WSR 98-07-047

PERMANENT RULES

FOREST PRACTICES BOARD

[Filed March 13, 1998, 8:35 a.m., effective May 1, 1998]



Date of Adoption: February 24, 1998

Purpose: To adopt forest practices rules implementing the Gorge management plan in the special management areas of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. These rules provide a regulatory process for forest practices in the special management area of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. This is a negotiated rule making proposal developed by key stakeholders interested in this issue

Citation of Existing Rules Affected by this Order: Amending WAC 222-16-010, 222-16-050, 222-20-010, 222-20-040; and new sections WAC 222-20-130 and 222-46-015

Statutory Authority for Adoption: RCW 76.09.040 and chapter 34.05 RCW

Adopted under notice filed as WSR 98-01-222 on December 24, 1997

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Comply with Federal Statute: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0; Federal Rules or Standards: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0; or Recently Enacted State Statutes: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted at Request of a Nongovernmental Entity: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted on the Agency's Own Initiative: New 2, amended 4, repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Clarify, Streamline, or Reform Agency Procedures: New 2, amended 4, repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted Using Negotiated Rule Making: New 2, amended 4, repealed 0; Pilot Rule Making: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0; or Other Alternative Rule Making: New 0, amended 0, repealed 0.

Effective Date of Rule: May 1, 1998

February 24, 1998

Jennifer M. Belcher

Commissioner of Public Lands

OTS-1918.2

AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-24-091, filed 12/3/97, effective 1/3/98)



WAC 222-16-010  General definitions.* Unless otherwise required by context, as used in these regulations:

"Act" means the Forest Practices Act, chapter 76.09 RCW.

"Affected Indian tribe" means any federally recognized Indian tribe that requests in writing from the department information on forest practices applications and notification filed on specified areas.

"Appeals board" means the forest practices appeals board established in the act.

"Area of resource sensitivity" means areas identified in accordance with WAC 222-22-050 (2)(d) or 222-22-060(2).

"Board" means the forest practices board established by the act.

"Bog" means wetlands which have the following characteristics: Hydric organic soils (peat and/or muck) typically 16 inches or more in depth (except over bedrock or hardpan); and vegetation such as sphagnum moss, labrador tea, bog laurel, bog rosemary, sundews, and sedges; bogs may have an overstory of spruce, western Hemlock, lodgepole pine, cedar, whitepine, crabapple, or aspen, and may be associated with open water. This includes nutrient-poor fens. See the Forest Practices Board Manual.

"Borrow pit" shall mean an excavation site outside the limits of construction to provide material necessary to that construction, such as fill material for the embankments.

"Chemicals" means substances applied to forest lands or timber including pesticides, fertilizers, and other forest chemicals.

"Clearcut" means a harvest method in which the entire stand of trees is removed in one timber harvesting operation. Except as provided in WAC 222-30-110, an area remains clearcut until:

It meets the minimum stocking requirements under WAC 222-34-010(2) or 222-34-020(2); and

The largest trees qualifying for the minimum stocking levels have survived on the area for five growing seasons or, if not, they have reached an average height of four feet.

"Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area or CRGNSA" means the area established pursuant to the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Act, 16 U.S.C. 544b(a).

"CRGNSA Special Management Area" means the areas designated in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Act, 16 U.S.C. 544b(b) or revised pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 544b(c). For purposes of this rule, the Special Management Area shall not include any parcels excluded by 16 U.S.C. 544f(o).

"CRGNSA Special Management Area Guidelines" means the guidelines and land use designations for forest practices developed pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 544f contained in the CRGNSA Management Plan developed pursuant to 15 U.S.C. 544d.

"Commercial tree species" means any species which is capable of producing a merchantable stand of timber on the particular site, or which is being grown as part of a Christmas tree or ornamental tree-growing operation.

"Completion of harvest" means the latest of:

Completion of removal of timber from the portions of forest lands harvested in the smallest logical unit that will not be disturbed by continued logging or an approved slash disposal plan for adjacent areas; or

Scheduled completion of any slash disposal operations where the department and the applicant agree within 6 months of completion of yarding that slash disposal is necessary or desirable to facilitate reforestation and agree to a time schedule for such slash disposal; or

Scheduled completion of any site preparation or rehabilitation of adjoining lands approved at the time of approval of the application or receipt of a notification: Provided, That delay of reforestation under this paragraph is permitted only to the extent reforestation would prevent or unreasonably hinder such site preparation or rehabilitation of adjoining lands.

"Constructed wetlands" means those wetlands voluntarily developed by the landowner. Constructed wetlands do not include wetlands created, restored, or enhanced as part of a mitigation procedure or wetlands inadvertently created as a result of current or past practices including, but not limited to: Road construction, landing construction, railroad construction, or surface mining.

"Contamination" means the introducing into the atmosphere, soil, or water, sufficient quantities of substances as may be injurious to public health, safety or welfare, or to domestic, commercial, industrial, agriculture or recreational uses, or to livestock, wildlife, fish or other aquatic life.

"Conversion option harvest plan" means a voluntary plan developed by the landowner and approved by the local government entity indicating the limits of harvest areas, road locations, and open space.

"Conversion to a use other than commercial timber operation" shall mean a bona fide conversion to an active use which is incompatible with timber growing.

"Cooperative habitat enhancement agreement (CHEA)" see WAC 222-16-105.

"Critical habitat (federal)" means the habitat of any threatened or endangered species designated as critical habitat by the United States Secretary of the Interior under Sections 3 (5)(A) and 4 (a)(3) of the Federal Endangered Species Act.

"Critical nesting season" means for marbled murrelets - April 1 to August 31.

"Critical wildlife habitat (state)" means those habitats designated by the board in accordance with WAC 222-16-080.

"Cultural resources" means archaeological and historic sites and artifacts and traditional religious, ceremonial and social uses and activities of affected Indian tribes.

"Cumulative effects" means the changes to the environment caused by the interaction of natural ecosystem processes with the effects of two or more forest practices.

"Daily peak activity" means for marbled murrelets - one hour before official sunrise to two hours after official sunrise and one hour before official sunset to one hour after official sunset.

"Debris" means woody vegetative residue less than 3 cubic feet in size resulting from forest practice activities which would reasonably be expected to cause significant damage to a public resource.

"Demographic support" means providing sufficient suitable spotted owl habitat within the SOSEA to maintain the viability of northern spotted owl sites identified as necessary to meet the SOSEA goals.

"Department" means the department of natural resources.

"Dispersal habitat" see WAC 222-16-085(2).

"Dispersal support" means providing sufficient dispersal habitat for the interchange of northern spotted owls within or across the SOSEA, as necessary to meet SOSEA goals. Dispersal support is provided by a landscape consisting of stands of dispersal habitat interspersed with areas of higher quality habitat, such as suitable spotted owl habitat found within RMZs, WMZs or other required and voluntary leave areas.

"Eastern Washington" means the lands of the state lying east of an administrative line which approximates the change from the Western Washington timber types to the Eastern Washington timber types described as follows:

Beginning at the International Border and Okanogan National Forest boundary at the N1/4 corner Section 6, T. 40N, R. 24E., W.M., south and west along the Pasayten Wilderness boundary to the west line of Section 30, T. 37N, R. 19E.,

Thence south on range line between R. 18E. and R. 19E., to the Lake Chelan-Sawtooth Wilderness at Section 31, T. 35N, R. 19E.,

Thence south and east along the eastern wilderness boundary of Lake Chelan-Sawtooth Wilderness to the west line of Section 18, T. 31N, R. 19E. on the north shore of Lake Chelan,

Thence south on the range line between R. 18E. and R. 19E. to the SE corner of T. 28N, R. 18E.,

Thence west on the township line between T. 27N, and T. 28N to the NW corner of T. 27N, R. 17E.,

Thence south on range line between R. 16E. and R. 17E. to the Alpine Lakes Wilderness at Section 31, T. 26N, R. 17E.,

Thence south along the eastern wilderness boundary to the west line of Section 6, T. 22N, R. 17E.,

Thence south on range line between R. 16E. and R. 17E. to the SE corner of T. 22N, R. 16E.,

Thence west along township line between T. 21N, and T. 22N to the NW corner of T. 21N, R. 15E.,

Thence south along range line between R. 14E. and R. 15E. to SW corner of T. 20N, R. 15E.,

Thence east along township line between T. 19N, and T. 20N to the SW corner of T. 20N, R. 16E.,

Thence south along range line between R. 15E. and R. 16E. to the SW corner of T. 18N, R. 16E.,

Thence west along township line between T. 17N, and T. 18N to the SE corner of T. 18N, R. 14E.,

Thence south along range line between T. 14E. and R. 15E. to the SW corner of T. 14N, R. 15E.,

Thence south and west along Wenatchee National Forest Boundary to the NW corner of T. 12N, R. 14E.,

Thence south along range line between R. 13E. and R. 14E. to SE corner of T. 10N, R. 13E.,

Thence west along township line between T. 9N, and T. 10N to the NW corner of T. 9N, R. 12E.,

Thence south along range line between R. 11E. and R. 12E. to SE corner of T. 8N, R. 11E.,

Thence west along township line between T. 7N, and T. 8N to the Gifford Pinchot National Forest Boundary,

Thence south along Forest Boundary to SE corner of Section 33, T. 7N, R. 11E.,

Thence west along township line between T. 6N, and T. 7N to SE corner of T. 7N, R. 9E.,

Thence south along Skamania-Klickitat County line to Oregon-Washington state line.

"End hauling" means the removal and transportation of excavated material, pit or quarry overburden, or landing or road cut material from the excavation site to a deposit site not adjacent to the point of removal.

"Erodible soils" means those soils exposed or displaced by a forest practice operation, that would be readily moved by water.

"Even-aged harvest methods" means the following harvest methods:

Clearcuts;

Seed tree harvests in which twenty or fewer trees per acre remain after harvest;

Shelterwood regeneration harvests in which twenty or fewer trees per acre remain after harvest;

Group or strip shelterwood harvests creating openings wider than two tree heights, based on dominant trees;

Shelterwood removal harvests which leave fewer than one hundred fifty trees per acre which are at least five years old or four feet in average height;

Partial cutting in which fewer than fifty trees per acre remain after harvest;

Overstory removal when more than five thousand board feet per acre is removed and fewer than fifty trees per acre at least ten feet in height remain after harvest; and

Other harvesting methods designed to manage for multiple age classes in which six or fewer trees per acre remain after harvest.

Except as provided above for shelterwood removal harvests and overstory removal, trees counted as remaining after harvest shall be at least ten inches in diameter at breast height and have at least the top one-third of the stem supporting green, live crowns. Except as provided in WAC 222-30-110, an area remains harvested by even-aged methods until it meets the minimum stocking requirements under WAC 222-30-010(2) or 222-34-020(2) and the largest trees qualifying for the minimum stocking levels have survived on the area for five growing seasons or, if not, they have reached an average height of four feet.

"Fen" means wetlands which have the following characteristics: Peat soils 16 inches or more in depth (except over bedrock); and vegetation such as certain sedges, hardstem bulrush and cattails; fens may have an overstory of spruce and may be associated with open water.

"Fertilizers" means any substance or any combination or mixture of substances used principally as a source of plant food or soil amendment.

"Fill" means the placement of earth material or aggregate for road or landing construction or other similar activities. Fill does not include the growing or harvesting of timber including, but not limited to, slash burning, site preparation, reforestation, precommercial thinning, intermediate or final harvesting, salvage of trees, brush control, or fertilization.

"Flood level - 50 year." For purposes of field interpretation of these regulations, the 50-year flood level shall be considered to refer to a vertical elevation measured from the ordinary high-water mark which is 1.25 times the vertical distance between the average stream bed and the ordinary high-water mark, and in horizontal extent shall not exceed 2 times the channel width measured on either side from the ordinary high-water mark, unless a different area is specified by the department based on identifiable topographic or vegetative features or based on an engineering computation of flood magnitude that has a 2 percent chance of occurring in any given year. The 50-year flood level shall not include those lands that can reasonably be expected to be protected from flood waters by flood control devices maintained by or under license from the federal government, the state, or a political subdivision of the state.

"Forest land" means all land which is capable of supporting a merchantable stand of timber and is not being actively used for a use which is incompatible with timber growing.

"Forest land owner" shall mean any person in actual control of forest land, whether such control is based either on legal or equitable title, or on any other interest entitling the holder to sell or otherwise dispose of any or all of the timber on such land in any manner: Provided, That any lessee or other person in possession of forest land without legal or equitable title to such land shall be excluded from the definition of "forest land owner" unless such lessee or other person has the right to sell or otherwise dispose of any or all of the timber located on such forest land.

"Forest practice" means any activity conducted on or directly pertaining to forest land and relating to growing, harvesting, or processing timber, including but not limited to:

Road and trail construction;

Harvesting, final and intermediate;

Precommercial thinning;

Reforestation;

Fertilization;

Prevention and suppression of diseases and insects;

Salvage of trees; and

Brush control.

"Forest practice" shall not include: Forest species seed orchard operations and intensive forest nursery operations; or preparatory work such as tree marking, surveying and road flagging; or removal or harvest of incidental vegetation from forest lands such as berries, ferns, greenery, mistletoe, herbs, mushrooms, and other products which cannot normally be expected to result in damage to forest soils, timber or public resources.

"Forest trees" excludes trees cultivated by agricultural methods in growing cycles shorter than ten years: Provided, That Christmas trees are forest trees and: Provided further, That this exclusion applies only to trees planted on land that was not in forest use immediately before the trees were planted and before the land was prepared for planting the trees.

"Green recruitment trees" means those trees left after harvest for the purpose of becoming future wildlife reserve trees under WAC 222-30-020(11).

"Herbicide" means any substance or mixture of substances intended to prevent, destroy, repel, or mitigate any tree, bush, weed or algae and other aquatic weeds.

"Historic site" includes:

Sites, areas and structures or other evidence of human activities illustrative of the origins, evolution and development of the nation, state or locality; or

Places associated with a personality important in history; or

Places where significant historical events are known to have occurred even though no physical evidence of the event remains.

"Identified watershed processes" means the following components of natural ecological processes that may in some instances be altered by forest practices in a watershed:

Mass wasting;

Surface and road erosion;

Seasonal flows including hydrologic peak and low flows and annual yields (volume and timing);

Large organic debris;

Shading; and

Stream bank and bed stability.

"Insecticide" means any substance or mixture of substances intended to prevent, destroy, repel, or mitigate any insect, other arthropods or mollusk pests.

"Interdisciplinary team" (ID Team) means a group of varying size comprised of individuals having specialized expertise, assembled by the department to respond to technical questions associated with a proposed forest practice activity.

"Islands" means any island surrounded by salt water in Kitsap, Mason, Jefferson, Pierce, King, Snohomish, Skagit, Whatcom, Island, or San Juan counties.

"Limits of construction" means the area occupied by the completed roadway or landing, including the cut bank, fill slope, and the area cleared for the purpose of constructing the roadway or landing.

"Load bearing portion" means that part of the road, landing, etc., which is supportive soil, earth, rock or other material directly below the working surface and only the associated earth structure necessary for support.

"Local government entity" means the governments of counties and the governments of cities and towns as defined in chapter 35.01 RCW.

"Low impact harvest" means use of any logging equipment, methods, or systems that minimize compaction or disturbance of soils and vegetation during the yarding process. The department shall determine such equipment, methods or systems in consultation with the department of ecology.

"Marbled murrelet detection area" means an area of land associated with a visual or audible detection of a marbled murrelet, made by a qualified surveyor which is documented and recorded in the department of fish and wildlife data base. The marbled murrelet detection area shall be comprised of the section of land in which the marbled murrelet detection was made and the eight sections of land immediately adjacent to that section.

"Marbled murrelet nesting platform" means any horizontal tree structure such as a limb, an area where a limb branches, a surface created by multiple leaders, a deformity, or a debris/moss platform or stick nest equal to or greater than 7 inches in diameter including associated moss if present, that is 50 feet or more above the ground in trees 32 inches dbh and greater (generally over 90 years of age) and is capable of supporting nesting by marbled murrelets.

"Median home range circle" means a circle, with a specified radius, centered on a spotted owl site center. The radius for the median home range circle in the Hoh-Clearwater/Coastal Link SOSEA is 2.7 miles; for all other SOSEAs the radius is 1.8 miles.

"Merchantable stand of timber" means a stand of trees that will yield logs and/or fiber:

Suitable in size and quality for the production of lumber, plywood, pulp or other forest products;

Of sufficient value at least to cover all the costs of harvest and transportation to available markets.

"Northern spotted owl site center" means the location of status 1, 2 or 3 northern spotted owls based on the following definitions:



Status 1: Pair or reproductive - a male and female heard and/or observed in close proximity to each other on the same visit, a female detected on a nest, or one or both adults observed with young.

Status 2: Two birds, pair status unknown - the presence or response of two birds of opposite sex where pair status cannot be determined and where at least one member meets the resident territorial single requirements.

Status 3: Resident territorial single - the presence or response of a single owl within the same general area on three or more occasions within a breeding season with no response by an owl of the opposite sex after a complete survey; or three or more responses over several years (i.e., two responses in year one and one response in year two, for the same general area).



In determining the existence, location, and status of northern spotted owl site centers, the department shall consult with the department of fish and wildlife and use only those sites documented in substantial compliance with guidelines or protocols and quality control methods established by and available from the department of fish and wildlife.

"Notice to comply" means a notice issued by the department pursuant to RCW 76.09.090 of the act and may require initiation and/or completion of action necessary to prevent, correct and/or compensate for material damage to public resources which resulted from forest practices.

"Occupied marbled murrelet site" means:

(1) A contiguous area of suitable marbled murrelet habitat where at least one of the following marbled murrelet behaviors or conditions occur:

(a) A nest is located; or

(b) Downy chicks or eggs or egg shells are found; or

(c) Marbled murrelets are detected flying below, through, into or out of the forest canopy; or

(d) Birds calling from a stationary location within the area; or

(e) Birds circling above a timber stand within one tree height of the top of the canopy; or

(2) A contiguous forested area, which does not meet the definition of suitable marbled murrelet habitat, in which any of the behaviors or conditions listed above has been documented by the department of fish and wildlife and which is distinguishable from the adjacent forest based on vegetative characteristics important to nesting marbled murrelets.

(3) For sites defined in (1) above, the outer perimeter of the occupied site shall be presumed to be the closer, measured from the point where the observed behaviors or conditions listed in (1) above occurred, of the following:

(a) 1.5 miles from the point where the observed behaviors or conditions listed in (1) above occurred; or

(b) The beginning of any gap greater than 300 feet wide lacking one or more of the vegetative characteristics listed under "suitable marbled murrelet habitat"; or

(c) The beginning of any narrow area of "suitable marbled murrelet habitat" less than 300 feet in width and more than 300 feet in length.

(4) For sites defined under (2) above, the outer perimeter of the occupied site shall be presumed to be the closer, measured from the point where the observed behaviors or conditions listed in (1) above occurred, of the following:

(a) 1.5 miles from the point where the observed behaviors or conditions listed in (1) above occurred; or

(b) The beginning of any gap greater than 300 feet wide lacking one or more of the distinguishing vegetative characteristics important to murrelets; or

(c) The beginning of any narrow area of suitable marbled murrelet habitat, comparable to the area where the observed behaviors or conditions listed in (1) above occurred, less than 300 feet in width and more than 300 feet in length.

(5) In determining the existence, location and status of occupied marbled murrelet sites, the department shall consult with the department of fish and wildlife and use only those sites documented in substantial compliance with guidelines or protocols and quality control methods established by and available from the department of fish and wildlife.

"Old forest habitat" see WAC 222-16-085 (1)(a).

"Operator" shall mean any person engaging in forest practices except an employee with wages as his/her sole compensation.

"Ordinary high-water mark" means the mark on the shores of all waters, which will be found by examining the beds and banks and ascertaining where the presence and action of waters are so common and usual, and so long continued in all ordinary years, as to mark upon the soil a character distinct from that of the abutting upland, in respect to vegetation: Provided, That in any area where the ordinary high-water mark cannot be found, the ordinary high-water mark adjoining saltwater shall be the line of mean high tide and the ordinary high-water mark adjoining freshwater shall be the line of mean high-water.

"Other forest chemicals" means fire retardants when used to control burning (other than water), nontoxic repellents, oil, dust-control agents (other than water), salt, and other chemicals used in forest management, except pesticides and fertilizers, that may present hazards to the environment.

"Park" means any park included on the parks register maintained by the department pursuant to WAC 222-20-100(2). Developed park recreation area means any park area developed for high density outdoor recreation use.

"Partial cutting" means the removal of a portion of the merchantable volume in a stand of timber so as to leave an uneven-aged stand of well-distributed residual, healthy trees that will reasonably utilize the productivity of the soil. Partial cutting does not include seedtree or shelterwood or other types of regeneration cutting.

"Pesticide" means any insecticide, herbicide, fungicide, or rodenticide but does not include nontoxic repellents or other forest chemicals.

"Plantable area" is an area capable of supporting a commercial stand of timber excluding lands devoted to permanent roads, utility rights-of-way, that portion of riparian management zones where scarification is not permitted, and any other area devoted to a use incompatible with commercial timber growing.

"Power equipment" means all machinery operated with fuel burning or electrical motors, including heavy machinery, chain saws, portable generators, pumps, and powered backpack devices.

"Public resources" means water, fish, and wildlife and in addition shall mean capital improvements of the state or its political subdivisions.

"Qualified surveyor" means an individual who has successfully completed the marbled murrelet field training course offered by the department of fish and wildlife or its equivalent.

"Rehabilitation" means the act of renewing, or making usable and reforesting forest land which was poorly stocked or previously nonstocked with commercial species.

"Relief culvert" means a structure to relieve surface runoff from roadside ditches to prevent excessive buildup in water volume and velocity.

"Resource characteristics" means the following specific measurable characteristics of fish, water, and capital improvements of the state or its political subdivisions:

For fish and water:

Physical fish habitat, including temperature and turbidity;

Turbidity in hatchery water supplies; and

Turbidity and volume for areas of water supply.

For capital improvements of the state or its political subdivisions:

Physical or structural integrity.

If the methodology is developed and added to the manual to analyze the cumulative effects of forest practices on other characteristics of fish, water, and capital improvements of the state or its subdivisions, the board shall amend this list to include these characteristics.

"Riparian management zone" means a specified area alongside Type 1, 2 and 3 Waters where specific measures are taken to protect water quality and fish and wildlife habitat.

"Rodenticide" means any substance or mixture of substances intended to prevent, destroy, repel, or mitigate rodents or any other vertebrate animal which the director of the state department of agriculture may declare by regulation to be a pest.

"Salvage" means the removal of snags, down logs, windthrow, or dead and dying material.

"Scarification" means loosening the topsoil and/or disrupting the forest floor in preparation for regeneration.

"Shorelines of the state" shall have the same meaning as in RCW 90.58.030 (Shoreline Management Act).

"Side casting" means the act of moving excavated material to the side and depositing such material within the limits of construction or dumping over the side and outside the limits of construction.

"Site preparation" means those activities associated with the removal of slash in preparing a site for planting and shall include scarification and/or slash burning.

"Skid trail" means a route used by tracked or wheeled skidders to move logs to a landing or road.

"Slash" means pieces of woody material containing more than 3 cubic feet resulting from forest practice activities.

"SOSEA goals" means the goals specified for a spotted owl special emphasis area as identified on the SOSEA maps (see WAC 222-16-086). SOSEA goals provide for demographic and/or dispersal support as necessary to complement the northern spotted owl protection strategies on federal land within or adjacent to the SOSEA.

"Spoil" means excess material removed as overburden or generated during road or landing construction which is not used within limits of construction.

"Spotted owl dispersal habitat" see WAC 222-16-085(2).

"Spotted owl special emphasis areas (SOSEA)" means the geographic areas as mapped in WAC 222-16-086. Detailed maps of the SOSEAs indicating the boundaries and goals are available from the department at its regional offices.

"Stop work order" means the "stop work order" defined in RCW 76.09.080 of the act and may be issued by the department to stop violations of the forest practices chapter or to prevent damage and/or to correct and/or compensate for damages to public resources resulting from forest practices.

"Sub-mature habitat" see WAC 222-16-085 (1)(b).

"Suitable marbled murrelet habitat" means a contiguous forested area containing trees capable of providing nesting opportunities:

(1) With all of the following indicators unless the department, in consultation with the department of fish and wildlife, has determined that the habitat is not likely to be occupied by marbled murrelets:

(a) Within 50 miles of marine waters;

(b) At least 40% of the dominant and codominant trees are Douglas-fir, western hemlock, western red cedar or sitka spruce;

(c) Two or more nesting platforms per acre;

(d) At least 7 acres in size, including the contiguous forested area within 300 feet of nesting platforms, with similar forest stand characteristics (age, species composition, forest structure) to the forested area in which the nesting platforms occur.

"Suitable spotted owl habitat" see WAC 222-16-085(1).

"Threatened or endangered species" means all species of wildlife listed as "threatened" or "endangered" by the United States Secretary of the Interior, and all species of wildlife designated as "threatened" or "endangered" by the Washington fish and wildlife commission.

"Timber" shall mean forest trees, standing or down, of a commercial species, including Christmas trees.

"Water bar" means a diversion ditch and/or hump in a trail or road for the purpose of carrying surface water runoff into the vegetation duff, ditch, or other dispersion area so that it does not gain the volume and velocity which causes soil movement and erosion.

"Watershed administrative unit (WAU)" means an area shown on the map specified in WAC 222-22-020(1).

"Watershed analysis" means, for a given WAU, the assessment completed under WAC 222-22-050 or 222-22-060 together with the prescriptions selected under WAC 222-22-070 and shall include assessments completed under WAC 222-22-050 where there are no areas of resource sensitivity.

"Weed" is any plant which tends to overgrow or choke out more desirable vegetation.

"Western Washington" means the lands of the state lying west of the administrative line described in the definition of Eastern Washington.

"Wetland" means those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions, such as swamps, bogs, fens, and similar areas. This includes wetlands created, restored, or enhanced as part of a mitigation procedure. This does not include constructed wetlands or the following surface waters of the state intentionally constructed from wetland sites: Irrigation and drainage ditches, grass lined swales, canals, agricultural detention facilities, farm ponds, and landscape amenities.

"Wetland functions" include the protection of water quality and quantity, providing fish and wildlife habitat, and the production of timber.

"Wetland management zone" means a specified area adjacent to Type A and B Wetlands where specific measures are taken to protect the wetland functions.

"Wildlife" means all species of the animal kingdom whose members exist in Washington in a wild state. The term "wildlife" includes, but is not limited to, any mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, or invertebrate, at any stage of development. The term "wildlife" does not include feral domestic mammals or the family Muridae of the order Rodentia (old world rats and mice).

"Wildlife reserve trees" means those defective, dead, damaged, or dying trees which provide or have the potential to provide habitat for those wildlife species dependent on standing trees. Wildlife reserve trees are categorized as follows:

Type 1 wildlife reserve trees are defective or deformed live trees that have observably sound tops, limbs, trunks, and roots. They may have part of the top broken out or have evidence of other severe defects that include: "Cat face," animal chewing, old logging wounds, weather injury, insect attack, or lightning strike. Unless approved by the landowner, only green trees with visible cavities, nests, or obvious severe defects capable of supporting cavity dependent species shall be considered as Type 1 wildlife reserve trees. These trees must be stable and pose the least hazard for workers.

Type 2 wildlife reserve trees are dead Type 1 trees with sound tops, limbs, trunks, and roots.

Type 3 wildlife reserve trees are live or dead trees with unstable tops or upper portions. Unless approved by the landowner, only green trees with visible cavities, nests, or obvious severe defects capable of supporting cavity dependent species shall be considered as Type 3 wildlife reserve trees. Although the roots and main portion of the trunk are sound, these reserve trees pose high hazard because of the defect in live or dead wood higher up in the tree.

Type 4 wildlife reserve trees are live or dead trees with unstable trunks or roots, with or without bark. This includes "soft snags" as well as live trees with unstable roots caused by root rot or fire. These trees are unstable and pose a high hazard to workers.

"Windthrow" means a natural process by which trees are uprooted or sustain severe trunk damage by the wind.

"Young forest marginal habitat" see WAC 222-16-085 (1)(b).



[Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040 and chapter 34.05 RCW. 97-24-091, 222-16-010, filed 12/3/97, effective 1/3/98; 97-15-105, 222-16-010, filed 7/21/97, effective 8/21/97. Statutory Authority: Chapters 76.09 and 34.05 RCW. 96-12-038, 222-16-010, filed 5/31/96, effective 7/1/96. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040 and chapter 34.05 RCW. 94-17-033, 222-16-010, filed 8/10/94, effective 8/13/94; 93-12-001, 222-16-010, filed 5/19/93, effective 6/19/93. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040, 76.09.050 and chapter 34.05 RCW. 92-15-011, 222-16-010, filed 7/2/92, effective 8/2/92. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040, 76.09.050 and 34.05.350. 92-03-028, 222-16-010, filed 1/8/92, effective 2/8/92; 91-23-052, 222-16-010, filed 11/15/91, effective 12/16/91. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040. 88-19-112 (Order 551, Resolution No. 88-1), 222-16-010, filed 9/21/88, effective 11/1/88; 87-23-036 (Order 535), 222-16-010, filed 11/16/87, effective 1/1/88. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040 and 76.09.050. 82-16-077 (Resolution No. 82-1), 222-16-010, filed 8/3/82, effective 10/1/82; Order 263, 222-16-010, filed 6/16/76.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 97-24-091, filed 12/3/97, effective 1/3/98)



WAC 222-16-050  Classes of forest practices. There are 4 classes of forest practices created by the act. All forest practices (including those in Classes I and II) must be conducted in accordance with the forest practices regulations.

(1) "Class IV - special." Application to conduct forest practices involving the following circumstances requires an environmental checklist in compliance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and SEPA guidelines, as they have been determined to have potential for a substantial impact on the environment. It may be determined that additional information or a detailed environmental statement is required before these forest practices may be conducted.

*(a) Aerial application of pesticides in a manner identified as having the potential for a substantial impact on the environment under WAC 222-16-070 or ground application of a pesticide within a Type A or B wetland.

(b) Specific forest practices listed in WAC 222-16-080 on lands designated as:

(i) Critical wildlife habitat (state) of threatened or endangered species; or

(ii) Critical habitat (federal) of threatened or endangered species except those excluded by the board under WAC 222-16-080(3).

(c) Harvesting, road construction, aerial application of pesticides and site preparation on all lands within the boundaries of any national park, state park, or any park of a local governmental entity, except harvest of less than 5 MBF within any developed park recreation area and park managed salvage of merchantable forest products.

*(d) Construction of roads, landings, rock quarries, gravel pits, borrow pits, and spoil disposal areas on slide prone areas as defined in WAC 222-24-020(6) and field verified by the department, in a watershed administrative unit that has not undergone a watershed analysis under chapter 222-22 WAC, when such slide prone areas occur on an uninterrupted slope above water typed pursuant to WAC 222-16-030, Type A or Type B Wetland, or capital improvement of the state or its political subdivisions where there is potential for a substantial debris flow or mass failure to cause significant impact to public resources.

*(e) Timber harvest in a watershed administrative unit that has not undergone a watershed analysis under chapter 222-22 WAC, on slide prone areas, field verified by the department, where soils, geologic structure, and local hydrology indicate that canopy removal has the potential for increasing slope instability, when such areas occur on an uninterrupted slope above any water typed pursuant to WAC 222-16-030, Type A or Type B Wetland, or a capital improvement of the state or its political subdivisions where there is a potential for a substantial debris flow or mass failure to cause significant impact to public resources.

(f) Timber harvest, in a watershed administrative unit that has not undergone a watershed analysis under chapter 222-22 WAC, construction of roads, landings, rock quarries, gravel pits, borrow pits, and spoil disposal areas on snow avalanche slopes within those areas designated by the department, in consultation with department of transportation, as high avalanche hazard.

(g) Timber harvest, construction of roads, landings, rock quarries, gravel pits, borrow pits, and spoil disposal areas on archaeological or historic sites registered with the Washington state office of archaeology and historic preservation, or on sites containing evidence of Native American cairns, graves, or glyptic records, as provided for in chapters 27.44 and 27.53 RCW. The department shall consult with affected Indian tribes in identifying such sites.

*(h) Forest practices subject to a watershed analysis conducted under chapter 222-22 WAC in an area of resource sensitivity identified in that analysis which deviates from the prescriptions (which may include an alternate plan) in the watershed analysis.

*(i) Filling or draining of more than 0.5 acre of a wetland.

(2) "Class IV - general." Applications involving the following circumstances are "Class IV - general" forest practices unless they are listed in "Class IV - special." Upon receipt of an application, the department will determine the lead agency for purposes of compliance with the State Environmental Policy Act pursuant to WAC 197-11-924 and 197-11-938(4) and RCW 43.21C.037(2). Such applications are subject to a 30-day period for approval unless the lead agency determines a detailed statement under RCW 43.21C.030 (2)(c) is required. Upon receipt, if the department determines the application is for a proposal that will require a license from a county/city acting under the powers enumerated in RCW 76.09.240, the department shall notify the applicable county/city under WAC 197-11-924 that the department has determined according to WAC 197-11-938(4) that the county/city is the lead agency for purposes of compliance with State Environmental Policy Act.

(a) Forest practices (other than those in Class I) on lands platted after January 1, 1960, or on lands being converted to another use.

(b) Forest practices which would otherwise be Class III, but which are taking place on lands which are not to be reforested because of likelihood of future conversion to urban development. (See WAC 222-16-060 and 222-34-050.)

(3) "Class I." Those operations that have been determined to have no direct potential for damaging a public resource are Class I forest practices. When the conditions listed in "Class IV - Special" are not present, these operations may be commenced without notification or application.

(a) Culture and harvest of Christmas trees and seedlings.

*(b) Road maintenance except: (i) Replacement of bridges and culverts across Type 1, 2, 3 or flowing Type 4 Waters; or (ii) movement of material that has a direct potential for entering Type 1, 2, 3 or flowing Type 4 Waters or Type A or B Wetlands.

*(c) Construction of landings less than 1 acre in size, if not within a shoreline area of a Type 1 Water, the riparian management zone of a Type 2 or 3 Water, the ordinary high-water mark of a Type 4 Water, a wetland management zone ((or within)), a wetland, or the CRGNSA Special Management Area.

*(d) Construction of less than 600 feet of road on a sideslope of 40 percent or less if the limits of construction are not within the shoreline area of a Type 1 Water, the riparian management zone of a Type 2 or Type 3 Water, the ordinary high-water mark of a Type 4 Water, a wetland management zone ((or within)), a wetland, or the CRGNSA Special Management Area.

*(e) Installation or removal of a portable water crossing structure where such installation does not take place within the shoreline area of a Type 1 Water and does not involve disturbance of the beds or banks of any waters.

*(f) Initial installation and replacement of relief culverts and other drainage control facilities not requiring a hydraulic permit.

(g) Rocking an existing road.

(h) Loading and hauling timber from landings or decks.

(i) Precommercial thinning and pruning, if not within the CRGNSA Special Management Area.

(j) Tree planting and seeding.

(k) Cutting and/or removal of less than 5,000 board feet of timber (including live, dead and down material) for personal use (i.e., firewood, fence posts, etc.) in any 12-month period, if not within the CRGNSA Special Management Area.

(l) Emergency fire control and suppression.

(m) Slash burning pursuant to a burning permit (RCW 76.04.205).

*(n) Other slash control and site preparation not involving either off-road use of tractors on slopes exceeding 40 percent or off-road use of tractors within the shorelines of a Type 1 Water, the riparian management zone of any Type 2 or 3 Water, or the ordinary high-water mark of a Type 4 Water, a wetland management zone ((or within)), a wetland, or the CRGNSA Special Management Area.

*(o) Ground application of chemicals, if not within the CRGNSA Special Management Area. (See WAC 222-38-020 and 222-38-030.)

*(p) Aerial application of chemicals (except insecticides), outside of the CRGNSA Special Management Area when applied to not more than 40 contiguous acres if the application is part of a combined or cooperative project with another landowner and where the application does not take place within 100 feet of lands used for farming, or within 200 feet of a residence, unless such farmland or residence is owned by the forest landowner. Provisions of chapter 222-38 WAC shall apply.

(q) Forestry research studies and evaluation tests by an established research organization.

(r) Any of the following if none of the operation or limits of construction takes place within the shoreline area of a Type 1 Water or the riparian management zone of a Type 2 or 3 Water, ((or within)) the ordinary high-water mark of a Type 4 Water or flowing Type 5 Water, or within the CRGNSA Special Management Area and the operation does not involve off-road use of tractor or wheeled skidding systems on a sideslope of greater than 40 percent:

(i) Any forest practices within the boundaries of existing golf courses.

(ii) Any forest practices within the boundaries of existing cemeteries which are approved by the cemetery board.

(iii) Any forest practices involving a single landowner where contiguous ownership is less than two acres in size.

(s) Removal of beaver structures from culverts on active and inactive roads. A hydraulics project approval from the Washington department of fish and wildlife may be required.

(4) "Class II." Certain forest practices have been determined to have a less than ordinary potential to damage a public resource and may be conducted as Class II forest practices: Provided, That no forest practice enumerated below may be conducted as a Class II forest practice if the operation requires a hydraulic project approval (RCW 75.20.100) or is within a "shorelines of the state," or involves a bond in lieu of landowners signature (other than renewals). Such forest practices require an application. No forest practice enumerated below may be conducted as a "Class II" forest practice if it takes place on lands platted after January 1, 1960, or on lands being converted to another use. Such forest practices require a Class IV application. Class II forest practices are the following:

(a) Renewal of a prior Class II notification where no change in the nature and extent of the forest practices is required under rules effective at the time of renewal.

(b) Renewal of a previously approved Class III or IV forest practice application where:

(i) No modification of the uncompleted operation is proposed;

(ii) No notices to comply, stop work orders or other enforcement actions are outstanding with respect to the prior application; and

(iii) No change in the nature and extent of the forest practice is required under rules effective at the time of renewal.

*(c) Any of the following if none of the operation or limits of construction takes place within the riparian management zone of a Type 2 or 3 Water, within the ordinary high-water mark of a Type 4 Water, within a wetland management zone ((or)), within a wetland, or within the CRGNSA Special Management Area:

(i) Construction of advance fire trails.

(ii) Opening a new pit of, or extending an existing pit by, less than 1 acre.

*(d) Any of the following if none of the operation or limits of construction takes place within the riparian management zone of a Type 2 or 3 Water, within the ordinary high-water mark of a Type 4 Water, within a wetland management zone or within a wetland; and if none of the operations involve off-road use of tractor or wheeled skidding systems on a sideslope of greater than 40 percent:

Salvage of logging residue.

*(e) Any of the following if none of the operation or limits of construction takes place within the riparian management zone of a Type 2 or 3 Water, within the ordinary high-water mark of a Type 4 Water, within a wetland management zone ((or)), within a wetland, or within the CRGNSA Special Management Area, and if none of the operations involve off-road use of tractor or wheeled skidding systems on a sideslope of greater than 40 percent, and if none of the operations are located on lands with a likelihood of future conversion (see WAC 222-16-060):

(i) West of the Cascade summit, partial cutting of 40 percent or less of the live timber volume.

(ii) East of the Cascade summit, partial cutting of 5,000 board feet per acre or less.

(iii) Salvage of dead, down, or dying timber if less than 40 percent of the total timber volume is removed in any 12-month period.

(iv) Any harvest on less than 40 acres.

(v) Construction of 600 or more feet of road, provided that the department shall be notified at least 2 business days before commencement of the construction.

(5) "Class III." Forest practices not listed under Classes IV, I or II above are "Class III" forest practices. Among Class III forest practices are the following:

(a) Those requiring hydraulic project approval (RCW 75.20.100).

*(b) Those within the shorelines of the state other than those in a Class I forest practice.

*(c) Aerial application of insecticides, except where classified as a Class IV forest practice.

*(d) Aerial application of chemicals (except insecticides), except where classified as Class I or IV forest practices.

*(e) Harvest or salvage of timber except where classed as Class I, II or IV forest practices.

*(f) All road construction and reconstruction except as listed in Classes I, II and IV forest practices.

(g) Opening of new pits or extensions of existing pits over 1 acre.

*(h) Road maintenance involving:

(i) Replacement of bridges or culverts across Type 1, 2, 3, or flowing Type 4 Waters; or

(ii) Movement of material that has a direct potential for entering Type 1, 2, 3 or flowing Type 4 Waters or Type A or B Wetlands.

(i) Operations involving an applicant's bond in lieu of a landowner's signature.

(j) Site preparation or slash abatement not listed in Classes I or IV forest practices.

(k) Harvesting, road construction, site preparation or aerial application of pesticides on lands which contain cultural, historic or archaeological resources which, at the time the application or notification is filed, are:

(i) On or are eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places; or

(ii) Have been identified to the department as being of interest to an affected Indian tribe.

(l) Harvesting exceeding 19 acres in a designated difficult regeneration area.

(m) Utilization of an alternate plan. See WAC 222-12-040.

*(n) Any filling of wetlands, except where classified as Class IV forest practices.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040 and chapter 34.05 RCW. 97-24-091, 222-16-050, filed 12/3/97, effective 1/3/98; 93-12-001, 222-16-050, filed 5/19/93, effective 6/19/93. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040, 76.09.050 and chapter 34.05 RCW. 92-15-011, 222-16-050, filed 7/2/92, effective 8/2/92. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040, 76.09.050 and 34.05.350. 91-23-052, 222-16-050, filed 11/15/91, effective 12/16/91. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040. 88-19-112 (Order 551, Resolution No. 88-1), 222-16-050, filed 9/21/88, effective 11/1/88; 87-23-036 (Order 535), 222-16-050, filed 11/16/87, effective 1/1/88. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040 and 76.09.050. 82-16-077 (Resolution No. 82-1), 222-16-050, filed 8/3/82, effective 10/1/82; Order 263, 222-16-050, filed 6/16/76.]

OTS-1916.2

AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 93-12-001, filed 5/19/93, effective 6/19/93)



WAC 222-20-010  Applications and notifications--Policy. (1) No Class II, III or IV forest practices shall be commenced or continued unless the department has received a notification for Class II forest practices, or approved an application for Class III or IV forest practices pursuant to the act. Where the time limit for the department to act on the application has expired, and none of the conditions in WAC 222-20-020(1) exist, the operation may commence. (NOTE: OTHER LAWS AND REGULATIONS AND/OR PERMIT REQUIREMENTS MAY APPLY. SEE CHAPTER 222-50 WAC.)

(2) The department shall prescribe the form and contents of the notification and application, which shall specify what information is needed for a notification, and the information required for the department to approve or disapprove the application.

(3) Applications and notifications for operations not converting to another use shall be signed by the landowner, the timber owner and the operator, or the operator and accompanied by a consent form signed by the timber owner and the landowner. A consent form may be another document if it is signed by the landowner(s) and it contains a statement acknowledging that he/she is familiar with the Forest Practices Act, including the provisions dealing with conversion to another use (RCW 76.09.060(3)). Where the application is not signed by the landowner, the department shall, provided all the other requirements contained in chapter 222-20 WAC are met, approve the application without the signature of the landowner if:

(a) The operator or timber owner provides legal evidence of timber rights, ownership, or other legal rights;

(b) The timber owner or operator posts a bond, in an amount determined by and a form acceptable to the department, securing compliance with the requirements of the forest practices regulations; and

(c) The operator or timber owner provides evidence of reasonably advance notification to the landowner of the proposed forest practice and that the landowner has been requested to sign the application, a copy of which has been made available to the landowner: Provided, That in lieu of such evidence the applicant may submit a sworn statement indicating inability to locate the landowner after a reasonable good faith attempt to locate and notify the landowner of the proposed forest practice.

(4) Where an application for a conversion is not signed by the landowner or accompanied by a consent form, as outlined in subsection (3) of this section, the department shall not approve the application. Applications and notifications for the development or maintenance of utility rights of way shall not be considered to be conversions.

(5) Transfer of the approved application or notification to a new landowner, timber owner or operator requires written notice by the original landowner or applicant to the department and should include the original application or notification number. This written notice shall be in a form acceptable to the department and shall contain an affirmation signed by the new landowner, timber owner, or operator, as applicable, that he/she agrees to be bound by all conditions on the approved application or notification. In the case of a transfer of an application previously approved without the landowner's signature the new timber owner or operator must submit a bond securing compliance with the requirements of the forest practices regulations as determined necessary by the department. If an application or notification indicates that the landowner or timber owner is also the operator, or an operator signed the application, no notice need be given regarding any change in subcontractors or similar independent contractors working under the supervision of the operator of record.

(6) Applications and notifications must be delivered to the department at the appropriate region office. Delivery should be in person or by registered or certified mail.

(7) Applications and notifications shall be considered received on the date and time shown on any registered or certified mail receipt, or the written receipt given at the time of personal delivery, or at the time of receipt by general mail delivery. Applications or notifications that are not complete, or are inaccurate will not be considered officially received until the applicant furnishes the necessary information to complete the application. A review statement from the U.S. Forest Service that evaluates compliance of the forest practices with the CRGNSA Special Management Area Guidelines is necessary information for an application or notification within the CRGNSA Special Management Area. The review statement requirement shall be waived if the applicant can demonstrate the U.S. Forest Service received a complete plan application and failed to act within 45 days. An environmental checklist (WAC 197-11-315) is necessary information for all Class IV applications. A local government entity clearing and/or grading permit is necessary information for all Class IV applications on lands that will be converted to a use other than commercial timber production or on lands which have been platted after January 1, 1960, if the local government entity has jurisdiction and has an ordinance requiring such permit. If a notification or application is delivered in person to the department by the operator or the operator's authorized agent, the department shall immediately provide a dated receipt. In all other cases, the department shall immediately mail a dated receipt to the applicant.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040 and chapter 34.05 RCW. 93-12-001, 222-20-010, filed 5/19/93, effective 6/19/93. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040, 76.09.050 and 34.05.350. 91-23-052, 222-20-010, filed 11/15/91, effective 12/16/91. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040. 87-23-036 (Order 535), 222-20-010, filed 11/16/87, effective 1/1/88; 82-18-053 (Resolution No. 82-2), 222-20-010, filed 8/31/82. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040 and 76.09.050. 82-16-077 (Resolution No. 82-1), 222-20-010, filed 8/3/82, effective 10/1/82; Order 263, 222-20-010, filed 6/16/76.]



AMENDATORY SECTION (Amending WSR 91-23-052, filed 11/15/91, effective 12/16/91)



WAC 222-20-040  Approval conditions. (1) Whenever an approvedapplication authorizes a forest practice which, because of soil condition, proximity to a water course or other unusual factor, has a potential for causing material damage to a public resource, as determined by the department, the applicant shall, when requested on the approved application, notify the department 2 business days before the commencement of actual operations.

(2) All approvals are subject to any conditions stipulated on the approved application and to any subsequent additional requirements set forth in a stop work order or a notice to comply.

(3) Local government entity conditions.

(a) RCW 76.09.240(1) allows a local government entity to exercise limited land use planning or zoning authority on certain types of forest practices. This subsection is designed to ensure that local government entities exercise this authority consistent with chapter 76.09 RCW and the rules in Title 222 WAC. The system provided for in this subsection is optional.

(b) This subsection only applies to Class IV general applications on lands that will be converted to a use other than commercial timber production or to Class IV general applications on lands which have been platted after January 1, 1960.

(c) The department shall transmit the applications to the appropriate local government entity within two business days from the date the department receives the application.

(d) The department shall condition the application consistent with the request of the local government entity if:

(i) The local government entity has adopted a clearing and/or grading ordinance that addresses the items listed in (e) of this subsection and requires a permit;

(ii) The local government entity has issued a permit under the ordinance in (i) that contains the requested conditions; and

(iii) The local government entity has entered into an interagency agreement with the department consistent with WAC 222-50-030 addressing enforcement of forest practices.

(e) The local government entity conditions may only cover:

(i) The location and character of open space and/or vegetative buffers;

(ii) The location and design of roads;

(iii) The retention of trees for bank stabilization, erosion prevention, and/or storm water management; or

(iv) The protection of critical areas designated pursuant to chapter 36.70A RCW.

(f) Local government entity conditions shall be filed with the department within twenty-nine days of the filing of the application with the department or within fourteen business days of the transmittal of the application to the local government entity or one day before the department acts on the application, whichever is later.

(g) The department shall incorporate local government entity conditions consistent with this subsection as conditions of the forest practices approval.

(h) Any exercise of local government entity authority consistent with this subsection shall be considered consistent with the forest practices rules in this chapter.

(4) Lead agency mitigation measures.

(a) This subsection is designed to specify procedures for a mitigated DNS process that are consistent with chapters 76.09 and 43.21C RCW and the rules in Title 222 WAC and chapter 197-11 WAC.

(b) This subsection applies to all Class IV applications in which the department is not the lead agency under SEPA. (See WAC 197-11-758.)

(c) The department shall transmit the application to the lead agency within two business days from the date the department receives the application.

(d) The lead agency may specify mitigation measures pursuant to WAC 197-11-350.

(e) The lead agency threshold determination and any mitigation measures must be filed with the department within the later of (i) twenty-nine days of the receipt of the application by the department, (ii) fourteen business days of the transmittal of the application to the lead agency if the lead agency is a local government entity; or (iii) one day before the department acts on the application.

(f) Unless the applicant clarifies or changes the application to include mitigation measures specified by the lead agency, the department must deny the application or require an EIS. (See WAC 197-11-738.)

(g) If the department does not receive a threshold determination from the lead agency by the time it must act on the application, the department shall deny the application.

(5) CRGNSA Special Management Area.

(a) Policy. The states of Oregon and Washington have entered into a Compact preauthorized by Congress to implement the CRGNSA Act, 16 U.S.C. 544, et seq. chapter 43.97 RCW, 16 U.S.C. 544c. The purposes of the CRGNSA Act are:

(i) To establish a national scenic area to protect and provide for the enhancement of the scenic, cultural, recreational, and natural resources of the Columbia River Gorge; and

(ii) To protect and support the economy of the Columbia River Gorge area by encouraging growth to occur in existing urban areas and by allowing future economic development in a manner that is consistent with paragraph (1). 16 U.S.C. 544a.

The forest practices rules addressing forest practices in the CRGNSA Special Management Area recognize the intent of Congress and the states expressed in the CRGNSA Act and Compact and the intent of the Washington state legislature in the Forest Practices Act. These rules are designed to recognize the public interest in sound natural resource protection provided by the Act and the Compact, including the protection to public resources, recreation, and scenic beauty. These rules are designed to achieve a comprehensive system of laws and regulations for forest practices in the CRGNSA Special Management Area which avoids unnecessary duplication, provides for interagency input and intergovernmental and tribal coordination and cooperation, considers reasonable land use planning goals contained in the CRGNSA Management Plan, and fosters cooperation among public resources managers, forest landowners, tribes and the citizens.

(b) The CRGNSA Special Management Area Guidelines shall apply to all forest practices within the CRGNSA Special Management Area. Other forest practices rules also apply to these forest practices. To the extent these other rules are inconsistent with the guidelines, the more restrictive requirement controls. To the extent there is an incompatibility between the guidelines and another rule, the guidelines control. Copies of the guidelines can be obtained from the department Southeast and Southwest regional offices and Olympia office, as well as from the Columbia River Gorge commission and the U.S. Forest Service.

(c) The department shall review and consider the U.S. Forest Service review statement and shall consult with the U.S. Forest Service and the Columbia River Gorge commission prior to making any determination on an application or notification within the CRGNSA Special Management Area.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040, 76.09.050 and 34.05.350. 91-23-052, 222-20-040, filed 11/15/91, effective 12/16/91. Statutory Authority: RCW 76.09.040. 87-23-036 (Order 535), 222-20-040, filed 11/16/87, effective 1/1/88; Order 263, 222-20-040, filed 6/16/76.]



NEW SECTION



WAC 222-20-130  Notice and administration in CRGNSA Special Management Area. The department shall administer the permitting process for all forest practices on forest land in the CRGNSA Special Management Area. For all applications and notifications within the CRGNSA Special Management Area, the department shall send copies of a satisfactorily completed application or notification, including the U.S. Forest Service review statement, to the county in which the forest practices are to be commenced, the Columbia River Gorge commission, the U.S. Forest Service, the Yakama Indian Nation, and any interested parties that have requested to receive copies.



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OTS-1917.1

NEW SECTION



WAC 222-46-015  Enforcement within the CRGNSA Special Management Area. The department shall administer and enforce the forest practices regulations, including the requirement that the CRGNSA guidelines apply to all forest practices in the SMA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service and the Columbia River Gorge commission.



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