WSR 00-15-077

PERMANENT RULES

DEPARTMENT OF

LABOR AND INDUSTRIES

[ Filed July 19, 2000, 10:35 a.m. , effective July 19, 2000 ]

Date of Adoption: July 19, 2000.

Purpose: Chapter 296-127 WAC, Prevailing wage (scope of work descriptions). The purpose of this rule making is to permanently adopt the scope of work rules that are currently in effect as emergency rules under the authority of RCW 34.05.350. In order for the Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) to continue to administer and enforce the Prevailing Wage Act, chapter 39.12 RCW, the scope of work descriptions must be permanently converted into rules. For many years, L&I has used the scope of work descriptions, which detail the specific tasks required of fifty-five construction trades, to enforce the statutory mandate that "the prevailing rate of wage shall be the rate of hourly wage, usual benefits and overtime paid in the locality ... to the majority of workers, laborers or mechanics, in the same trade or occupation" (RCW 39.12.010). The prevailing wage rates for particular trades correspond with the scope of work descriptions. This rule-making order will convert the scope of work descriptions into permanent rules (WAC 296-127-01301 through 296-127-01391) to address an emergent need and as directed by Governor's Executive Order 97-02 on regulatory improvement (by incorporating necessary policy into rule). This rule-making will also amend WAC 296-127-013 to eliminate unnecessary or redundant requirements and reflect the addition of the new scope of work rules.

These rules arise from a prevailing wage enforcement action entitled In re Anderson & Wood, in which a contractor asserted that the scope of work descriptions were not properly promulgated as rules and, therefore, could not be used to require contractors to pay the corresponding prevailing wage rates. On December 15, 1999, the director of L&I agreed that the scope of work policies should be adopted as rules under the Administrative Procedure Act, chapter 34.05 RCW. Without the use of these scope of work descriptions to define the statutory terms "the same trade or occupation" and to therefore assure that the correct prevailing rate is paid for particular types of tasks, L&I is unable to enforce the prevailing wage laws. To address this L&I adopted the scope of work descriptions as emergency rules on March 21, 2000, in order to protect contractors, workers, and the public from economic harm.

The Prevailing Wage Act requires contractors working on government projects to pay employees the prevailing or "market" rate. Using surveys to gather information, L&I establishes prevailing wages county by county for each trade or occupation employed on public works projects. State agencies, counties, municipalities and all political subdivisions of the state award public works contracts.

Contractors rely upon the scope of work descriptions to properly assign prevailing wage rates to the work required to complete their contract with the awarding agency. Prevailing wage disputes are frequently resolved informally simply by bringing the correct scope of work descriptions to the contractor's attention. If the perception exists that the scope of work descriptions are mere suggestions or guidance, rather than binding rules, contractors will lack certainty in bidding on projects and in the wages that they pay their workers.

Without firm scope of work descriptions, uninformed or out of area contractors may be tempted to use the uncertainty to their advantage, by submitting bids based on lower wage rates. Because public agencies are required to award contracts to the lowest bidder, responsible local contractors will lose work to contractors planning to pay incorrect prevailing wages. The result will undermine an important purpose of the Prevailing Wage Act, to stabilize and protect local wage standards. See e.g. Everett Concrete v. Department of Labor & Industries, 109 Wn.2d 819 (1988) (Washington State Supreme Court holds that the purpose behind Washington's prevailing wage law is to protect employees of contractors who bid on government work from substandard earnings and to preserve local wage standards).

The harm done to local contractors is real and irreparable. Once a contract is awarded to an out of state contractor, who has gained an unfair bidding advantage by deciding to pay a lower prevailing wage than appropriate for the actual work performed on the project, a local firm's opportunity is lost. These outcomes are unfortunate and costly. Enforceable prevailing wages, through use of the scope of work descriptions, are necessary to preserve stability in public work bidding, and to protect Washington contractors from unfair competition.

Washington workers' earnings and opportunities are also harmed by the lack of firm scope of work descriptions. Contractors who ignore prevailing wage requirements can use out of area workers willing to work for less than the prevailing wage for their craft, unfairly displacing local tradespeople. Even if local workers are used, the uncertainty presently surrounding the scope of work descriptions may result in pay to workers that is less than prevailing wages. Such workers may file a complaint with the department and proceed through the adjudicative process; however, without firm scope of work descriptions, there is a real chance that the workers' claims will not prevail. Even those disputes resolved in the workers' favor will mean the workers will wait years for proper wage payments and will not receive interest.

Prevailing wage surveys and resulting wage calculations are based on the department's classification plan, which is detailed in the scope of work descriptions. If the wage data reported to the department is based on incorrect worker classifications, the same incorrect information will be used in prevailing wage calculations. The result will be an artificial depression of the prevailing wage levels and a harmful erosion of local wage standards.

Erosion of local wage standards is an economic harm to the general public, as is the unfair competition for general contractors by providing an opportunity for certain contractors to submit low bids, which will supplant local contractors on large government projects. These harms will be avoided by adopting the scope of work descriptions as permanent rules.

In order to avoid the harms associated with not adopting the scope of work descriptions as permanent rules the department intends to adopt and simultaneously put these rules into effect on July 19, 2000 (coinciding with the expiration date of the emergency rules that are currently in effect). The immediate effective date of these rules will ensure that these rules continue to stay in effect.

Amended section: WAC 296-127-013 Scope of work definitions is being amended to reflect the inclusion of the new scope of work descriptions. Changes include:

(1) Amended this subsection to reflect that the director or his/her designee (currently the industrial statistician) will issue scope of work descriptions. The issuance of these descriptions will be done through the rule as defined in chapter 34.05 RCW, the Administrative Procedure Act.

(2) Eliminated the wording, "industrial statistician may issue" referring to the issuance of scope of work descriptions because now the descriptions will be done through rule. Also, the wording, "shall be created" was added to clarify that the scope of work descriptions will be created using authoritative sources available to the department.

(4) Eliminated this subsection because the schedule for issuing scope of work descriptions will be done according to the rule-making procedures defined in chapter 34.05 RCW, the Administrative Procedure Act.

(5) Eliminated this subsection because chapter 34.05 RCW establishes the legal requirements for the effective date of rules.

(7) Eliminated this subsection because, as rule, the scope of work descriptions are made available by the Washington State Code Reviser. However, the department also provides copies of the rules upon request and they can be obtained via the Internet.

(8) Eliminated this subsection because affected parties must be notified as required by chapter 34.05 RCW, the Administrative Procedure Act.

New sections: The following scope of work descriptions are being adopted into chapter 296-127 WAC: WAC 296-127-01301 Certified asbestos abatement workers, 296-127-01303 Heat and frost insulators and asbestos workers, 296-127-01305 Boilermakers, 296-127-01306 Brick masons, 296-127-01308 Building service employees (janitors, waxers, and window washers), 296-127-01309 Cabinet makers, 296-127-01310 Carpenters, 296-127-01312 Carpenter tenders, 296-127-01313 Carpet and resilient floor layers, 296-127-01315 Cement masons, 296-127-01317 Drywall applicators (drywall nailers and sheetrock installers), 296-127-01318 Drywall finishers (tapers), 296-127-01320 Power line construction electricians, 296-127-01322 Electronic technicians, 296-127-01323 Inside wireman electrician, 296-127-01325 Electrical fixture maintenance workers, 296-127-01327 Elevator constructors, 296-127-01328 Fence erectors and fence laborers, 296-127-01329 Flaggers, 296-127-01331 Glaziers, 296-127-01332 Hod carriers, mason tenders, and mortarmen, 296-127-01333 Heating equipment mechanics, 296-127-01335 Inland boatmen, 296-127-01337 Insulation applicators, 296-127-01339 Ironworkers, 296-127-01340 Laborers in utilities construction, 296-127-01342 Clean-up laborers, 296-127-01344 Laborers, 296-127-01346 Landscape construction, 296-127-01347 Lathers, 296-127-01349 Marble setters, 296-127-01351 Millwrights, 296-127-01352 Metal fabricators, 296-127-01354 Operating engineers (equipment operators), 296-127-01356 Painters, 296-127-01358 Pile drivers, 296-127-01360 Plasterers, 296-127-01362 Playground and park equipment installers, 296-127-01364 Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters, 296-127-01367 Refrigeration mechanic, 296-127-01369 Remote controlled cleaning, inspection and sealing of underground sewer and water systems, 296-127-01370 Roofers, 296-127-01372 Sheet metal workers, 296-127-01374 Sign makers and sign installers, 296-127-01375 Sprinkler fitters, 296-127-01376 Stone masons, 296-127-01377 Outside telephone line construction, 296-127-01378 Telecommunication technicians, 296-127-01379 Terrazzo (artificial marble) workers, 296-127-01382 Terrazzo workers' helpers, tile and marble setters' helpers (finishers), 296-127-01384 Tile setters, 296-127-01386 Traffic control stripers, 296-127-01387 Power line clearance tree trimming, 296-127-01389 Utilities construction (underground sewers and water lines), and 296-127-01391 Water well drillers, exploration drillers, water well pump installers, and equipment oilers.

Citation of Existing Rules Affected by this Order: Amending WAC 296-127-013.

Statutory Authority for Adoption: Chapter 39.12 RCW, RCW 43.22.270 and 43.22.051.

Adopted under notice filed as WSR 00-11-136 on May 23, 2000.

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Comply with Federal Statute: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; Federal Rules or Standards: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; or Recently Enacted State Statutes: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted at Request of a Nongovernmental Entity: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted on the Agency's Own Initiative: New 55, Amended 1, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Clarify, Streamline, or Reform Agency Procedures: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted Using Negotiated Rule Making: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; Pilot Rule Making: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; or Other Alternative Rule Making: New 55, Amended 1, Repealed 0. Effective Date of Rule: July 19, 2000.

July 19, 2000

Gary Moore

Director

OTS-3891.2


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 92-01-104, filed 12/18/91, effective 1/31/92)

WAC 296-127-013
Scope of work ((definitions)) descriptions.

(1) In order to determine applicable prevailing wage rates, the ((industrial statistician)) director or his/her designee will issue scope of work descriptions for each trade and occupation recognized as being involved in public work.

(2) The ((industrial statistician may issue)) scope of work descriptions((,)) shall be created using authoritative sources available to the department, such as:

(a) Washington state apprenticeship and training council approved apprenticeship standards;

(b) Collective bargaining agreements;

(c) Dictionaries of occupational titles;

(d) Experts from organized labor, licensed contractors, and contractors' associations;

(e) Recognized labor and management industry practice.

(3) The applicable prevailing wage rates for workers employed on public works projects shall be determined by the scopes of work performed by those workers, and not by their specific job titles.

(4) ((Scope of work descriptions may be established or revised:

(a) On the first business day of February and the first business day of August each year along with the prevailing wage publication; or

(b) In response to an administrative or judicial finding, or at any time necessary to correct an error.

(5) All scope of work descriptions shall become effective thirty days after their establishment or revision.

(6))) The applicable scope of work description for a public works contract is the scope of work description that is in effect on the date that the bids are due to be submitted to the contract awarding agency. If the contract is not awarded within six months of the bid due date, then the applicable scope of work description shall be that which is in effect on the date that the contract is awarded. The same scope of work description shall remain in effect for the duration of the contract.

(((7) The department shall make scope of work descriptions available to all interested parties upon request.

(8) The department shall notify trade associations, labor organizations, and public agencies, reasonably known to be affected, prior to adopting new scope of work descriptions or changes or additions to existing scope of work descriptions, and shall provide sixty days from the date of issuance for comment.))

(5) In the event a dispute arises regarding a scope of work description following the award of a public works contract, the aggrieved party may request an arbitration hearing pursuant to the provisions of RCW 39.12.060, WAC 296-127-060, 296-127-061, and 296-127-062.

[Statutory Authority: Chapters 39.04 and 39.12 RCW and RCW 43.22.270. 92-01-104, 296-127-013, filed 12/18/91, effective 1/31/92; 88-22-046 (Order 88-22), 296-127-013, filed 10/31/88.]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01301
Certified asbestos abatement workers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the department of labor and industries has established the work classification of certified asbestos abatement workers.

Asbestos abatement work may be performed by any worker who is certified as an asbestos remover and encapsulator, except when the work performed is incidental to the normal scope of work of another trade or occupation. Incidental asbestos work includes only that work of short duration which is indistinguishable from the work of another established classification.

This classification does not include work falling within the scope of work for asbestos workers. That work is primarily related to the installation of insulation material around mechanical systems.

Certified asbestos abatement workers perform all of the work, including any cleanup required in connection with the abatement of asbestos, coming within the purpose and scope of chapter 49.26 RCW and chapter 296-65 WAC. WAC 296-65-003 provides definitions which establish the scope of this work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01303
Heat and frost insulators and asbestos workers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, heat and frost insulators and asbestos workers apply insulation materials to mechanical systems to reduce loss or absorption of heat, prevent moisture condensation and to deaden sound and prevent vibration.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

The preparation and physical distribution on the job site of asbestos, cork, plastic, magnesia or similar insulation materials.

Insulation of mechanical systems, plumbing, heating systems, any insulation connected with air handling systems, refrigeration piping and related vessels, boilers, tanks, flues breechings, evaporators, turbines, fittings, valves, ducts, flues, vats and all insulation connected with steam, condensate, feedwater and/or chilled water, or insulation of any mechanical system for sound control.

All cleanup required in connection with heat and frost insulators and asbestos worker's work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01305
Boilermakers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, boilermakers assemble, erect, repair and clean boilers, tanks, vats and pressure vessels according to blueprint specifications, using hand tools and portable power tools and equipment.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Locating and marking of reference points for columns or plates on foundations, using master straightedge, squares, transit and measuring tape.

Using rigging or cranes to lift parts to specified positions.

Aligning structures or plate sections, using plumb bobs, levels, wedges, dogs or turnbuckles.

Drilling, reaming, chipping, caulking and grinding of structures and sections and bolting or welding them together.

Setting of drums and headers and installation of tubes.

And all the cleanup required in connection with boilermakers work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01306
Brick masons.

For the intents and purposes of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the job description for brick masons is as follows:

Prepare and lay building materials such as brick, concrete block, cinder block, terra cotta block, marble and granite block, and related materials to construct, repair and waterproof structures, such as walls, partitions, arches, sewers, chimneys or smokestacks, piers, abutments, walks and curbstones.

Measure distance from reference points and mark guidelines on working surface to lay out work.

Spread soft layer of mortar that serves as base and binder for brick (or block), using trowel.

Apply mortar to end of brick and position brick in mortar bed.

Tap brick with trowel to level, align, and embed in mortar, allowing specified thickness of joint. Remove excess mortar from face of brick, using trowel.

Finish mortar between brick with pointing tool or trowel.

Break bricks to fit spaces too small for whole brick, using edge of trowel or brick hammer.

Determine vertical and horizontal alignment of courses, using plumb bob, gaugeline and level. Fasten brick or terra cotta veneer to face of structures, with tie wires embedded in mortar between bricks, or in anchor holes in veneer brick.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01308
Building service employees (janitors, waxers, and window washers).

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the work of building service employees includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Janitors. Empty trash and damp wipe containers. Dust chairs, sides of desks, top of filing cabinets, panelled walls, doors, ledges and picture frames within easy reach. Damp wipe desk tops, telephones and desk fixtures. Damp mop floors. Vacuum upholstered furniture and draperies. Wash vinyl furniture with cleaning solution. Wash doors and other surfaces and spot wash painted walls. Clean door glass and inside partition glass. Vacuum and shampoo carpets.

(2) Utility janitors. Performs the following duties in addition to those performed by janitors: Waxing of floors (when not performed by traveling waxers), high wall and ceiling washing requiring the use of a ladder, and minor repairs and maintenance necessary to the operation of the building.

(3) Waxers. Waxing of floors.

(4) Window washers. Washing of all windows, other than inside partition glass and door glass, washing of painted walls, (when not done as a prerequisite to repainting) and wall paper cleaning.

(5) And all the cleanup required in connection with building service employees.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01309
Cabinet makers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, cabinet makers set up and operate a variety of woodworking machines and use various hand tools to fabricate and repair wooden cabinets, sashes, doors, and furniture in a shop or plant.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Study blueprints or drawings of articles to be constructed or repaired and plan sequences of cutting or shaping operations to be performed.

Mark outline or dimensions of parts on paper or lumber stock, according to blueprint or drawing specifications. Match materials for color, grain or texture.

Set up and operate woodworking machines, such as: Power saws, jointer, mortiser, tenoner, molder and shaper to cut and shape parts from woodstock.

Trim component parts of joints to assure snug fit, using hand tools, such as: Planes, chisels, or wood files. Bore holes for insertion of screws or dowels by hand or using boring machine. Glue, fit and clamp parts and subassemblies together to form a complete unit, using clamps or clamping machine. Drive nails or other fasteners into joints at designated places to reinforce joints.

Sand and scrape surfaces and joints of articles to prepare articles for finishing. Dip, brush or spray assembled articles with protective or decorative materials, such as stain, varnish, or paint.

Install hardware such as: Hinges, catches and drawer pulls.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01310
Carpenters.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, carpenters construct, erect, install and repair structures, structural members and fixtures made of wood, plywood, wallboard and materials that take the place of wood, such as plastic, metals, composites, and fiberglass, using carpenter hand tools and power tools.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Build rough wooden structures, such as concrete forms, scaffolds, wooden bridges, trestles, coffer dams, tunnel and sewer support; welding and burning.

Install ladders, handrails, walkways, platforms and gangways.

Install door and window bucks (rough frames in which finished frames are inserted) in building frame work and brace them with boards nailed to frame work.

Install subflooring in buildings.

Nail plaster grounds (wood or metal strips) to studding.

Fit and nail sheathing on outer walls and roofs on buildings.

Construct, erect, install and repair commercial, industrial and residential structures.

Select specified type of lumber or other materials.

Prepare layout, using rule, framing square and calipers.

Mark cutting and assembling lines on materials, using pencil, chalk, and marking gauge.

Shape materials to prescribed measurements, using saws, chisels and planes.

Assemble, cut and shape materials and fasten them together with nails, dowel pins, or glue.

Verify trueness of structure with plumb bob and carpenter's level.

Apply decorative paneling to walls.

Erect frame work for structures and lay subflooring.

Cover subfloor with building paper to keep out moisture and lay hardwood, parquet and wood-strip-lock floors by nailing floors to subfloor or cementing them to mastic or asphalt base.

Build stairs and layout and install partitions and cabinets.

Install metal roof decking and metal siding, regardless of the fastening method, or what it is fastened to.

Install all other types of siding, regardless of composition, fastening method, or what it is fastened to.

Fit and install prefabricated wooden cabinets, window frames, door frames, doors, weather stripping, interior and exterior trim, and finish hardware, such as locks, letter drops and kick plates.

Apply acoustical tile to ceilings and walls of buildings to reduce reflecting of sound and to decorate rooms.

Cement tile to masonry surface.

Nail channels or wood furring strips to surfaces to provide mounting for tile.

Place building paper between tile and furring strip to keep out moisture.

Nail, screw, or staple tile to wooden furring strips.

Nail or screw moulding to walls to support and seal joint between ceiling tile and wall. Hang dry lines to wall mauling.

Drive hanger inserts into reinforced concrete ceiling, suspend and bend hanger wires at points touching dry lines.

Thread wires through holes in main runners and cut and attach cross supports to suspended runners and wall mauling.

Cut tiles for fixtures and borders and insert tiles into supporting frame work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01312
Carpenter tenders.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, carpenter tenders are laborers who assist carpenters engaged in construction, erection, installation and repair of wooden structures and fixtures. Carpenter tenders perform a variety of routine tasks which do not require the use of carpenter tools, such as:

Cleaning materials, equipment, tools and work areas.

Moving and lifting building materials, tools and supplies.

Handing materials, tools and supplies to carpenters.

Dismantling temporary wooden structures.

Assisting carpenters in stripping forms and shoring.

Cleaning and moving forms.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01313
Carpet and resilient floor layers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, carpet and resilient floor layers do the measuring, cutting, sewing, taping, fitting, laying and installing of oil cloth, matting, linen, carpet, synthetic turf, linoleum, vinyl, plastic, rubber, cork, mastic, asphalt, mastipave, tile and chalkboard, nonslip or abrasive materials, resilient, decorative seamless surface coatings (except terrazzo, magnesite and latex built-up floors) and all other resilient coverings on floors, walls, counters, table tops and ceilings when cemented, tacked or otherwise applied to a base, whether used as shock-absorbing, sound-absorbing, or decorative coverings.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Handling of the materials at the site of installation.

Sweeping, scraping, sanding, or chipping dirt and irregularities from base surfaces and filling cracks with putty, plaster, or cement grout to form smooth, clean foundations.

All necessary preparation work and finish work, such as drilling holes for sockets and pins, installation of underlayment, sanding and filling, fitting of metal edgings, metal corners and caps and fitting devices for attachment of such materials.

Spreading of adhesive cement over floor to cement foundation material to the floor. Laying covering on cement. Rolling finished floor to smooth it out and press cement into base and covering.

All the cleanup required in connection with carpet and resilient floor layers work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01315
Cement masons.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, cement masons perform all work where finishing tools are used.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

The setting of screeds, the rodding (buildings), shaping, smoothing and finishing of the surfaces of freshly poured concrete floors, walls, sidewalks, curbs, steps and stairways, the finishing of extruded barrier rails, or any other concrete surface requiring finishing, using hand tools or power tools, including floats, trowels, screeds and straightedge.

The removing of rough or defective spots from concrete surfaces, using grinder or chisel and hammer and patching holes with fresh concrete or epoxy compound preparatory to sacking. (The finishing of a large surface of patched holes.)

The moulding of expansion joints and edges, using edging tools, jointers and straightedge.

The application of penetrating sealer and primer protective coatings to concrete floors and steps for the first twenty-four hours after pouring, when part of the finishing process.

The installation of seamless composition floors and the installation and finishing of epoxy based coatings or polyester based linings to all surfaces, when the coatings or linings are applied by spraying or troweling.

Sandblasting or waterblasting for architectural finish or preparatory to patching.

The setting of all forms one board high.

The cutting of joints with concrete saw for the control of cracks in buildings and contiguous to buildings.

The setting of concrete curb, gutter and sidewalk forms as a composite crew with laborers.

All cleanup work required in connection with the above work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01317
Drywall applicators (drywall nailers and sheetrock installers).

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, drywall applicators install plasterboard or other wallboards to ceilings and interior walls of buildings, using hand tools and portable power tools.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Installing horizontal and vertical metal studs for attachment of wallboard on interior walls.

Cutting angle iron and channel iron to specified size and suspending angle iron grid and channel iron from ceiling, using wire.

Cutting wallboard to size.

Cutting openings for electrical and other outlets.

Nailing wallboard to wall and ceiling supports.

Trimming rough edges from wallboard to maintain even joints.

Nailing prefabricated metal pieces around windows and doors and between dissimilar materials to protect drywall edges.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01318
Drywall finishers (tapers).

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, drywall finishers perform all the preparatory work and finishing work involved in covering interior walls and ceilings with decorative or protective finish materials.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Handling of all materials after the initial unloading at the job site, including the distribution to the points of application.

Erecting, moving and dismantling of all scaffolding.

All preparatory work of taping, sealing, finishing and sanding of joints between plasterboard or other wallboard.

Spotting, caulking, pointing and sealing of cracks and holes in walls and ceilings.

Applying protective coverings prior to the application of the finish materials.

Spackling of surfaces and application of texture finishes where adhesive materials are used.

Applying all primers, sealers, decorative or protective finish materials, regardless of the method of application.

Installing metal moulding at corners instead of sealant and tape.

Removing all drywall material scraps and all cleaning work, including scraping of floors.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01320
Power line construction electricians.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, power line construction electricians erect, maintain and repair transmission poles (whether built of wood, metal or other material), fabricated metal transmission towers, outdoor substations, switch racks, or similar electrical structures, electric cables and related auxiliary equipment for high-voltage transmission and distribution power lines used to conduct energy between generating stations, substations and consumers.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

The moving of men, tools, or equipment. The sorting, loading and moving of materials from the first drop. The handling, assembling and erecting of all necessary materials.

The trenching, digging, and backfilling of vaults, holes for poles and anchors (by hand or mechanical equipment), guying, fastening to the stub-in on concrete footings or pads, assembling of the grillage, grounding of all structures, the stringing and installation of transformers.

Constructing, repairing and maintaining highway and street lighting systems and highway and street traffic signal systems.

Trimming trees and brush prior to the construction of new power lines, during repair of damaged lines, or as part of routine maintenance of the lines (tree trimmers).

All the cleanup required in connection with line construction electrician work.

All the classifications listed below work under the supervision of linemen and assist linemen.

(1) Groundmen. Performs the following tasks:

Manual digging of pole holes, anchor holes and trenches.

Assists in framing of poles, pulling guys.

Assembles and erects fixtures.

Tamping and compacting.

Driving of 1/2 to 3/4 ton pickup truck.

(2) Head groundman. Performs the following tasks:

Manual digging of pole holes, anchor holes, and trenches.

Assists in framing of poles, pulling guys.

Assembles and erects fixtures.

Tamping and compacting.

Driving of 1/3 to 3/4 ton pickup truck for material or man haul.

(3) Line equipment operators. They operate caterpillars, trucks equipped with winch and/or boom, hydraulically operated backhoes with or without front end loaders, mounted booms, and any other equipment that does not come within the scope of heavy equipment operators.

(4) Heavy line equipment operators. They operate any piece of equipment which, in accordance with manufacturer's recommended specifications is capable of operating with one hundred or more aggregate feet of boom, be it crane, backhoe, clam shell, drag line, or shovel.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01322
Electronic technicians.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the scope of work for electronic technicians is as follows:

(1) The installation, operation, inspection, maintenance, repair and service of:

(a) Radio, television and recording systems and devices.

(b) Systems for paging, intercommunication, public address, wired music, clocks, security and surveillance systems and mobile radio systems.

(c) Fire alarm and burglar systems.

(2) The installation of nonmetallic conduits and incidental shielded metallic conduits of no longer than ten feet nor larger than one inch, when installed for the specific purpose of carrying low voltage wiring.

(3) Pulling wiring through the type of conduit described under subsection (2) of this section, when the wiring is installed for the specific purpose of carrying low voltage electricity.

(4) All the cleanup required in connection with electronic technician's work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01323
Inside wireman electrician.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, inside wireman electricians plan the layout, install and repair conduit, wiring, electrical fixtures, apparatus, and control equipment in buildings and adjacent yards to provide electricity for power and lighting.

(1) They assemble, install and maintain all electrical lighting, electric heating and cooling equipment, standby motor generators, electric heat pumps, under-floor duct and luminous ceilings.

They install, repair and maintain highway and street lighting systems and highway and street traffic signal systems.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

The handling and moving of any electrical materials, equipment and apparatus on the job site.

Welding, burning, brazing, bending, drilling and shaping of all copper, silver, aluminum, angle iron and brackets to be used in connection with the installation and erection of electrical wiring and equipment.

Measuring, cutting, bending, threading, forming, assembling and installing of electrical conduit, using such tools as hacksaw, pipe threader and conduit bender.

Pulling wiring through conduit.

The installation of conduit and interduct raceways for fiber optic cable and the pulling of fiber optic cable through these raceways, except telephone conduit and cable.

Cutting holes in floors and walls for electrical conduit:

With point and hammer.

Core-drilled.

Chasing and channeling necessary to complete any electrical work, including the fabrication and installation of duct and manhole forms incidental to electrical installation.

Splicing wires by stripping insulation from terminal leads with knife or pliers, twisting or soldering wires together and applying tape or terminal caps.

Installation and maintenance of lighting fixtures.

Connecting wiring to lighting fixtures and power equipment.

Assembling and installing of conduit switches, relays, junction boxes, circuit breaker panels, and related accessories and controls.

Testing continuity of circuit to insure electrical compatibility and safety of components.

All cleanup required in connection with electrical work.

(2) The following power line construction classifications may assist journeymen wireman in the installation, repair and maintenance of highway and signal lighting systems and highway and street traffic signal systems:

(a) Groundmen.

Performs the following tasks:

Manual digging of pole holes, anchor holes and trenches.

Assembles and erects fixtures.

Assists in framing of poles, pulling guys.

Tamping and compacting.

Driving of 1/2 or 3/4 ton pickup truck.

(b) Head groundman.

Performs the following tasks:

Manual digging of pole holes, anchor holes and trenches.

Assists in framing of poles, pulling guys.

Assembles and erects fixtures.

Tamping and compacting.

Driving of 1/3 or 3/4 ton pickup truck for materials or man haul.

(c) Line equipment operators. Operate caterpillars, trucks equipped with winch and/or boom, hydraulically operated backhoes with or without front end loaders, mounted booms, and any other equipment that does not come within the scope of heavy equipment operators.

(d) Heavy line equipment operators. Operate any piece of equipment which, in accordance with manufacturer's recommended specifications is capable of operating with one hundred or more aggregate feet of boom, be it crane, backhoe or clam shell, drag line, or shovel.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01325
Electrical fixture maintenance workers.

For the purpose of chapter 39.12 RCW, Washington state prevailing wage law, the prevailing wage for electrical fixture maintenance worker is required for the following work:

Cleaning of all types of lighting fixtures, luminous ceilings, all types of diffused areas and ceiling lighting. The work also includes replacement of lamps, ballasts, sockets and the installation of energy efficiency upgrades. This work must be limited to nonresidential fixture bodies, but may also include replacement or retrofitting of remote located ballasts with approved products.

Work beyond that which is described above must be paid at another electrical classification such as inside wireman electrician or residential electrician. Electrical fixture maintenance worker does not include installation of new fixtures or branch circuits, movement or relocation of existing fixtures, or alteration of existing branch circuits.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01327
Elevator constructors.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, elevator constructors assemble and install electric and hydraulic freight and passenger elevators, escalators, and dumbwaiters.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Studies blueprints and lays out location of framework, counterbalance rails, motor pump, cylinder, and plunger foundations.

Drills holes in concrete or structural steel members with portable electric drill, secures anchor bolts or welds brackets to support rails and framework, and verifies alignment with plumb bob and level.

Cuts prefabricated sections of framework, rails, and other elevator components to specified dimensions, using acetylene torch, power saw, and disc grinder.

Installs cables, counterweights, pumps, motor foundations, escalator drives, guide rails, elevator cars, and control panels.

Positions electric motor and equipment on top of elevator shaft, using hoists and cable slings.

Connects electrical wiring to control panels and electric motors.

Installs safety and control devices.

All cleanup required in connection with the installation of elevators.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01328
Fence erectors and fence laborers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, fence erectors and fence laborers erect and repair metal and wooden fences and fence gates around industrial establishments (schools, playgrounds, etc.), residences, farms and along highways using power tools and hand tools.

The work of the fence erectors includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Fence erector.

Lays out fence line, using tape measure, and marks for postholes.

Digs postholes with mechanical posthole digger or power-driven auger.

Aligns posts, using line or by sighting along edges of posts.

Verifies vertical alignment of posts with plumb bob or spirit level.

Attaches fence-rail support to post, using hammer and pliers.

Cuts metal tubing, using pipe cutter, and inserts tubing through rail support.

Completes top fence rail of metal fence by connecting tube sections, using metal sleeves.

Attaches rails or tension wire along bottoms of posts to form fencing frame.

May weld metal parts together, using portable gas welding equipment.

Stretches wire, wire mesh, barbed wire, or chain link fencing between posts and attaches fencing to frame.

Assembles gate and fastens in position, using hand tools.

Saws required length of lumber to make rails for wooden fence.

Nails top and bottom rails to fence posts, or inserts them in slots on posts.

Nails pointed slats to rails to construct picket fence.

Erects alternate panel, basket weave, and louvered fences.

(2) Fence laborer. In addition to assisting the fence erector in the performance of the tasks described above, the work of the fence laborer includes, but is not limited to:

Digs holes for posts with spade or posthole digger.

Blasts rock formations with dynamite to facilitate digging of holes.

Sets metal or wooden posts in upright position in holes.

Mixes concrete by hand or by use of a cement mixer.

Pours concrete around base of posts or tamps soil into holes to embed posts.

All the cleanup required in connection with the erection of fences.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01329
Flaggers.

For the intents and purposes of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the scope of work for flaggers is as follows:

Controls and directs pedestrian and vehicular traffic through construction projects using sign, hand and flag signals, warning paddles and radio communication.

Informs drivers of detour routes through construction sites. Distributes signs, markers, flares, barricades, cones and other traffic control devices along construction sites in designated patterns.

Is responsible for the safety of the workers and the public on construction sites.

Must have completed a Washington state approved flagging course, or the equivalent.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01331
Glaziers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, glaziers select, cut, prepare, handle, install or remove all window glass, plate glass, and all other types of glass, including structural glass, mirror glass, tempered and laminated glass, safety or protection glass, all types of insulating glass units, all plastics or other similar materials when used in place of glass and when set or glazed with putty, moulding rubber, cement, lead and all types of mastic, or other materials used in place of same.

Glaziers install the above materials in windows, louvers, doors, partitions, skylights, and on building fronts, walls, ceilings and tables, whether the materials are set in wood, stone, cement, or metal of all types.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Install mirrors of all types.

Mark outline or pattern on glass and cut glass, using glasscutter. Break off excess glass by hand or with notched tool.

Fasten glass panes into wood sash with glazier's points and spread smooth putty around edge of panes with knife to seal joints.

Install metal window and door frames into which glass panels are to be fitted, such as fixed or sliding patio doors and vented, fixed or sliding windows.

Bolt metal hinges, handles, locks, and other hardware to prefabricated glass doors. Set glass doors in frame and fit hinges.

Install metal-framed glass enclosures for showers, bath tubs, and skylights where the glass installation and frame assembly is a single operation.

Install mirror or structural glass on building fronts, walls, ceilings, or tables, using mastic, screws or decorative moulding.

All the cleanup required in connection with glazing work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01332
Hod carriers, mason tenders, and mortarmen.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, hod carriers, mason tenders and mortarmen assist bricklayers and masons.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

The mixing, packing, wheeling and tempering of mortar and fire clay.

The mixing, handling and conveying of all other materials used by bricklayers and masons (e.g., brick, tile, stone and cast stone), whether done by hand or any other process (e.g., operation of forklifts, hoisting equipment and pumping equipment).

Building of scaffolds, trestles, boxes and swinging staging.

Hanging of cables and placing of putlogs.

Carrying bricks and mortar in a hod.

Cleaning and clearing of all debris.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01333
Heating equipment mechanics.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, heating equipment mechanics replace the gas and oil burners in furnaces or replace complete furnaces, but they do not install the original furnaces.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Removal of old burner.

Installation of new burner.

Connection of fuel lines.

Installation of instrumentation lines.

Installation of new fan.

Firing off.

Setting burner on correct ratio.

All cleanup required in connection with the installation of heating equipment.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01335
Inland boatmen.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, inland boatmen man the tugs and launches (but not outboard-powered skiffs) engaged in construction, dredge tending, pile driving, diver tending and geodetic surveying.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01337
Insulation applicators.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, insulation applicators install all the insulation material in floors, walls, sound rated partitions and ceilings.

They also install insulation materials on roofs, when the material must be measured, cut and nailed to the inside or outside of an existing roofing system.

The insulation materials installed by insulation applicators include, but are not limited to:

Batt insulation, semi-rigid and rigid insulation, blown spray and foam-type insulation, regardless of method of installation, attachment or connection.

All the cleanup required in connection with insulation applicators.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01339
Ironworkers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, ironworkers perform all work in connection with field fabrication and/or erection, installation, removal, wrecking and dismantling of structural, architectural and reinforcing iron and steel, ornamental lead, bronze, brass, copper and aluminum, and plastics or other materials when used in place thereof.

The work performed by ironworkers includes, but is not limited to:

Steel and metal houses and packaged buildings.

Bridges, viaducts, cableways, tramways, monorails.

Locks, gates, metal forms, railings (including pipe).

Steel towers, energy producing windmill type towers, nuclear reactors.

Frames in support of boilers.

The installation of metal siding and metal roof decking, regardless of the fastening method, or what it is fastened to.

All reinforcing work in connection with field fabrication, handling, burning, welding and tying of all materials used to reinforce concrete structures.

The signaling, rigging, hoisting, aligning, bolting, riveting, or welding of structural-steel members.

The unloading, loading, distributing, stockpiling, hoisting, rigging, and handling of materials used by ironworkers and all cleanup work.

Work process:

(1) Structural:

(a) Erecting:

Connecting

Fitting

Hooking on

Bolting up

Torquing

Signaling

Preengineered buildings

Sheeting

(b) Rigging:

Cranes

Derricks

Land rigs

Cable splicing

(c) Maintenance of equipment:

Dismantling

Field rigging

Moving field equipment

(2) Welding:

(a) Acetylene welding

(b) Electric arc welding

(c) Cutting and burning

(d) Heliarc.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01340
Laborers in utilities construction.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the work for laborers includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Pipe layer.

Shoring, building of manholes and catch basins.

Sealing, doping and wrapping of the pipe after the joints have been welded and before the pipe is lowered into the trench or ditch.

Joining ductile iron pipe by using screws, bolts, fittings, caulking or any other method for making joints in the industry, when the pipe will not be under pressure. Lowering the pipe into the trench or ditch.

(2) Topman. Assists the pipe layer from the surface, he does not work in the trench or ditch.

(3) General laborer.

Performs all other laborers' work which is not done by pipe layers and topmen.

Responsible for all cleanup required in connection with utilities construction work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01342
Clean-up laborers.

For the intents and purposes of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the scope of work for clean-up laborers is as follows:

Performs general clean-up in buildings during construction when too much rubbish has accumulated.

Cleans areas where the next phase of construction will take place.

Performs final clean-up after the construction has been completed.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01344
Laborers.

For the intents and purposes of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, laborers perform a variety of tasks such as:

Erect and repair guard rails, median rails, guide and reference posts, sign posts and right of way markers along highways.

Mix, pour and spread asphalt, gravel and other materials, using hand tools, and mix, pour, spread and rod concrete.

Lift, carry and hold building materials, tools and supplies.

Measure distances from grade stakes, drive stakes and stretch tight line.

Bolt, nail, align and block up under forms.

Signal operators of construction equipment to facilitate alignment, movement and adjustment of machinery to conform to grade specifications.

Level earth to fine grade specifications, using pick and shovel.

Mix concrete, using portable mixer.

Position, join, align, wrap and seal pipe sections.

The placement and testing of plastic conduit for electrical cable, when the conduit is buried underground.

Erect scaffolding, shoring and braces.

Mop, or spread bituminous compounds over surfaces for protection (outside buildings).

Spray material such as water, sand, steam, vinyl, or stucco through hoses to clean, coat or seal surfaces.

Apply caulking compounds by hand or with caulking gun to seal crevices.

The application of penetrating sealer and primer protective coatings to concrete floors and steps when safe to walk on.

Installation of plastic panels on the inside of existing window frames for insulation (instead of storm windows). The panels are held in place magnetically (with metal brackets) and with self-taping screws.

The cleaning and grinding of concrete floors and walls by high pressure waterblasting or sandblasting preparatory to the application of waterproofing.

The removing of rough or defective spots from concrete surfaces, using grinder or chisel and hammer and patching holes with fresh concrete or epoxy compound when not preparatory to sacking (finishing a large surface of patched holes).

The setting of concrete curb, gutter and sidewalk forms as a composite crew with cement masons.

The laying of concrete, granite and brick pavers in beds of sand.

General clean-up required after damage caused by water or fire.

All cleanup work required in connection with the above work. Clean tools, equipment, materials and work areas:

(1) When the clean-up is performed for more than one trade (usually employed by general contractor).

(2) When assisting those trades for which laborers have been specifically designated as tenders, e.g., carpenter tender, cement finisher tender, etc.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01346
Landscape construction.

For the purposes of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, landscape construction involves the beautification of a plot of land by changing its natural features through the addition or modification of lawns, trees, bushes, etc.

(1) Landscape construction includes:

Constructing or maintaining lawns, yards, gardens or other landscaped surfaces.

Mixing and spreading mulches, ground covers, soil amendments, decorative bark or decorative rock.

Seeding, sodding or hydroseeding.

Applying chemicals or fertilizers.

Planting trees, shrubs or plants.

Installing, servicing or repairing above ground lawn or landscape sprinkler systems.

Installing, servicing or repairing underground lawn or landscape sprinkler systems to a maximum depth of three feet below finish grade.

Assembling or placing premanufactured trellis work, play equipment, benches or picnic tables.

Constructing rock walls to a maximum height of four feet.

Land clearing.

Spreading top soil to a maximum depth of six inches below finish grade.

Trenching to a maximum depth of three feet below finish grade.

Installing french drains or other subsurface water collection systems to a maximum depth of three feet below finish grade.

Hauling top soil, plants or other landscaping materials in trucks with only one rear axle.

(2) Landscape construction does not include:

Any activity or task (including those mentioned above) when performed preparatory to any nonlandscaping construction work.

Constructing roads, footpaths, trails or rock walls more than four feet high.

Custom fabrication of trellis work, play equipment, benches or picnic tables.

Constructing restrooms, shelters or similar structures.

Installing sewer systems, storm sewer systems, catch basins, vaults or drainage systems for impervious surfaces (such as parking lots).

Installing drainage systems or underground sprinkler systems more than three feet below final grade.

Land clearing, dozing, grading, excavating or hauling except as permitted above.

Tree falling or bucking.

Subgrade preparation.

The use of power equipment with more than ninety horsepower.

The use of trucks with more than one rear axle except hydroseeders.

Demolition of structures.

Asphalt or concrete work except incidental anchorage for play equipment, benches or picnic tables.

Welding.

Installing agricultural irrigation systems.

Encapsulation of landfills.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01347
Lathers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, a lather erects horizontal metal framework to which laths are fastened, using nails, bolts, and studgun. Drills holes in floor and ceiling and drives ends of wooden or metal studs into holes to provide anchor for furring or rockboard laths.

Cuts and shapes lath and other materials, using hand tools and power tools.

Nails, clips or fastens all types of wood, wire and metal laths, plasterboard, wallboard, rockboard, gypsum, sheetrock and acoustical materials which take the place of same to walls, ceilings, and partitions of buildings to provide supporting base for plaster, fireproofing or acoustical material.

Erects all metal plastering accessories which are covered and/or serve as ground, guard, stock or screed for plaster materials, including wire mesh.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Installs all carrying bars and purlins (pieces of horizontal timber), light iron and metal furring (thin strips of wood or metal to create air space) of all descriptions, such as rods, channels, flatiron, t-bar, h-bar and other ceiling bars or systems for the receipt of lath and board.

Wires plasterer's channels to overhead structural framework to provide support for plaster or acoustical ceiling tile.

Nails, plaster grounds (wood or metal strips) to studding to provide a guide for plasters.

Handles, moves, hoists and stores on the job site all materials used by lathers and does all the cleanup required in connection with lather work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01349
Marble setters.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, marble setters cut, trim and set marble slabs in floors and walls of buildings and repair and polish slabs previously set in buildings.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Cutting, trimming and facing marble to specified size, using cutting, power sawing, and facing equipment and hand tools.

Drilling holes in slabs and attaching brackets.

Spreading mortar on bottom of slabs and on sides of adjacent slabs.

Setting blocks in position, tamping them into place, and anchoring bracket attachments with wire.

Filling joints with grout and removing excess grout from marble with a sponge.

Cleaning and beveling cracks or chips on slabs, using power tools and hand tools.

Heating cracked or chipped areas with blowtorch and filling defects with composition mastic that matches grain of marble.

Polishes marble and other ornamental stone to high luster, using power tools or by hand.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01351
Millwrights.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, millwrights install machinery and equipment according to layout plans, blueprints, and other drawings in industrial establishments, using hoists, lift trucks, hand tools and power tools. They read blueprints and schematic drawings to determine work procedures.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Dismantle machines, using hammers, wrenches, crowbars, and other hand held tools.

Move machinery and equipment, using hoists, dollies, rollers, and trucks.

Assemble and install equipment, such as shafting, conveyors, and tram rails, using hand tools and power tools.

Construct foundation for machines, using hand tools and building materials, such as wood, cement, and steel.

Align machines and equipment, using hoists, jacks, hand tools, squares, rules, micrometers, and plumb bobs.

Assemble machines and bolt, weld, rivet, or otherwise fasten them to foundation or other structures, using hand tools and power tools.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01352
Metal fabricators.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, metal fabricators fabricate and assemble structural or ornamental metal products, such as frame work or shells for machinery, tanks, stacks, and metal parts for buildings and bridges.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Develop layout and plan sequences of operation.

Design and construct templates and fixtures.

Locate and mark bending and cutting lines onto workpiece.

Operate a variety of machines and equipment to fabricate metal products, such as brakes, saws rolls, shears, flame cutters, drill presses, bending machines, welding machines, and punch and forming presses.

Set up and operate machine tools associated with fabricating shops, such as radial drill presses, end mills and edge planers, to turn, drill and mill metal to specific dimensions.

Weld, forge weld, braze, solder, rivet or bolt components together to assemble workpiece.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01354
Operating engineers (equipment operators).

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, operating engineers operate, repair and maintain all types of self-propelled mechanically, electrically, electronically, hydraulic, automatic or remote controlled equipment on construction projects.

The work includes, but is not limited to, the following types of construction and equipment:

(1) Type of construction.

(a) Heavy and highway.

Roads, streets, highways, grading and paving, excavation of earth and rock, viaducts, bridges, abutments, retaining walls, alleys, sidewalks, guard rails, fences, parkways, parking areas, athletic fields, railroads, airport grading, surfacing and drainage, pile driving, water supply, water development, reclamation, irrigation, drainage and flood control projects, water mains, pipe lines, sanitation and sewer projects, all common ditches, dams, aqueducts, canals, reservoirs, intakes, channels, levees, dikes, revetments, jetties, quarrying of breakwater or riprap stone, foundations pile driving piers, docks, locks, river and harbor projects, breakwaters, dredging, channel-cutoffs, duct lines, subways, shafts, tunnels, drilling, soil testing, clearing and grubbing, land leveling, quarrying, demolition and site clearing, tramways, soil stabilization, landscaping, beautification projects, hoisting or related work done by helicopters.

Oil or gas refineries, nuclear power plants, industrial complexes and incidental structures.

It shall also include any work relating to off-shore drilling and pipe lines.

(b) Building.

Construction, erection, alteration, repair, modification, demolition, addition or improvement, in whole or in part, of any building structure.

It shall include the installation, operation, maintenance and repair of equipment, and other facilities used in connection with the performance of such building construction.

(c) Material supply. Operations such as quarries, sand and gravel plants, screening plants, asphalt plants, ready-mix concrete or batch plants and prestressed concrete plants (excluding established plants) that are established at the job site.

(2) Type of equipment.

(a) Self-propelled.

Asphalt machines, backhoes, blades, boring equipment, brooms, chippers, compactors, compressors, concrete saws, cranes, derricks, dozers, drilling equipment, hoists, lifts, loaders, motor graders, pavement breakers, paving machines, pumps, rollers, scrapers, screeds, shovels, tractors, and trenchers.

(b) Stationary.

Asphalt plants, concrete batch plants, crushing plants, and screening plants.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01356
Painters.

For the intents and purposes of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the job description for painters is as follows:

(1) Preparation of surfaces.

(a) Washing, cleaning and smoothing of surfaces, using sandpaper, brushes or steel wool.

(b) Removal of old paint or other coatings from surfaces, using paint remover, scraper, wire brush or by sandblasting.

(c) Filling of nail holes, cracks and joints with putty, plaster or other fillers.

(2) Color matching and mixing.

(3) Application of paint, varnish, stain, enamel, lacquer, vinyl, wallpaper and other materials of whatever kind or quality applied to walls or ceilings with paste or adhesive using brushes, spray gun or paint rollers.

(4) Application of polyurethane elastomers, vinyl plastics, neoprene, resin, polyester and epoxy as waterproofing or protective coatings to any kind of surfaces (except roofs) when applied with brushes, spray guns or rollers.

(5) Application of sprayed on fire retardant foam.

(6) Texturing and decorating.

(7) Erecting of scaffolding or setting up of ladders to perform the work above ground level.

(8) Responsible for all the cleanup required in connection with painters work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01358
Pile drivers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the work of a pile driver includes, but is not limited to:

Pile driver (pile buck).

The preparation, aligning, plumbing, setting, stressing, testing, pulling, welding, cutting off and capping of piling of any type including steel pile and concrete pile and the splicing, barking, heading and shoeing of piling and the rigging and signaling connected with all of the above.

Operating engineer pile driver.

Operating any power equipment used for pile driving, such as cranes equipped with drophammers and drums and hoists on A-frame type fixed leads on floating rigs.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01360
Plasterers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, plasterers apply gypsum, portland cement, stucco, imitation stone, and kindred materials and products to interior walls, ceilings, and partitions and to exterior walls of buildings, and finish those materials and products.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

The spreading of plaster over laths, masonry, or any other base, using trowel and smoothing the plaster with darby and float for uniform thickness.

The application of all the various manufacturer's brand names of "thin coat" or "plaster veneer."

The application of all bonding agents and mastical.

Roughing of undercoat with wire or metal scraper to provide bond for succeeding coats of plaster.

The application of all malleable plastic materials and apoxy materials.

The setting in place of plasterboard, insulationboard, "styro-foam and bead-board," ground, locks, patent dots, cork plates, brownstone and acoustical tile, fiberglass reinforcement and finished products.

The plastering of joints, nail holes, and bruises on wallboard.

The grouting and filling of door bucks, runners and similar installations.

The application of scratchcoat, browncoat, and finishcoat of plaster to wood, metal, or board laths successively to all ceilings and walls when finished with terrazzo or tile, and the application of any plastic material to same.

The fireproofing of all building assemblies with plaster materials, sprayed fiberglass or similar materials, whether applied to gypsum, metal lath or directly.

All waterproofing work, such as the cutting and placing of nylon mesh and the plastering and finish of all exterior wall insulation and plaster finish systems.

The application of crushed stone, marble or ceramic chips and broken glass where embedded in plaster, cement, plastic, or similar materials.

The placing of acoustic blocks with any plastic material, regardless of thickness.

The placing, by any method, of plaster or composition caps and ornaments.

Creating decorative textures in finish coat by marking surface of coat with brush and trowel or by spattering it with small stones ("stucco") where plastering equipment and/or materials are used.

The operation and control of all types of plastering machines, including power trowels and floats.

All cleanup work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01362
Playground and park equipment installers.

For the intents and purposes of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the job description for playground and park equipment installers is as follows:

Construction and placement of play equipment, benches and picnic tables in school grounds and parks.

Responsible for all the cleanup required in connection with installation of playground and park equipment.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01364
Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters assemble, install, and maintain piping systems, fixtures and equipment for the transportation of water, steam, gas, air, sewage, oil, fuels, liquids, gases, or similar substances.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Piping systems installed in structures (e.g., buildings, industrial plants, etc.).

(a) The handling and moving of any plumbing, pipefitting and steamfitting materials, supplies, and equipment on the job site.

(b) Cutting, threading, and bending pipe.

(c) Joining pipes by use of screws, bolts, fittings, solder, welding and caulking, or any other method of making joints in the pipefitting industry.

(d) Assembling, installing, and repairing valves, pipe fittings, and pumps.

(e) Testing the piping system.

(f) Installing and repairing plumbing fixtures, such as sinks, bathtubs, water heaters, and water softeners.

(g) Cutting holes in floors and walls for pipes:

With point and hammer.

Core-drilled.

(h) Responsible for all cleanup required in connection with plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters work.

(2) Distribution lines (e.g., water mains, sewer mains, oil and gas lines, etc.).

(a) The handling and moving of any plumbing, pipefitting and steamfitting materials, supplies, and equipment on the job site.

(b) Steel pipe: Welding of pipe joints and joining pipes with screws, bolts, fittings, solder, caulking, or any other method for making joints in the industry.

(c) Ductile iron pipe: Joining pipes by using any method for making joints in the industry, when the pipe will be under pressure.

Assembling, installing, and repairing valves and pumps.

(d) Testing the piping system.

(e) Responsible for all cleanup required in connection with plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01367
Refrigeration mechanic.

For the purpose of Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, refrigeration mechanics install industrial, commercial, residential, and marine refrigeration systems involved in cold storage, ice making, cooling, heating, air conditioning, humidifying, dehumidifying or dehydrating and charge (pump gas or fluid in the system), start, test, service, and repair the installed systems.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Lay out reference points for the installation of the structural and functional components, using tape, transit, plumb bob, level, and square.

Lay out and drill holes and cut chases and channels, set and erect belts, inserts, stands, brackets, hangers, supports, sleeves, thimbles, conduits and hoses.

Lay out, cut, thread, bend and connect pipe to functional components and water or power system of premises.

Move, lift, and install all compressors, pumps, motors, controls, switches, gauges, valves, condensers, evaporators, and other fixtures and appurtenances included in such systems.

Bolt, rivet, weld, braze and solder parts to structural and functional components.

All clean-up work required in connection with refrigeration mechanics' work.

Excluded is the installation of sheet metal duct work leading to and/or from units described above.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01369
Remote controlled cleaning, inspection and sealing of underground sewer and water systems.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, this special method of repairing in-place, underground sewer and water pipes, includes the following work:

Cleaning of interior pipe surface.

Closed circuit television inspection.

Electronic air testing of joints, cracks and breaks.

Internal sealing of joints, cracks and breaks with chemical grout.

All the above functions must be performed by remote control.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01370
Roofers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, roofers apply and install any and all types of roofing materials, other than sheet metal. The work of roofers includes, but is not limited to:

(1) The installation of slate and tile and all substitute materials taking the place of slate and tile, with necessary metal flashing to make water-tight.

All cementing in, on or around slate and tile roofs.

All laying of felt or paper beneath the slate and tile.

All dressing, punching and cutting of all roof slate or tile either by hand or machinery.

(2) The installation of all forms of plastic, slate, slag, gravel; asphalt and composition roofing; rock asphalt mastic when used for damp and waterproofing; prepared paper; compressed paper, and chemically prepared paper with or without coating.

The installation of all damp resisting preparations when applied on roofs with mop, three-knot brush, roller, swab or spray system.

(3) The installation of all forms of elastomeric and/or plastic (elasto-plastic) roofing systems, both sheet and liquid applied, whether single-ply or multi-ply.

All types of aggregates, blocks, bricks or stones used to ballast these elasto-plastic systems.

All types of aggregates used as a ballast for inverted roofing membrane assembly, or roof of similar construction where the insulation is laid over the roofing membrane.

All sealing and caulking of seams and joints on these elasto-plastic systems to insure water-tightness.

All liquid-type elasto-plastic preparation for roofing, damp or waterproofing when applied with a squeegee, trowel, roller or spray equipment.

All sheet-type elasto-plastic systems, whether single or multi-ply, for waterproofing.

All priming of surfaces to be roofed, damp or waterproofed, whether done by roller, mop, swab, three-knot brush, or spray systems.

All types of preformed panels used in waterproofing.

(4) The application of all types of spray-in-place foams such as urethane or polyurethane, and the coatings that are applied over them.

(5) The application of roof insulation, when the insulation material is applied as an integral part of the roofing system, whether the insulation material is applied as the first, last or any other layer in between.

(6) The handling, hoisting and storing of all roofing, damp and waterproofing materials.

(7) The tear-off and/or removal of any type of roofing, including roofing materials containing asbestos, all spudding, sweeping, vacuuming and/or cleanup of any and all areas of any type where a roof is to be relayed, and all other cleanup required in connection with roofing work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01372
Sheet metal workers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, sheet metal workers perform the following work:

(1) The handling, conditioning, assembling, installing, servicing, repairing, altering and dismantling of the duct work for the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems regardless of the materials used and the setting and the servicing of all equipment and all supports and reinforcements in connection therewith.

(2) The installation of expansion and discharge valves, air filters, and water filters in heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems.

(3) The testing and balancing of air-handling equipment and duct work.

(4) The handling, conditioning, assembling, installing, repairing and dismantling (except when a building is demolished) of cornices, gutters and down spouts.

(5) The installation of metal siding and metal roof decking, regardless of the fastening method, or what it is fastened to.

(6) The installation of furnaces and any and all sheet metal work in connection with or incidental to commercial kitchen equipment or refrigerating plants.

(7) The handling, moving, hoisting and storing of all sheet metal materials on the job site and all the cleanup required in connection with sheet metal work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01374
Sign makers and sign installers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, sign makers and sign installers fabricate, install, repair, alter, maintain and dismantle commercial signs, bulletins and poster panels.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Electric and luminous tube signs.

The manufacture of all luminous tubes, which includes the coating and processing of tubes and the bending, repairing and pumping for all tubes.

The shop assembly and fabrication of signs and displays and the installation, alteration, repair and dismantling of all electric and neon sign displays.

The wiring, assembly, service and electrical maintenance of all such displays.

The installation and servicing of fluorescent lighting fixtures.

(2) Painted and photographed signs.

The preparing of sign surfaces, patterns and layouts.

Applying all decals.

Preparing and pouncing of patterns and tracing all patterns.

Designing, cutting out of all letters made of wood or like materials, such as plastic, masonite, wallboard, cardboard.

Priming, finishing and gilding of letters.

Use of stencil knife, perforating wheel and friskit cutting.

Applying and/or hanging of all cut-out letters.

All pictorial work on signs, screen process work in its entirety including photography and operation of projector and mimeograph.

Erecting commercial signs, bulletins and poster panels.

Repainting of all signs, including painting of capping on bulletins and poster panels, by spraying and use of rollers.

All work on banners, cloth, plastic, paper and cardboard, walls, bulletins, windows, truck lettering and all lettering on any surface.

The use of stencil knife on sandblasted signs.

The layout and application of all vinyl letters.

(3) All the cleanup required in connection with sign making and installing.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01375
Sprinkler fitters.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, sprinkler fitters perform the installation, adjustments and corrections, maintenance, repair and dismantling of all fire protection and fire control systems and the installation of all piping for tubing, appurtenances and equipment pertaining thereto.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Underground water mains, fire hydrants and hydrant mains, stand pipes and hose connections to sprinkler systems and overhead piping.

(2) Sprinkler tank heaters.

(3) Air lines and thermal systems used in connection with sprinkler and alarm systems and all tanks and pumps connected thereto.

(4) Co2 and cardox systems, dry chemical systems, halon and foam systems and all other fire protection systems.

(5) Cutting holes in floors and walls for pipes:

With point and hammer.

Core-drilled.

(6) The unloading, handling and storing of all the above.

(7) All cleanup work.

Excluded are steam fire protection systems and stand pipes not connected to automatic sprinkler systems.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01376
Stone masons.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, stone masons shape and set stone blocks to build stone structures, such as piers, walls and abutments, and lay walks, curbstones, or special types of masonry, such as alberene (acid-resistant soapstone) for vats, tanks, and floors, using mason's tools.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Shaping stone blocks preparatory to setting, using chisel, hammer, and other shaping tools.

Spreading mortar over stone and foundation with trowel and setting stone in place by hand or with the aid of a crane.

Aligning stone with plumbline and finishing joints between stone with a pointing trowel.

Spreading mortar along mortar guides to insure joints of uniform thickness.

Cleaning surface of finished structure and removing mortar, using muriatic acid and brush.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01377
Outside telephone line construction.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, outside telephone line construction includes, but is not limited to, the following work:

(1) Head groundman. Operates light equipment and drives vehicles.

(2) Telephone equipment operator - light. Operates backhoes, trenching machines and small cable plows.

(3) Telephone equipment operator - heavy. Operates bulldozers, trenchers, backhoes, cable plows and plows pulling other equipment.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01378
Telecommunication technicians.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, telecommunications technicians install, inspect, maintain, repair and service telecommunication systems.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Main distribution frame (MDF). The distribution frame where the permanent outside lines entering a building terminate and the subscriber's line multiple cabling and truck multiple cabling originate. It is usually located on the ground floor of a building.

(2) Intermediate distribution frames (IDF). Distribution frames which provide flexibility in allocating the subscriber's number to the line or equipment in the office which is to be associated with the particular line. These frames are located on each floor of a building.

(3) Blocks. Subpanels. They are connecting devices where large feed cables terminate at the distribution frames.

(4) Common equipment or key service unit. Consists of a backboard assembly, an equipment mounting frame, for connecting external telephones and Pacific Northwest Bell lines.

(5) Instruments, terminals, sets. Communications equipment at either end of a circuit. Equipment at a subscriber's or user's terminal including such items as telephones.

(6) Ancillary equipment. Add-on equipment such as bells, buzzers, speakerphones, headsets, automatic dialers, recorders, etc.

(7) Telephone cable.

(a) Network channel service cable owned by the telephone companies.

(b) Riser cables between floors of a building.

(c) Distribution cables installed on each floor of a building in the floor or the ceiling.

(d) Inside wires between the telephone and the connection to the distribution cable.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01379
Terrazzo (artificial marble) workers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, terrazzo workers create durable and decorative surfaces on floors, walls and ceilings.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Spreading a one-half inch mixture of sand, cement, and water with trowel to form a base over walls, ceilings, and concrete floors where terrazzo is to be applied.

(2) The cutting and setting of metal or wooden strips into the terrazzo base so that the top edges form a design or pattern and define the level of the finished floor surface.

(3) Spreading a mixture of cement terrazzo, magnasite terrazzo, polyacrylate terrazzo, epoxy matrix terrazzo, exposed aggregate, rustic or rough washed for the interior or exterior of buildings, over a terrazzo base with float and trowel to form the finished surface.

(4) Spreading of any other kind of mixture of plastics composed of chips or granules of marble, granite, blue stone, enamel, mother-of-pearl, quartz, ceramic colored quartz and all other kinds of chips or granules when mixed with cement, rubber, neoprene, vinyl, magnesium, chloride or any other resinous or chemical substances used for seamless flooring systems, and all other binding materials when used on any part of the interior and exterior of buildings and on fountains, swimming pools, etc.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01382
Terrazzo workers' helpers, tile and marble setters' helpers (finishers).

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the scope of work for terrazzo workers' helpers, tile and marble setters' helpers includes, but is not limited to:

Handling, moving, hoisting, storing and distributing sand, mortar, cement, lime, terrazzo, tile, marble, stone, slate or any other materials that may be used by terrazzo workers, tile layers, marble setters and stone masons.

Performing all rigging.

Installing and dismantling of scaffolding or staging.

Mixing mortar and grout.

All preparation prior to installation, such as helping with the bedding and cutting, priming, and the installation of ties and wire lath.

Grinding, cleaning, washing, rubbing and polishing of all tile and marble.

Applying protective coverings, such as soap compounds, paper products, varnishes and lacquers and all types of tapes and polyethylene coverings.

Cleanup of the job site.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01384
Tile setters.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, tile setters apply tile to floors, walls, ceilings, stair treads, promenade roof decks, garden walks, swimming pools, and all places where tiles may be used to form a finished surface for practical use, sanitary finish or decorative purpose.

The tile is defined as all burned clay products, as used in the tile industry, either glazed or unglazed, and all composition materials and all substitute materials in single units up to and including 15" x 20" x 2" (except quarry tiles larger than 9" x 1 1/4"), and all mixtures in the form of cement, plastics and metals that are used as a finished surface.

The work includes, but is not limited to:

Measuring and cutting metal lath to size for walls and ceilings with tin snips. Tacking lath to wall and ceiling surfaces with staple gun or hammer. Spreading plaster base over lath with trowel and leveling plaster to specified thickness, using screed.

Spreading concrete on subfloors with trowel and leveling it with screed.

Spreading mastic or other adhesive base on roof deck, using serrated spreader to form base for promenade tile.

Cutting and shaping tile with tile cutters and biters.

Positioning tile and tapping it with trowel handle to affix tile to plaster or adhesive base.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01386
Traffic control stripers.

For intents and purposes of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the scope of work for traffic control stripers is as follows:

(1) All painting, application and installing of lines, arrows, bumpers, curbs, etc., on parking lots, air fields, highways, game courts and other such surfaces.

(2) The handling, painting and installing of all car stops, stop signs and any other type sign installed for the purpose of regulating traffic on such surfaces.

(3) The installation of plastic, metal or composition button, or lines used instead of paint.

(4) Installation of parking gates, ticket spitters and other similar mechanical and automatic control devices.

(5) Seal coating, slurry coating and other surface protection.

(6) Line removal; chemical sand and hydro-blast, paint and button.

(7) Installation of guard rail and posts and similar protective devices.

(8) Manufacturing and installation of all car stops, per example: Metal, wood, concrete, plastic, etc., and all similar traffic regulators.

(9) Manufacturing, painting, stenciling, servicing, repairing, placing and removal of traffic safety and control devices (barricades).

(10) The preparation and maintenance of all surfaces as outlined above.

(11) Responsible for all the cleanup required in connection with traffic control stripers work.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01387
Power line clearance tree trimming.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the scope of work for power line clearance tree trimmers, chippermen and power line clearance tree trimmer apprentices is as follows:

(1) Power line clearance tree trimmer.

Trims trees to clean right of way for electrical power lines to minimize storm and short-circuit hazards.

Climbs trees to reach branches interfering with wires and transmission towers, using climbing equipment, or may work from bucket of extended truck boom to reach limbs.

Prunes treetops, limbs and branches, using saws or pruning shears.

Falls trees interfering with power service, using chainsaw.

Repairs trees damaged by storms or lighting, by trimming jagged stumps and painting them to prevent bleeding of sap.

Removes broken limbs from wires, using hooked extension pole.

(2) Chipperman.

Assists tree trimmer in clearing trees, branches and brush interfering with electrical power lines. He performs all this work on the ground.

Hoists tools and equipment to tree trimmers and lowers tree tops, limbs and branches with rope or block and tackle. Positions and steadies ladders. Operates the wood chipper (turns on and off). Saws and chops up tree trunks, tree tops, limbs, branches, and brush and leads them into the chipper. Drives the truck which tows the chipper.

This classification is being phased out. To be used only for employees hired as "chippermen" prior to July 1, 1985.

(3) Power line clearance tree trimmer apprentice.

Assist tree trimmer in clearing trees, branches and brush interfering with electrical power lines. He performs all his work on the ground.

Hoists tools and equipment to tree trimmer and lowers tree tops, limbs and branches with rope of block and tackle. Positions and steadies ladders. Operates the wood chipper (turns it on and off). Saws and chips up tree trunks, tree tops, limbs, branches, and brush and feeds them into the chipper. Drives the truck which tows the chipper.

Drags tree trunks, limbs, branches, and brush to the chipper, when the chipper is stationed a considerable distance from the location where the tree trimming is done.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01389
Utilities construction (underground sewers and water lines).

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, utilities construction is defined as follows:

The construction, alteration, repair or improvement of water mains, sanitary sewer mains, underground storm sewers and branch lines to buildings but not underneath buildings, within cities, towns, suburbs and subdivisions. The work includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Clearance of right of way preparatory to the excavation of trenches or ditches.

(2) Excavation and trimming of trenches or ditches (including establishing and maintaining grade).

(3) Shoring, building of manholes, catch basins, etc.

(4) Distribution of pipe and skids, placing of skids and pipe over the trench or ditch.

(5) The cleaning, sealing, doping and wrapping of the pipe after the joints have been welded and before lowering the pipe into the trench and alignment.

(6) Lowering of the pipe and the removal of the skids.

(7) Backfilling, compaction and resurfacing of trenches or ditches (e.g., asphalt work necessary to cover the trench or ditch, but all other asphalt work is excluded).

(8) Clean-up and restoration of right of way (e.g., restore landscaping).

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-127-01391
Water well drillers, exploration drillers, water well pump installers, and equipment oilers.

For the purpose of the Washington state public works law, chapter 39.12 RCW, the work of water well drillers, exploration drillers, water well pump installers, and equipment oilers includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Water well drillers. The drilling of wells for:

(a) Commercial water supplies.

(b) Irrigation water supplies.

(c) Water supplies for any other purpose.

(d) Dewatering, or similar purposes.

(2) Exploration drillers.

(a) Hole drilling for geologic or hydrologic information.

(b) Core drilling for geologic information.

(3) Water well pump installers. The installation of water well pumps for all purposes, except commercial water supplies.

(4) Equipment oilers. Assist the drillers and pump installers in the performance of the tasks described above.

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Washington State Code Reviser's Office