as 296-307-28030. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28030, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28040  What requirements apply to guarding clutches, cutoff couplings, and clutch pulleys? (1) Unless guarded by location, clutches, cutoff couplings, or clutch pulleys with projecting parts must be enclosed by a stationary guard constructed according to WAC ((296-306A-28046)) 296-307-28046. You may use a "U" type guard.

(2) In enginerooms, a guardrail, preferably with toeboard, may be used instead of the guard if the room is only occupied by engineroom attendants.

(3) A bearing support next to a friction clutch or cutoff coupling must have self-lubricating bearings that require infrequent maintenance.



[Recodified as 296-307-28040. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28040, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28042  What requirements apply to guarding belt shifters, clutches, shippers, poles, perches, and fasteners? "Belt pole" (sometimes called a "belt shipper" or "shipper pole") means a device used in shifting belts on and off fixed pulleys on line or countershaft where there are no loose pulleys.

(1) Tight and loose pulleys must have a permanent belt shifter with a mechanical means to prevent the belt from creeping from loose to tight pulley.

(2) Belt shifter and clutch handles must be rounded. They must be as far as possible from danger of accidental contact, but within easy reach of the operator. Where belt shifters are not directly over a machine or bench, the handles must be cut off 6 feet 6 inches above floor level.

(3) All belt and clutch shifters of the same type in each shop should move in the same direction to stop machines, i.e., either all right or all left.



Exception: This requirement does not apply to a friction clutch on a countershaft carrying two clutch pulleys with open and crossed belts. In this case the shifter handle has three positions and the machine is at a standstill when the clutch handle is in the neutral or center position.



(4) When belt poles must be used as a substitute for mechanical shifters, they must be big enough for employees to grasp them securely. Poles must be smooth and preferably of straight grain hardwood, such as ash or hickory. The edges of rectangular poles should be rounded. Poles should extend from the top of the pulley to within approximately 40 inches of the floor or working platform.

(5) Where loose pulleys or idlers are not practical, belt perches such as brackets, rollers, etc., must be used to keep idle belts away from the shafts. Perches should be substantial and designed for safe belt shifting.

(6) Belts that must be shifted by hand and belts within seven feet of the floor or working platform that are not guarded according to WAC ((296-306A-28046)) 296-307-28046 must not be fastened with metal, nor with any other fastening that creates a hazard.



[Recodified as 296-307-28042. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28042, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28048  What requirements apply to disk, shield, and U-guards? (1) A disk guard must have a sheet-metal disk of at least No. 22 gauge fastened by U-bolts or rivets to the spokes of pulleys, flywheels, or gears. To prevent contact with sharp edges of the disk, the edge must be rolled or wired. In all cases, the nuts must have locknuts on the unexposed side of the wheel.

(2) A shield guard must have a frame filled in with wire mesh or expanded, perforated, or solid sheet metal.

(3) If the shield area is less than six square feet, the wire mesh or expanded metal may be fastened in a framework of 3/8-inch solid rod, 3/4-inch by 3/4-inch by 1/8-inch angle iron, or a metal construction of equivalent strength. Metal shields may have edges entirely rolled around a 3/8-inch solid iron rod.

(4) A U-guard consisting of a flat surface with edge members must cover the under surface and lower edge of a belt, multiple chain, or rope drive. It must be constructed of materials specified in Table P-1, and must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-28054)) 296-307-28054 through ((296-306A-28058)) 296-307-28058. Edges must be smooth and, if the size of the guard requires, be reinforced by rolling, wiring, or by binding with angle or flat iron.



[Recodified as 296-307-28048. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28048, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28052  When may wood guards be used? Wood guards may be used where fumes would cause rapid deterioration of metal guards and outdoors where extreme cold or extreme heat make metal guards and railings undesirable.

(1) Wood must be sound, tough, and without loose knots.

(2) Guards must be made of planed lumber not less than 1-inch rough board measure, with rounded edges and corners.

(3) Wood guards must be securely fastened together with wood screws, hardwood dowel pins, bolts, or rivets.

(4) Wood guards must be equal in strength and rigidity to metal guards specified in WAC ((296-306A-28050)) 296-307-28050 and Table P-1.



Note: Requirements for the construction of standard wood railings are in WAC ((296-306A-28060)) 296-307-28060.





[Recodified as 296-307-28052. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28052, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-28060  What materials must be used for guardrails and toeboards? (1) A guardrail used to guard power transmission parts must be 42 inches tall, with a midrail between the top rail and the floor.

(2) Posts must be 8 feet apart or less. They must be permanent and substantial, smooth, and free from protruding nails, bolts, and splinters. If made of pipe, the post must be at least 1-1/4 inches inside diameter. If posts are made of metal shapes or bars, the section must be as strong as posts made of 1-1/2 by 1-1/2 by 3/16-inch angle iron. If posts are made of wood, the posts must be at least 2 by 4 inches. The upper rail must be 2 by 4 inches, or two 1 by 4 inch strips, one at the top and one at the side of the posts. The midrail must be at least 1 by 4 inches.

(3) The rails (metal shapes, metal bars, or wood), should be on the side of the posts that gives the best protection and support. Where panels are fitted with expanded metal or wire mesh (as noted in Table 1) the middle rails may be omitted. Where guard is exposed to contact with moving equipment, additional strength may be necessary.

(4) Toeboards must be at least 4 inches tall, of wood, metal, or metal grill of a maximum 1-inch mesh. Toeboards at flywheel pits should be placed as close to edge of the pit as possible.



(WAC 296-307-28060, Illus. 1) Place illustration here.




(WAC 296-307-28060, Illus. 2) Place illustration here.




[Recodified as 296-307-28060. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-28060, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-29005  What requirements apply to auger conveying equipment? "Augers" means screw conveyors and related accessories designed primarily for conveying agricultural materials on farms.

(1) Power take-off shafts must be guarded according to WAC ((296-306A-28046)) 296-307-28046.

(2) All augers must be covered or guarded when exposed to contact.

(3) You must ensure that each sweep auger has its top half shielded by a guard. All guard openings must be no larger than 4 3/4 inches across.

(4) You must ensure that the exposed auger at the hopper and the intake is guarded or designed to prevent accidental contact with the rotating inlet area. The guard must extend at least 2 1/2 inches above and below the exposed auger. Openings in the guard, for the free flow of material, must be no larger than 4 3/4 inches across and must be strong enough to support 250 pounds at mid span.

(5) The hand raising winch must have a control that will hold the auger at any angle, and that will only respond to the control. You must ensure that the operator is able to lower the auger without disengaging the control. The maximum force required on the handle to raise or lower the auger manually must be 50 pounds.

(6) The wire rope lifting pulleys must be grooved to fit the wire rope used.

(7) In order to avoid separation, you must provide a positive restraint between the auger tube and the under-carriage lifting arm. You must provide stops that restrict the maximum raised angle and minimum lowered angle.

(8) Wire ropes (cables) must be rust resistant and selected for the design load and service intended.

(9) You must provide the auger operator with service and operation instructions that include safe operation and servicing practices.



[Recodified as 296-307-29005. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-29005, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-30003  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-300)) 296-307-300 applies to the guarding and care of farmstead equipment.

"Farmstead equipment" means agricultural equipment normally used in a stationary manner. This includes, but is not limited to, materials handling equipment and accessories for such equipment whether or not the equipment is an integral part of a building.



[Recodified as 296-307-30003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-30003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-30009  How must other power transmission components of farmstead equipment be guarded? (1) ((The mesh or nip-points of all power driven gears, belts, chains, sheaves, pulleys, sprockets, and idlers must be guarded)) All power transmission parts must be guarded according to WAC 296-307-280.

(2) ((All revolving shafts, including projections such as bolts, keys, or set screws, must be guarded.



Exception: The following may be unguarded:



(a))) Smooth shafts and shaft ends (without any projecting bolts, keys, or set screws)((, revolving)) may be unguarded if they:

(a) Revolve at less than 10 RPM((, on)); and

(b) Are part of feed handling equipment used on the top surface of materials in bulk storage facilities.

(((b) Smooth shaft ends protruding less than one-half the outside diameter of the shaft and its locking means.))



[Recodified as 296-307-30009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-30009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-30018  What requirements apply to electrical control for maintaining and servicing farmstead equipment? (1) You must ensure that only the employee maintaining or servicing equipment has control of the electrical power source by:

(a) Providing an exclusive, positive locking means on the main switch that can be operated only by the employee performing the maintenance or service; or

(b) For material handling equipment in a bulk storage structure, by providing on the equipment an electrical or mechanical means to disconnect the power. Minimum lockout means must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-320)) 296-307-320.

(2) All circuit protection devices, including those that are an integral part of a motor, must have a manual reset, except where:

(a) A manual reset is infeasible because of the nature of the operation, distances involved, and the amount of time normally spent by employees in the area of the affected equipment;

(b) An electrical disconnect switch is available to the employee within fifteen feet of the equipment being maintained or serviced; and

(c) A sign, prominently posted near each hazardous component, warns the employee that unless the electrical disconnect switch is utilized, the motor could automatically reset while the employee is working on the hazardous component.



[Recodified as 296-307-30018. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-30018, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-32001  What does this section cover? (1) WAC ((296-306A-320)) 296-307-320 covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected start up of the machine or equipment or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees. This standard establishes minimum performance requirements for the control of such hazardous energy.

(2) Normal production operations are not covered by this standard. Servicing and/or maintenance that takes place during normal production operations is covered by this standard only if:

(a) An employee is required to remove or bypass a guard or other safety device; or

(b) An employee is required to place a body part into a point of operation or where an associated danger zone exists during a machine operating cycle.



Exception: Minor servicing activities, that take place during normal production operations, are not covered by this standard if they are routine, repetitive, and integral to the use of the equipment for production, provided that the work is performed using alternative measures that provide effective protection.





[Recodified as 296-307-32001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-08-051A, 296-306A-32001, filed 3/31/97, effective 5/1/97; 96-22-048, 296-306A-32001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-32003  When does this section not apply? (1) WAC ((296-306A-320)) 296-307-320 does not apply to work on cord and plug connected electric equipment when:

(a) Unexpected energization or start up of the equipment is controlled by unplugging the equipment from the energy source; and

(b) The plug is under the exclusive control of the employee performing the servicing or maintenance.

(2) WAC ((296-306A-320)) 296-307-320 does not apply to hot tap operations involving transmission and distribution systems for substances such as gas, steam, water, or petroleum products when they are performed on pressurized pipelines, when:

(a) Continuity of service is essential;

(b) Shutdown of the system is impractical; and

(c) Documented procedures are followed, and special equipment is used that will provide proven effective protection for employees.

(3) WAC ((296-306A-320)) 296-307-320 does not cover exposure to electrical hazards from work on, near, or with conductors or equipment in electric utilization installations. These hazards are covered in chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T.



[Recodified as 296-307-32003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-32003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-32009  How does an employer determine when to use lockout vs. tagout? (1) If an energy isolating device is not capable of being locked out, your energy control program must use a tagout system.

(2) If an energy isolating device is capable of being locked out, your energy control program must use lockout unless a tagout system will provide full employee protection according to WAC ((296-306A-32011)) 296-307-32011.

(3) Whenever major replacement or major repair, renovation, or modification of a machine or equipment is performed, and whenever new machines or equipment are installed, energy isolating devices for such machines or equipment must be designed to accept a lockout device.



[Recodified as 296-307-32009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-32009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-32017  How often must the energy control procedure be inspected? (1) You must conduct an inspection of the energy control procedure at least annually to ensure that the procedure and the requirements of this standard are followed.

(a) An authorized employee, other than the one(s) using the energy control procedure, must perform the inspection.

(b) The inspection must be conducted to correct any deviations or inadequacies identified.

(c) Where lockout is used for energy control, the inspection must include a review, between the inspector and each authorized employee, of that employee's responsibilities under the energy control procedure.

(d) Where tagout is used for energy control, the inspection must include a review, between the inspector and each authorized and affected employee, of that employee's responsibilities under the energy control procedure, and the elements of WAC ((296-306A-32021)) 296-307-32021.

(2) You must certify that the inspections have been performed. The certification must identify the machine or equipment on which the energy control procedure was being used, the date of the inspection, the employees included in the inspection, and the person performing the inspection.



[Recodified as 296-307-32017. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-32017, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-32035  What requirements apply to testing and positioning machines and equipment? When lockout or tagout devices must be temporarily removed from the energy isolating device and the machine or equipment energized to test or position the machine or equipment, the following sequence of actions must be followed:

(1) Clear the machine or equipment of tools and materials according to WAC ((296-306A-32033)) 296-307-32033 (1)(a).

(2) Remove employees from the machine or equipment area according to WAC ((296-306A-32033)) 296-307-32033 (1)(b).

(3) Remove the lockout or tagout devices as specified in WAC ((296-306A-32033)) 296-307-32033(3).

(4) Energize and proceed with testing or positioning.

(5) Deenergize all systems and reapply energy control measures in accordance with WAC ((296-306A-32031)) 296-307-32031 to continue the servicing and/or maintenance.



[Recodified as 296-307-32035. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-32035, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-32039  What requirements apply to group lockout or tagout? (1) When servicing and/or maintenance is performed by a crew or other group, they must use a procedure that provides a level of protection equivalent to that provided by the implementation of a personal lockout or tagout device.

(2) Group lockout or tagout devices must be used according to the procedures required by WAC ((296-306A-32013)) 296-307-32013 including, but not limited to, the following:

(a) An authorized employee has primary responsibility for a set number of employees working under the protection of a group lockout or tagout device (such as an operations lock); and

(b) A method for the authorized employee to determine if individual group members are exposed to release of stored energy hazards; and

(c) When more than one crew or group is involved, assignment of overall lockout or tagout control responsibility to an authorized employee designated to coordinate individual group members and ensure continuity of protection; and

(d) Each authorized employee must affix a personal lockout or tagout device to the group lockout device when beginning work, and must remove those devices when the work is complete.



[Recodified as 296-307-32039. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-32039, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-34003  What does this section cover? (1) WAC ((296-306A-340)) 296-307-340 applies to the placement, use, maintenance, and testing of portable fire extinguishers provided for employee use. WAC ((296-306A-34012)) 296-307-34012 does not apply to extinguishers provided for employee use on the outside of workplace buildings or structures. If you do not intend for employees to use extinguishers, and your emergency action plan and fire prevention plan meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-35018)) 296-307-35018, then only the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-34015)) 296-307-34015 and ((296-306A-34018)) 296-307-34018 apply.

(2) All standpipe and hose systems, automatic sprinkler systems, fixed extinguishing systems, dry-chemical fixed extinguishing systems, water-spray and foam, and fire detection systems, must be installed according to state and local ordinances, codes, and regulations governing such installations.



[Recodified as 296-307-34003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-34003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-34006  Who is exempt from the requirements of this section? (1) You are exempt from all requirements of this section, if:

(a) You have implemented a written fire safety policy that requires all employees to evacuate immediately when the fire alarm sounds; and

(b) You have an emergency action plan and a fire prevention plan meeting the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-35015)) 296-307-35015 and ((296-306A-35018)) 296-307-35018; and

(c) Extinguishers are not available for employee use in the workplace.





Note: ((If a specific section of this chapter requires you to provide a portable fire extinguisher, this exemption does not apply.)) If you are covered by one of the following sections requiring you to provide a portable fire extinguisher, then you may not apply this exemption:

WAC 296-307-07013(12)--Transporting employees;

WAC 296-307-34009(8)--Storage of flammables; or

WAC 296-307-49503(2)--Welding.





(2) You are exempt from the distribution requirements in WAC ((296-306A-34012)) 296-307-34012, if:

(a) You have an emergency action plan meeting the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-35015)) 296-307-35015

that authorizes only certain employees to use the available portable fire extinguishers; and

(b) The plan requires all other employees to evacuate immediately when the fire alarm sounds.



[Recodified as 296-307-34006. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-34006, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-34503  What does this section cover? (1) WAC ((296-306A-345)) 296-307-345 applies to all emergency employee alarms required by a specific WAC chapter. This section does not apply to discharge or supervisory alarms required on various fixed extinguishing systems or to supervisory alarms on fire suppression, alarm or detection systems unless they are intended to be employee alarm systems.

(2) The maintenance, testing, and inspection requirements of this section apply to all local fire alarm signaling systems used for alerting employees regardless of the other functions of the system.

(3) All predischarge employee alarms required by this chapter must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-34506)) 296-307-34506 and ((296-306A-34512)) 296-307-34512.



[Recodified as 296-307-34503. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-34503, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-35003  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-350)) 296-307-350 requires you to provide exit routes for employees to leave the workplace safely during emergencies. This section does not apply to mobile workplaces, such as vehicles or vessels.



[Recodified as 296-307-35003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-35003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-35012  What are the operation and maintenance requirements for exit routes? You must ensure that each workplace meets the following requirements:

(1) The workplace exit route is maintained to minimize danger to employees during an emergency.

(a) The workplace exit route is free of explosive or highly flammable furnishings or decorations.

(b) Accumulations of flammable or combustible waste materials are controlled.

(c) An exit route does not require employees to travel toward materials that burn very quickly, emit poisonous fumes, or are explosive, unless those materials are effectively shielded from the exit route.

(2) Each exit route is adequately lit.

(3) Each exit is clearly visible and is marked by a distinctive sign reading "exit."

(a) An exit door is free of signs or decorations that obscure its visibility.

(b) Signs are posted along the exit route indicating the direction of travel to the nearest exit.

(c) The line-of-sight to an exit sign is uninterrupted.

(d) Any doorway or passage that might be mistaken for an exit is marked "not an exit" or with an indication of its actual use.

(e) An exit sign is illuminated to a surface value of at least 5 foot candles by a reliable light source and shows a designated color. Self-luminous or electroluminescent signs have a minimum luminance surface value of .06 footlamberts.

(4) Fire retardant paints or other coatings used in the workplace are maintained.

(5) Each safeguard to protect employees during an emergency is maintained in proper working order.

(6) Employees do not occupy a workplace under construction until an exit route that meets these requirements is available for the portion of the workplace to be occupied.

(a) Employees do not occupy a workplace during repair or alteration unless either all exits and existing fire protection are maintained or alternate fire protection is provided that ensures an equivalent level of safety.

(b) Flammable or explosive materials used during construction or repair do not expose employees to hazards not otherwise present in the workplace or impede emergency escape from the workplace.

(7) An operable employee alarm system with a distinctive signal to warn employees of fire or other emergencies is installed and maintained. No employee alarm system is required if employees can see or smell a fire or other hazard so that it would provide adequate warning to them. The employee alarm system complies with the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-345)) 296-307-345.



[Recodified as 296-307-35012. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-35012, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-35015  What are the requirements for an emergency action plan? (1) You must develop an emergency action plan for each part of the workplace ((whenever a WISHA standard requires one)) as required by WAC 296-307-030 (3)(d).

(a) The plan must be in writing, kept in the workplace, and made available to employees on request.

(b) An employer of 10 or fewer employees may communicate the plan orally to employees rather than develop a written plan.

(2) An emergency action plan must include:

(a) Procedures for emergency evacuation, including exit route assignments;

(b) Procedures to account for all employees after evacuation;

(c) Procedures for reporting a fire or other emergency;

(d) Procedures to follow for emergency operation or shut down of critical equipment before evacuation;

(e) Procedures to follow for rescue and medical duties;

(f) Procedures for operating and maintaining an emergency alarm system; and

(g) Names or job titles of employees to be contacted to get more information about what to do in an emergency.

(3) You must designate employees to assist in the safe emergency evacuation of other employees. You must ensure that the designated employees receive training in emergency evacuation procedures.

(4) You must review the emergency action plan with each employee covered by the plan:

(a) When the plan is developed or the employee is assigned initially to the job;

(b) When the employee's responsibilities under the plan change; and

(c) When the plan is changed.



[Recodified as 296-307-35015. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-35015, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-35018  What are the requirements for a fire prevention plan? (1) You must develop a fire prevention plan for each part of the workplace ((whenever another WISHA standard requires one)) if required by WAC 296-307-34006(1).

(a) The plan must be in writing, kept in the workplace, and made available to employees on request.

(b) An employer of 10 or fewer employees may communicate the plan orally to employees rather than develop a written plan.

(2) A fire prevention plan must include:

(a) A list of all major fire hazards, including proper handling and storage procedures for hazardous materials, potential ignition sources and their control, and the type of fire protection equipment necessary to control each major hazard;

(b) Procedures to control accumulations of flammable and combustible waste materials;

(c) Procedures for regular maintenance of safeguards installed on heat producing equipment to prevent accidental ignition of combustible materials;

(d) Names or job titles of employees responsible for maintaining equipment to prevent or control sources of ignition or fires;

(e) Names or job titles of employees responsible for control of fuel source hazards.

(3) You must:

(a) Inform employees of the fire hazards to which they are exposed; and

(b) Review with each employee those parts of the fire prevention plan necessary for self-protection upon initial assignment to a job.



[Recodified as 296-307-35018. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-35018, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-36005  What does this part cover? (1) Chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T covers methods to protect against electrical hazards in agricultural workplaces.

(2) Chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T does not cover:

Installations in watercraft, or automotive vehicles; or

Electric welding. (See chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part V.)

(3) Unless otherwise provided in this chapter all electrical work, installation, and wire capacities must be according to the National Electrical Code, NFPA 70-1973; ANSI C1-1971, and all other applicable standards administered by the department of labor and industries.



[Recodified as 296-307-36005. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-36005, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-36230  What access and working space must be provided for electrical equipment over 600 volts, nominal? (1) Conductors and equipment used on circuits exceeding 600 volts, nominal, must meet all requirements of WAC ((296-306A-36221)) 296-307-36221 and the additional requirements of this section. This section does not apply to equipment on the supply side of the service conductors.

(2) Electrical installations in a vault, room, closet or area surrounded by a wall, screen, or fence, with access controlled by lock and key or other approved means, are considered accessible to qualified persons only. A wall, screen, or fence less than 8 feet high is not considered to prevent access unless it has other features that provide a degree of isolation equivalent to an 8 foot fence. The entrances to all buildings, rooms, or enclosures containing exposed live parts or exposed conductors operating at over 600 volts, nominal, must be kept locked or under the observation of a qualified person at all times.

(a) Electrical installations with exposed live parts must be accessible to qualified persons only.

(b) Electrical installations that are open to unqualified persons must be made with metal-enclosed equipment or enclosed in a vault or in an area, with access controlled by a lock. If metal-enclosed equipment is installed so that the bottom of the enclosure is less than 8 feet above the floor, the door or cover must be kept locked. Metal-enclosed switchgear, unit substations, transformers, pull boxes, connection boxes, and other similar associated equipment must be marked with appropriate caution signs. If equipment is exposed to physical damage from vehicular traffic, guards must be provided to prevent damage. Ventilating or similar openings in metal-enclosed equipment must be designed so that foreign objects inserted through these openings will be deflected from energized parts.

(3) You must provide and maintain enough space around electric equipment to permit ready and safe operation and maintenance of equipment. Where energized parts are exposed, the minimum clear workspace must be at least 6 feet 6 inches high (measured vertically from the floor or platform), or less than 3 feet wide (measured parallel to the equipment). The depth must meet the requirements of Table T. The workspace must be adequate to permit at least a 90-degree opening of doors or hinged panels.

(a) The minimum clear working space in front of electric equipment such as switchboards, control panels, switches, circuit breakers, motor controllers, relays, and similar equipment must be at least that specified in Table T unless otherwise indicated. Distances must be measured from the live parts if they are exposed, or from the enclosure front or opening if the live parts are enclosed. However, working space is not required in back of equipment such as deadfront switchboards or control assemblies where there are no renewable or adjustable parts (such as fuses or switches) on the back and where all connections are accessible from another direction. Where rear access is required to work on deenergized parts on the back of enclosed equipment, a minimum working space of 30 inches horizontally shall be provided.



Table T

Minimum Depth of Clear Working Space

in Front of Electric Equipment





Conditions (ft)


Nominal

voltage to

ground

(a) (b) (c)


601 to 2,500


3


4


5
2,501 to 9,000 4 5 6
9,001 to 25,000 5 6 9
25,001 to 75kV1 6 8 10
Above 75kV1 8 10 12


Note: Minimum depth of clear working space in front of electric equipment with a nominal voltage to ground above 25,000 volts may be the same as for 25,000 volts under conditions (a), (b) and (c) for installations built prior to April 16, 1981.




Conditions:

(a) Exposed live parts on one side and no live or grounded parts on the other side of the working space, or exposed live parts on both sides guarded by suitable wood or other insulating materials. Insulated wire or insulated busbars operating at 300 volts or less are not considered live parts.

(b) Exposed live parts on one side and grounded parts on the other side. Concrete, brick, or tile walls will be considered grounded surfaces.

(c) Exposed live parts on both sides of the workspace (not guarded as in (a)) with the operator between.



(b) All working spaces around electric equipment must be adequately lit. The lighting outlets shall be arranged so that anyone changing lamps or making repairs on the lighting system will not be endangered by live parts or other equipment. The points of control must be located so that no one is likely to come in contact with any live part or moving part of the equipment while turning on the lights.

(c) Unguarded live parts above working space must be elevated to at least the height specified below:



Elevation of Unguarded

Energized Parts Above Working Space





Nominal voltage

between phases



Minimum

elevation



601 to 7,500


8 feet 6 inches
7,501 to 35,000 9 feet
Over 35kV 9 feet.+ 0.37

inches per kV

above 35kV



Note: Minimum elevation may be 8 feet for installations built prior to April 16, 1981, if the nominal voltage between phases is in the range of 601-6600 volts.



(4) Entrance and access to workspace must meet the following requirements:

(a) At least one entrance that is at least 24 inches wide and 6 feet 6 inches high must be provided to give access to the working space around electric equipment. On switchboard and control panels over 48 inches wide, there must be one entrance at each end of the board where practical. Where bare energized parts at any voltage or insulated energized parts above 600 volts are located adjacent to the entrance, they must be suitably guarded.

(b) Permanent ladders or stairways must be provided to give safe access to the working space around electric equipment installed on platforms, balconies, mezzanine floors, or in attic or roof rooms or spaces.



[Recodified as 296-307-36230. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-36230, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-36636  How must high voltage systems be grounded? Grounded high voltage (1000 volts or more) systems and circuits must meet all requirements of WAC ((296-306A-366)) 296-307-366 and the additional requirements of this section.

(1) Systems supplying portable or mobile high voltage equipment, other than substations installed on a temporary basis, must meet the following requirements:

(a) Portable and mobile high voltage equipment must be supplied from a system having its neutral grounded through an impedance. If a delta-connected high voltage system is used to supply the equipment, a system neutral must be derived.

(b) Exposed noncurrent-carrying metal parts of portable and mobile equipment must be connected by an equipment grounding conductor to the point at which the system neutral impedance is grounded.

(c) Ground-fault detection and relaying must be provided to automatically deenergize any high voltage system component that has developed a ground fault. The continuity of the equipment grounding conductor must be continuously monitored to deenergize automatically the high voltage feeder to the portable equipment on loss of continuity of the equipment grounding conductor.

(d) The grounding electrode to which the portable or mobile equipment system neutral impedance is connected must be isolated from and separated in the ground by at least 20 feet from any other system or equipment grounding electrode. There must be no direct connection between the grounding electrodes, such as buried pipe, fence, etc.

(2) All noncurrent-carrying metal parts of portable equipment and fixed equipment including their associated fences, housings, enclosures, and supporting structures shall be grounded. However, equipment that is guarded by location and isolated from ground need not be grounded. Additionally, pole-mounted distribution apparatus over 8 feet above ground or grade level need not be grounded.



[Recodified as 296-307-36636. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-36636, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-36803  Does this section apply to factory-assembled equipment? WAC ((296-306A-368)) 296-307-368 does not apply to conductors that are an integral part of factory-assembled equipment.



[Recodified as 296-307-36803. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-307-36803, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37203  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-372)) 296-307-372 covers the requirements for electric equipment and wiring in locations that are classified based on the properties of the flammable vapors, liquids or gases, or combustible dusts or fibers that may be present and the likelihood that a flammable combustible concentration or quantity is present. Each room, section, or area must be considered individually to determine its classification.

All requirements in this part apply to hazardous locations, unless otherwise indicated.



[Recodified as 296-307-37203. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37203, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37209  What equipment, wiring methods, and installations may be used in hazardous locations? Equipment, wiring methods, and installations of equipment in hazardous locations must be intrinsically safe, or approved for the hazardous location, or safe for the hazardous location. Requirements for each of these options are as follows:

(1) Equipment and associated wiring approved as intrinsically safe are permitted in any hazardous location for which it is approved.

(2) Requirements to be approved for the hazardous location:

(a) Equipment must be approved for the class of location and for the ignitable or combustible properties of the specific gas, vapor, dust, or fiber that will be present.

(b) Equipment must be marked to show the class, group, and operating temperature or temperature range, based on operation in a 40 degrees C ambient, for which it is approved. The temperature marking must be a maximum of the ignition temperature of the specific gas or vapor to be encountered. The following provisions apply to specific equipment:

(i) Nonheat-producing equipment, such as junction boxes, conduit, and fittings, and heat-producing equipment with a maximum temperature of 100 degrees C (212 degrees F) need not have a marked operating temperature or temperature range.

(ii) Fixed lighting fixtures marked for use in Class I, Division 2 locations only, need not be marked to indicate the group.

(iii) Fixed general-purpose equipment in Class I locations (other than lighting fixtures) that is acceptable for use in Class I, Division 2 locations need not be marked with the class, group, division, or operating temperature.

(iv) Fixed dust-tight equipment (other than lighting fixtures) that is acceptable for use in Class II, Division 2 and Class III locations need not be marked with the class, group, division, or operating temperature.

(3) Equipment that is safe for the location shall be of a type and design that provides protection from the hazards arising from combustible and flammable vapors, liquids, gases, dusts, or fibers.



Note: Equipment that meets the requirements of The National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, shall be considered in compliance with the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-372)) 296-307-372.





[Recodified as 296-307-37209. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37209, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37603  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-376)) 296-307-376 applies to work performed on exposed live parts (involving either direct contact or contact by means of tools or materials) or near enough to them for employees to be exposed to any hazard they present.



[Recodified as 296-307-37603. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37603, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37606  Who may work on energized parts? Only qualified persons may work on electric circuit parts of equipment that have not been deenergized under the procedures of WAC ((296-306A-37807)) 296-307-37807. Qualified persons must be capable of working safely on energized circuits and must be familiar with the proper use of special precautionary techniques, personal protective equipment, insulating and shielding materials, and insulated tools.



[Recodified as 296-307-37606. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37606, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37612  What requirements apply to qualified persons working near overhead lines? When a qualified person is working near overhead lines, whether in an elevated position or on the ground, the person must not approach, or take any conductive object without an approved insulating handle, closer to exposed energized parts than shown in WAC ((296-306A-150)) 296-307-150 unless:

(1) The person is insulated from the energized part (gloves, with sleeves if necessary, rated for the voltage involved are considered to be insulation of the person from the energized part on which work is performed); or

(2) The energized part is insulated both from all other conductive objects at a different potential and from the person; or

(3) The person is insulated from all conductive objects at a potential different from that of the energized part.



[Recodified as 296-307-37612. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37612, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37615  What requirements apply to vehicles and mechanical equipment near overhead lines? (1) Any vehicle or mechanical equipment that may have parts of its structure elevated near energized overhead lines must be operated so that a clearance of 10 ft. is maintained. If the voltage is higher than 50kV, the clearance must be increased 0.4 inch for every 1kV over the voltage. The clearance may be reduced only if:

(a) The vehicle is in transit with its structure lowered, the clearance may be reduced to 4 ft. If the voltage is higher than 50kV, the clearance must be increased 0.4 inch for every 1kV over that voltage.

(b) Insulating barriers are installed to prevent contact with the lines, and if the barriers are rated for the voltage of the line being guarded and are not a part of or an attachment to the vehicle or its raised structure, the clearance may be reduced to a distance within the designed working dimensions of the insulating barrier.

(2) If the equipment is an aerial lift insulated for the voltage involved, and if the work is performed by a qualified person, the clearance (between the uninsulated portion of the aerial lift and the power line) may be reduced to the distance given in WAC ((296-306A-150)) 296-307-150.

(3) Employees standing on the ground must not contact the vehicle or mechanical equipment or any of its attachments, unless:

(a) The employee is using protective equipment rated for the voltage; or

(b) The equipment is located so that no uninsulated part of its structure (that portion of the structure that provides a conductive path to employees on the ground) can come closer to the line than permitted in this section.

(4) If any vehicle or mechanical equipment that may have parts of its structure elevated near energized overhead lines is intentionally grounded, employees working on the ground near the point of grounding must not stand at the grounding location whenever there is a possibility of overhead line contact. Additional precautions, such as the use of barricades or insulation, must be taken to protect employees from hazardous ground potentials, depending on earth resistivity and fault currents, which can develop within the first few feet or more outward from the grounding point.



[Recodified as 296-307-37615. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37615, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37801  What does this section cover? (1) WAC ((296-306A-376)) 296-307-376 and ((296-306A-378)) 296-307-378 cover electrical safety-related work practices for both qualified persons (those who have training in avoiding the electrical hazards of working on or near exposed energized parts) and unqualified persons (those with little or no such training) working on, near, or with the following installations:

(a) Installations of electric conductors and equipment within or on buildings or other structures, and on other premises such as yards, parking, and other lots, and industrial substations;

(b) Installations of conductors that connect to the supply of electricity;

(c) Installations of other outside conductors on the premises; and

(d) Installations of optical fiber cable where such installations are made along with electric conductors.

(2) ((Chapter 306-376 WAC and WAC 296-306A-378)) WAC 296-307-367 and 296-307-378 cover work performed by unqualified persons on, near, or with the installations listed in subsection (3) of this section.

(3) WAC ((296-306A-376)) 296-307-376 and ((296-306A-378)) 296-307-378 do not apply to work performed by qualified persons on or directly associated with the following installations:

(a) Installations for the generation, control, transformation, transmission, and distribution of electric energy (including communication and metering) located in buildings used for such purposes or located outdoors.

Work on or directly associated with generation, transmission, or distribution installations includes:

(i) Work performed directly on installations, such as repairing distribution lines or repairing a feed-water pump for the boiler in a generating plant.

(ii) Work directly associated with installations, such as line-clearance tree trimming and replacing utility poles.

(iii) Work on electric utilization circuits in a generating plant where:

The circuits are combined with installations of power generation equipment or circuits; and

The generation equipment or circuits present greater electrical hazards than those posed by the utilization equipment or circuits (such as exposure to higher voltages or lack of overcurrent protection).

(b) Installations in watercraft, railway rolling stock, aircraft, or automotive vehicles other than mobile homes and recreational vehicles.

(c) Installations of railways for generation, transformation, transmission, or distribution of power used exclusively for operation of rolling stock or installations of railways used exclusively for signaling and communication purposes.



[Recodified as 296-307-37801. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37801, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37803  How must employees be trained on safety practices? (1) The training requirements in this section apply to employees who face a risk of electrical shock that is not reduced to a safe level by the electrical installation requirements of WAC ((296-306A-362)) 296-307-362 through ((296-306A-374)) 296-307-374.

(2) Training contents must include the following:

(a) Employees must be trained in and familiar with the safety-related work practices required by WAC ((296-306A-376)) 296-307-376 through ((296-306A-378)) 296-307-378 that apply to their job assignments.

(b) Employees who are covered by this section but who are not qualified persons must also be trained in and familiar with any electrically related safety practices that are not covered by this standard, but that are necessary for their safety.

(c) Qualified persons must, at a minimum, be trained in and familiar with the following:

(i) The skills and techniques necessary to distinguish exposed live parts from other parts of electric equipment;

(ii) The skills and techniques necessary to determine the nominal voltage of exposed live parts; and

(iii) The clearance distance specified in WAC ((296-306A-376)) 296-307-376 and the corresponding voltages to which the qualified person will be exposed.



Note 1: For the purposes of WAC ((296-306A-376)) 296-307-376 and ((296-306A-378)) 296-307-378, an employee must have the training required for a qualified person in order to be considered a qualified person.

Note 2: Qualified persons whose work on energized equipment involves either direct contact or contact by means of tools or materials must also have the training needed to meet WAC ((296-306A-376)) 296-307-376.



(3) You must provide either classroom or on-the-job training. The degree of training provided must be determined by the risk to the employee.



[Recodified as 296-307-37803. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37803, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37807  What work practices must be followed for work on exposed deenergized parts? (1) This section applies to work on exposed deenergized parts or near enough to them to expose the employee to any electrical hazard they present. Conductors and parts of electric equipment that have been deenergized but have not been locked out or tagged must be treated as energized parts, and WAC ((296-306A-376)) 296-307-376 applies to work on or near them.

(2) While any employee is exposed to contact with parts of fixed electric equipment or circuits which have been deenergized, the circuits energizing the parts must be locked out or tagged or both according to the requirements of this section. The requirements must be followed in the order in which they are presented.

"Fixed equipment" means equipment that is fastened or connected by permanent wiring methods.



Note: Lockout and tagging procedures that comply with WAC ((296-306A-320)) 296-307-320 will also be deemed to comply with WAC ((296-306A-37807)) 296-307-37807 through ((296-306A-37817)) 296-307-37817 if:

The procedures address the electrical safety hazards covered by this part; and

The procedures include the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-37813)) 296-307-37813(4) and ((296-306A-37815)) 296-307-37815(2).





[Recodified as 296-307-37807. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37807, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37809  Must an employer have a written copy of lockout-tagout procedures? The employer must maintain a written copy of the procedures outlined in WAC ((296-306A-37807)) 296-307-37807 through ((296-306A-37817)) 296-307-37817 and must make it available for inspection by us or by employees.

The written procedures may be in the form of a copy of WAC ((296-306A-37807)) 296-307-37807 through ((296-306A-37817)) 296-307-37817.



[Recodified as 296-307-37809. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37809, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-37825  What safety-related work practices relate to flammable materials? Where flammable materials are present only occasionally, electric equipment capable of igniting them must not be used, unless measures are taken to prevent hazardous conditions from developing.

Such materials include, but are not limited to: flammable gases, vapors, or liquids; combustible dust; and ignitable fibers or flyings.



Note: Electrical installation requirements for locations where flammable materials are present on a regular basis are contained in WAC ((296-306A-372)) 296-307-372.





[Recodified as 296-307-37825. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-37825, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-38006  What requirements apply to general protective equipment and tools? (1) When working near exposed energized conductors or circuit parts, each employee must use insulated tools or handling equipment if the tools or handling equipment might make contact with such conductors or parts. If the insulating capability of insulated tools or handling equipment is subject to damage, the insulating material must be protected.

(2) Ropes and handlines used near exposed energized parts must be nonconductive.

(3) Protective shields, protective barriers, or insulating materials must be used to protect each employee from shock, burns, or other electrically related injuries while that employee is working near exposed energized parts that might be accidentally contacted or where dangerous electric heating or arcing might occur. When normally enclosed live parts are exposed for maintenance or repair, they must be guarded to protect unqualified persons from contact with the live parts.

(4) Altering techniques must be used to warn and protect employees from hazards that could cause injury due to electric shock, burns, or failure of electric equipment parts.

(5) Safety signs, safety symbols, or accident prevention tags must be used where necessary to warn employees about electrical hazards that may endanger them, as required by WAC ((296-306A-330)) 296-307-330.



[Recodified as 296-307-38006. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-38006, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-38012  What electrical requirements apply to electrical protective devices? Insulating blankets, matting, covers, line hose, gloves, and sleeves made of rubber must meet the following electrical requirements:

(1) Equipment must be capable of withstanding the a-c proof-test voltage specified in Table 1 or the d-c proof-test voltage specified in Table 2.

(a) The proof-test must reliably indicate that the equipment can withstand the voltage involved.

(b) The test voltage must be applied continuously for three minutes for equipment other than matting and must be applied continuously for one minute for matting.

(c) Gloves must also be capable of withstanding the a-c proof-test voltage specified in Table 1 after a sixteen-hour water soak.

(2) When the a-c proof-test is used on gloves, the 60 hertz proof-test current must not exceed the values specified in Table 1 at any time during the test period.

(a) If the a-c proof-test is made at a frequency other than 60 hertz, the permissible proof-test current must be computed from the direct ratio of the frequencies.

(b) For the test, gloves (right side out) must be filled with tap water and immersed in water to a depth that is in accordance with Table 3. Water must be added to or removed from the glove, as necessary, so that the water level is the same inside and outside the glove.

(c) After the sixteen-hour water soak, the 60 hertz proof-test current may exceed the values given in Table 1 by not more than 2 milliamperes.

(3) Equipment that has been subjected to a minimum breakdown voltage test must not be used for electrical protection.

(4) Material used for Type II insulating equipment must be capable of withstanding an ozone test, with no visible effects. The ozone test must reliably indicate that the material will resist ozone exposure in actual use. Any visible signs of ozone deterioration of the material, such as checking, cracking, breaks, or pitting, is evidence of failure to meet the requirements for ozone-resistant material.



Note: Rubber insulating equipment meeting the following national consensus standards is considered to be in compliance with WAC ((296-306A-38009, 296-306A-38012, and 296-306A-38015)) 296-307-38009, 296-307-38012, and 296-307-38015:

American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D 120-87, Specification for Rubber Insulating Gloves.

ASTM D 178-93, Specification for Rubber Insulating Matting.

ASTM D 1048-93, Specification for Rubber Insulating Blankets.

ASTM D 1049-93, Specification for Rubber Insulating Covers.

ASTM D 1050-90, Specification for Rubber Insulating Line Hose.

ASTM D 1051-87, Specification for Rubber Insulating Sleeves.





These standards contain specifications for conducting the tests required in this section.



[Recodified as 296-307-38012. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-38012, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-38015  What workmanship and finish requirements apply to electrical protective devices? Insulating blankets, matting, covers, line hose, gloves, and sleeves made of rubber must meet the following workmanship and finish requirements:

(1) Equipment must be free of harmful physical irregularities that can be detected by the tests or inspections required in WAC ((296-306A-38012)) 296-307-38012.

(2) Surface irregularities that may be present on all rubber goods because of imperfections on forms or molds or because of inherent difficulties in the manufacturing process and that may appear as indentations, protuberances, or imbedded foreign material are acceptable if:

(a) The indentation or protuberance blends into a smooth slope when the material is stretched.

(b) Foreign material remains in place when the insulating material is folded and stretches with the insulating material surrounding it.



[Recodified as 296-307-38015. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-38015, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40001  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-400)) 296-307-400 covers the transportation and application of anhydrous ammonia.



[Recodified as 296-307-40001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40005  What general requirements apply to the storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia? (1) All employees must use at least gloves and goggles ((and/or)) and may supplement with a face shield while working on or with charged anhydrous ammonia equipment.

(2) You must ensure that equipment is inspected before each day's work. Conditions that would contribute to leaks shall be corrected.

(3) Hose end-valves must be closed when not in use to prevent accidental discharge in case the main valve is opened.

(4) Relief and vapor valves must discharge away from the operator's working position.



[Recodified as 296-307-40005. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40005, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40007  What requirements apply to systems mounted on farm wagons (implements of husbandry) for the transportation of ammonia? All anhydrous ammonia containers with a capacity of 3,000 gallons or less and equipment mounted on farm wagons (implements of husbandry) that is used to transport ammonia must meet the requirements of this section.

WAC ((296-306A-40011)) 296-307-40011 through ((296-306A-40037)) 296-307-40037 also apply unless otherwise noted.

(1) Containers must meet the following mounting requirements:

(a) The farm wagon or container has a stop so the container does not dislodge from its mounting when a farm wagon stops suddenly.

(b) The container is anchored to the farm wagon at one or more places on each side of the container.

(c) The weight of containers mounted on four-wheel farm wagons, is distributed evenly over both axles.

(d) When the cradle and the container are not welded together, material between them eliminates metal-to-metal friction.

(2) Container accessories must meet the following requirements:

(a) Each container has a fixed maximum liquid-level gauge.

(b) All containers with more than 250-gallon capacity have a pressure gauge with a dial graduated from 0-400 psi.

(c) The filling connection is fitted with one of the following:

(i) A combination back-pressure check valve and excess-flow valve; or

(ii) One double or two single back-pressure check valves; or

(iii) A positive shut-off valve that has either an internal back-pressure check valve or an internal excess flow valve.

(d) All containers with more than 250-gallon capacity are equipped for spray loading or with an approved vapor return valve.

(e) All vapor and liquid connections have approved excess flow valves or quick-closing internal valves that are only open for operating.



Exception: Safety-relief valves and connections that are specifically exempted by WAC ((296-306A-40019)) 296-307-40019(5) are exempt from this requirement.



(f) Fittings are protected from physical damage by a rigid guard. The guard is designed to withstand force from any direction, equal to twice the weight of the container and lading, at a safety factor of four. If the guard is fully enclosed, the safety-relief valves are properly vented through the guard.

(g) If a liquid withdrawal line is installed in the bottom of a container, the connections and hose are at least as high as the lowest horizontal edge of the farm wagon axle.

(h) Both ends of the hose are secure while in transit.

(3) Each side and the rear end of the container must be marked in letters at least four inches high, with the words "anhydrous ammonia" or, "caution--ammonia," or marked according to DOT regulations.

(4) Farm wagons (implements of husbandry) must meet all state regulations and the following requirements:

(a) All farm wagons must be securely attached to the vehicle drawing them by drawbars with safety chains.

(b) A farm wagon must be constructed so that it will follow the path of the towing vehicle and will prevent the towed wagon from whipping or swerving dangerously from side to side.

(c) All farm wagons must have five gallons or more of readily available clean water.



[Recodified as 296-307-40007. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40007, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40009  What requirements apply to systems mounted on farm wagons (implements of husbandry) for the application of ammonia? This section applies to systems mounted on farm equipment that are used for the field application of ammonia.

WAC ((296-306A-40011)) 296-307-40011 through ((296-306A-40037)) 296-307-40037 also apply unless otherwise noted.

(1) All containers must be securely mounted.

(2) Container valves and accessories must meet the following requirements:

(a) Each container has a fixed maximum liquid-level gauge.

(b) The filling connection is fitted with one of the following:

(i) A combination back-pressure check valve and excess-flow valve; or

(ii) One double or two single back-pressure check valves; or

(iii) A positive shut-off valve that has either an internal back-pressure check valve or an internal excess flow valve.

(c) An excess-flow valve is not required in the vapor connection if the controlling orifice is a maximum of 7/16 inch in diameter and the valve is a hand-operated shut-off valve. To assist in filling applicator tanks, you may bleed vapors to the open air, if this requirement is met.

(d) Metering devices may be connected directly to the tank withdrawal valve. You may use a union type connection between the tank valve and metering device. You may use remote mounting of metering devices if the hose meets the requirements of Appendix B. When the applicator tank is trailed and the metering device is remotely mounted, such as on the tractor tool bar, you must use an automatic break-away type, self-closing coupling.

(e) No excess-flow valve is required in the liquid withdrawal line if the controlling orifice between the contents of the container and the outlet of the shut-off valve is a maximum of 7/16 inch in diameter.



[Recodified as 296-307-40009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40013  What requirements apply to the construction, original test, and requalification of nonrefrigerated containers? The code is the Unfired Pressure Vessel Code of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Section VIII of the ASME Boiler Construction Code), 1952, 1956, 1959, 1962, 1965, 1968 and 1971 editions, the joint code of the American Petroleum Institute and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (API-ASME Code) 1951 edition, and amendments or later editions, as adopted.

(1) Containers used with systems covered in WAC ((296-306A-40005)) 296-307-40005 and ((296-306A-40007)) 296-307-40007 must be constructed and tested according to the code.



Exception: Construction under Table UW-12 at a basic joint efficiency of under 80% is prohibited. Containers built according to code are exempt from paragraphs UG-125 to UG-128, inclusive, and paragraphs UG-132 and UG-133 of the code.



Note: This subsection allows the continued use or reinstallation of containers constructed and maintained according to the 1949, 1950, 1952, 1956, 1959, 1962, 1965 and 1968 editions of the Unfired Pressure Vessel Code of the ASME or any revisions thereof in effect at the time of fabrication.



(2) Containers more than 36 inches in diameter or 250 gallons water capacity must be constructed to meet one or more of the following requirements:

(a) Containers must be stress relieved after fabrication according to the code; or

(b) Cold-formed heads, when used, must be stress relieved; or

(c) Hot-formed heads must be used.

(3) Welding to the shell, head, or any other part of the container subject to internal pressure must be according to the code. Other welding is permitted only on saddle plates, lugs, or brackets attached to the container by the container manufacturer.



[Recodified as 296-307-40013. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40013, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40015  How must nonrefrigerated containers and systems (other than DOT containers) be marked? (1) System nameplates, when required, must be permanently attached to the system so they are readily accessible for inspection.

(2) Each container or system covered in WAC ((296-306A-40005)) 296-307-40005 and ((296-306A-40007)) 296-307-40007 must be marked as follows:

(a) With indication that the container or system meets the requirements of the code under which the container is constructed.

(b) With indication on the container and system nameplate when the system is designed for underground installation.

(c) With the name and address of the supplier of the container or the trade name of the container and with the date of fabrication.

(d) With the water capacity of the container in pounds at 60F or gallons, United States standard.

(e) With the design pressure in pounds per square inch gauge.

(f) With the wall thickness of the shell and heads.

(g) With indication of the maximum fill level for liquid anhydrous ammonia between 20F and 100F. Markings must be in increments of not more than 20F.



Exception: Containers with fixed maximum level indicators, such as fixed length dip tubes, or containers that are filled by weight are exempt from this requirement.



(h) With the outside surface area in square feet.

(i) With minimum temperature in Fahrenheit for which the container is designed.

(j) The marking must be on the container itself or on a permanently attached nameplate.

(3) All main operating valves on permanently installed containers with a capacity of over 3,000 water gallons must be identified to show whether the valve is in liquid or vapor service. The valve must be identified as follows:

(a) The word liquid (or liquid valve), vapor (or vapor valve), as appropriate, must be placed on or within twelve inches of the valve by means of a stencil tag or decal.

(b) Liquid valves must be painted orange and vapor valves must be painted yellow. The legend orange-liquid, yellow-vapor must be displayed in one or more conspicuous places at each permanent storage location. The legend must have letters at least two inches high and must be placed against a contrasting background.



[Recodified as 296-307-40015. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40015, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40021  What requirements apply to piping, tubing, and fittings? (1) All piping, tubing and fittings must be made of material suitable for anhydrous ammonia service.

(2) All piping, tubing and fittings must be designed for a pressure of at least the maximum pressure to which they may be subjected in service.

(3) All piping must be well supported and allow for expansion and contraction. All refrigeration system piping must conform to the Refrigeration Piping Code (ANSI B31.5 1966 addenda B31.1a-1968), a section of the American Standard Code for Pressure Piping, as it applies to ammonia.

(4) Piping used on nonrefrigerated systems must meet the requirements of ASTM A-53-1969 Grade B Electric Resistance Welded and Electric Flash Welded Pipe. Pipe must be at least Schedule 40 when joints are welded, or welded and flanged. Pipe must be at least Schedule 80 when joints are threaded. Brass, copper, or galvanized steel pipe or tubing is prohibited.

(5) All metal flexible connections for permanent installations must have a minimum working pressure of 250 psig (safety factor of 4). For temporary installations, you may use hose that meets the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-40023)) 296-307-40023.

(6) Cast iron fittings are prohibited. You must use fittings made especially for ammonia service of malleable or nodular iron that meet the requirements of Specification ASTM A47 or ASTM A395.

(7) All piping, tubing, and fittings must allow for expansion, contraction, jarring, vibration, and settling.

(8) You must make adequate provision to protect all exposed piping from physical damage from moving machinery, the presence of automobiles or trucks, or other strain on the piping.

(9) Joint compounds must be resistant to ammonia.

(10) After assembly, all piping and tubing must be tested and proved to be free from leaks at pressure that is at least equal to the normal operating pressure of the system.



[Recodified as 296-307-40021. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40021, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40023  What specifications must hoses meet? (1) Hose used in ammonia service and subject to container pressure must meet the requirements of the joint Rubber Manufacturers Association and the Fertilizer Institute "Hose Specifications for Anhydrous Ammonia."

(2) Hose subject to container pressure must be designed for a minimum working pressure of 350 psig and a minimum burst pressure of 1750 psig. Hose assemblies must be able to withstand a test pressure of 500 psig.

(3) Hose and hose connections on the low pressure side of flow control or pressure reducing valves on devices discharging to atmospheric pressure must be designed for the maximum low side working pressure. All connections must be designed, constructed, and installed to prevent leaks when connected.

(4) Where liquid transfer hose is not drained after transfer operations, the hose must have an approved shut-off valve at the discharge end. You must provide a method to prevent excessive hydrostatic pressure in the hose. (See WAC ((296-306A-40025)) 296-307-40025.)

(5) On all hose 1/2-inch outside diameter and larger, used for the transfer of anhydrous ammonia liquid or vapor, you must ensure that the following information is etched, cast, or impressed at five-foot intervals:

Anhydrous Ammonia

xxx psig (Maximum working pressure)

Manufacturer's Name or Trademark

Year of Manufacture



[Recodified as 296-307-40023. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40023, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40025  What requirements apply to safety-relief devices? (1) Every container used in systems covered by WAC ((296-306A-400)) 296-307-400 must have one or more spring-loaded safety-relief valves or the equivalent.

(2) The discharge from safety-relief valves must be vented away from the container, upward, and unobstructed to the atmosphere. All safety-relief valve discharge openings must have suitable raincaps that allow free discharge of the vapor and prevent water from entering. You must provide a method to drain condensate. The rate of discharge must be as follows:



Surface

Area sq.

ft.

Flow

Rate

CFM

Air

Surface

Area sq.

ft.

Flow

Rate

CFM

Air

Surface

Area sq.

ft.

Flow

Rate

CFM

Air

20 258 185 1,600 900 5,850
25 310 190 1,640 950 6,120
30 360 195 1,670 1,000 6,380
35 408 200 1,710 1,050 6,640
40 455 210 1,780 1,100 6,900
45 501 220 1,850 1,150 7,160
50 547 230 1,920 1,200 7,410
55 591 240 1,980 1,250 7,660
60 635 250 2,050 1,300 7,910
65 678 260 2,120 1,350 8,160
70 720 270 2,180 1,400 8,410
75 762 280 2,250 1,450 8,650
80 804 290 2,320 1,500 8,900
85 845 300 2,380 1,550 9,140
90 885 310 2,450 1,600 9,380
95 925 320 2,510 1,650 9,620
100 965 330 2,570 1,700 9,860
105 1,010 340 2,640 1,750 10,090
110 1,050 350 2,700 1,800 10,330
115 1,090 360 2,760 1,850 10,560
120 1,120 370 2,830 1,900 10,800
125 1,160 380 2,890 1,950 11,030
130 1,200 390 2,950 2,000 11,260
135 1,240 400 3,010 2,050 11,490
140 1,280 450 3,320 2,100 11,720
145 1,310 500 3,620 2,150 11,950
150 1,350 550 3,910 2,200 12,180
155 1,390 600 4,200 2,250 12,400
160 1,420 650 4,480 2,300 12,630
165 1,460 700 4,760 2,350 12,850
170 1,500 750 5,040 2,400 13,080
175 1,530 800 5,300 2,450 13,300
180 1,570 850 5,590 2,500 13,520


Surface area.= total outside surface area of container in square feet. When the surface area is not stamped on the name plate or when the marking is not legible, calculate the area with one of the following formulas:



Hemispherical heads: Area.= (Length in feet) X (outside diameter in feet) X 3.1416.

Other than hemispherical heads: Area.= (Length in feet).+(0.3 outside diameter in feet) X (outside diameter in feet) X 3.1416.

Spherical container: Area.= (outside diameter in feet)2 X 3.1416.

Flow rate: CFM air.= cubic feet per minute of air required at standard conditions, 60F and atmospheric pressure (14.7 psia).

For containers with total outside surface area greater than 2,500 sq. ft., the formula is: Flow rate CFM air.= 22.11 A0.82 where A.= outside surface area of the container in square feet.

(3) Container safety-relief valves must be set for start to discharge as follows, according to the design pressure of the container.



Containers Minimum Maximum.*

ASME U-68, U-69 110% 125%
ASME U-200, U-201 95% 100%
ASME 1952, 95% 100%
1956, 1959,
1962, 1965,
1968 or 1971
API-ASME 95% 100%
U.S. Coast Guard As required by USCG regulations
DOT As required by DOT regulations
.*Note: Plus a relief valve manufacturer's tolerance of ten percent.

(4) Safety-relief devices used in systems covered by WAC ((296-306A-400)) 296-307-400 must be constructed to discharge at a rate equal to or greater than the rates required in subsection (2) of this section before the pressure exceeds 120% (not including the tolerance referred to in subsection (3) of this section) of the maximum permitted start-to-discharge pressure setting of the device.

(5) Safety-relief valves must be arranged to minimize tampering. If the pressure setting adjustment is external, the relief valves must have a sealable adjustment.

(6) Shut-off valves installed between the safety-relief valves and the containers or systems described in WAC ((296-306A-400)) 296-307-400 are prohibited.



Exception: A shut-off valve may be used where the arrangement of the valve allows the required capacity flow through the relief valves.

Exception example 1: A three-way valve installed under two safety-relief valves, each of which has the required rate of discharge and is installed to allow either of the safety-relief valves to be closed off, but does not allow both safety valves to be closed off at the same time.

Exception example 2: Two separate relief valves are installed with individual shut-off valves. The two shut-off valve stems must be mechanically interconnected to allow the full required flow of one safety-relief valve at all times.

Exception example 3: A safety-relief valve manifold that allows one valve of two, three, four or more to be closed off and the remaining valve or valves will provide not less than the rate of discharge shown on the manifold nameplate.



(7) Safety-relief valves must have direct communication with the vapor space of the container.

(8) Each safety-relief valve used with systems described in WAC ((296-306A-400)) 296-307-400 must be plainly and permanently marked as follows:

(a) With the letters "AA" or the symbol NH3.

(b) The pressure in pounds per square inch gauge (psig) at which the valve is set to start to discharge.

(c) The rate of discharge of the valve in cubic feet per minute of air at 60F and atmospheric pressure (14.7 psia).

(d) The manufacturers name and catalog number.

For example: A safety-relief valve marked AA-250-4200 (air) mean the valve is suitable for use on an anhydrous ammonia container; that it is set to start to discharge at 250 psig; and that its rate of discharge is 4,200 cubic feet per minute of air.

(9) No connection to the safety-relief valve may restrict the flow capacity on either the upstream or downstream side.

(10) The manufacturer or supplier of a safety-relief valve manifold must publish complete data showing the flow rating through the combined assembly of the manifold with safety-relief valves installed. The manifold flow rating must be determined by testing the manifold with all but one valve discharging. The flow rate must be determined by the restricted opening or openings or those having the lowest flow. The valve must be marked as required in subsection (7) of this section.

(11) A hydrostatic relief valve must be installed between each pair of valves in the liquid ammonia piping or hose where liquid may be trapped to release into the atmosphere at a safe location.

(12) Discharge from safety-relief devices must not terminate in or beneath any building.



[Recodified as 296-307-40025. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40025, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40033  What requirements apply to tank car unloading points and operations? (1) Provisions for unloading tank cars must meet DOT requirements.

(2) Unloading operations must be performed by reliable employees who are properly instructed and responsible for careful compliance with all procedures.

(3) Caution signs must be placed on the track or car to give necessary warning to anyone approaching car from the open end of the siding. The signs must be left up until after car is unloaded and disconnected from discharge connections. Signs must be of metal or other suitable material, at least 12 by 15 inches, and bear the words "STOP--Tank car connected" or "STOP--Men at work." The word "STOP" must be in letters at least four inches high and the other words in letters at least two inches high. The letters must be white on a blue background.

(4) The track of a tank car siding must be substantially level.

(5) Brakes must be set and wheels blocked on all cars being unloaded.

(6) Tank cars of anhydrous ammonia must be unloaded only at approved locations meeting the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-40025)) 296-307-40025(4) and ((296-306A-40031)) 296-307-40031(8).



[Recodified as 296-307-40033. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40033, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-40039  What requirements apply to electrical equipment and wiring? (1) Electrical equipment and wiring for use in ammonia installations must be general purpose or weather resistant as appropriate.

(2) Where concentrations of ammonia in the air in excess of 16% by volume are likely to be encountered, electrical equipment and wiring must be specified by and installed according to chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T, for Class I, Group D locations.



[Recodified as 296-307-40039. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-40039, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41001  What does this part cover? Chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part U2 covers the storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases.

The requirements of WAC ((296-306A-410)) 296-307-410 apply to all LP-gas installations covered by this part.

For additional requirements related to: See WAC:
Cylinder systems ((296-306A-415))

296-307-415

Systems using non-DOT containers ((296-306A-420))

296-307-420

LP-gas as a motor fuel ((296-306A-425))

296-307-425

Storage of containers awaiting use or resale ((296-306A-430))

296-307-430

LP-gas installations on commercial vehicles ((296-306A-435))

296-307-435

LP-gas service stations ((296-306A-440))

296-307-440





[Recodified as 296-307-41001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41017  Where must containers be located? You must ensure that containers are located according to the following:

(1) Containers and first stage regulating equipment are located outdoors.

Containers may be located indoors under any of the following conditions:

(a) In buildings used exclusively for container charging, vaporization pressure reduction, gas mixing, gas manufacturing, or distribution;

(b) When portable use is necessary and meets the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-41509)) 296-307-41509;

(c) LP-gas fueled stationary or portable engines that meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-42521)) 296-307-42521 or ((296-306A-42523)) 296-307-42523;

(d) LP-gas fueled industrial trucks that meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-42525)) 296-307-42525;

(e) LP-gas fueled vehicles garaged according to WAC ((296-306A-42527)) 296-307-42527; or

(f) Containers awaiting use or resale when stored according to WAC ((296-306A-430)) 296-307-430.

(2) Each individual container is located away from the nearest important building, group of buildings, or line of adjoining property that may be built on, according to Table U-1.



TABLE U-1

Minimum distances



Water

capacity per

container

Containers Between

above-ground

containers

Under-

ground

Above-

ground

Less than
125 galsa 10 feet None None
125-250 gals 10 feet 10 feet None
251-500 gals 10 feet 10 feet 3 feet
501-2,000 gals 25 feetb 25 feetb 3 feet
2,001-30,000 gals 50 feet 50 feet 5 feet
30,001-70,000 gals

50 feet


75 feet


1/4 of sum of diameters of adjacent containers
70,001-90,000 gals

50 feet


100 feet


1/4 of sum of diameters of adjacent containers


(a) If the total water capacity of a multicontainer installation at a consumer site is 501 gallons or more, the minimum distance must comply with this table, applying the aggregate capacity instead of the capacity per container. For multiple installations, installations must be at least twenty-five feet apart. Do not apply the minimum distances between aboveground containers to such installations.

(b) Distance requirements may be reduced to 10 feet for a single container of 1200 gallons water capacity or less, if the container is at least 25 feet from any other LP-gas container of more than 125 gallons water capacity.

(c) In buildings devoted exclusively to gas manufacturing and distributing operations, the distances may be reduced if no containers of more than 500 gallons water capacity are located closer than ten feet to gas manufacturing and distributing buildings.

(3) Containers installed for use must not be stacked one above the other.

(4) In industrial installations involving containers of 180,000 gallons total water capacity or more, where serious exposures from the container to adjacent properties are common, firewalls or other means of protection designed and constructed according to good engineering practices are required.

(5) Readily ignitible material such as weeds and long dry grass is removed within ten feet of any container.

(6) The minimum separation between LP-gas containers and flammable liquid tanks is twenty feet; the minimum separation between a container and the centerline of the dike is ten feet.





EXCEPTION: This does not apply when LP-gas containers of 125 gallons or less capacity are installed adjacent to Class III flammable liquid tanks of 275 gallons or less capacity.



(7) The accumulation of flammable liquids under adjacent LP-gas containers is prevented by a means such as diking, diversion curbs, or grading.

(8) When dikes are used with flammable liquid tanks, no LP-gas containers are located within the diked area.



[Recodified as 296-307-41017. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41017, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41025  What requirements apply to safety devices? (1) Every container except those constructed according to DOT specifications and every vaporizer (except motor fuel vaporizers and vaporizers described in WAC ((296-306A-41029)) 296-307-41029(3) and ((296-306A-42007)) 296-307-42007 (6)(a) whether heated by artificial means or not, must have one or more safety-relief valves of spring-loaded or equivalent type. These valves must be arranged to afford free vent to the outer air with discharge not less than five feet horizontally away from any opening into the building that is below such discharge. The rate of discharge must be according to the requirements of subsection (2) or (4) of this section.

(2) Minimum required rate of discharge in cubic feet per minute of air at one hundred twenty percent of the maximum permitted start to discharge pressure for safety-relief valves to be used on containers other than those constructed according to DOT specification must be as follows:



Surface

area

sq. ft.

Flow

rate

CFM

air

Surface

area

sq. ft.

Flow

rate

CFM

air

Surface

area

sq. ft.

Flow

rate

CFM

air


20 or less 626 170 3,620 550 9,470
25 751 175 3,700 600 10,170
30 872 180 3,790 650 10,860
35 990 185 3,880 700 11,550
40 1,100 190 3,960 750 12,220
45 1,220 195 4,050 850 13,540
50 1,330 200 4,130 900 14,190
55 1,430 210 4,300 950 14,830
60 1,540 220 4,470 1,000 15,470
65 1,640 230 4,630 1,050 16,100
70 1,750 240 4,800 1,100 16,720
75 1,850 250 4,960 1,150 17,350
80 1,950 260 5,130 1,200 17,960
85 2,050 270 5,290 1,250 18,570
90 2,150 280 5,450 1,300 19,180
95 2,240 290 5,610 1,350 19,780
100 2,340 300 5,760 1,400 20,380
105 2,440 310 5,920 1,450 20,980
110 2,530 320 6,080 1,500 21,570
115 2,630 330 6,230 1,550 22,160
120 2,720 340 6,390 1,600 22,740
125 2,810 350 6,540 1,650 23,320
130 2,900 360 6,690 1,700 23,900
135 2,990 370 6,840 1,750 24,470
140 3,080 380 7,000 1,800 25,050
145 3,170 390 7,150 1,850 25,620
150 3,260 400 7,300 1,900 26,180
155 3,350 450 8,040 1,950 26,750
160 3,440 500 8,760 2,000 27,310
165 3,530
Surface area.= total outside surface area of container in square feet.

(3) When the surface area is not stamped on the name plate or when the marking is not legible, calculate the area with one of the following formulas:

Hemispherical heads: Area.= (overall length) X (outside diameter) X 3.1416.

Other than hemispherical heads: Area.= (overall length).+0.3 (outside diameter) X (outside diameter ) X 3.1416.



Note: This formula is not exact, but will give results within the limits of practical accuracy for the sole purpose of sizing relief valves.



Spherical container: Area.= (outside diameter)2 X 3.1416.

Flow rate: CFM air.= required flow capacity in cubic feet per minute of air at standard conditions, 60F and atmospheric pressure (14.7 psia).

For containers with total outside surface area greater than 2,000 sq. ft., the formula is: Flow rate CFM air.= 53.632 A0.82 where A.= outside surface area of the container in square feet.

Valves not marked "air" have flow rate marking in cubic feet per minute of LP-gas. These can be converted to ratings in cubic feet per minute of air by multiplying the LP-gas ratings by factors listed below. Air flow ratings can be converted to ratings in cubic feet per minute of LP-gas by dividing the air ratings by the factors listed below.



air conversion factors


Container type


100


125


150


175


200
Air conversion factor 1.162 1.142 1.113 1.078 1.010


(4) The minimum required rate of discharge for safety-relief valves for LP-gas vaporizers (steam heated, water heated, and direct fired) must be determined as follows:

(a) Obtain the total surface area by adding the surface area of vaporizer shell in square feet directly in contact with LP-gas and the heat exchanged surface area in square feet directly in contact with LP-gas.

(b) Obtain the minimum required rate of discharge in cubic feet of air per minute, at 60F and 14.7 psia from subsection (2) of this section, for this total surface area.

(5) Container and vaporizer safety-relief valves must be set to start to discharge, with relation to the design pressure of the container, according to the following:





Containers
Minimum

(percent)

Maximum

(percent)



ASME Code; Par. U-68,

U-69--1949 and earlier

editions







110






.*125
ASME Code; Par. U-200,

U-201--1949 edition



88


.*100
ASME Code--1950, 1952,

1956, 1959, 1962, 1965 and

1968 (Division I) editions





88




.*100
API--ASME Code--all

editions



88


.*100
DOT As prescribed in 49 CFR Chapter I


.*Manufacturers of safety-relief valves are allowed a plus tolerance not exceeding 10% of the set pressure marked on the valve.

(6) Safety-relief devices used with systems employing non-DOT containers must be constructed to discharge at not less than the rates shown in subsection (2) of this section, before the pressure is in excess of 120% of the maximum (not including the 10% referred to in subsection (5) of this section) permitted start-to-discharge pressure setting of the device.

(7) In high temperature areas, you must use a lower vapor pressure product or a higher designed pressure vessel to prevent the safety valves from opening. The tanks may be protected by cooling devices such as spraying, shading, or other means.

(8) Safety-relief valves must be arranged to minimize tampering. For external pressure setting or adjustment, the relief valves must have an approved sealable adjustment.

(9) Shut-off valves are prohibited between safety-relief devices and the container, equipment, or piping.



EXCEPTION: A shut-off valve may be used where the arrangement of the valve allows the required capacity flow through the safety-relief device.



(10) Safety-relief valves must have direct communication with the vapor space of the container.

(11) Each safety-relief valve must be plainly and permanently marked with the following:

(a) Container type of the pressure vessel on which the valve is designed to be installed;

(b) The pressure in psig at which the valve is set to discharge;

(c) The actual rate of discharge of the valve in cubic feet per minute of air at 60F and 14.7 psia; and

(d) The manufacturer's name and catalog number.

For example: T200-250-4050 AIR: Indicates that the valve is suitable for use on a Type 200 container, that it is set to start to discharge at 250 psig; and that its rate of discharge is 4,050 cubic feet per minute of air.

(12) Safety-relief valve assemblies and their connections must be large enough to provide the required rate of flow for the container on which they are installed.

(13) A hydrostatic relief valve must be installed between each pair of shut-off valves on LP-gas liquid piping. The start-to-discharge pressure setting of such relief valves must be a maximum of 500 psig. The minimum setting on relief valves installed in piping connected to non-DOT containers shall be 140% of the container relief valve setting. For piping connected to DOT containers, the minimum must be 400 psig. The relief valve should not be installed in the pump discharge piping if the same protection can be provided by installing the relief valve in the suction piping. The start-to-discharge pressure setting of such a relief valve, if installed on the discharge side of a pump, must exceed the maximum pressure permitted by the recirculation device in the system.

(14) The discharge from any safety-relief device must not terminate in or beneath any building.



EXCEPTION: This requirement does not apply to relief devices covered by WAC ((296-306A-41017(1), 296-306A-41507(1) or 296-306A-41509)) 296-307-41017(1), 296-307-41507(1), or 296-307-41509.



(15) Container safety-relief devices and regulator relief vents must be located at least five feet in any direction from air openings into sealed combustion system appliances or mechanical ventilation air intakes.



[Recodified as 296-307-41025. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41025, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41027  How must indirect fired vaporizers be constructed and installed? Indirect fired vaporizers utilizing steam, water, or other heating medium must be constructed and installed according to the following:

(1) Vaporizers must be constructed according to the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-41011)) 296-307-41011 and must be permanently marked as follows:

(a) With the code marking signifying the specifications to which the vaporizer is constructed;

(b) With the allowable working pressure and temperature for which the vaporizer is designed;

(c) With the sum of the outside surface area and the inside heat exchange surface area expressed in square feet; and

(d) With the name or symbol of the manufacturer.

(2) Vaporizers with an inside diameter of six inches or less exempted by the ASME Unfired Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, 1968, must have a design pressure of at least 250 psig and need not be permanently marked.

(3) Heating or cooling coils installed inside a storage container are prohibited.

(4) Vaporizers may be installed in buildings, rooms, sheds, or lean-tos used exclusively for gas manufacturing or distribution, or in other light, noncombustible structures that are well ventilated near the floor line and roof.



Exception: When vaporizing and/or mixing equipment is in a structure not used exclusively for gas manufacturing or distribution, the structure or room must be separated from the remainder of the building. The separation must be a wall designed to withstand a static pressure of at least 100 pounds per square foot. This wall must have no openings or pipe or conduit passing through it. Such structure or room must have adequate ventilation and must have a roof or at least one exterior wall of lightweight construction.



(5) All DOT vaporizers must have, at or near the discharge, a safety-relief valve providing an effective rate of discharge according to WAC ((296-306A-41025)) 296-307-41025.

(6) The heating medium lines into and out of the vaporizer must have a mechanism to prevent the flow of gas into the heat systems in the event of tube rupture in the vaporizer. Vaporizers must have an automatic means to prevent liquid from passing through the vaporizers to the gas discharge piping.

(7) The device that supplies heat to produce steam, hot water, or other heat may be installed in a building, compartment, room, or lean-to ventilated near the floorline and roof to the outside. The device must be separated from all compartments or rooms containing LP-gas vaporizers, pumps, and central gas mixing devices by a wall designed to withstand a static pressure of at least 100 pounds per square foot. This wall must have no openings or pipes or conduit passing through it.



Exception: This requirement does not apply to the domestic water heaters that may supply heat for a vaporizer in a domestic system.



(8) Gas-fired heating systems supplying heat exclusively for vaporization must have automatic safety devices to shut off the flow of gas to main burners, if the pilot light should fail.

(9) Vaporizers may be an integral part of a fuel storage container directly connected to the liquid section or gas section or both.

(10) Fusible plugs are prohibited on vaporizers.

(11) Vaporizer houses must not have unprotected drains to sewers or sump pits.



[Recodified as 296-307-41027. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41027, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41031  How must direct gas-fired vaporizers be constructed and installed? Direct gas-fired vaporizers must be constructed, marked, and installed as follows:

(1) According to the requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, 1968, that apply to the maximum working conditions for which the vaporizer is designed.

(2) With the name of the manufacturer; rated Btu input to the burner; the area of the heat exchange surface in square feet; the outside surface of the vaporizer in square feet; and the maximum vaporizing capacity in gallons per hour.

(3) Vaporizers may be connected to the liquid section or the gas section of the storage container, or both. The container must have a manually operated valve in each connection that completely shuts off when desired, all flow of gas or liquid from container to vaporizer.

(4) Vaporizers with a maximum capacity of 35 gallons per hour must be located at least 5 feet from container shut-off valves. Vaporizers more than 35 gallon capacity but a maximum of 100 gallons per hour must be located at least 10 feet from the container shut-off valves. Vaporizers having a capacity greater than 100 gallons per hour must be located at least 15 feet from container shut-off valves.

(5) Vaporizers may be installed in buildings, rooms, housings, sheds, or lean-tos used exclusively for vaporizing or mixing of LP-gas. Vaporizing housing structures must be noncombustible, and well ventilated near the floorline and the highest point of the roof. When vaporizer and/or mixing equipment is located in a structure or room attached to or within a building, such structure or room must be separated from the remainder of the building by a wall designed to withstand a static pressure of at least 100 pounds per square foot. This wall must have no openings or pipes or conduit passing through it. The structure or room must have adequate ventilation, and a roof or at least one exterior wall of lightweight construction.

(6) Vaporizers must have at or near the discharge, a safety-relief valve providing an effective rate of discharge according to WAC ((296-306A-41025)) 296-307-41025. The relief valve must be located where it is not subjected to temperatures over 140F.

(7) Vaporizers must have suitable automatic means to prevent liquid passing from the vaporizer to the gas discharge piping of the vaporizer.

(8) Vaporizers must have means for manually turning off the gas to the main burner and pilot.

(9) Vaporizers must have automatic safety devices to shut off the flow of gas to main burners if the pilot light should fail. When the flow through the pilot exceeds 2,000 Btu per hour, the pilot also must have an automatic safety device to shut off the flow of gas to the pilot should the pilot flame be extinguished.

(10) Pressure regulating and pressure reducing equipment located within 10 feet of a direct fired vaporizer must be separated from the open flame by an airtight noncombustible partition.

(11) Except as provided in subsection (5) of this section, the following minimum distances must be maintained between direct fired vaporizers and the nearest important building, group of buildings, or line of adjoining property that may be built on:

(a) Ten feet for vaporizers with a vaporizing capacity of 15 gallons per hour or less;

(b) Twenty-five feet for vaporizers with a vaporizing capacity of 16-100 gallons per hour;

(c) Fifty feet for vaporizers with a vaporizing capacity over 100 gallons per hour.

(12) Direct fired vaporizers must not raise the product pressure above the design pressure of the vaporizer equipment or above the pressure shown in the second column of Table U-8.

(13) Fusible plugs are prohibited on vaporizers.

(14) Vaporizers must not have unprotected drains to sewers or sump pits.



[Recodified as 296-307-41031. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41031, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41039  What requirements apply to LP-gas in buildings? (1) Vapor may be piped into buildings at pressures over 20 psig only if the buildings or separate areas thereof:

(a) Are constructed according to this section;

(b) Are used exclusively to house equipment for vaporization, pressure reduction, gas mixing, gas manufacturing, or distribution, or to house internal combustion engines, industrial processes, research and experimental laboratories, or equipment and processes using such gas and having similar hazard;

(c) Are buildings, structures, or equipment under construction or undergoing major renovation.

(2) Liquid may be permitted in buildings as follows:

(a) In buildings, or separate areas of buildings, used exclusively to house equipment for vaporization, pressure reduction, gas mixing, gas manufacturing, or distribution, or to house internal combustion engines, industrial processes, research and experimental laboratories, or equipment and processes using such gas and having similar hazard; and when such buildings, or separate areas are constructed according to this section.

(b) In buildings, structures, or equipment under construction or undergoing major renovation if the temporary piping meets the following conditions:

(i) Liquid piping inside the building meets the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-41021)) 296-307-41021 and is a maximum of three-fourths iron pipe size. Copper tubing with an outside diameter of 3/4 inch or less may be used if it meets the requirements of Type K of Specifications for Seamless Water Tube, ANSI H23.1-1970 (ASTM B88-1969). (See Table U-2.) All such piping must be protected against construction hazards. Liquid piping inside buildings must be kept to a minimum. Such piping must be securely fastened to walls or other surfaces to provide adequate protection from breakage and located to subject the liquid line to the lowest ambient temperatures.

(ii) A shut-off valve must be installed in each intermediate branch line where it takes off the main line and must be readily accessible. A shut-off valve must also be placed at the appliance end of the intermediate branch line. Such shut-off valve must be upstream of any flexible connector used with the appliance.

(iii) Suitable excess flow valves must be installed in the container outlet line supplying liquid LP-gas to the building. A suitable excess flow valve must be installed immediately downstream of each shut-off valve. Excess flow valves must be installed where piping size is reduced and must be sized appropriately.

(iv) Hydrostatic relief valves must be installed according to WAC ((296-306A-41025)) 296-307-41025(13).

(v) Using hose to carry liquid between the container and the building or at any point in the liquid line, except at the appliance connector, is prohibited.

(vi) Where flexible connectors are necessary for appliance installation, such connectors must be as short as practical and must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-41021)) 296-307-41021(4) or ((296-306A-41023)) 296-307-41023.

(vii) Release of fuel when any section of piping or appliances is disconnected must be minimized by either of the following methods:

(A) Using an approved automatic quick-closing coupling (closing in both directions when coupled in the fuel line); or

(B) Closing the valve nearest to the appliance and allowing the appliance to operate until the fuel in the line is consumed.

(viii) See WAC ((296-306A-41509)) 296-307-41509 for the conditions under which portable containers may be brought indoors.



[Recodified as 296-307-41039. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41039, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41041  What requirements apply to transfer of liquids? When transferring liquids, you must ensure that:

(1) At least one attendant remains close to the transfer connection from the time the connections are first made until they are finally disconnected, during the transfer of the product.

(2) Containers must be filled or used only upon authorization of the owner.

(3) Containers manufactured according to DOT specifications authorized by DOT as a "single trip" or "nonrefillable container" must not be refilled or reused in LP-gas service.

(4) Gas or liquid must not be vented to the atmosphere to assist in transferring contents of one container to another, except as provided in WAC ((296-306A-42509)) 296-307-42509(4). A listed pump may use LP-gas in the vapor phase as a source of energy. The gas may be vented to the atmosphere at a rate not to exceed that from a No. 31 drill size opening, if venting and liquid transfer are located at least 50 feet from the nearest important building.

(5) Filling fuel containers for industrial trucks or motor vehicles from industrial bulk storage containers must be performed at least ten feet from the nearest important masonry-walled building or at least twenty-five feet from the nearest important building or other construction and always at least 25 feet from any building opening.

(6) Filling portable containers, containers mounted on skids, fuel containers on farm tractors, or similar applications, from storage containers used in domestic or commercial service, must be performed at least 50 feet from the nearest important building.

(7) The filling connection and the vent from the liquid level gauges in containers, filled at point of installation, must be at least ten feet in any direction from air openings into sealed combustion system appliances or mechanical ventilation air intakes.

(8) Fuel supply containers must be gauged and charged only in the open air or in buildings especially provided for that purpose.

(9) Marketers and users must exercise precaution to ensure that only those gases for which the system is designed, examined, and listed, are employed in its operation, particularly with regard to pressures.

(10) Pumps or compressors must be designed for use with LP-gas. When compressors are used they must normally take suction from the vapor space of the container being filled and discharge to the vapor space of the container being emptied.

(11) Pumping systems, when equipped with a positive displacement pump, must include a recirculating device that limits the differential pressure on the pump under normal operating conditions to the maximum differential pressure rating of the pump. The discharge of the pumping system must be protected so that pressure is a maximum of 350 psig. If a recirculation system discharges into the supply tank and contains a manual shut-off valve, an adequate secondary safety recirculation system must be incorporated that has no means of rendering it inoperative. Manual shut-off valves in recirculation systems must be kept open except during an emergency or when repairs are being made to the system.

(12) When necessary, unloading piping or hoses must have suitable bleeder valves for relieving pressure before disconnection.

(13) Agricultural air moving equipment, including crop dryers, shall be shut down when supply containers are filling unless the air intakes and sources of ignition on the equipment are located 50 feet or more from the container.

(14) Agricultural equipment employing open flames or equipment with integral containers, such as flame cultivators, weed burners, and tractors, must be shut down during refueling.



[Recodified as 296-307-41041. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41041, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41047  What electrical requirements apply to LP-gas installations? (1) Electrical equipment and wiring must be specified by and installed according to chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T, for ordinary locations.

(2) Fixed electrical equipment and wiring installed within classified areas must comply with Table U-5 and must be installed according to chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T.



EXCEPTION: This provision does not apply to fixed electrical equipment at residential or commercial installations of LP-gas systems, LP-gas used as a motor fuel, or to LP-gas system installations on commercial vehicles.





TABLE U-5



Part Location Extent of classified area1 Equipment

shall be

suitable for

Class I,

Group D2



A


Storage containers other than DOT cylinders


Within 15 feet in all directions from connections, except connections otherwise covered in this table


Division 2


B


Tank vehicle and tank car loading and unloading3


Within 5 feet in all directions from connections regularly made or disconnected for product transfer


Division 1


Beyond 5 feet but within 15 feet in all directions from a point where connections are regularly made or disconnected and within the cylindrical volume between the horizontal equator of the sphere and grade (See Figure H-1)


Division 2


C


Gauge vent openings other than those on DOT cylinders


Within 5 feet in all directions from point of discharge


Division 1


Beyond 5 feet but within 15 feet in all directions from point of discharge


Division 2


D


Relief valve discharge other than those on DOT cylinders


Within direct path of discharge


Division 1

Note: Fixed electrical equipment should not be installed



Within 5 feet in all directions from point of discharge


Division 1


Beyond 5 feet but within 15 feet in all directions from point of discharge except within the direct path of discharge


Division 2


E


Pumps, compressors, gas-air mixers and vaporizers other than direct fired


Indoors without ventilation


Entire room and any adjacent room not separated by a gastight partition


Division 1


Within 15 feet of the exterior side of any exterior wall or roof that is not vaportight or within 15 feet of any exterior opening


Division 2


Indoors with adequate ventilation4


Entire room and any adjacent room not separated by a gastight partition


Division 2


Outdoors in open air at or above grade


Within 15 feet in all directions from this equipment and within the cylindrical volume between the horizontal equator of the sphere and grade (See Figure H-1)


Division 2


F


Service station dispensing units


Entire space within dispenser enclosure, and 18 inches horizontally from enclosure exterior up to an elevation 4 ft. above dispenser base. Entire pit or open space beneath dispenser


Division 1


Up to 18 inches above grade within 20 ft. horizontally from any edge of enclosure


Division 2


Note: For pits within this area, see Part F of this table


G


Pits or trenches containing or located beneath LP-gas valves, pumps, compressors, regulators, and similar equipment


Without mechanical ventilation


Entire pit or trench


Division 1


Entire room and any adjacent room not separated by a gastight partition


Division 2


Within 15 feet in all directions from pit or trench when located outdoors


Division 2


With adequate mechanical ventilation


Entire pit or trench


Division 2


Entire room and any adjacent room not separated by a gastight partition


Division 2


Within 15 feet in all directions from pit or trench when located outdoors


Division 2


H


Special buildings or rooms for storage of portable containers


Entire room


Division 2


I


Pipelines and connections containing operational bleeds, drips, vents or drains


Within 5 ft. in all directions from point of discharge


Division 1


Beyond 5 ft. from point of discharge, same as Part E of this table


J


Container filling


Indoors without ventilation


Entire room


Division 1


Indoors with adequate ventilation4


Within 5 feet in all directions from connections regularly made or disconnected for product transfer


Division 1


Beyond 5 feet and entire room


Division 2


Outdoors in open air


Within 5 feet in all directions from connections regularly made or disconnected for product transfer


Division 1


Beyond 5 feet but within 15 feet in all directions from a point where connections are regularly made or disconnected and within the cylindrical volume between the horizontal equator of the sphere and grade (See Fig. H-1.)


Division 2


1The classified area must not extend beyond an unpierced wall, roof, or solid vaportight partition.
2See chapter 296-46 WAC, and chapter 296-306A WAC Part T.
3When classifying the extent of a hazardous area, consider the possible variations in the spotting of tank cars and tank vehicles at the unloading points and the effect these variations of actual spotting point may have on the point of connection.
4Ventilation, either natural or mechanical, is considered adequate when the concentration of the gas in a gas-air mixture does not exceed twenty-five percent of the lower flammable limit under normal operating conditions.


(WAC 296-307-41047, Figure U) Place illustration here.




[Recodified as 296-307-41047. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41047, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41049  What requirements apply to liquid-level gauging devices? (1) Each container manufactured after December 31, 1965, and filled on a volumetric basis must have a fixed liquid-level gauge to indicate the maximum permitted filling level according to subsection (5) of this section. Each container manufactured after December 31, 1969, must have permanently attached to the container adjacent to the fixed level gauge a marking showing the percentage full that will be shown by that gauge. When used with a variable liquid-level gauge, the fixed liquid-level gauge will act as a check on the variable gauge. Gauges must be used in charging containers as required in WAC ((296-306A-41034)) 296-307-41034.

(2) All variable gauging devices must be arranged so that the maximum liquid level for butane, for a 50/50 mixture of butane and propane, and for propane, to which the container may be charged, is easily determined. Liquid levels from empty to full must be marked on the system nameplate or gauging device. Dials of magnetic or rotary gauges must show whether they are for cylindrical or spherical containers and whether for aboveground or underground service. The dials of gauges for aboveground containers of over 1,200 gallons water capacity must be so marked.

(3) Gauging devices that require bleeding of the product to the atmosphere, such as the rotary tube, fixed tube, and slip tube, shall be designed so that the bleed valve maximum opening is not larger than a No. 54 drill size, unless provided with excess flow valve.

(4) Gauging devices must have a design working pressure of at least 250 psig.

(5) Length of tube or position of fixed liquid-level gauge must be designed to indicate the maximum level to which the container may be filled for the product contained. This level shall be based on the volume of the product at 40F at its maximum permitted filling density for aboveground containers and at 50F for underground containers. You must calculate the filling point for which the fixed liquid level gauge must be designed according to this section.





Note: It is impossible to set out in a table the length of a fixed dip tube for various tank capacities because of the various tank diameters and lengths, and because the tank may be installed either vertically or horizontally. If you know the maximum permitted filling volume in gallons, however, you can determine the length of the fixed tube by using a strapping table from the container manufacturer.



The fixed tube should be long enough so that when its lower end touches the surface of the liquid in the container, the contents of the container will be the maximum permitted volume as determined by the following formula:



Water capacity of container1 (gals.)

X filling density2


Specific gravity of LP-gas1 x volume

correction factor3 x 100





.=


Maximum

volume

of LP-gas



1Measure at 60F.

2From WAC ((296-306A-41037)) 296-307-41037(1).

3For aboveground containers the liquid temperature is assumed to be 40F and for underground containers the liquid temperature is assumed to be 50F. To correct the liquid volumes at these temperatures to 60F, use the following factors:



(a) To determine maximum volume of LP-gas for which a fixed length of dip tube must be set:



TABLE U-6

VOLUME CORRECTION FACTORS

Specific gravity Aboveground Underground


0.500


1.033


1.017
.510 1.031 1.016
.520 1.029 1.015
.530 1.028 1.014
.540 1.026 1.013
.550 1.025 1.013
.560 1.024 1.012
.570 1.023 1.011
.580 1.021 1.011
.590 1.020 1.010


(b) To calculate the maximum volume of LP-gas that can be placed in a container when determining the length of the dip tube expressed as a percentage of total water content of the container, use the formula in (c) of this subsection.

(c) Determine the maximum weight of LP-gas that may be placed in a container for determining the length of a fixed dip tube by multiplying the maximum volume of LP-gas from Table U-6 by the pounds of LP-gas in a gallon at 40F for aboveground and at 50F for underground containers. Typical pounds per gallon are specified below:



Example: Assume a one hundred gallon total water capacity tank for aboveground storage of propane having a specific gravity of 0.510 of 60F.



100 (gals.) x 42 (filling density)


0.510 x 1.031 (correction factor

from Table U-6) x 100



.=



4200


52.6





4200


52.6






.=


79.8 gallons propane, the

maximum amount permitted

to be placed in a 100-gallon total water capacity above

ground container equipped

with a fixed dip tube.



Maximum volume of LP-gas (from

formula in (a) of this subsection)

x 100


Total water content of

container in gallons







.=





Maximum

percent

of LP-gas



Aboveground,

pounds per

gallon



Underground,

pounds per

gallon



Propane


4.37


4.31
N Butane 4.97 4.92


(6) Fixed liquid-level gauges used on non-DOT containers must be stamped on the exterior of the gauge with the letters DT followed by the vertical distance (expressed in inches and carried out to one decimal place) from the top of container to the end of the dip tube or to the centerline of the gauge when located at the maximum permitted filling level. For portable containers that may be filled in the horizontal and/or vertical position the letters DT must be followed by V with the vertical distance from the top of the container to the end of the dip tube for vertical filling, and with H followed by the proper distance for horizontal filling. For DOT containers the stamping must be placed both on the exterior of the gauge and on the container. On aboveground or cargo containers where the gauges are positioned at specific levels, the marking may be specified in percent of total tank contents and the marking must be stamped on the container.

(7) Columnar gauge glasses must be restricted to charging plants where the fuel is withdrawn in the liquid phase only. They must have valves with metallic handwheels, excess flow valves, and extra-heavy glass adequately protected with a metal housing applied by the gauge manufacturer. They must be shielded against the direct rays of the sun. Columnar gauge glasses are prohibited on tank trucks, motor fuel tanks, and containers used in domestic, commercial, and industrial installations.

(8) Float gauging devices or equivalent that do not require flow for their operation and that have connections extending outside the container do not have to have excess flow valves if the piping and fittings are adequately designed to withstand the container pressure and are properly protected against physical damage and breakage.



[Recodified as 296-307-41049. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41049, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41501  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-415)) 296-307-415 applies to systems using DOT containers. Cylinder systems must meet all requirements of WAC ((296-306A-410)) 296-307-410 (unless otherwise indicated) and the additional requirements of this section.



[Recodified as 296-307-41501. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41501, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41507  What additional requirements apply to cylinder systems installed outdoors? (1) Containers must not be buried below ground. However, systems may be installed in a compartment or recess below grade level, such as a niche in a slope or terrace wall that is used for no other purpose, if the container and regulating equipment are not in contact with the ground, and the compartment or recess is drained and ventilated horizontally to the outside air from its lowest level, with the outlet at least 3 feet away from any building opening below the level of the outlet.

(2) Except as provided in WAC ((296-306A-41025)) 296-307-41025(14), the discharge from safety-relief devices must be located at least three feet away from any building opening that is below the level of discharge and must not terminate beneath any building unless the space is well ventilated to the outside and is not enclosed on more than two sides.

(3) Containers must be set on firm foundation or otherwise firmly secured; the possible effect of settling on the outlet piping must be guarded against by a flexible connection or special fitting.



[Recodified as 296-307-41507. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41507, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-41513  What requirements apply to safety devices for cylinder systems? (1) Containers must have safety devices as required by DOT regulations.

(2) A final stage regulator of an LP-gas system (excluding any appliance regulator) must have, on the low-pressure side, a relief valve that is set to start to discharge within the limits specified in Table U-7.



TABLE U-7



Relief valve start-to-discharge

pressure setting (percent of

regulator delivery pressure)

Regulator delivery pressure Minimum Maximum


1 psig or less


200


300
Above 1 psig but not over 3 psig 140 200
Above 3 psig 125 200


(3) When a regulator or pressure relief valve is used indoors for other than purposes specified in WAC ((296-306A-41017)) 296-307-41017(1), the relief valve and the space above the regulator and relief valve diaphragms shall be vented to the outside air with the discharge outlet located at least three feet horizontally away from any building opening that is below such discharge.



Exception: This requirement does not apply to individual appliance regulators when protection is otherwise provided, nor to WAC ((296-306A-41509)) 296-307-41509 and ((296-306A-41025)) 296-307-41025(14). In buildings devoted exclusively to gas distribution, the space above the diaphragm need not be vented to the outside.





[Recodified as 296-307-41513. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-41513, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-42001  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-420)) 296-307-420 applies to systems using storage containers not constructed according to DOT specifications. Non-DOT containers must meet all requirements of WAC ((296-306A-410)) 296-307-410 (unless otherwise indicated) and the additional requirements of this section.



[Recodified as 296-307-42001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-42001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-42007  What additional requirements apply to safety devices for non-DOT containers? (1) All safety devices must comply with the following:

(a) All container safety-relief devices must be located on the containers.

(b) In industrial and gas manufacturing plants, discharge pipe from safety-relief valves on pipe lines within a building must discharge upward and be piped to a point outside a building.

(c) Safety-relief device discharge terminals must be located to provide protection against physical damage and must be fitted with loose raincaps. Return bends and restrictive pipefittings are prohibited.

(d) If desired, discharge lines from two or more safety-relief devices located on the same unit, or similar lines from two or more different units, may be run into a common discharge header, if the cross-sectional area of the header is at least equal to the sum of the cross-sectional area of the individual discharge lines, and the setting of safety-relief valves are the same.

(e) Each storage container of over 2,000 gallons water capacity must have a suitable pressure gauge.

(f) A final stage regulator of an LP-gas system (excluding any appliance regulator) must have, on the low-pressure side, a relief valve that is set to start to discharge within the limits specified in Table U-7.

(g) When a regulator or pressure relief valve is installed indoors, the relief valve and the space above the regulator and relief valve diaphragms must be vented to the outside air with the discharge outlet located not less than 3 feet horizontally away from any opening into the building that is below such discharge.



Exception: This requirement does not apply to individual appliance regulators already protected. In buildings devoted exclusively to gas distribution, the space above the diaphragm need not be vented to the outside.



(2) Safety devices for aboveground containers must be provided as follows:

(a) Containers of 1,200 gallons water capacity or less that may contain liquid fuel when installed aboveground must have the rate of discharge required by WAC ((296-306A-41025)) 296-307-41025(2) provided by a spring-loaded relief valve or valves. In addition to the required spring-loaded relief valve, a suitable fuse plug may be used if the total discharge area of the fuse plug for each container does not exceed 0.25 square inch.

(b) The fusible metal of the fuse plugs must have a yield temperature of 208F minimum and 220F maximum. Relief valves and fuse plugs must have direct communication with the vapor space of the container.

(c) On a container having a water capacity between 125 and 2,000 gallons, the discharge from the safety-relief valves must be vented away from the container upwards and unobstructed to the open air so that it prevents any impingement of escaping gas upon the container; loose-fitting rain caps shall be used. Suitable provision must be made for draining condensate that may accumulate in the relief valve or its discharge pipe.

(d) On containers of 125 gallons water capacity or less, the discharge from safety-relief devices must be located at least 5 feet horizontally away from any opening into the building below the level of such discharge.

(e) On a container having a water capacity greater than 2,000 gallons, the discharge from the safety-relief valves must be vented away from the container upwards to a point at least 7 feet above the container, and unobstructed to the open air so that it prevents any impingement of escaping gas upon the container; loose-fitting rain caps shall be used. Suitable provision must be made so that any liquid or condensate that may accumulate inside of the safety-relief valve or its discharge pipe will not render the valve inoperative. If a drain is used, the container, adjacent containers, piping, or equipment must be protected against impingement of flame resulting from ignition of product escaping from the drain.

(3) On all containers that are installed underground and that contain no liquid fuel until buried and covered, the rate of discharge of the spring-loaded relief valve installed thereon may be reduced to a minimum of 30% of the rate of discharge specified in WAC ((296-306A-41025)) 296-307-41025(2). Containers so protected must remain covered after installation until the liquid fuel has been removed. Containers that may contain liquid fuel before being installed underground and before being completely covered with earth are aboveground containers when determining the rate of discharge requirement of the relief valves.

(4) On underground containers of over 2,000 gallons water capacity, the discharge from safety-relief devices must be piped directly upward to a point at least 7 feet above the ground.

(5) Where the manhole or housing may become flooded, the discharge from regulator vent lines must be above the highest probable water level. All manholes or housings must have ventilated louvers or equivalent, and the area of openings must be equal to or exceed the combined discharge areas of the safety-relief valves and other vent lines that discharge their content into the manhole housing.

(6) Safety devices for vaporizers must be provided as follows:

(a) Vaporizers of less than 1 quart total capacity, heated by the ground or the surrounding air, need not have safety-relief valves if adequate tests demonstrate that the assembly is safe without safety-relief valves.

(b) Fusible plugs are prohibited on vaporizers.

(c) In industrial and gas manufacturing plants, safety-relief valves on vaporizers within a building must be piped to a point outside the building and be discharged upward.



[Recodified as 296-307-42007. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-42007, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-42013  How must non-DOT containers be installed? (1) Containers installed aboveground must have substantial masonry or noncombustible structural supports on firm masonry foundation, unless otherwise indicated.

(2) Aboveground containers must be supported as follows:

(a) Horizontal containers must be mounted on saddles that permit expansion and contraction. Structural metal supports may be used when they are protected against fire. Suitable means of preventing corrosion must be provided on that portion of the container in contact with the foundations or saddles.

(b) Containers of 2,000 gallons water capacity or less may be installed with nonfireproofed ferrous metal supports if mounted on concrete pads or footings, and if the distance from the outside bottom of the container shell to the concrete pad, footing, or the ground is a maximum of 24 inches.

(3) Any container may be installed with nonfireproofed ferrous metal supports if mounted on concrete pads or footings, and if the distance from the outside bottom of the container to the ground is a maximum of 5 feet, if the container is in an isolated location.

(4) Partially buried containers must meet the following requirements:

(a) The portion of the container below the surface and for a vertical distance not less than 3 inches above the surface of the ground is protected to resist corrosion, and the container is protected against settling and corrosion as required for fully buried containers.

(b) Partially buried containers must meet the same spacing requirements as underground tanks.

(c) Relief valve capacity must be the same as for aboveground containers.

(d) Container is protected against vehicular damage by location or other means.

(e) Partially buried containers must meet the same requirements for filling densities as for aboveground containers.

(5) Containers buried underground must be placed so that the top of the container is at least 6 inches below grade. Underground containers subject to abrasive action or physical damage must be:

(a) Placed not less than 2 feet below grade; or

(b) Otherwise protected against such physical damage.

It is not necessary to cover the portion of the container to which manhole and other connections are affixed. When necessary to prevent floating, containers must be securely anchored or weighted.

(6) Containers must be given a protective coating before being placed underground. This coating must be equivalent to hot-dip galvanizing or to two coatings of red lead followed by a heavy coating of coal tar or asphalt. In lowering the container into place, take care to prevent damage to the coating. Any damage to the coating must be repaired before backfilling.

Containers must be set on a firm foundation (firm earth may be used) and surrounded with earth or sand firmly tamped in place. Backfill should be free of rocks or other abrasive materials.

(7) Containers with foundations attached (portable or semiportable containers with suitable steel runners or skids popularly known as "skid tanks") must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-410)) 296-307-410 and the following:

(a) If they are to be used at a given general location for a temporary period of 6 months at most, they may be without fire-resisting foundations or saddles but must have adequate ferrous metal supports.

(b) They must not be located with the outside bottom of the container shell more than 5 feet above the surface of the ground unless fire-resisting supports are provided.

(c) The bottom of the skids must be between 2 and 12 inches below the outside bottom of the container shell.

(d) Flanges, nozzles, valves, fittings, and the like, having communication with the interior of the container, must be protected against physical damage.

(e) When not permanently located on fire-resisting foundations, piping connections must be flexible enough to minimize breakage or leakage of connections if the container settles, moves, or is otherwise displaced.

(f) Skids, or lugs for attachment of skids, must be secured to the container according to the rules under which the container is designed and built (with a minimum factor of safety of four) to withstand loading in any direction equal to four times the weight of the container and attachments when filled to the maximum permissible loaded weight.

(8) Field welding where necessary must be made only on saddle plates or brackets that were applied by the manufacturer of the tank.

(9) For aboveground containers, secure anchorage or adequate pier height must be provided against possible container flotation wherever high floodwater might occur.

(10) When permanently installed containers are interconnected, you must allow for expansion, contraction, vibration, and settling of containers, and interconnecting piping. Where flexible connections are used, they must be approved and designed for a bursting pressure of at least five times the vapor pressure of the product at 100F. Nonmetallic hose is prohibited for permanently interconnecting containers.

(11) Container assemblies listed for interchangeable installation aboveground or underground must meet the requirements for aboveground installations for safety-relief capacity and filling density. For installation aboveground all other requirements for aboveground installations apply. For installation underground all other requirements for underground installations apply.



[Recodified as 296-307-42013. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-42013, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-42023  What other requirements apply to non-DOT containers? (1) Aboveground containers must be kept properly painted.

(2) Vaporizers for internal combustion engines must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-42515)) 296-307-42515.

(3) Gas regulating and mixing equipment for internal combustion engines must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-42517)) 296-307-42517.

(4) Where vaporized gas on the low-pressure side of the system may condense to a liquid at normal operating temperatures and pressures, means must be provided to revaporize condensate.

(5) You must protect LP-gas systems against damage from vehicular traffic.

(6) Avoid the use of pits when possible, except pits fitted with automatic flammable vapor detecting devices. No drains or blowoff lines must be directed into or in proximity to sewer systems used for other purposes.



[Recodified as 296-307-42023. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-42023, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-42501  What does this section cover? (1) WAC ((296-306A-425)) 296-307-425 applies to internal combustion engines, fuel containers, and pertinent equipment for the use of LP-gases as a motor fuel on easily movable, readily portable units including self-propelled vehicles. This section does not apply to containers for transportation of LP-gases nor to marine fuel use.

(2) All uses of LP-gas as a motor fuel must meet all requirements of WAC ((296-306A-410)) 296-307-410 (unless otherwise indicated) and the additional requirements of this section.



[Recodified as 296-307-42501. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-42501, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-42503  What general requirements apply to LP-gas used as a motor fuel? (1) Fuel may be used from the cargo tank of a truck while in transit, but not from cargo tanks on trailers or semitrailers. Fuel may be used from the cargo tanks to operate stationary engines if the wheels are securely blocked.

(2) Passenger-carrying vehicles must not be fueled while passengers are on board.

(3) Industrial trucks (including lift trucks) equipped with permanently mounted fuel containers must be charged outdoors. Charging equipment must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-440)) 296-307-440.

(4) LP-gas fueled industrial trucks must comply with the Standard for Type Designations, Areas of Use, Maintenance and Operation of Powered Industrial Trucks, NFPA 505-1969.

(5) Engines on vehicles must be shut down while fueling if the fueling operation involves venting to the atmosphere.



[Recodified as 296-307-42503. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-42503, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-42519  What is the maximum container capacity allowed? A single fuel container used on passenger carrying vehicles must have a maximum of 200 gallons water capacity. A single fuel container on other vehicles normally operating on the highway must have a maximum of 300 gallons water capacity except as provided in WAC ((296-306A-42503)) 296-307-42503(1).



[Recodified as 296-307-42519. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-42519, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-42521  What requirements apply to stationary engines used indoors? Stationary engines and gas turbines installed in buildings, including portable engines used instead of or to supplement stationary engines, must comply with the Standard for the Institution and Use of Stationary Combustion Engines and Gas Turbines, NFPA 37-1970, and the appropriate requirements of WAC ((296-306A-410)) 296-307-410 through ((296-306A-420)) 296-307-420.



[Recodified as 296-307-42521. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-42521, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-42523  What requirements apply to portable engines used indoors? (1) Portable engines may be used in buildings only for emergency use, and according to WAC ((296-306A-42521)) 296-307-42521.

(2) Exhaust gases must be discharged outside the building or to an area where they will not constitute a hazard.

(3) Provision must be made to supply sufficient air for combustion and cooling.

(4) An approved automatic shut-off valve must be provided in the fuel system ahead of the engine, designed to prevent flow of fuel to the engine when the ignition is off or if the engine should stop.



[Recodified as 296-307-42523. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-42523, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-43001  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-430)) 296-307-430 applies to the storage of portable containers a maximum of 1,000 pounds water capacity, filled or partially filled, at user location but not connected for use, or in storage for resale by dealers or resellers. This section does not apply to containers stored at charging plants or at plants devoted primarily to the storage and distribution of LP-gas or other petroleum products.



[Recodified as 296-307-43001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-43001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-43501  What does this section cover? (1) WAC ((296-306A-435)) 296-307-435 applies to:

(a) LP-gas system installations on vehicles (self-propelled, trailers, or semitrailers) used for commercial or construction purposes;

(b) All exchangeable container systems with container capacities greater than 105 pounds water capacity (approximately 45 pounds LP-gas capacity); and

(c) Systems using containers permanently mounted on vehicles.

(2) All LP-gas installations on commercial vehicles must meet all requirements of WAC ((296-306A-410)) 296-307-410 (unless otherwise indicated) and the additional requirements of this section. When such a vehicle is permanently parked, and LP-gas is supplied from a system not mounted on and secured to the unit, WAC ((296-306A-415)) 296-307-415 and ((296-306A-420)) 296-307-420 also apply.

(3) This section does not apply to LP-gas motor fuel systems covered by WAC ((296-306A-425)) 296-307-425.



[Recodified as 296-307-43501. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-43501, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-43503  How must containers be constructed? Containers must be constructed according to WAC ((296-306A-41011)) 296-307-41011, and marked according to the applicable requirements of WAC ((296-306A-41015)) 296-307-41015, and must also meet the following:

(1) Containers designed for use as portable cylinders must be constructed according to DOT specifications.

(2) All other containers whether designed for permanent mounting, or for portable or semiportable use (such as skid tanks), must be constructed as provided for by WAC ((296-306A-41009)) 296-307-41009(4) and ((296-306A-41011)) 296-307-41011(1).

(3) Nonrecessed container fittings and accessories must be protected against damage by either:

(a) Their location;

(b) The vehicle frame or bumper; or

(c) Protective housing. The housing must meet the requirements under which the tanks are fabricated with respect to design and construction and must be designed to withstand static loading in any direction equal to twice the weight of the tank and attachments when filled with the lading at a safety factor of at least four, based on the ultimate strength of the material used. The housing must have a weather cover if necessary to ensure proper operation of valves and safety devices.

(4) Manually operated shut-off valves or self-closing internal valves must be closed except during transfer operations.

(5) Permanently installed containers must meet the following requirements:

(a) Tank motor vehicles with frames not made integral with the tank, as by welding, must have turnbuckles or similar positive devices for drawing the tank down tight on the frame. In addition, suitable stops or anchors must be attached to the frame and/or the tank to prevent relative motion between them from starting, stopping, and turning. The stops and anchors must be installed to be accessible for inspection and maintenance.

(b) Any tank motor vehicle designed and constructed so that the cargo tank constitutes the stress member used instead of a frame must be supported by external cradles enclosing at least 120 degrees of the shell circumference. The design calculations must include beam stress, shear stress, torsion stress, bending moment, and acceleration stress for the cargo tank as a whole using a factor of safety of four, based on the ultimate tensile strength of the material. Maximum concentrated stresses that might be created at pads and cradles due to shear, bending, and torsion shall also be calculated according to Appendix G of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Unfired Pressure Vessel Code, 1968. Fully loaded vehicles must be assumed to be operating under highway conditions equal to two "g" loading. The effects of fatigue shall be taken into consideration. Cargo tanks mounted on frames may be supported by upright supports attached to pads if these factors are taken into account.

(c) Where any tank support is attached to any part of a tank head, the stresses imposed upon the head must be provided for as required above.

(d) Tank supports, stops, anchors, and bumpers must not be welded directly to the tank but must be attached by means of pads of the same material as the tank. The pad thickness must be at least 1/4 inch, or the thickness of the shell material if less, and no greater than the shell material. Each pad must extend at least four times its thickness, in each direction, beyond the weld attaching the support, bumper, stop, or anchor. Each pad must be preformed to an inside radius no greater than the outside radius of the tank at the place of attachment. Each pad corner must be rounded to a radius at least one-fourth the width of the pad, and no greater than one-half the width of the pad. Weepholes and tell-tale holes, if used, must be drilled or punched before the pads are attached to the tank. Each pad must be attached to the tank by continuous fillet welding using filler material having properties that meet the recommendations of the maker of the shell and head material.

(6) Portable or semiportable containers must meet the applicable requirements of WAC ((296-306A-42507)) 296-307-42507(3). Containers designed for permanent installation as part of systems under WAC ((296-306A-420)) 296-307-420 are prohibited.

(a) Filling connections must have an approved automatic back pressure check valve, excess flow check valve, or quick closing internal valve to prevent excessive escape of gas in case the filling connection is broken.



Exception: Where the filling and discharge connect on a common opening in the container shell, and the opening is fitted with a quick-closing internal valve, the automatic valve is not required.



Every inlet and outlet connection must have a manually or automatically operated shut-off valve. Liquid discharge openings, except those for engine fuel lines, on tanks built after September 1, 1965, must be fitted with a remotely controlled internal shut-off valve. Valves must meet the following requirements:

(i) The seat of the valve must be inside the tank, or in the opening nozzle or flange, or in a companion flange bolted to the nozzle or flange.

(ii) All parts of the valve inside the tank, nozzle, or companion flange must be made of material that protects against corrosion or other deterioration in the presence of the lading.

(iii) The parts must be arranged so that damage to parts exterior to the tank will not prevent effective seating of the valve.

(iv) The valve may be operated mechanically, by hydraulically, or by air, or gas pressure.

(v) The valve must have remote means of automatic closure, both mechanical and thermal, in at least two places for tanks over 3,500 gallons water capacity. These remote control stations must be located at each end of the tank and diagonally opposite. The thermal control mechanism must have a fusible element with a melting point between 220F and 208F. At least one remote control station must be provided for tanks of 3,500 gallons water capacity or less, and such actuating means may be mechanical.

(b) All other connections to containers, except those used for gauging devices, thermometer wells, safety-relief devices, and plugged openings, must have suitable automatic excess flow valves, or may instead be fitted with quick-closing internal valves.

The control mechanism for the internal valve must have a secondary control, remote from the fill or discharge connections (for use in the event of accidents or fire during delivery operations), and such control mechanism must have a fusible element with a melting point not over 220F or less than 208F.

(c) Excess flow valves must close automatically at the rated flow of vapor or liquid as specified by the valve manufacturers. The flow rating of the piping beyond the excess flow valve must be greater than that of the excess flow valve and such rating must include valves, fittings, and hose.



Exception: When branching or necessary restrictions are incorporated in a piping system so that flow ratings are less than that of the excess flow valve and the tank, then additional excess flow valves must be installed in the piping where such flow rate is reduced.



(d) Container inlets and outlets, except those used for safety-relief valves, liquid-level gauging devices, and pressure gauges, must be labeled to designate whether they communicate with vapor or liquid space when the container is filled to maximum permitted filling density. Labels may be on the valves.



[Recodified as 296-307-43503. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-43503, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-43509  What requirements apply to valves and accessories? Container valves and accessories must be provided, protected and mounted as follows:

(1) Systems using DOT cylinders according to WAC ((296-306A-41511)) 296-307-41511.

(2) All other systems according to WAC ((296-306A-42005)) 296-307-42005 (2) through (8).

(3) Portable, semiportable and permanently mounted containers shall be mounted and protected as provided under WAC ((296-306A-43503)) 296-307-43503 (2), (5), and (6).



[Recodified as 296-307-43509. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-43509, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-43511  What requirements apply to safety devices? (1) DOT containers must have safety-relief devices as required by DOT regulations.

(2) A final stage regulator of an LP-gas system (excluding any appliance regulator) must have, on the low-pressure side, a relief valve that is set to start to discharge within the limits specified in Table U-7.

(3) The relief valve and space above the regulator and relief valve diaphragms must be vented to the outside air and terminate at a position to minimize the possibility of vapors accumulating at sources of ignition.

(4) Whenever equipment such as a cargo heater or cooler on commercial vehicles is designed to be in operation while in transit, suitable means to stop the flow such as an excess flow valve or other device, must be installed. This device will be actuated to stop the flow in the event of the break in the fuel supply line. All excess flow valves must comply with WAC ((296-306A-41019)) 296-307-41019(3).



[Recodified as 296-307-43511. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-43511, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-43515  What requirements apply to enclosures and mounting? (1) Housing or enclosures must be designed to provide proper ventilation.

(2) Hoods, domes, or removable portions of cabinets must have means to keep them firmly in place during transit.

(3) The assembly must hold the containers firmly in position and prevent their movement during transit according to WAC ((296-306A-42507)) 296-307-42507(3).

(4) Containers must be mounted on a substantial support or base secured firmly to the vehicle chassis. Neither the container nor its support must extend below the frame.



[Recodified as 296-307-43515. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-43515, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-44001  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-440)) 296-307-440 applies to storage containers, dispensing devices, and pertinent equipment in service stations where LP-gas is stored and dispensed into fuel tanks of motor vehicles. LP-gas service stations must meet all requirements of WAC ((296-306A-410)) 296-307-410 and the requirements of this section.



[Recodified as 296-307-44001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-44001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-44007  What requirements apply to safety devices? (1) All safety-relief devices must be installed as follows:

(a) On the container and directly connected with the vapor space.

(b) Safety-relief valves and discharge piping shall be protected against physical damage. The outlet must have loose-fitting rain caps. There shall be no return bends or restrictions in the discharge piping.

(c) The discharge from two or more safety-relief valves with the same pressure settings may be run into a common discharge header. The cross-sectional area of such header must be at least equal to the sum of the individual discharges.

(d) Discharge from a safety-relief device that terminates in or beneath any building is prohibited.

(2) Aboveground containers must have safety-relief valves as follows:

(a) The rate of discharge, which may be provided by one or more valves, must be at least that specified in WAC ((296-306A-41025)) 296-307-41025(2).

(b) The discharge from safety-relief valves must be vented upward to the open air to prevent impingement of escaping gas upon the container. You must use loose-fitting rain caps. On a container having a water capacity greater than 2,000 gallons, the discharge from the safety-relief valves must be vented upward away from the container to a point at least 7 feet above the container. Provisions must be made so that any liquid or condensate accumulation inside the relief valve or its discharge pipe will not render the valve inoperative. If a drain is used, you must protect the container, adjacent containers, piping, or equipment against impingement of flame resulting from ignition of the product escaping from the drain.

(3) Underground containers must have safety-relief valves as follows:

(a) The discharge from safety-relief valves must be piped upward to a point at least 10 feet above the ground. The discharge lines or pipes must be adequately supported and protected against physical damage.

(b) In areas where the manhole or housing may flood, the discharge from regulator vent lines should be above the highest probable water level.

(c) If no liquid is put into a container until after it is buried and covered, the rate of discharge of the relief valves may be reduced to at least 30 percent of the rate shown in WAC ((296-306A-41025)) 296-307-41025(2). If liquid fuel is present during installation of containers, the rate of discharge must be the same as for aboveground containers. Only empty containers may be uncovered.



[Recodified as 296-307-44007. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-44007, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-45001  What general requirements apply to hazardous materials and flammable and combustible liquids? (1) Fuel and other flammable and combustible liquids must be stored, handled and marked according to the recommendations of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) or other agencies with jurisdiction.

(2) You must ensure that compressed gas cylinders under your control are in a safe condition to the extent that you can determine by visual inspection. Inspections must be conducted according to the hazardous materials regulations of the Department of Transportation (49 CFR Parts 171-179 and 14 CFR Part 103).



Exception: Where those regulations are not applicable, inspections must be conducted according to the Compressed Gas Association Pamphlets C-6-1968 and C-8-1962.



(3) Compressed gas cylinders, portable tanks, and cargo tanks must have pressure relief devices installed and maintained according to Compressed Gas Association Pamphlets S-1.1-1963 and 1965 addenda and S-1.2-1963.

(4) The following equipment must be shut down during refueling:

Tractors;

Agricultural equipment employing open flames; and

Equipment with integral containers, such as flame cultivators, weed burners.



[Recodified as 296-307-45001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-45001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-45003  What requirements apply to dip tanks containing flammable or combustible liquids? Dip tanks containing flammable or combustible liquids must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-450)) 296-307-450.



[Recodified as 296-307-45003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-45003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-45009  What general requirements apply to the construction of dip tanks? (1) Dip tanks and drainboards must be constructed of substantial noncombustible material, and their supports must be of heavy metal, reinforced concrete, or masonry. Where dip tanks extend through a floor to the story below or where the weakening of the tank supports by fire may result in the tank collapse, supports should be of material with at least 1-hour fire resistance.

(2) The capacity of the salvage tank must be greater than the capacity of the dip tanks to which they are connected.

(3) All dip tanks exceeding 150 gallons liquid capacity or having a liquid surface area exceeding 4 square feet must be protected by at least one of the automatic extinguishing facilities in WAC ((296-306A-45021)) 296-307-45021 (2), (3), (4), (5) or (6).



Exception: Hardening and tempering tanks must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-45023)) 296-307-45023.



(4) Dip tanks that use a conveyor system must be arranged so that, in the event of fire, the conveyor system must automatically stop and the bottom drains shall open. Conveyor systems must automatically stop unless required ventilation is in full operation.

(5) When dip tank liquids are heated by dipping heated articles or by other application of heat to the liquid, you must prevent a temperature rise greater than 50F below the flashpoint of the liquid.



[Recodified as 296-307-45009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-45009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-45017  What measures must an employer take to prevent hazards from electrical and other ignition sources? (1) In vapor areas, there must be no open flames, spark producing devices, or heated surfaces hot enough to ignite vapors. Electrical wiring and equipment in any vapor area must be explosion proof as required in chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T for Class I locations and must meet the requirements of chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T.



Exception: The requirements for electrostatic apparatus are in WAC ((296-306A-45027)) 296-307-45027.



(2) Electrical equipment is prohibited in the vicinity of dip tanks, drainboards, or drying operations that are subject to splashing or dripping of dip tank liquids, unless the equipment is approved for locations containing deposits of readily ignitable residues and explosive vapors.



Exception: Wiring in rigid conduit or in threaded boxes or fittings containing no taps, splices, or terminal connections are permitted. Other exceptions are in WAC ((296-306A-45027)) 296-307-45027.



(3) In any floor space outside a vapor area but within 20 feet and not separated by tight partitions, open flames or spark producing devices are prohibited. Electrical wiring and equipment must meet the requirements of chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T.



Exception: Open flames are only allowed as specifically permitted in NFPA Standard No. 86A-1969, Ovens and Furnaces, paragraph 200-7.





[Recodified as 296-307-45017. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-45017, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-45021  What requirements must fire extinguishing systems meet? (1) Dip tank areas must have portable fire extinguishers suitable for flammable and combustible liquid fires, and that meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-085)) 296-307-085.

(2) Automatic water spray extinguishing systems must meet the requirements of ANSI/NFPA No. 13, Sprinkler Systems, and NFPA No. 13, Sprinkler Systems Maintenance, and shall be arranged to protect tanks, drainboards, and stock over drainboards.

(3) Automatic foam extinguishing systems must meet the requirements of ANSI/NFPA No. 11, Foam Extinguishing Systems.

(a) The foam-producing material must be suitable for intended use, taking into account the characteristics of the dip tank liquid.

(b) The overflow pipe must be arranged to prevent foam from floating away and clogging the overflow pipe. You must use one of the following methods:

(i) The overflow pipe may be extended through tank wall and terminated in an ell pointing downward. The bottom of the overflow pipe at the point it enters the tank wall should be a maximum of 2 inches above the opening or the face of the ell.

(ii) The overflow pipe inlet may have a removable screen of 1/4-inch mesh with an area at least twice the cross-sectional area of overflow pipe. Screens that may be clogged by dip tank ingredients must be inspected and cleaned periodically.

(4) Automatic carbon dioxide systems must meet the requirements of ANSI/NFPA No. 12, Carbon Dioxide, and must be arranged to protect dip tanks and drainboards. The system must be arranged to protect stock over drainboards unless the stock is otherwise protected with automatic extinguishing facilities.

(5) Dry chemical extinguishing systems must meet the requirements of ANSI/NFPA No. 17, Dry Chemical Systems, and must be arranged to protect dip tanks and drainboards. The system must be arranged to protect stock over drainboards unless the stock is otherwise protected with automatic extinguishing facilities.

(6) Dip tank covers must meet the following requirements:

(a) Covers arranged to close automatically in the event of fire must be actuated by approved automatic devices and shall also be designed for manual operation.

(b) Covers must be of substantial noncombustible material or tin-clad with enclosing metal applied with locked joints.

(c) Chains or wire rope must be used for the cover support or operating mechanism where a burnt cord would interfere with the device action.

(d) Covers must be kept closed when tanks are not in use.



[Recodified as 296-307-45021. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-45021, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-45023  What requirements apply to hardening and tempering tanks? (1) Tanks must be located as far as practical from furnaces and away from combustible floors.

(2) Tanks must have a noncombustible hood and vent or other equivalent means of venting to the outside of the building that will serve as a vent in case of fire. All vent ducts must be treated as flues and be kept away from combustible roofs or materials.

(3) Tanks must be designed so that the maximum workload is incapable of raising the temperature of the cooling medium to within 50F below its flashpoint, or tanks must have circulating cooling systems that will provide equal protection.

(4) Tanks must have a high temperature limit switch arranged to sound an alarm when the temperature of the quenching medium reaches within 50F below the flashpoint. If practical from an operating standpoint, such limit switches must also shut down conveying equipment supplying work to the tank.

(5) All hardening and tempering tanks exceeding 500 gallons liquid capacity or having a liquid surface area exceeding 25 square feet must be protected with at least one of the automatic extinguishing facilities conforming to WAC ((296-306A-45021)) 296-307-45021 (2), (3), (4), (5) or (6).

(6) Using air under pressure to fill or to agitate oil tanks is prohibited.

(7) Bottom drains may be combined with the oil circulating system or arranged independently to drain the oil to a safe location. The drain valve must be operated automatically with approved heat actuated devices or manually. The valve of a manual device must be operated from a safe distance.



[Recodified as 296-307-45023. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-45023, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-45027  What requirements apply to electrostatic apparatus? (1) All requirements of WAC ((296-306A-450)) 296-307-450 apply to electrostatic detearing equipment unless otherwise specified.

(2) Electrostatic apparatus and devices used in connection with paint detearing operations must be approved.

(3) Transformers, powerpacks, control apparatus, and all other electrical portions of the equipment must be located outside the vapor area or must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-45017)) 296-307-45017.



Exception: This requirement does not apply to high voltage grids and their connections.



(4) Electrodes must be substantially constructed, rigidly supported in permanent locations, and insulated from ground. Insulators must be nonporous and noncombustible.

(5) High voltage leads to electrodes must be permanently supported on suitable insulators, and guarded against accidental contact or grounding. An automatic means must be provided for grounding and discharging any accumulated residual charge on the electrode assembly or the secondary circuit of the high voltage transformer when the transformer primary is disconnected from the supply source.

(6) Maintain space between goods being deteared and electrodes or conductors of at least twice the sparking distance. A sign stating the sparking distance must be conspicuously posted near the assembly.

(7) Goods being deteared using the electrostatic process must be supported on conveyors. The conveyors must be arranged to maintain safe distances between the goods and the electrodes at all times. All goods must be supported to prevent any swinging or movement that would reduce the clearance to less than twice the sparking distance.



Exception: The electrostatic process is prohibited where goods being deteared are manipulated by hand.



(8) Electrostatic apparatus must have automatic controls that will operate immediately to disconnect the power supply to the high voltage transformer and to signal the operator under any of the following conditions:

(a) The ventilating fans stop or the ventilating equipment fails for any cause;

(b) The conveyor carrying goods past the high voltage grid stops;

(c) A ground or imminent ground at any point on the high voltage system occurs; or

(d) Clearance is reduced below twice the sparking distance.

(9) Adequate fencing, railings, or guards must be placed so that they ensure that the process is safely isolated from plant storage or employees. Such railings, fencing and guards must be of conducting material, adequately grounded, and should be at least 5 feet from processing equipment.

(10) Electrode insulators must be kept clean and dry.

(11) The detearing area must be ventilated according to WAC ((296-306A-45007)) 296-307-45007.

(12) All areas for detearing must be protected by automatic sprinklers where this protection is available. Where this protection is not available, other approved automatic extinguishing equipment must be provided.

(13) Drip plates and screens subject to paint deposits must be removable and shall be taken to a safe place for cleaning.



[Recodified as 296-307-45027. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-45027, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-48023  What requirements apply to fuel-gas manifolds? (1) Manifolds must be approved either separately for each component part or as an assembled unit.

(2) Fuel-gas cylinders connected to one manifold inside a building must be limited to a maximum total capacity of 300 pounds of LP-gas or 3,000 cubic feet of other fuel-gas. More than one such manifold with connected cylinders may be located in the same room if the manifolds are at least 50 feet apart or separated by a noncombustible barrier at least 5 feet high having a fire-resistance rating of at least one-half hour.

(3) Exception: Fuel-gas cylinders connected to one manifold having an aggregate capacity exceeding 300 pounds of LP-gas or 3,000 cubic feet of other fuel-gas must be located outdoors, or in a separate building or room constructed according to 252 (a)(8) and (9) CFR.

(4) Separate manifold buildings or rooms may also be used for the storage of drums of calcium carbide and cylinders containing fuel gases as provided in WAC ((296-306A-48007)) 296-307-48007. Such buildings or rooms must have no open flames for heating or lighting and must be well ventilated.

(5) High-pressure fuel-gas manifolds must have approved pressure regulating devices.



[Recodified as 296-307-48023. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-48023, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-48027  What requirements apply to low pressure oxygen manifolds? This section applies to cylinders with a maximum DOT service pressure of 200 psig.

(1) Manifolds must be of substantial construction suitable for use with oxygen at a pressure of 250 psig. They must have a minimum bursting pressure of 1,000 psig and must be protected by a safety-relief device that will relieve at a maximum pressure of 500 psig.





Note: DOT-4L200 cylinders have safety devices that relieve at a maximum pressure of 250 psig (or 235 psig if vacuum insulation is used).



(2) Hose and hose connections subject to cylinder pressure must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-48049)) 296-307-48049. Hose must have a minimum bursting pressure of 1,000 psig.

(3) The assembled manifold including leads must be tested and proven gas-tight at a pressure of 300 psig. The fluid used for testing oxygen manifolds must be oil-free and not combustible.

(4) The location of manifolds must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-48025)) 296-307-48025.

(5) The following sign must be conspicuously posted at each manifold:

Low-Pressure Manifold

Do Not Connect High-Pressure Cylinders

Maximum Pressure--250 PSIG



[Recodified as 296-307-48027. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-48027, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-48029  What requirements apply to manifolding portable outlet headers? (1) Portable outlet headers must not be used indoors except for temporary service where the conditions preclude a direct supply from outlets located on the service piping system.

(2) Each outlet on the service piping from which oxygen or fuel-gas is withdrawn to supply a portable outlet header must have a readily accessible shut-off valve.

(3) Hose and hose connections used for connecting the portable outlet header to the service piping must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-48051)) 296-307-48051.

(4) Master shut-off valves for both oxygen and fuel-gas must be provided at the entry end of the portable outlet header.

(5) Portable outlet headers for fuel-gas service must have an approved hydraulic back-pressure valve installed at the inlet and preceding the service outlets, unless an approved pressure-reducing regulator, an approved backflow check valve, or an approved hydraulic back-pressure valve is installed at each outlet. Outlets provided on headers for oxygen service may be fitted for use with pressure-reducing regulators or for direct hose connection.

(6) Each service outlet on portable outlet headers must have a valve assembly that includes a detachable outlet seal cap, chained or otherwise attached to the body of the valve.

(7) Materials and fabrication procedures for portable outlet headers must comply with WAC ((296-306A-48033, 296-306A-48035, and 296-306A-48041)) 296-307-48033, 296-307-48035, and 296-307-48041.

(8) Portable outlet headers must have frames that will support the equipment securely in the correct operating position and protect them from damage during handling and operation.



[Recodified as 296-307-48029. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-48029, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-48031  What operating procedures apply to cylinder manifolds? (1) Cylinder manifolds must be installed under the supervision of someone familiar with the proper practices of construction and use.

(2) All component parts used in the methods of manifolding described in WAC ((296-306A-48023)) 296-307-48023 must have the materials, design and construction approved either separately or as an assembled unit.

(3) All manifolds and parts used in methods of manifolding must be used only for the gas or gases for which they are approved.

(4) When acetylene cylinders are coupled, approved flash arresters must be installed between each cylinder and the coupler block. For outdoor use only, and when the number of cylinders coupled does not exceed three, one flash arrester installed between the coupler block and regulator is acceptable.

(5) Each fuel-gas cylinder lead should have a backflow check valve.

(6) The maximum aggregate capacity of fuel-gas cylinders connected to a portable manifold inside a building must be 3,000 cubic feet of gas.

(7) Acetylene and liquefied fuel-gas cylinders must be manifolded vertically.

(8) The pressure in the gas cylinders connected to and discharged simultaneously through a common manifold must be approximately equal.



[Recodified as 296-307-48031. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-48031, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-48033  How must service piping systems be designed? (1) Piping and fittings must comply with Section 2, Industrial Gas and Air Piping Systems, of the American National Standard Code for Pressure Piping, ANSI B 31.1-1967, if they do not conflict with subsections (2) and (3) of this section.

(2) Pipe must be at least Schedule 40 and fittings must be at least standard weight in sizes up to and including 6-inch nominal.

(3) Copper tubing must be Types K or L according to the Standard Specification for Seamless Copper Water Tube, ASTM B88-66a.

(4) Piping must be steel, wrought iron, brass or copper pipe, or seamless copper, brass or stainless steel tubing, except as provided in subsections (5) through (9) of this section.

(5) Oxygen piping and fittings at pressures in excess of 700 psig, must be stainless steel or copper alloys.

(6) Hose connections and hose complying with WAC ((296-306A-48051)) 296-307-48051 may be used to connect the outlet of a manifold pressure regulator to piping if the working pressure of the piping is 250 psig or less and the length of the hose is a maximum of 5 feet. Hose must have a minimum bursting pressure of 1,000 psig.

(7) When oxygen is supplied to a service piping system from a low-pressure oxygen manifold without an intervening pressure regulating device, the piping system must have a minimum design pressure of 250 psig. A pressure regulating device must be used at each station outlet when the connected equipment is for use at pressures less than 250 psig.

(8) Piping for acetylene or acetylenic compounds must be steel or wrought iron.

(9) Unalloyed copper must only be used for acetylene or acetylenic compounds in listed equipment.



[Recodified as 296-307-48033. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-48033, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-48501  What general requirements apply to resistance welding equipment? (1) All equipment must be installed by a qualified electrician according to the requirements of chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T. There must be a safety-type disconnecting switch or a circuit breaker or circuit interrupter to open each power circuit to the machine, conveniently located at or near the machine, so that the power can be shut off when the machine or its controls are to be serviced.

(2) Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment must have a thermal protection switch.

(3) Employees designated to operate resistance welding equipment must have been properly instructed and judged competent to operate such equipment.

(4) Controls of all automatic or air and hydraulic clamps must be arranged or guarded to prevent the operator from accidentally activating them.



[Recodified as 296-307-48501. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-48501, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-48505  What requirements apply to flash welding equipment? (1) Flash welding machines must have a hood to control flying flash. In cases of high production, where materials may contain a film of oil and where toxic elements and metal fumes are given off, ventilation must be provided according to WAC ((296-306A-50009)) 296-307-50009 through ((296-306A-50029)) 296-307-50029.

(2) For the protection of the operators of nearby equipment, fire-resistant curtains or suitable shields must be set up around the machine and in such a manner that the operator's movements are not hampered.

(3) If the welding process cannot be isolated, anyone who may be exposed to the hazard of arc flash must be properly protected.



[Recodified as 296-307-48505. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-48505, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-49005  How must arc welding equipment be designed? (1) A controller integrally mounted in an electric motor driven welder must be able to carry the rated motor current, must be able to make and interrupt stalled rotor current of the motor, and may serve as the running overcurrent device if provided with the number of over-current units as specified by chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T. Starters with magnetic undervoltage release should be used with machines installed more than one to a circuit to prevent circuit overload caused by simultaneously starting several motors upon return of voltage.

(2) On all types of arc welding machines, control apparatus must be enclosed except for the operating wheels, levers, or handles.





Note: Control handles and wheels should be large enough to be easily grasped by a gloved hand.



(3) Input power terminals, tap change devices, and live metal parts connected to input circuits must be completely enclosed and accessible only by tools.

(4) Terminals for welding leads should be protected from accidental electrical contact by employees or by metal objects i.e., vehicles, crane hooks, etc. You may provide protection with:

Dead-front receptacles for plug connections;

Recessed openings with nonremovable hinged covers;

Heavy insulating sleeving or taping; or

Other equivalent electrical and mechanical protection.

If a welding lead terminal that is intended to be used exclusively for connection to the work is connected to the grounded enclosure, it must be done by a conductor at least two AWG sizes smaller than the grounding conductor and the terminal must be marked to indicate that it is grounded.

(5) No connections for portable control devices (such as push buttons to be carried by the operator) must be connected to an a.c. circuit of higher than 120 volts. Exposed metal parts of portable control devices operating on circuits above 50 volts must be grounded by a grounding conductor in the control cable.

(6) Auto transformers or a.c. reactors must not be used to draw welding current directly from any a.c. power source having a voltage exceeding 80 volts.



[Recodified as 296-307-49005. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-49005, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-49007  How must arc welding equipment be installed? Arc welding equipment, including the power supply, must be installed according to the requirements of chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T.



[Recodified as 296-307-49007. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-49007, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-49009  How must arc welding equipment be grounded? (1) The frame or case of the welding machine (except engine-driven machines) must be grounded according to the requirements of chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T.

(2) Conduits containing electrical conductors must not be used for completing a work-lead circuit. Pipelines must not be used as a permanent part of a work-lead circuit, but may be used during construction, extension or repair if current is not carried through threaded joints, flanged bolted joints, or caulked joints and special precautions are used to avoid sparking at connection of the work-lead cable.

(3) Using chains, wire ropes, cranes, hoists, and elevators to carry welding current is prohibited.

(4) Where a structure, conveyor, or fixture is regularly used as a welding current return circuit, joints must be bonded or provided with adequate current collecting devices and appropriate periodic inspection should be conducted to ensure that no electrocution, shock, or fire hazard exists.

(5) All ground connections must be checked to determine that they are mechanically strong and electrically adequate for the required current.



[Recodified as 296-307-49009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-49009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-49011  What requirements apply to supply connections and conductors? (1) A disconnecting switch or controller must be provided at or near each welding machine without a switch or controller mounted as an integral part of the machine. The switch must meet the requirements of chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T. Overcurrent protection must be provided as specified in chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T. A disconnect switch with overload protection or equivalent disconnect and protection means, permitted by chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part T must be provided for each outlet intended for connection to a portable welding machine.

(2) For individual welding machines, the rated current-carrying capacity of the supply conductors must be at least that of the rated primary current of the welding machines.

(3) For groups of welding machines, the rated current-carrying capacity of conductors may be less than the sum of the rated primary currents of the welding machines supplied. The conductor rating must be determined according to the machine loading based on the use to be made of each welding machine and the allowance permissible in the event that all the welding machines supplied by the conductors will not be in use at the same time.

(4) In operations involving several welders on one structure, d.c. welding process requirements may require the use of both polarities; or supply circuit limitations for a.c. welding may require distribution of machines among the phases of the supply circuit. In such cases, no load voltages between electrode holders will be two times normal in d.c. or 1, 1.4, 1.73, or 2 times normal on a.c. machines. Similar voltage differences will exist if both a.c. and d.c. welding are done on the same structure.

(a) All d.c. machines must be connected with the same polarity.

(b) All a.c. machines must be connected to the same phase of the supply circuit and with the same instantaneous polarity.



[Recodified as 296-307-49011. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-49011, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-49013  How must arc welding equipment be operated? (1) Employees assigned to operate or maintain arc welding equipment must be acquainted with the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-490, 296-306A-495, and 296-306A-500)) 296-307-490, 296-307-495, and 296-307-500; if doing gas-shielded arc welding, also Recommended Safe Practices for Gas-Shielded Arc Welding, A6.1-1966, American Welding Society.

(2) Before starting operations, all connections to the machine must be checked to make certain they are properly made. The work lead must be firmly attached to the work; magnetic work clamps shall be freed from adherent metal particles of spatter on contact surfaces. Coiled welding cable must be spread out before use to avoid serious overheating and damage to insulation.

(3) You must ensure that the welding machine frame grounding is checked with special attention given to safety ground connections of portable machines.

(4) Cylinders must be kept away from radiators, piping systems, layout tables, etc., that may be used for grounding electric circuits. Any practice such as the tapping of an electrode against a cylinder to strike an arc is prohibited.

(5) There must be no leaks of cooling water, shielding gas or engine fuel.

(6) You must ensure that the machine has proper switching equipment for shutting down.

(7) Printed rules and instructions covering operation of equipment supplied by the manufacturers must be strictly followed.

(8) Electrode holders when not in use must be placed so that they cannot make electrical contact with persons, conducting objects, fuel or compressed gas tanks.

(9) Cables with splices within 10 feet of the holder are prohibited. The welder should not coil or loop welding electrode cable around parts of the body.



[Recodified as 296-307-49013. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-49013, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-49501  What basic fire prevention precautions must be taken? For more information on these basic precautions and the special precautions of WAC ((296-306A-49503)) 296-307-49503, including fire protection and prevention responsibilities of welders, cutters, their supervisors (including outside contractors), and management, see the Standard for Fire Prevention in Use of Cutting and Welding Processes, NFPA Standard 51B, 1962.

The basic precautions for fire prevention in welding or cutting work are:

(1) If the object to be welded or cut cannot readily be moved, all movable fire hazards in the vicinity must be taken to a safe place.

(2) If the object to be welded or cut cannot be moved and if all the fire hazards cannot be removed, then guards must be used to confine the heat, sparks, and slag, and to protect the fire hazards.

(3) If the requirements of this section cannot be met, then welding and cutting are prohibited.



[Recodified as 296-307-49501. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-49501, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-49503  What special fire prevention precautions must be taken? When the nature of the work to be performed falls within the scope of WAC ((296-306A-49501)) 296-307-49501(2), certain additional precautions may be necessary:

(1) Wherever there are floor openings or cracks in the flooring that cannot be closed, precautions must be taken so that no readily combustible materials on the floor below will be exposed to sparks that drop through. The same precautions must be observed with regard to cracks or holes in walls, open doorways, and open or broken windows.

(2) Suitable fire extinguishing equipment must be maintained in a state of readiness for instant use. Such equipment may consist of pails of water, buckets of sand, hose, or portable extinguishers depending upon the nature and quantity of the combustible material exposed.

(3) The following requirements apply to fire watch:

(a) Fire watchers are required whenever welding or cutting is performed in locations where other than a minor fire might develop, or any of the following conditions exist:

(i) Appreciable combustible material, in building construction or contents, closer than 35 feet to the point of operation.

(ii) Appreciable combustibles are more than 35 feet away but are easily ignited by sparks.

(iii) Wall or floor openings within a 35-foot radius expose combustible material in adjacent areas including concealed spaces in walls or floors.

(iv) Combustible materials are adjacent to the opposite side of metal partitions, walls, ceilings, or roofs and are likely to be ignited by conduction or radiation.

(b) Fire watchers must have fire extinguishing equipment readily available and be trained in its use. They must be familiar with facilities for sounding an alarm in the event of a fire. They must watch for fires in all exposed areas, try to extinguish them only when obviously within the capacity of the equipment available, or otherwise sound the alarm. A fire watch must be maintained for at least a half hour after completion of welding or cutting operations to detect and extinguish possible smoldering fires.

(4) Before cutting or welding is permitted, the area must be inspected by the individual responsible for authorizing cutting and welding operations. The responsible individual must designate precautions to be followed in granting authorization to proceed, preferably in the form of a written permit.

(5) Where combustible materials such as paper clippings, wood shavings, or textile fibers are on the floor, the floor must be swept clean for a radius of 35 feet. Combustible floors must be kept wet, covered with damp sand, or protected by fire-resistant shields. Where floors have been wet down, employees operating arc welding or cutting equipment must be protected from possible shock.

(6) Cutting and welding are prohibited in the following situations:

(a) In areas not authorized by management.

(b) In sprinklered buildings while such protection is impaired.

(c) In the presence of explosive atmospheres (mixtures of flammable gases, vapors, liquids, or dusts with air), or where explosive atmospheres may develop inside uncleaned or improperly prepared tanks or equipment that have previously contained such materials, or that may develop in areas with an accumulation of combustible dusts.

(d) In areas near the storage of large quantities of exposed, readily ignitable materials such as bulk sulphur, baled paper, or cotton.

(7) Where practical, all combustibles must be relocated at least 35 feet from the worksite. Where relocation is impractical, combustibles must be protected with flameproofed covers or otherwise shielded with metal or asbestos guards or curtains. Edges of covers at the floor should be tight to prevent sparks from going under them. This precaution is also important at overlaps where several covers are used to protect a large pile.

(8) Ducts and conveyor systems that might carry sparks to distant combustibles must be suitably protected or shut down.

(9) Where cutting or welding is done near walls, partitions, ceiling, or roof of combustible construction, fire-resistant shields or guards must be provided to prevent ignition.

(10) If welding is to be done on a metal wall, partition, ceiling, or roof, precautions must be taken to prevent ignition of combustibles on the other side, due to conduction or radiation, preferably by relocating combustibles. Where combustibles are not relocated, a fire watch on the opposite side from the work must be provided.

(11) Welding must not be attempted on a metal partition, wall, ceiling, or roof having a combustible covering nor on walls or partitions of combustible sandwich-type panel construction.

(12) Cutting or welding on pipes or other metal in contact with combustible walls, partitions, ceilings or roofs must not be undertaken if the work is close enough to cause ignition by conduction.

(13) You are responsible for the safe use of cutting and welding equipment on your property and:

(a) Based on fire potentials of plant facilities, you must establish areas and procedures for cutting and welding;

(b) You must designate an individual responsible for authorizing cutting and welding operations in areas not specifically designed for such processes;

(c) You must insist that cutters or welders and their supervisors are suitably trained in the safe operation of their equipment and the safe use of the process; and

(d) You must advise all contractors about flammable materials or hazardous conditions of which they may not be aware.

(14) The supervisor must:

(a) Ensure that cutting and welding equipment is handled and used safely.

(b) Determine the combustible materials and hazardous areas present or likely to be present in the work location.

(c) Protect combustibles from ignition by the following:

(i) Have the work moved to a location free from dangerous combustibles;

(ii) If the work cannot be moved, have the combustibles moved to a safe distance from the work or have the combustibles properly shielded against ignition; and

(iii) See that cutting and welding are so scheduled that plant operations that might expose combustibles to ignition are not started during cutting or welding.

(d) Secure authorization for the cutting or welding operations from the designated management representative.

(e) Determine that the cutter or welder secures their approval that conditions are safe before going ahead;

(f) Determine that fire protection and extinguishing equipment are properly located at the site; and

(g) Ensure fire watches are available at the site when required.

(15) Cutting or welding is permitted only in areas that are or have been made fire safe. Within the confines of an operating plant or building, cutting and welding should preferably be done in a specific area designed for such work, such as a maintenance shop or a detached outside location. Such areas should be of noncombustible or fire-resistive construction, essentially free of combustible and flammable contents, and suitably segregated from adjacent areas. When work cannot be moved practically, as in most construction work, the area must be made safe by removing combustibles or protecting combustibles from ignition sources.



[Recodified as 296-307-49503. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-49503, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-50005  What protective clothing must welders wear? (1) Employees exposed to the hazards created by welding, cutting, or brazing operations must be protected by personal protective equipment according to the requirements of chapter ((296-306A)) 296-307 WAC Part H. Appropriate protective clothing required for any welding operation will vary with the size, nature and location of the work to be performed.

(2) The following suggestions may be helpful when choosing protective clothing:

(a) Except when engaged in light work, all welders should wear flameproof gauntlet gloves.

(b) Flameproof aprons made of leather, asbestos, or other suitable material may help to protect against radiated heat and sparks.

(c) Woolen clothing is better than cotton because it is less easily ignited and helps to protect the welder from changes in temperature. Cotton clothing, if used, should be chemically treated to reduce its combustibility. All outer clothing such as jumpers or overalls should be reasonably free from oil or grease.

(d) Sparks may lodge in rolled-up sleeves, pockets, or cuffs. Therefore sleeves and collars should be buttoned, and clothing should have no front pockets. Trousers or overalls should be uncuffed.

(e) For heavy work, fire-resistant leggings, high boots, or other equivalent means should be used.

(f) In production work a sheet metal screen in front of the employee's legs can provide further protection against sparks and molten metal in cutting operations.

(g) Capes or shoulder covers made of leather or other suitable materials should be worn during overhead welding or cutting operations. Leather skull caps may be worn under helmets to prevent head burns.

(h) For welding and cutting overhead or in extremely confined spaces, ear protection is sometimes desirable.

(i) Where there is exposure to sharp or heavy falling objects, or a hazard of bumping in confined spaces, hard hats or head protectors must be used.



[Recodified as 296-307-50005. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-50005, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-50009  What employee protection must be provided in confined spaces? "Confined space" means a relatively small or restricted space such as a tank, boiler, pressure vessel, or small compartment of a ship.

(1) Confined spaces must be ventilated. For ventilation requirements see WAC ((296-306A-50011)) 296-307-50011 through ((296-306A-50029)) 296-307-50029.

(2) When welding or cutting in a confined space, the gas cylinders and welding machines must be left outside. Before operations are started, heavy portable equipment mounted on wheels must be securely blocked to prevent accidental movement.

(3) Where a welder must enter a confined space through a manhole or other small opening, means must be provided for quickly removing the welder in case of emergency. When safety belts and lifelines are used, they must be attached so that the welder's body cannot be jammed in a small exit opening. An attendant with a preplanned rescue procedure must be stationed outside to observe the welder at all times and be able to put rescue operations into effect.

(4) After welding operations are completed, the welder must mark the hot metal or provide some other means of warning other employees.



[Recodified as 296-307-50009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-50009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-50011  What general requirements apply to welding ventilation? (1) The following three factors in arc and gas welding must be considered when determining the amount of contamination to which welders may be exposed:

(a) Dimensions of space in which welding is to be done (especially ceiling height);

(b) Number of welders; and

(c) The possibility of hazardous fumes, gases, or dust according to the metals involved.

(2) Other factors involved may require ventilation or respiratory protective devices as needed to meet the requirements of this section. Such factors include:

(a) Atmospheric conditions;

(b) Heat generated; and

(c) Presence of volatile solvents.

(3) When welding must be performed in a space entirely screened on all sides, the screens must be arranged so that no serious restriction of ventilation exists. The screens should be mounted so that they are about 2 feet above the floor unless the work is performed at so low a level that the screen must be extended nearer to the floor to protect nearby employees from the glare of welding.

(4) Local exhaust or general ventilating systems must be provided and arranged to keep the amount of toxic fumes, gases, or dusts below the maximum allowable in chapter 296-62 WAC.





Note: A number of potentially hazardous materials are employed in fluxes, coatings, coverings, and filler metals used in welding and cutting or are released to the atmosphere during welding and cutting. These include but are not limited to the materials itemized in WAC ((296-306A-50019)) 296-307-50019 through ((296-306A-50029)) 296-307-50029.



(5) You must determine which potentially hazardous materials are associated with welding and cutting and inform employees through signs, labels or other appropriate means.

(a) Welding may produce fumes and gases hazardous to health. Avoid breathing these fumes and gases. Use adequate ventilation. See ANSI Z 49.1-1967, Safety in Welding and Cutting, published by the American Welding Society.

(b) Brazing (welding) filler metals containing cadmium in significant amounts must carry the following notice on tags, boxes, or other containers:



warning

contains cadmium--poisonous fumes may be formed on heating



Do not breathe fumes. Use only with adequate ventilation such as fume collectors, exhaust ventilators, or air-supplied respirators. See ANSI Z 49.1-1967.

If chest pain, cough, or fever develops after use call physician immediately.

Keep children away when using.



(c) Brazing and gas welding fluxes containing fluorine compounds must have a cautionary wording to indicate that they contain fluorine compounds. The American Welding Society recommends the following for brazing and gas welding fluxes:



caution

contains fluorides



This flux when heated gives off fumes that may irritate eyes, nose and throat.

Avoid fumes. Use only in well-ventilated spaces.

Avoid contact of flux with eyes or skin.

Do not take internally.



[Recodified as 296-307-50011. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-50011, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-50013  What ventilation must be provided for general welding and cutting? (1) Mechanical ventilation must be provided when welding or cutting is done on metals not covered in WAC ((296-306A-50019)) 296-307-50019 through ((296-306A-50029)) 296-307-50029 in the following locations:

(a) In a space of less than 10,000 cubic feet per welder.

(b) In a room with a ceiling height of less than 16 feet.

(c) In confined spaces or where the welding space contains partitions, balconies, or other structural barriers to the extent that they significantly obstruct cross-ventilation.

(2) Ventilation must be at the minimum rate of 2,000 cubic feet per minute per welder.



Exception: This requirement does not apply where local exhaust hoods and booths that meet the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-50015)) 296-307-50015, or airline respirators approved by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for such purposes are provided. Natural ventilation is considered sufficient for welding or cutting operations where the restrictions in subsection (1) of this section are not present.





[Recodified as 296-307-50013. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-50013, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-50019  What requirements apply to welding fluorine compounds? In confined spaces, welding or cutting involving fluxes, coverings, or other materials that contain fluorine compounds must be done according to WAC ((296-306A-50017)) 296-307-50017.

"Fluorine compound" means a compound that contains fluorine as an element in chemical combination, not as a free gas.



Note: The need for local exhaust ventilation or airline respirators for welding or cutting in other than confined spaces will depend on the circumstances. However, such protection is desirable for fixed-location production welding and for all production welding on stainless steels. Where air samples taken at the welding location indicate that the fluorides liberated are below the maximum allowable concentration, such protection is not necessary.





[Recodified as 296-307-50019. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-50019, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-50021  What requirements apply to welding zinc? (1) In confined spaces welding or cutting involving zinc-bearing base or filler metals or metals coated with zinc-bearing materials must be done according to WAC ((296-306A-50017)) 296-307-50017.

(2) Indoors, welding or cutting involving zinc-bearing base or filler metals coated with zinc-bearing materials must be done according to WAC ((296-306A-50015)) 296-307-50015.



[Recodified as 296-307-50021. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-50021, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-50023  What requirements apply to welding lead? (1) In confined spaces, welding involving lead-base metals (erroneously called lead-burning) must be done according to WAC ((296-306A-50017)) 296-307-50017.

(2) Indoors, welding involving lead-base metals must be done according to WAC ((296-306A-50015)) 296-307-50015.

(3) In confined spaces or indoors, welding or cutting involving metals containing lead, other than as an impurity, or involving metals coated with lead-bearing materials, including paint, must be done using local exhaust ventilation or airline respirators. Outdoors, such operations must be done using respiratory protective equipment approved by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for such purposes. In all cases, employees in the immediate vicinity of the cutting operation must be protected as necessary by local exhaust ventilation or airline respirators.



Note: See chapter 296-62 WAC for additional requirements on lead.





[Recodified as 296-307-50023. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-50023, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-50027  What requirements apply to welding cadmium? (1) Welding or cutting indoors or in confined spaces involving cadmium-bearing or cadmium-coated base metals must be done using local exhaust ventilation or airline respirators unless atmospheric tests under the most adverse conditions have established that employee exposure is within the acceptable concentrations defined by chapter 296-62 WAC. Outdoors, such operations must be done using respiratory protective equipment such as fume respirators approved by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for such purposes.

(2) Welding (brazing) involving cadmium-bearing filler metals must be done using ventilation as prescribed in WAC ((296-306A-50015)) 296-307-50015 or ((296-306A-50017)) 296-307-50017 if the work is to be done in a confined space.



Note: See chapter 296-62 WAC for additional requirements on cadmium.





[Recodified as 296-307-50027. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-50027, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-52001  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-520)) 296-307-520 applies to all powered industrial trucks used in agricultural operations.



[Recodified as 296-307-52001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-52001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-52003  What is a "powered industrial truck"? "Powered industrial truck" (or "truck") means a fork truck, industrial tractor, platform lift truck, motorized hand truck, or other specialized industrial trucks, powered by electric motors or internal combustion engines. The definition does not include compressed gas-operated industrial trucks, ((farm vehicles)) tractor-mounted forklifts, or vehicles intended primarily for earth moving or over-the-road hauling.



[Recodified as 296-307-52003. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-52003, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-52005  What manufacturer's requirements apply to powered industrial trucks? (1) All powered industrial trucks must meet the design and construction requirements for powered industrial trucks established in the ANSI B56.1-1969, "Powered Industrial Trucks."

(2) Approved trucks must have a label indicating approval by the testing laboratory as meeting the specifications and requirements of ANSI B56.1-1969.

(3) Modifications or additions must only be performed with the manufacturer's prior written approval. When modifications or additions are made, capacity, operation, and maintenance instruction plates, tags, or decals must be changed accordingly.

(4) If the truck is equipped with front-end attachments other than factory installed attachments, it ((shall)) must be marked to identify the attachments and show the approximate weight of the truck and attachment combination at maximum elevation with the load centered from side to side.

(5) The user must ensure that all nameplates and markings are in place and legible.



[Recodified as 296-307-52005. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-52005, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-52009  What must a user consider before choosing a powered industrial truck? Before choosing the industrial truck to use, the user must determine whether the atmosphere or location is hazardous or nonhazardous. The type of industrial truck ((shall)) must be chosen according to the requirements of WAC ((296-306A-52011)) 296-307-52011.



[Recodified as 296-307-52009. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-52009, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-52011  What requirements determine which trucks to use in specific hazardous environments? Following are the minimum truck types required in specific hazardous environments. You may choose to use industrial trucks having greater safeguards.

(1) Powered industrial trucks are prohibited in atmospheres with a hazardous concentration of acetylene, butadiene, ethylene oxide, hydrogen (or gases or vapors equivalent in hazard to hydrogen, such as manufactured gas), propylene oxide, acetaldehyde, cyclopropane, diethyl ether, ethylene, isoprene, or unsymmetrical dimenthyl hydrazine (UDMH).

(a) Approved EX trucks must be used in atmospheres containing hazardous concentrations of metal dust, including aluminum, magnesium, and their commercial alloys; other metals of similarly hazardous characteristics; or in atmospheres containing carbon black, coal, or coke dust.

(b) In atmospheres where dust of magnesium, aluminum or aluminum bronze may be present, fuses, switches, motor controllers, and circuit breakers of trucks must have enclosures specifically approved for such locations.

(2) Approved EX trucks must be used in atmospheres containing acetone, acrylonitrile, alcohol, ammonia, benzine, bensol, butane, ethylene dichloride, gasoline, hexane, lacquer solvent vapors, naphtha, natural gas, propane, propylene, styrene, vinyl acetate, vinyl chloride, or xylenes in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures.

(3) Approved DY, EE, or EX trucks must be used in locations where volatile flammable liquids or flammable gases are handled, processed or used, if the hazardous liquids, vapors or gases are normally confined within closed containers or closed systems from which they can escape only in case of accidental rupture or breakdown, or in case of abnormal equipment operation.

Approved DY, EE, or EX trucks may also be used in locations in which hazardous concentrations of gases or vapors are normally prevented by mechanical ventilation but that might become hazardous through failure or abnormal operation of the ventilating equipment.

(4) Approved DS, ES, GS, or LPS trucks must be used in locations used for the storage of hazardous liquids in sealed containers or liquefied or compressed gases in containers. This classification includes locations where volatile flammable liquids or flammable gases or vapors are used but are hazardous only in case of an accident or an unusual operation condition.

The quantity of hazardous material that might escape in case of accident, the adequacy of ventilating equipment, the total area involved, and the business's history of explosions or fires are all factors that should be considered in determining which truck has sufficient safeguards for the location.

(a) Approved EX trucks must be used in atmospheres in which combustible dust is or may be suspended in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures, or where mechanical failure or abnormal operation of machinery or equipment might cause such mixtures to be produced.

(b) The EX classification usually includes the working areas of: Grain handling and storage plants, rooms containing grinders or pulverizers, cleaners, graders, scalpers, open conveyors or spouts, open bins or hoppers, mixers or blenders, automatic or hopper scales, packing machinery, elevator heads and boots, stock distributors, dust and stock collectors (except all-metal collectors vented to the outside), and all similar dust producing machinery and equipment in grain processing plants, starch plants, sugar pulverizing plants, malting plants, hay grinding plants, and other similar locations; and areas where combustible dust may, under normal operating conditions, be present in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures.

(5) Approved DY, EE, or EX trucks must be used in atmospheres in which deposits or accumulations of combustible dust may be ignited by arcs or sparks from the truck, if combustible dust will not normally be suspended or thrown into suspension by the normal operation of equipment or apparatus in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures.

(6) Approved DY, EE, or EX trucks must be used in locations with easily ignitable fibers or flyings if the fibers or flyings are not likely to be suspended in quantities sufficient to produce ignitable mixtures.

(7) Approved DS, DY, ES, EE, EX, GS, or LPS trucks must be used in locations, including outside storage, where easily ignitable fibers are stored or handled, but are not processed or manufactured. E trucks that have been previously used in these locations may continue to be used.

(8) If storage warehouses and outside storage locations are hazardous, the specified approved truck must be used. If not classified as hazardous, any approved D, E, G, or LP truck may be used, or trucks meeting the requirements for these types may be used.



(((WAC 296-307-52011, Illus. 1)

Place illustration here.))



(((WAC 296-307-52011, Illus. 2)

Place illustration here.))



[Recodified as 296-307-52011. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-52011, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



Reviser's note: The spelling errors in the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency and appear in the Register pursuant to the requirements of RCW 34.08.040.



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-52013  In what environments may converted trucks be used? When powered industrial trucks that were originally approved to use gasoline are converted to use LP-gas according to WAC ((296-306A-52047)) 296-307-52047(12), they may be used in locations where G, GS or LP, and LPS trucks are specified.



[Recodified as 296-307-52013. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-52013, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-52015  What requirements apply to overhead safety guards? (1) High-lift rider trucks must be fitted with an overhead guard manufactured according to WAC ((296-306A-52005)) 296-307-52005(1), unless operating conditions do not permit.

(2) An overhead guard must be used as protection against falling objects.



Note: An overhead guard is intended to offer protection from the impact of small packages, boxes, bagged material, and other objects involved in the job, but not to withstand the impact of a falling capacity load.





[Recodified as 296-307-52015. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-52015, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-52017  What requirements apply to load backrests? (1) A load backrest extension must be used whenever necessary to minimize the possibility of the load or part of it from falling rearward.

(2) If the type of load presents a hazard, the user must equip fork trucks with a vertical load backrest extension manufactured according to WAC ((296-306A-52005)) 296-307-52005(1).



[Recodified as 296-307-52017. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-52017, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-52047  What requirements apply to maintaining powered industrial trucks? (1) Powered industrial trucks must be removed from service when not in safe operating condition. All repairs must be made by an authorized employee.

(2) No repairs may be made in Class I, II, and III locations.

(3) When repairs to fuel and ignition systems of industrial trucks involve fire hazards, the repairs must be conducted only in designated locations.

(4) Trucks in need of repairs to the electrical system must have the battery disconnected prior to repair.

(5) Industrial truck parts must be replaced only by parts of equivalent safety.

(6) Industrial trucks must not be altered so that the relative positions of parts are different from when they were manufactured. Industrial trucks must not have parts added or eliminated, except as provided in WAC ((296-306A-52005)) 296-307-52005. Fork trucks must not have additional counterweighting added unless approved by the truck manufacturer.

(7) Industrial trucks must be examined at least daily before being placed in service. Industrial trucks must not be placed in service if the examination shows any unsafe condition.

Where industrial trucks are used on a round-the-clock basis, they shall be examined after each shift. Defects must be immediately reported and corrected.

(8) Water mufflers must be filled daily or as frequently as necessary to prevent the water supply from dropping below 75 percent. Vehicles must not be operated if muffler screens or other parts are clogged. Any vehicle that emits hazardous sparks or flames from the exhaust system must immediately be removed from service until the emission of such sparks and flames has been eliminated.

(9) When the temperature of any part of any truck exceeds its normal operating temperature, the vehicle must be removed from service until the cause for overheating has been eliminated.

(10) Industrial trucks must be kept clean and free of excess accumulations of combustible materials, oil, and grease. Noncombustible agents should be used for cleaning trucks. Low flash point (below 100F) solvents must not be used. High flash point (at or above 100F) solvents may be used. Take precautions regarding toxicity, ventilation, and fire hazard according to the agent or solvent used.

(11) Glycol base antifreeze must be used in the engine cooling system.

(12) Industrial trucks originally approved to use gasoline fuel may be converted to use LP-gas fuel if the converted truck has the features specified for LP or LPS designated trucks. The converted equipment must be approved. You may find a description of the conversion system and the recommended method of installation in the "listed by report" of a nationally recognized testing laboratory.



[Recodified as 296-307-52047. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-52047, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-53001  What does this section cover? WAC ((296-306A-530)) 296-307-530 applies to the servicing of multipiece and single-piece rim wheels used on large vehicles such as trucks, tractors, trailers, buses and off-road machines. It does not apply to servicing rim wheels used on automobiles, or on pickup trucks and vans with automobile tires or truck tires designated "LT."



[Recodified as 296-307-53001. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-53001, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)



WAC 296-307-53005  What training must an employer provide for employees who service rim wheels? (1) You must implement a training program that covers at least the following:

(a) The hazards involved in servicing rim wheels;

(b) The safe operating procedures for the types of wheel serviced, described in WAC ((296-306A-53013)) 296-307-53013 and ((296-306A-53015)) 296-307-53015; and

(c) The applicable data contained in the charts (rim manuals) and the contents of this standard.

(2) You must ensure that each employee demonstrates and maintains the ability to service rim wheels safely, including the following:

(a) Demounting tires (including deflation);

(b) Inspecting and identifying the rim wheel components;

(c) Mounting tires (including inflation with a restraining device or other safeguard required by this section);

(d) Using the restraining device and other equipment required by this section;

(e) Handling rim wheels;

(f) Inflating the tire when a single-piece rim wheel is mounted on a vehicle;

(g) Understanding the necessity of standing outside the trajectory both during inflation of the tire and during inspection of the rim wheel following inflation; and

(h) Installing and removing rim wheels.

(3) If you believe that any employee is unable to read and understand the charts or rim manual, you must instruct the employee in the contents of the charts and rim manual in a manner that the employee can understand.

(4) You must evaluate each employee's ability to perform these tasks safely, and provide additional training as necessary to ensure that each employee maintains proficiency.



[Recodified as 296-307-53005. 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, 296-306A-53005, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]



REPEALER



The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:



WAC 296-307-28008 What training must an employer provide for employees who use agricultural equipment?

WAC 296-307-28010 What requirements apply to machine controls?

WAC 296-307-28012 What requirements apply to guarding steam pipes?

Legislature Code Reviser 

Register

Washington State Code Reviser's Office