WSR 12-18-004

PERMANENT RULES

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR

STANDARDS BOARD

[ Filed August 23, 2012, 10:44 a.m. , effective September 23, 2012 ]


Effective Date of Rule: Thirty-one days after filing.

Purpose: Amends chapter 181-78A WAC. Defines professional growth team and clarifies the requirement for a professional growth plan to be oriented to the professional certificate. Technical corrections related to educational service associate certificates.

Citation of Existing Rules Affected by this Order: Amending X [WAC 181-78A-010, 181-78A-270, 181-78A-507, and 181-78A-509].

Statutory Authority for Adoption: RCW 28A.410.210.

Adopted under notice filed as WSR 12-12-043 on May 31, 2012.

A final cost-benefit analysis is available by contacting David Brenna, 600 Washington Street South, Room 400, Olympia, WA 98504-7236, phone (360) 725-6238, fax (360) 586-4548, e-mail david.brenna@k12.wa.us.

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Comply with Federal Statute: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; Federal Rules or Standards: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; or Recently Enacted State Statutes: New 0, Amended 4, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted at Request of a Nongovernmental Entity: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted on the Agency's Own Initiative: New 0, Amended 4, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Clarify, Streamline, or Reform Agency Procedures: New 0, Amended 4, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted Using Negotiated Rule Making: New 0, Amended 4, Repealed 0; Pilot Rule Making: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; or Other Alternative Rule Making: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

Date Adopted: July 30, 2012.

David Brenna

Senior Policy Analyst

OTS-4752.4


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 10-08-030, filed 3/31/10, effective 12/1/11)

WAC 181-78A-010   Definition of terms.   The following definitions shall be used in this chapter:

(1) "College or university" means any regionally accredited baccalaureate degree granting Washington institution of higher learning or cooperative group of such institutions which has or develops programs of preparation in education which are submitted to the professional educator standards board for approval.

(2) "Endorsement" means a specification placed on a certificate to indicate the subject area, grade level, and/or specialization for which the individual is prepared to teach.

(3) "Interstate compact" means the contractual agreement among several states authorized by RCW 28A.690.010 and 28A.690.020 which facilitates interstate reciprocity.

(4) "Program approval" means the approval by the professional educator standards board of an educator preparation program within Washington state.

(5) "Field experience" means a sequence of learning experiences which occur in actual school settings or clinical or laboratory settings. Such learning experiences are related to specific program outcomes and are designed to integrate educational theory, knowledge, and skills in actual practice under the direction of a qualified supervisor.

(6) "Regionally accredited institution of higher education" means a community college, college, or university which is a candidate for accreditation or is accredited by one of the following regional accrediting bodies:

(a) Middle States, Association of Colleges and Schools;

(b) New England Association of Schools and Colleges;

(c) North Central Association of Colleges and Schools;

(d) Northwest Association of Schools and of Colleges and Universities;

(e) Southern Association of Colleges and Schools;

(f) Western Association of Schools and Colleges: Accrediting Commission for Junior and Senior Colleges.

(7) "Accredited institution of higher education," for purposes of credit on salary schedule per RCW 28A.415.024, means a regionally accredited institution of higher education, or a community college, college, or university, which is a candidate for accreditation or is accredited by the distance education and training council (DETC).

(8) "An approved performance-based educator preparation program" means a program that requires the candidate to demonstrate in multiple ways, over time, specific professional educator standards board required standards, criteria, knowledge and skills, including, where appropriate, evidence related to positive impact on student learning.

(9) "A positive impact on student learning" means that a teacher through instruction and assessment has been able to document students' increased knowledge and/or demonstration of a skill or skills related to the state goals and/or essential academic learning requirements: Provided, That teachers employed by private schools who are candidates for the professional teaching certificate shall document students' increased knowledge and/or demonstration of a skill or skills related to either:

(a) The state goals or essential academic learning requirements; or

(b) Such alternative learning goals as the private school has established.

(10) "Collaboration" (as used in WAC 181-78A-500 through 181-78A-540) means ongoing communication among the professional growth team members using a variety of formats (e.g., conferences, electronic mail, conference calls, etc.) to reach consensus regarding the content - Course work, experiences, competencies, knowledge and skills - Of the candidate's professional growth plan.

(11) "Professional growth team((.))"

(((a) Principal/program administrator "professional growth team,")) for the purpose of professional certification, means a team comprised of the candidate for the professional certificate, a ((district representative or designee, a professional association representative, and a college or university advisor. "Professional growth team," for the purpose of renewal of the professional certificate, means a team comprised of the individual renewing the certificate and the superintendent, or superintendent designee or appointed representative.

(b) School counselor, school psychologist, and school social worker "professional growth team" for the purpose of professional certification, means a team comprised of the candidate for the professional certificate, a college/university)) program administrator/designee, and a colleague/peer from the same professional role specified by the candidate. ((A district representative is also required to serve on the professional growth team. Provided that, a candidate may petition the university to have membership of a district representative waived.))

(12) "((Individual)) Professional growth plan" means the document which identifies the specific competencies, knowledge, skills and experiences needed to meet the standards set forth in WAC 181-79A-207 and 181-78A-540.

(13) "Draft professional growth plan" means the document which identifies the specific competencies, knowledge, skills and experiences needed to meet the standards set forth in WAC 181-78A-540.

(14) "Culminating seminar" means that component of the approved professional certificate program in which the candidate for a professional certificate presents his/her final documentation and evidence of professional certificate level knowledge, skill and performance, and positive impact on student learning. The culminating seminar shall meet requirements set forth in WAC 181-78A-535(2).

[Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. 10-08-030, 181-78A-010, filed 3/31/10, effective 12/1/11; 09-22-023, 181-78A-010, filed 10/26/09, effective 12/1/11; 07-19-056, 181-78A-010, filed 9/14/07, effective 10/15/07; 06-14-010, 181-78A-010, filed 6/22/06, effective 7/23/06. 06-02-051, recodified as 181-78A-010, filed 12/29/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.401.010 [28A.410.010]. 04-21-038, 180-78A-010, filed 10/15/04, effective 11/15/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 and 28A.410.010. 02-18-037, 180-78A-010, filed 8/26/02, effective 9/26/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010 and 28A.305.130 (1) and (2). 01-19-080, 180-78A-010, filed 9/19/01, effective 10/20/01; 00-03-049, 180-78A-010, filed 1/14/00, effective 2/14/00. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 (1) and (2), 28A.410.010 and 28A.150.220(4). 99-01-174, 180-78A-010, filed 12/23/98, effective 1/23/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010 and 28A.305.130. 98-01-025, 180-78A-010, filed 12/8/97, effective 1/8/98. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130. 97-04-084, 180-78A-010, filed 2/5/97, effective 3/8/97.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 12-04-036, filed 1/27/12, effective 2/27/12)

WAC 181-78A-270   Approval standard -- Knowledge and skills.   ((Building on the mission to prepare educators who demonstrate a positive impact on student learning based on the Improvement of Student Achievement Act of 1993 (1209), the following evidence shall be evaluated to determine whether)) Each preparation program ((is)) must be in compliance with the program approval standards of WAC 181-78A-220(5):

(1) TEACHER RESIDENCY CERTIFICATION.

(a) EFFECTIVE TEACHING.

(i) Using multiple instructional strategies, including the principles of second language acquisition, to address student academic language ability levels and cultural and linguistic backgrounds;

(ii) Applying principles of differentiated instruction, including theories of language acquisition, stages of language, and academic language development, in the integration of subject matter across the content areas of reading, mathematical, scientific, and aesthetic reasoning;

(iii) Using standards-based assessment that is systematically analyzed using multiple formative, summative, and self-assessment strategies to monitor and improve instruction;

(iv) Implementing classroom/school centered instruction, including sheltered instruction that is connected to communities within the classroom and the school, and includes knowledge and skills for working with other;

(v) Planning and/or adapting standards-based curricula that are personalized to the diverse needs of each student;

(vi) Aligning instruction to the learning standards and outcomes so all students know the learning targets and their progress toward meeting them;

(vii) Planning and/or adapting curricula that are standards driven so students develop understanding and problem-solving expertise in the content area(s) using reading, written and oral communication, and technology;

(viii) Preparing students to be responsible citizens for an environmentally sustainable, globally interconnected, and diverse society;

(ix) Planning and/or adapting learner centered curricula that engage students in a variety of culturally responsive, developmentally, and age appropriate strategies;

(x) Using technology that is effectively integrated to create technologically proficient learners; and

(xi) Informing, involving, and collaborating with families/neighborhoods, and communities in each student's educational process, including using information about student cultural identity, achievement and performance.

(b) PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. Developing reflective, collaborative, professional growth-centered practices through regularly evaluating the effects of his/her teaching through feedback and reflection.

(c) TEACHING AS A PROFESSION.

(i) Participating collaboratively and professionally in school activities and using appropriate and respectful verbal and written communication.

(ii) Demonstrating knowledge of professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities and policies.

(d) PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT. An approved preparation program for teachers shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process approved by the professional educator standards board. The assessment will verify that the candidate for a residency teacher certificate can meet the teacher standards in (a), (b) and (c) of this subsection and understands teacher impact on student learning. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan oriented toward the expectations for the professional certificate.

(2) PRINCIPAL AND PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR.

(a) ((Effective September 1, 2010,)) Principal and program administrator candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:

Successful demonstration of standards.

(i) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by leading the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by school and community stakeholders;

(ii) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by leading through advocating, nurturing, and sustaining district/school cultures and coherent instructional programs that are conducive to student learning and staff professional growth;

(iii) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment;

(iv) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources;

(v) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner; and

(vi) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.

(b) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for principals shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board. The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan oriented toward the expectations for the professional certificate.

(3) SUPERINTENDENT. An approved preparation program for superintendents shall require the candidate to demonstrate in course work and the internship the following standards:

(a) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by leading the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by school and community stakeholders;

(b) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by leading through advocating, nurturing, and sustaining district/school cultures and coherent instructional programs that are conducive to student learning and staff professional growth;

(c) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment;

(d) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources;

(e) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner; and

(f) A school administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.

(4) SCHOOL COUNSELOR. ((Effective September 1, 2005,)) School counselor candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:

(a) Successful demonstration of standards:

(i) ((Foundations of the)) School counseling ((profession)) program: Certified school counselors ((design, deliver,)) develop, lead, and evaluate ((student-centered,)) a data-driven school counseling program((s)) that ((advance the mission of the school in light of recognized theory, research, exemplary models, community context, and professional standards)) is comprehensive, utilizes best practices, and advances the mission of the school.

(ii) ((School counseling and student competencies:)) Student learning and assessments: Certified school counselors ((integrate academic, career, and personal/social student competencies, including Washington state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, into the school counseling program; teach counseling and guidance related material by using effective curriculum, instructional strategies, and instructional management; support teachers and parents in helping students develop knowledge and skill for learning, living, and working; and provide information about best practices to a school community.

(iii) Human growth and development: Certified school counselors apply comprehensive, in-depth knowledge of human growth and development to improve student learning, well-being, and to enhance resiliency; provide guidance to parents and teachers about developmentally appropriate practices that support students throughout their schooling experience)) use their knowledge of pedagogy, child development, individual differences, learning barriers, and Washington state learning requirements to support student learning. They work effectively with other educators to monitor and improve student success.

(((iv))) (iii) Counseling theories and technique: Certified school counselors ((demonstrate an understanding of established and emerging counseling theories through effective use of individual and group techniques for working with a diverse population)) use a variety of research-based counseling approaches to provide prevention, intervention, and responsive services to meet the academic, personal/social and career needs of all students.

(((v))) (iv) Equity, fairness, and diversity: Certified school counselors ((value and show respect for all members of the community; demonstrate fairness, equity, and sensitivity to every student, and advocate for equitable access to instructional programs and activities; use data for designing and implementing plans that remove barriers to learning; and help to close achievement gaps among subgroups of students)) understand cultural contexts in a multicultural society, demonstrate fairness, equity, and sensitivity to every student, and advocate for equitable access to instructional programs and activities.

(((vi))) (v) School climate and collaboration: Certified school counselors collaborate with colleagues, families, and community members to establish and foster a safe, inclusive, and nurturing learning environment for students, staff, and families ((and use strategies designed to prevent or resolve problems that could limit or diminish the capacity of students to learn and achieve at their highest levels.

(vii) Collaboration with school staff, family, and community: Certified school counselors work collaboratively with school staff, families and community members to achieve common goals for the education of students, improvement of schools, and advancement of the larger community; know appropriate behavior management strategies and can team with staff and families to improve student achievement; and use their knowledge of community resources to make appropriate referrals based on the needs of students.

(viii) Information resources and technology: Certified school counselors select and use informational resources and technology to facilitate delivery of a comprehensive school counseling program that meets student needs; and skillfully use technology to enhance communication.

(ix) Student assessment and program evaluation: Certified school counselors understand the basic principles and purposes of assessment; collection and use of data; regularly monitor student progress and are able to communicate the purposes, design, and results of assessments to various audiences; know basic principles of research design, action research, and program evaluation for purposes of program improvement and accountability.

(x) Leadership and advocacy: Certified school counselors support practices and policies that promote academic rigor-skills for learning, living, and working; provide leadership that enhances student academic, career, and personal/social development and advocate for guidance as an integral part of a school's educational system; model practices that help students, parents, teachers, and policy makers understand how curriculum, instruction and assessment can help students see the relationship between effort, performance, and success beyond high school. Certified school counselors help promote understanding of graduation requirements, WASL scores, and development of the high school and beyond plan)).

(((xi) Professionalism, ethics, and legal mandates:)) (vi) Professional identity and ethical practice: Certified school counselors ((develop a professional identity congruent with knowledge of all aspects of professional functions, professional development, and state and national school counselor organizations. They adhere strictly to the profession's codes of ethics, especially those that have been established by the American Counseling Association (ACA), the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC), and other relevant codes of ethics. They are familiar with state and federal policies, laws, and legislation relevant to school counseling.

(xii) Reflective practice: Certified school counselors integrate knowledge, skills, and life experiences to respond effectively to new or unexpected critical events and situations; serve as change agents by using their understanding of schools as social, cultural and political systems within a larger organizational context; monitor practice with continuous, in-depth reflection; and make adjustments as needed)) engage in continuous professional growth and development and advocate for appropriate school counselor identity and roles. They adhere to ethical practices and to the Washington state and federal policies, laws, and legislation relevant to school counseling.

(b) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for school counselors shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board ((and published by the office of the superintendent of public instruction)). The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan oriented to the expectations for the professional certificate.

(5) SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST. ((Effective September 1, 2005,)) School psychologist candidates((, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements,)) will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:

(a) Successful demonstration of standards:

(i) Data-based decision making and accountability: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment ((that yield information useful in identifying strengths and needs, in understanding problems, and in measuring progress and accomplishments; use such models and methods)) as part of a systematic process ((to collect data and other information, translate assessment results into empirically based decisions about service delivery, evaluate the outcomes of services; and)) of data-based decision making that permeates every aspect of professional practice.

(ii) Consultation and collaboration: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of behavioral, mental health, collaborative, and((/or)) other consultation models and methods and of their application to ((particular)) individual and contextual situations; collaborate effectively with others in planning and decision-making processes at the individual, group, and system levels.

(iii) ((Effective instruction and development of cognitive/)) Interventions and instructional support to develop academic skills: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of ((human learning processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of cognitive and academic skills;)) the influence of biological, cultural, linguistic, and early life experiences on academic development and collaborate with others((, develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions, including, but not limited to, instructional interventions and consultation)) to access, implement, and evaluate services at universal, targeted, and intensive levels using a variety of culturally and developmentally appropriate assessments.

(iv) ((Socialization and development of)) Interventions and mental health services to develop social and life skills: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of ((human)) biological, cultural, developmental ((processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social skills)), and social influences on behavior and mental health; collaborate with others, to develop ((appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions, including, but not limited to, consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling)) implement, and evaluate services that support socialization, cultural competence, learning, and mental health for positive impact on student learning.

(v) ((Student diversity in development and)) Schoolwide practices to promote learning: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of ((individual differences, abilities, and disabilities and of the potential influence of biological, social, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socioeconomic, gender-related, and linguistic factors in development and learning; demonstrate the sensitivity and skills needed to work with individuals of diverse characteristics and to implement strategies selected and/or adapted based on individual characteristics, strengths, and needs.

(vi) School and systems organization, policy development, and climate: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of general education, special education, and other educational and related services; understanding of schools and other settings as systems; work with individuals and groups to facilitate policies and practices that create and maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning environments for children and others)) general and special education, evidence-based practices, and equity pedagogy that responds to the needs of the learners; demonstrate skills to manage time effectively, respond to the learning needs of the individual students, and plan and measure positive impact on student learning.

(((vii))) (vi) Prevention((, crisis intervention, and mental health)) and responsive services: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of ((human development and psychopathology and of associated biological, cultural, and social influences on human behavior; provide or contribute to prevention and intervention programs that promote the mental health and physical well-being of students)) principles of resilience and risk factors and demonstrate skills in multitiered delivery of services that respond to crisis and promote learning and mental health across cultures.

(((viii) Home/school/community)) (vii) School collaboration services: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on student development, learning, and behavior, and of methods to involve families in education and service delivery; ((work effectively with families, educators, and others in the community to promote and provide comprehensive services to children and families.)) facilitate family and school partnerships and interactions with community agencies for enhancement of academic and social-behavior outcomes for children.

(viii) Diversity in development and learning: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of the principles and research related to culture, linguistic development, context, individual and role differences; work collaboratively to provide professional services that respond to the diverse needs of individuals and families; advocate for social justice and equity pedagogy.

(ix) Research and program evaluation: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods; evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of services at individual, group, and systems levels.

(x) ((School psychology practice and development:)) Legal, ethical, and professional practice: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of their profession; of ((various)) multiple service models and methods; ((of public policy development applicable to services to children and families; and)) of ethical, professional, and legal standards, including the Washington Administrative Code and federal and state accountability legislation; practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards((, are involved in their profession, and have the knowledge and skills needed to acquire career-long professional development)); engage in responsive ethical and professional decision-making; and apply professional work characteristics.

(xi) ((Information technology:)) Emerging and assistive technologies: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of ((information sources and technology relevant to their work; access, evaluate, and utilize information sources and technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services)) and access, implement, and evaluate technology relevant to their work and to the instructional needs of individuals with disabilities.

(b) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for school psychologists shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board ((and published by the office of the superintendent of public instruction)). The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan oriented to the expectations for the professional certificate.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. 12-04-036, 181-78A-270, filed 1/27/12, effective 2/27/12; 11-15-049, 181-78A-270, filed 7/15/11, effective 8/15/11. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210 and 2009 c 548, 2010 c 235, 2009 c 128 [2009 c 468]. 10-17-029, 181-78A-270, filed 8/9/10, effective 9/9/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. 07-23-046, 181-78A-270, filed 11/14/07, effective 12/15/07; 06-14-010, 181-78A-270, filed 6/22/06, effective 7/23/06. 06-02-051, recodified as 181-78A-270, filed 12/29/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.401.010 [28A.410.010]. 04-21-038, 180-78A-270, filed 10/15/04, effective 11/15/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010. 04-04-089, 180-78A-270, filed 2/3/04, effective 3/5/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 and 28A.410.010. 02-18-037, 180-78A-270, filed 8/26/02, effective 9/26/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010 and 28A.305.130 (1) through (4). 02-04-018, 180-78A-270, filed 1/24/02, effective 2/24/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010 and 28A.305.130 (1) and (2). 99-23-023, 180-78A-270, filed 11/9/99, effective 12/10/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 (1) and (2), 28A.410.010 and 28A.150.220(4). 99-01-174, 180-78A-270, filed 12/23/98, effective 1/23/99.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 09-16-053, filed 7/29/09, effective 8/29/09)

WAC 181-78A-507   Overview -- Principal/program administrator professional certificate programs.   ((By September 1, 2007, all colleges and universities offering a)) Professional certificate programs for principals/program administrators must be in compliance with ((the new)) program standards. To obtain a professional certificate, the residency principal or assistant principal will need to complete a professional educator standards board-approved professional certificate program and document three contracted school years of employment as a principal or assistant principal; the residency program administrator will need to complete a professional educator standards board-approved professional certificate program.

The professional certificate for principals/program administrators requires successful demonstration of six standards at the professional certification benchmark levels, or above, and the candidate will need to provide evidence that he/she has had a positive impact on student learning.

The candidate with the approved program shall develop an individual professional growth plan oriented toward the expectations for the professional certificate that shall address the six knowledge and skills standards, focus on activities that enhance student learning, and be informed by the performance evaluation process, and an analysis of the administrative context and assignment.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. 09-16-053, 181-78A-507, filed 7/29/09, effective 8/29/09; 07-08-050, 181-78A-507, filed 3/28/07, effective 4/28/07; 06-14-010, 181-78A-507, filed 6/22/06, effective 7/23/06. 06-02-051, recodified as 181-78A-507, filed 12/29/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010. 05-23-042, 180-78A-507, filed 11/9/05, effective 12/10/05; 04-21-039, 180-78A-507, filed 10/15/04, effective 11/15/04; 04-04-010, 180-78A-507, filed 1/23/04, effective 2/23/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 and 28A.410.010. 02-18-037, 180-78A-507, filed 8/26/02, effective 9/26/02.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 07-19-056, filed 9/14/07, effective 10/15/07)

WAC 181-78A-509   Overview -- Educational staff associate -- School counselor/school psychologist((/school social worker)) professional certificate programs.   ((By September 1, 2008, all colleges and universities offering)) ESA professional certificate programs must be in compliance with ((the new)) program standards. To obtain a professional ESA certificate, individuals will need to hold a valid ESA residency certificate, be employed in his/her ESA role in a public school district, professional educator standards board-approved private school or state agency providing educational services for students, and complete a professional educator standards board-approved professional ESA certificate program in his/her ESA role.

(1) The professional certificate requires successful demonstration of the ESA role standards at the professional certificate benchmark levels, or above, and the candidate will need to provide evidence that he/she has had a positive impact on student learning.

(2) The candidate shall develop an individual professional growth plan ((to be approved by the professional education advisory board (PEAB) or the professional growth team (PGT))) oriented toward the expectations for the professional certificate. The individual growth plan shall be based on an assessment of the candidate's ability to demonstrate standards at the professional benchmark level and evidence of a positive impact on student learning.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. 07-19-056, 181-78A-509, filed 9/14/07, effective 10/15/07; 07-04-005, 181-78A-509, filed 1/24/07, effective 2/24/07; 06-14-010, 181-78A-509, filed 6/22/06, effective 7/23/06. 06-02-051, recodified as 181-78A-509, filed 12/29/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.401.010 [28A.410.010]. 04-21-038, 180-78A-509, filed 10/15/04, effective 11/15/04.]