WSR 08-23-097

PROPOSED RULES

DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY


[ Order 05-19 -- Filed November 19, 2008, 11:17 a.m. ]

Original Notice.

Preproposal statement of inquiry was filed as WSR 06-03-135.

Title of Rule and Other Identifying Information: This action amends the two rules that regulate new or modified sources of toxic air pollutants, WAC 173-400-110 General regulations for air pollution sources, new source review, and chapter 173-460 WAC, Controls for new sources of toxic air pollutants.

Hearing Location(s): Department of Ecology, 300 Desmond Drive S.E., Lacey, WA 98503, on January 13, 2009, at 7:00 p.m.; and at the Eastern Regional Office, Department of Ecology, 4601 North Monroe Street, Spokane, WA 99205, on January 14, 2009, at 4:00 p.m.

Date of Intended Adoption: March 1, 2009.

Submit Written Comments to: Linda Whitcher, P.O. Box 47600, Olympia, WA 98504-7600, e-mail liwh461@ecy.wa.gov, fax (360) 407-7534, by 5:00 p.m. on January 24, 2009.

Assistance for Persons with Disabilities: Contact Tami Dahlgren at (360) 407-6830, by January 3, 2009. Persons with hearing loss, call 711 for Washington Relay Service. Persons with a speech disability, call 877-833-6341.

Purpose of the Proposal and Its Anticipated Effects, Including Any Changes in Existing Rules: This programmatic action involves a general update of chapter 173-460 WAC and a limited update of WAC 173-400-110. The revision to chapter 173-460 WAC includes an update of the list of toxic air pollutants, recalculation of the acceptable source impact levels and small quantity emission rates to reflect current scientific findings, setting the de minimis values for emissions of toxic air pollutants, and deleting out of date control technologies for best available control technologies. The revisions to WAC 173-200-110 are focused on integrating the new source review process in the two rules. Both WACs regulate new or modified sources of air pollution.

This rule making has three major goals: To update the toxic air pollutant list; to establish acceptable source impact levels for emission, small quantity emission rates, and de minimis emission levels to reflect current scientific information, and to increase the consistency between chapters 173-400 and 173-460 WAC. In the new rule the permit process and exemptions have been consolidated in WAC 173-400-110.

Since the conclusion of the advisory committee meetings ecology has added to the rule making a new de minimis level for PM2.5. The method of determining this level is the same as was used in developing the other criteria pollutant de minimis values. We invite comments on this revision in addition to the other changes to the two rules.

Reasons Supporting Proposal: Ecology has made a commitment to periodically update this rule, in order to reflect the most current scientific understanding of the toxic effects of industrial air emissions.

Statutory Authority for Adoption: Chapter 70.94 RCW, Washington Clean Air Act.

Statute Being Implemented: Chapter 70.94 RCW, Washington Clean Air Act.

Rule is not necessitated by federal law, federal or state court decision.

Name of Proponent: Air quality program, department of ecology, governmental.

Name of Agency Personnel Responsible for Drafting: Linda Whitcher, Lacey, Washington, (360) 407-6875; Implementation and Enforcement: Richard Hibbard, Lacey, Washington, (360) 407-6896.

A small business economic impact statement has been prepared under chapter 19.85 RCW.

Small Business Economic Impact Statement

Note: Due to size limitations relating to the filing of documents with the code reviser, the small business economic impact statement (SBEIS) does not contain the appendices that further explain ecology's analysis. Additionally, it does not contain the raw data used in this analysis, or all of ecology's analysis of this data. However, this information is being placed in the rule-making file, and is available upon request.

Executive Summary: Based on research and analysis required by the Regulatory Fairness Act, RCW 19.85.070, ecology has determined that the amendments to chapters 173-400 and 173-460 WAC have a disproportionate impact on small business. Therefore, we must include cost-minimizing features in the rule where it is legal and feasible to do so.

1. Background:

General Air Pollution Regulations and New Source Review: In order to protect air quality in the state, Washington law requires permitting of significant sources of criteria pollutants, and new sources of toxic air pollutants (TAPs). Criteria pollutants are pollutants for which EPA has set national ambient air quality standards to protect human health and welfare. TAPs are airborne chemicals that have been shown to be hazardous to human health. These chemicals are associated with a wide variety of ailments and disorders when people are exposed to them.

Washington state has been regulating new sources of these pollutants since 1991 via the permitting process. The regulation was last updated in 1994 to reflect scientific knowledge current at that time. Proposed projects which will establish a new source of air pollution may be required to obtain a new source review (air quality) permit prior to beginning construction.

Ecology or the local clean air agency with jurisdiction is responsible for reviewing projects that will install a new source or modify an existing source of TAPs. Applicants proposing to install a new source - or modify an existing source - of TAPs are required to submit a notice of construction (NOC) application to ecology or the local air authority.

The application must include a detailed description of the project, and include process equipment information, type and amount of air contaminants that would be emitted, air pollution control practices, and air pollution control equipment. Some types of projects - such as residential uses, or projects emitting less than specific emission thresholds of particular TAPs - are exempt.

Criteria Air Pollutant Exemption Limits: The existing rule (WAC 173-400-110(5)) describes the criteria for defining exempt sources of criteria air pollutants. Listed sources emitting below these levels are exempt from program requirements for criteria air pollutants. The current rule contains exemption limits (essentially de minimis limits) for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, particulate matter, fine particulate, and volatile organic compounds.

Exemption limits in the existing regulation were calculated by dividing the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) increment levels by twenty (setting them at 5% of the EPA's PSD increment levels). Increment is the maximum amount of pollutant (measured in tons per year) that a PSD permit can allow to be emitted and not break the modeled ambient concentrations. PSD increment levels are designed to:

Protect public health and welfare;
Preserve, protect, and enhance the air quality in national parks, national wilderness areas, national monuments, national seashores, and other areas of special national or regional natural, recreational, scenic, or historic value;
Insure that economic growth will occur in a manner consistent with the preservation of existing clean air resources; and
Assure that any decision to permit increased air pollution in any area to which this section applies is made only after careful evaluation of all the consequences of such a decision and after adequate procedural opportunities for informed public participation in the decision-making process.1
Three Existing Tiers of Toxic Air Permitting: There are three levels of review when processing a permit application for a new or modified emissions unit emitting TAPs:

Toxic screening (first tier).
Health impacts assessment (second tier).
Risk management decision (third tier).2
First Tier Analysis: All projects are required to undergo a first tier toxic screening analysis as required by WAC 173-460-040. There are two ways to perform a first tier analysis:

Determine if proposed emissions are below the small quantity emission rate (SQER) tables. If yes, then further analysis is not required.
If emissions of a TAP are greater than the relevant SQER, those emissions must be modeled, and the resultant ambient concentration is compared to the appropriate acceptable source impact level (ASIL). If the ambient concentration is below the ASIL, then no further analysis is required.
If the modeled ambient concentration of a TAP is above the relevant ASIL, the permit moves to second tier review, below.
It is most common for NOC permit applications to require only first tier review. Based on recent permitting data, approximately 400 - 450 first tier permits are issued in Washington state each year.3

Second Tier Analysis: A second tier analysis (WAC 173-460-090) is a site-specific health impacts assessment of the emissions resulting from a proposed project. The objective of a second tier analysis is to quantify:

The increase in lifetime cancer risk for persons exposed to the increased concentration of any carcinogenic TAP.
The increased health hazard from any noncarcinogenic TAP in ambient air.
Once quantified, the cancer risk is compared to the maximum risk allowed by a second tier analysis (one in one hundred thousand). The concentration of any noncarcinogenic TAP that would result from the proposed project is compared to a risk-based concentration.

This level of permitting is considerably less common than first tier analysis. Based on recent permitting data, approximately six second tier permits are issued in Washington state each year.4

Third Tier Analysis: If the emissions of a carcinogenic TAP result in a cancer risk of greater than one in one hundred thousand, then an applicant may request ecology headquarters to perform a third tier analysis. A third tier analysis is basically a risk management decision, in which the director of ecology makes a decision that the risk of the project is acceptable, based on determination that emissions will be maximally reduced through:

Available preventive measures.
Assessment of environmental benefit.
Disclosure of risk at a public hearing.
Related factors associated with the facility and the surrounding community.
There has never been an NOC permit application that has required third tier review.

Regulatory Baseline: The baseline for all analyses of the proposed rule amendments is the regulatory environment in the absence of any changes. Under the current regulatory framework, the permitting process for new source review would remain as is described above (see new source review). Without the adoption of the proposed rule amendments, the existing permitting process would remain in place.

Changes under the Proposed Rule Amendments: The proposed amendments to chapters 173-400 and 173-460 WAC make a number of changes to the permitting process, air quality screening standards, applicability, and organization and consistency of regulatory language. Each of these actions is authorized by the Clean Air Act (chapter 70.94 RCW).

Specific changes under the proposed amendments include:

Updating the TAPs and screening levels (acceptable source impact level, or ASIL; small quantity emissions rate, or SQER) involved in the permitting process with current scientific knowledge.
Establishing de minimis values for emissions.
Adding exemption emissions level for particulate matter - 2.5 (PM-2.5) as a criteria pollutant.
Optional emissions netting within and across facilities.
Expanding applicability of new source review.
Streamlining language and procedures.
Each of these is describe [described] in detail, below.5

Updating TAPs, ASIL Values, and SQER Values: The proposed rule amendments update the list of regulated TAPs and their associated ASIL values based on a four-step procedure and three established sources of toxicological and health information. The process ecology used in selecting ASIL values and which TAPs to include in the amended list sourced risk-based concentrations from:

United States Environmental Protection Agency.
Agency for toxic substances and disease registry.
California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment.
Ecology determined that if TAPs were not addressed by these sources, they did not have an ASIL, and therefore did not include them in the amended regulatory list for this rule.

Ecology updated SQERs based on the relevant amended ASIL values. Like ASILs, SQERs are additional screening levels, used to determine the necessary level of review.

Establishing De Minimis Values for Emissions: Ecology calculated de minimis emissions rates based on the relevant amended ASIL values. De minimis emissions values are minimum emissions rates for first tier review. If a proposed new source of TAPs has expected emissions below de minimis levels for a TAP, the NOC permit application does not require first tier review for that TAP. For new sources of TAPs with expected emissions below de minimis levels for all TAPs, no evaluation by ecology or a local clean air authority is necessary.

Adding Exemption Emissions Level for Particulate Matter - 2.5 (PM-2.5): The proposed rule amendments include the addition of an exemption level for PM-2.5 to the exempt emissions rates for criteria air pollutants. Since this rule was last revised, the EPA established a prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) emissions rate and increment level for PM-2.5. Ecology proposed updating the rule to reflect this change.

Ecology calculated the proposed emissions rate of 0.5 tons/year in the same way that it calculated existing exemption levels for the other criteria pollutants. Ecology multiplied the PSD increment level recently set for PM-2.5 by the EPA (ten tons/year) by 5%, resulting in an exempt level of emissions of 0.5 tons/year.

Under the baseline, new sources are required to calculate emissions rates for the criteria pollutants, and compare them to the exemption levels. If all emissions - including PM-2.5 are below exemption levels (for PM-2.5, the baseline exempt emissions rate is zero), then the project is exempt from registration program requirements. This means, if any PM-2.5 is going to be emitted, the project cannot be exempt under the existing rule.

Emissions Netting: Where proposed new sources of TAPs are required to install emissions controls, the proposed rule amendments allow permit applicants to generate an equivalent net reduction in emissions across multiple emissions units or sources, including existing sources. Emissions netting is constrained by the type of TAP emissions that must be reduced, and the source location. This option does not exist under the baseline rule.

Expanding Applicability: The baseline rule for new sources of TAPs applies to those types of sources specifically listed in the rule. The proposed rule amendments expand new source review to all new sources, except those that qualify for exemption - either categorically, or by de minimis emissions standards. Under the baseline, new source review only applies to new sources that are listed categorically in the rule.

Streamlining Language and Procedures: The baseline new source review permitting process involves multiple regulations, with TAPs listed across separate tables, in separate sections of the code. In addition, the baseline permitting process applies to select industries, and can apply differently across industries and attributes of proposed new TAP sources. The proposed rule amendments streamline applicability, and clarify the regulation and permitting process.

2. Compliance Costs for Washington Businesses: Ecology calculated in the cost-benefit analysis (Ecology Publication No. 08-02-023) for the proposed rule amendments, that the proposed rule would result in both quantifiable costs and benefits to Washington businesses. These impacts on Washington businesses are as follows:

Avoided cost: $2.7 million annually in reduced costs to first tier permittees. Range $1.8 - $3.6 million.
Avoided cost: $125 thousand annually in reduced costs to second tier permittees. Range $0 - $300 thousand.
Increased cost: $2.9 million annually in increased costs to first tier permittees. Range $1.8 - $7.1 million.
Ecology also determined that additional cost reductions to Washington businesses were likely, due to rule amendments that streamlined the rule, and the addition of optional netting of emissions across facilities. As these benefits to businesses were not quantifiable, ecology focused on the most conservative quantified net costs, as based on quantified benefits and costs from the cost-benefit analysis.

The broadest range of net compliance costs, when accounting for the full possible range of costs and benefits of the proposed rule, is between the sets of (lowest cost, highest benefit) and (highest cost, lowest benefit). This range of net compliance costs is large, from an annual net cost of $5 million, to an annual net benefit of $2.1 million in avoided compliance costs.

Alternately, using the average expected costs and benefits, the proposed rule amendments generate a net quantified cost of $75 thousand to Washington businesses.

3. Quantification of Costs and Ratios: Ecology based its aggregate calculations on estimates of the annual number of NOC permits impacted by the proposed rule amendments, in Washington state. The expected number of impacted NOC permits each year is one hundred forty-three, after accounting for permits that do not include any TAP emissions, and permits that are not expected to change in the number of TAP emissions exceeding the relevant SQER values.

Dividing the range of annual net compliance costs to Washington businesses, ecology calculated that the impact of the proposed rule amendments is between a net compliance cost of $35 thousand per affected NOC permit, and a net compliance benefit (avoided cost) of $15 thousand per affected NOC permit. At the average expected net cost, the per-NOC-permit cost is $525.

This cost is expected to be constant for any typical new source of TAPs, as ecology could not determine whether there is a significant correlation between business size, new source size, the TAPs emitted, and the impacts of the proposed rule amendments. Therefore, ecology concluded that on a per-employee basis, the proposed rule amendments have a disproportionate impact on small businesses.

4. Action Taken to Reduce Small Business Impacts: As the proposed rule amendments either update the rule's scientific content to current scientific standards, or serve to make compliance with the rule easier or less expensive, ecology determined that the existing provisions in the rule (these also remain in the amended rule) were otherwise sufficient to aid small businesses in compliance. The primary compliance costs to businesses are (1) analysis costs and (2) fees.

For analysis costs, these depend, to some extent, on the number of TAPs emitted by a new source, in excess of the relevant de minimis levels and SQERs. If there is a correlation between business size and the size of a new source's emissions of TAPs, then small businesses are more likely to emit below the proposed rule amendments' new de minimis emissions levels, or revised SQER values for all TAPs. This makes it more likely that small businesses will not require new source review, or will at most require first tier review.

For fees (to local clean air agencies and/or ecology), existing provisions in the rule, which remain in the proposed amended rule, aid small businesses in compliance by attempting to reduce their disproportionate burden by offering fee reductions. The proposed rule amendments retain fees determined by reference to another section of the code.

WAC 173-455-120 New source review fees, allows for a fee reduction for small businesses. The definition of small business is, "any business entity, including a sole proprietorship, corporation, partnership, or other legal entity, that is owned and operated independently from all other businesses, that has the purpose of making a profit, and that has fifty or fewer employees." This corresponds to the definition used for SBEIS.

The new source review fee for small businesses that apply for a fee reduction is then the greater of:

50% of the new source review fee; or
Two hundred fifty dollars.
An extreme hardship fee reduction is also available for small businesses. This reduction would further reduce fees, to a level determined by ecology, for small businesses with "special economic circumstances." See WAC 173-455-120 (4)(e) for determinants of "special economic circumstances" and the extreme hardship fee.

5. Small Business Involvement: In the rule development process for the proposed rule amendments, ecology held stakeholder meetings that included direct and indirect small business representation. Two small businesses were directly represented by employees participating in the stakeholder process. Other small businesses were represented in the stakeholder process by the Independent Business Association and the Association of Washington Business.

6. NAICS Codes of Impacted Industries: The proposed rule amendments expand applicability of the new source review rule to all new sources of TAPs. Many of these sources are not expected to experience an impact from the rule due to exemption or size of TAP emissions, although ecology cannot be certain of all businesses that will be newly affected, as this data does not exist. Based on a review of past NOC permits requiring first tier or second tier review, ecology expects the proposed rule amendments to generate cost impacts for new sources in at least the industries listed in Table 1.


Table 1: Impacted Industries
NAICS

Code

Total Businesses

in WA

Small Businesses
337110 689 670
811121 1,111 1100
811490 842 841
221320 14 14
212312 2 2
325211 14 13
327310 5 3
311920 29 27
517210 604 598
321113 44 31
511210 15 13
519130 0 0
562219 29 26
423920 189 183
221112 7 6
324110 22 18

Source: Washington state employment security department industry and employer data. Note that this includes only businesses or parts of businesses operated in Washington. The actual number of small businesses may be smaller, as this dataset does not reflect Washington-based subsidiary operations of larger interstate or international corporations.

7. Impact on Jobs: By creating additional compliance costs to some businesses, in the form of payments to regulatory agencies, environmental consultants, and emissions control manufacturers and installers, the proposed rule amendments create transfers of money between these industries. These financial impacts can then filter through the economy (additional or reduced resources to employ individuals, purchase inputs, etc.).

Ecology used the 2002 Washington state office of financial management input-output model to estimate the impacts of financial transfers created by the proposed rule amendments. Based on payments made by impacted industries going entirely to the consulting and analysis industry (as in the most conservative estimate of costs), the proposed rule amendments generate a net gain in employment of twenty-seven jobs each year. Table 2 summarizes the distribution of job impacts across industry categories.


Table 2: Aggregate Employment Impacts
Natural Resources and Utilities -3.211
Construction and Manufacturing -13.651
Retail and Wholesale Trade 1.021
Producer and Transport Services 33.696
Consumer Services 9.461
Total 27.316

1 EPA prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) basic information web site http://www.epa.gov/nsr/psd.html#air.

2 The proposed rule amendments change the names of these levels of review to the names in parentheses. For clarity, this document uses "first tier," "second tier" and "third tier" throughout when referring to these levels of review.

3 Based on a survey of clean air authorities in Washington state. Clean air authorities/agencies: Benton, Northwest, Olympic Region, Puget Sound, Southwest, Spokane Regional, and Yakima. Ecology regional offices administering NOC permits: Central Regional Office and Eastern Regional Office. Most recent, or averaged most recent number of completed NOC permits, and number involving TAPs, if available.

4 Second tier NOC permit review is performed by ecology. Average of six permits annually based on completed NOC permits.

5 Third tier analysis is only performed for carcinogens under the existing baseline, and all risks of noncarcinogenic TAPs are evaluated in the second tier analysis. Under the proposed rule amendments, both carcinogens and noncarcinogens are included in third tier analysis. As there has never been an NOC permit application that has required third tier review, ecology does not expect future third tier review, and therefore does not expect an impact from this rule amendment.

A copy of the statement may be obtained by contacting Kasia Patora, Economic and Regulatory Research, Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 47600, Lacey, WA 98504-7600, phone (360) 407-6184, fax (360) 407-6989, e-mail kpat461@ecy.wa.gov.

A cost-benefit analysis is required under RCW 34.05.328. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis may be obtained by contacting Kasia Patora, Economic and Regulatory Research, Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 47600, Lacey, WA 98504-7600, phone (360) 407-6184, fax (360) 407-6989, e-mail kpat461@ecy.wa.gov.

November 18, 2008

Polly Zehm

Deputy Director

OTS-1835.3


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 06-03, filed 5/8/07, effective 6/8/07)

WAC 173-400-110   New source review (NSR).   In lieu of filing a notice of construction application under this section, the owner or operator may apply for coverage under an applicable general order of approval issued under WAC 173-400-560. Coverage under a general order of approval satisfies the requirement for new source review under RCW 70.94.152.

(1) Applicability.

(a) This section, WAC 173-400-112 and 173-400-113 apply statewide except where an authority has adopted its own new source review rule.

(b) This section applies to sources as defined in RCW 70.94.030(((21))) (22), but does not include nonroad engines. Nonroad engines are regulated under WAC 173-400-035.

(2) Projects subject to NSR - notice of construction application.

(a) A notice of construction application must be filed by the owner or operator and an order of approval issued by the permitting authority prior to ((the establishment)) beginning actual construction of any new source, except for the following:

(i) Those sources exempt under subsection (4) or (5) of this section; and

(ii) A source regulated under WAC 173-400-035.

For purposes of this section (("establishment" shall mean to begin actual construction, as that term is defined in WAC 173-400-030, and)) "new source" ((shall)) includes any modification to an existing stationary source, as defined in WAC 173-400-030, and any new or modified toxic air pollutant source, as defined in WAC 173-460-020.

(b) Regardless of any other subsection of this section, a notice of construction application must be filed and an order of approval issued by the permitting authority prior to ((establishment)) beginning actual construction of any of the following new sources:

(i) Any project that qualifies as construction, reconstruction or modification of an affected facility, within the meaning of 40 CFR Part 60 (New Source Performance Standards), except ((Part)) subpart AAA, Wood stoves (((in effect on February 20, 2001))) and except subpart IIII (Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines) and subpart JJJJ (Standards of Performance for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines) as they apply to emergency stationary internal combustion engines with a maximum engine power less than or equal to 500 brake horsepower (federal rules in effect on April 30, 2008);

(ii) Any project that qualifies as a new or modified source within the meaning of 40 CFR 61.02 (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) (in effect on July 1, 2004), except for asbestos demolition and renovation projects subject to 40 CFR 61.145, and except from sources or emission units emitting only radionuclides, which are required to obtain a license under WAC 246-247-060, and are subject to 40 CFR Part 61, subparts H and/or I;

(iii) Any project that qualifies as a new source within the meaning of 40 CFR 63.2 (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Categories) (((in effect on October 1, 2006))) except subpart ZZZZ (National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines) as it applies to emergency or limited use stationary reciprocating internal combustion engines with a maximum engine power less than or equal to 500 brake horsepower (federal rules in effect on April 30, 2008);

(iv) Any project that qualifies as a new major stationary source, or a major modification to a major stationary source subject to the requirements of WAC 173-400-112;

(v) Any modification to a stationary source that requires an increase either in a plant-wide cap or in a unit specific emission limit.

(c) An applicant filing a notice of construction application for a project described in WAC 173-400-117(2), Special protection requirements for Class I areas, must send a copy of the application to the responsible federal land manager.

(3) Modifications. New source review of a modification ((shall be)) is limited to the emission unit or units proposed to be added to an existing source or modified and the air contaminants whose emissions would increase as a result of the modification; provided, however, that review of a major modification must comply with WAC 173-400-112 and/or 173-400-720, as applicable.

(4) Emission unit and activity exemptions.

Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, ((establishment of a new emission unit that falls within)) the construction or modification of emission units in one of the categories listed below is exempt from new source review((. Modification of any emission unit listed below is exempt from new source review)), provided that the modified unit continues to fall within one of the listed categories. The ((installation)) construction or modification of ((a)) an emission unit exempt under this subsection does not require the filing of a notice of construction application.

(a) Maintenance/construction:

(i) Cleaning and sweeping of streets and paved surfaces;

(ii) Concrete application, and installation;

(iii) Dredging wet spoils handling and placement;

(iv) Paving application and maintenance, excluding asphalt plants;

(v) Plant maintenance and upkeep activities (grounds keeping, general repairs, routine house keeping, routine plant painting, welding, cutting, brazing, soldering, plumbing, retarring roofs, etc.);

(vi) Plumbing installation, plumbing protective coating application and maintenance activities;

(vii) Roofing application;

(viii) Insulation application and maintenance, excluding products for resale;

(ix) Janitorial services and consumer use of janitorial products.

(b) Storage tanks:

Note: It can be difficult to determine requirements for storage tanks. Ecology strongly recommends that an owner or operator contact the permitting authority to determine the exemption status of storage tanks prior to their installation.


(i) Lubricating oil storage tanks except those facilities that are wholesale or retail distributors of lubricating oils;

(ii) Polymer tanks and storage devices and associated pumping and handling equipment, used for solids dewatering and flocculation;

(iii) Storage tanks, reservoirs, pumping and handling equipment of any size containing soaps, vegetable oil, grease, animal fat, and nonvolatile aqueous salt solutions;

(iv) Process and white water storage tanks;

(v) Operation, loading and unloading of storage tanks and storage vessels, with lids or other appropriate closure and less than 260 gallon capacity (35 cft);

(vi) Operation, loading and unloading of storage tanks, ≤ 1100 gallon capacity, with lids or other appropriate closure, not for use with materials containing toxic air pollutants, as defined in chapter 173-460 WAC, max. VP 550 mm Hg @21C;

(vii) Operation, loading and unloading storage of butane, propane, or liquefied petroleum gas with a vessel capacity less than 40,000 gallons;

(viii) Tanks, vessels and pumping equipment, with lids or other appropriate closure for storage or dispensing of aqueous solutions of inorganic salts, bases and acids.

(c) A project with combined aggregate heat inputs of combustion units, ≤ all of the following:

(i) ≤ 500,000 Btu/hr using coal with ≤ 0.5% sulfur or other fuels with ≤ 0.5% sulfur;

(ii) ≤ 500,000 Btu/hr used oil, per the requirements of RCW 70.94.610;

(iii) ≤ 400,000 Btu/hr wood waste or paper;

(iv) < 1,000,000 Btu/hr using kerosene, #1, or #2 fuel oil and with ≤0.05% sulfur;

(v) ≤ 4,000,000 Btu/hr using natural gas, propane, or LPG.

(d) Material handling:

(i) Continuous digester chip feeders;

(ii) Grain elevators not licensed as warehouses or dealers by either the Washington state department of agriculture or the U.S. Department of Agriculture;

(iii) Storage and handling of water based lubricants for metal working where organic content of the lubricant is ≤ 10%;

(iv) Equipment used exclusively to pump, load, unload, or store high boiling point organic material in tanks less than one million gallon, material with initial atmospheric boiling point not less than 150C or vapor pressure not more than 5 mm Hg @21C, with lids or other appropriate closure.

(e) Water treatment:

(i) Septic sewer systems, not including active wastewater treatment facilities;

(ii) NPDES permitted ponds and lagoons used solely for the purpose of settling suspended solids and skimming of oil and grease;

(iii) De-aeration (oxygen scavenging) of water where toxic air pollutants as defined in chapter 173-460 WAC are not emitted;

(iv) Process water filtration system and demineralizer vents;

(v) Sewer manholes, junction boxes, sumps and lift stations associated with wastewater treatment systems;

(vi) Demineralizer tanks;

(vii) Alum tanks;

(viii) Clean water condensate tanks.

(f) Environmental chambers and laboratory equipment:

(i) Environmental chambers and humidity chambers not using toxic air pollutant gases, as regulated under chapter 173-460 WAC;

(ii) Gas cabinets using only gases that are not toxic air pollutants regulated under chapter 173-460 WAC;

(iii) Installation or modification of a single laboratory fume hood;

(iv) Laboratory research, experimentation, analysis and testing at sources whose primary purpose and activity is research or education. To be exempt, these sources must not engage in the production of products, or in providing commercial services, for sale or exchange for commercial profit except in a de minimis manner. Pilot-plants or pilot scale processes at these sources are not exempt.

(v) Laboratory calibration and maintenance equipment.

(g) Monitoring/quality assurance/testing:

(i) Equipment and instrumentation used for quality control/assurance or inspection purpose;

(ii) Hydraulic and hydrostatic testing equipment;

(iii) Sample gathering, preparation and management;

(iv) Vents from continuous emission monitors and other analyzers.

(h) Miscellaneous:

(i) Single-family residences and duplexes;

(ii) Plastic pipe welding;

(iii) Primary agricultural production activities including soil preparation, planting, fertilizing, weed and pest control, and harvesting;

(iv) Comfort air conditioning;

(v) Flares used to indicate danger to the public;

(vi) Natural and forced air vents and stacks for bathroom/toilet activities;

(vii) Personal care activities;

(viii) Recreational fireplaces including the use of barbecues, campfires, and ceremonial fires;

(ix) Tobacco smoking rooms and areas;

(x) Noncommercial smokehouses;

(xi) Blacksmith forges for single forges;

(xii) Vehicle maintenance activities, not including vehicle surface coating;

(xiii) Vehicle or equipment washing (see (c) of this subsection for threshold for boilers);

(xiv) Wax application;

(xv) Oxygen, nitrogen, or rare gas extraction and liquefaction equipment not including internal and external combustion equipment;

(xvi) Ozone generators and ozonation equipment;

(xvii) Solar simulators;

(xviii) Ultraviolet curing processes, to the extent that toxic air pollutant gases as defined in chapter 173-460 WAC are not emitted;

(xix) Electrical circuit breakers, transformers, or switching equipment installation or operation;

(xx) Pulse capacitors;

(xxi) Pneumatically operated equipment, including tools and hand held applicator equipment for hot melt adhesives;

(xxii) Fire suppression equipment;

(xxiii) Recovery boiler blow-down tank;

(xxiv) Screw press vents;

(xxv) Drop hammers or hydraulic presses for forging or metal working;

(xxvi) Production of foundry sand molds, unheated and using binders less than 0.25% free phenol by sand weight;

(xxvii) Kraft lime mud storage tanks and process vessels;

(xxviii) Lime grits washers, filters and handling;

(xxix) Lime mud filtrate tanks;

(xxx) Lime mud water;

(xxxi) Stock cleaning and pressurized pulp washing down process of the brown stock washer;

(xxxii) Natural gas pressure regulator vents, excluding venting at oil and gas production facilities and transportation marketing facilities;

(xxxiii) Nontoxic air pollutant, as defined in chapter 173-460 WAC, solvent cleaners less than 10 square feet air-vapor interface with solvent vapor pressure not more than 30 mm Hg @21C;

(xxxiv) Surface coating, aqueous solution or suspension containing ≤ 1% (by weight) VOCs, and/or toxic air pollutants as defined in chapter 173-460 WAC;

(xxxv) Cleaning and stripping activities and equipment using solutions having ≤ 1% VOCs (by weight); on metallic substances, acid solutions are not exempt;

(xxxvi) Dip coating operations, using materials less than 1% VOCs (by weight) and/or toxic air pollutants as defined in chapter 173-460 WAC.

(xxxvii) Abrasive blasting performed inside a booth or hangar designed to capture the blast grit or overspray.

(xxxviii) For structures or items too large to be reasonably handled indoors, abrasive blasting performed outdoors that employs control measures such as curtailment during windy periods and enclosure of the area being blasted with tarps and uses either steel shot or an abrasive containing less than one percent (by mass) which would pass through a No. 200 sieve.

(xxxix) Emergency generators powered by internal combustion engines with a maximum power of less than or equal to 500 brake horsepower.

(xl) Gasoline dispensing facilities (GDFs) regulated by chapter 173-491 WAC.

(5) Exemptions based on emissions.

(a) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section and in this subsection:

(i) Construction of a new emissions unit that has a potential to emit below each of the levels listed in the table contained in (d) of this subsection is exempt from new source review provided that the conditions of (b) of this subsection are met.

(ii) A modification to an existing emissions unit that increases the unit's actual emissions by less than each of the threshold levels listed in the table contained in (d) of this subsection is exempt from new source review provided that the conditions of (b) of this subsection are met.

(b) The owner or operator seeking to exempt a project from new source review under this section ((shall)) must notify, and upon request, file a brief project summary with the permitting authority prior to beginning actual construction on the project. If the permitting authority determines that the project will have more than a de ((minimus)) minimis impact on air quality, the permitting authority may require the filing of a notice of construction application. The permitting authority may require the owner or operator to demonstrate that the emissions increase from the new or modified emission((s)) unit is smaller than all of the levels listed below.

(c) The owner/operator may begin actual construction on the project thirty-one days after the permitting authority receives the summary, unless the permitting authority notifies the owner/operator within thirty days that the proposed new source requires a notice of construction application.

(d) Exemption level table:

POLLUTANT LEVEL (TONS

PER YEAR)


(a) Total Suspended Particulates

1.25
(b) PM-10 0.75
(c) PM-2.5 0.5
(d) Sulfur Oxides 2.0
(((d))) (e) Nitrogen Oxides 2.0
(((e))) (f) Volatile Organic Compounds, total 2.0
(((f))) (g) Carbon Monoxide 5.0
(((g))) (h) Lead 0.005
(((h))) (i) Ozone Depleting Substances 1.0
(in effect on July 1, 2000), total
(((i))) (j) Toxic Air Pollutants ((As specified in chapter 173-460 WAC.)) The de minimis emission rate specified for each TAP in WAC 173-460-150.

(6) Application processing - completeness determination.

(a) Within thirty days after receiving a notice of construction application, the permitting authority ((shall)) must either notify the applicant in writing that the application is complete or notify the applicant in writing of all additional information necessary to complete the application.

(b) For a project subject to the Special protection requirements for federal Class I areas in WAC 173-400-117(2), a completeness determination includes a determination that the application includes all information required for review of that project under WAC 173-400-117(3).

(7) Final determination.

(a) Within sixty days of receipt of a complete notice of construction application, the permitting authority ((shall)) must either issue a final decision on the application or for those projects subject to public notice under WAC 173-400-171(1), initiate notice and comment on a proposed decision, followed as promptly as possible by a final decision.

(b) A person seeking approval to construct or modify a source that requires an operating permit may elect to integrate review of the operating permit application or amendment required under chapter 173-401 WAC and the notice of construction application required by this section. A notice of construction application designated for integrated review ((shall)) must be processed in accordance with operating permit program procedures and deadlines in chapter 173-401 WAC and must also comply with WAC 173-400-171.

(c) Every final determination on a notice of construction application ((shall)) must be reviewed and signed prior to issuance by a professional engineer or staff under the direct supervision of a professional engineer in the employ of the permitting authority.

(d) If the new source is a major stationary source or the change is a major modification subject to the requirements of WAC 173-400-112, the permitting authority ((shall)) must:

(i) Submit any control technology determination included in a final order of approval for a major source or a major modification to a major stationary source in a nonattainment area to the RACT/BACT/LAER clearinghouse maintained by EPA; and

(ii) Send a copy of the final approval order to EPA.

(8) Appeals. Any conditions contained in an order of approval, or the denial of a notice of construction application may be appealed to the pollution control hearings board as provided in chapter 43.21B RCW. The permitting authority ((shall)) must promptly mail copies of each order approving or denying a notice of construction application to the applicant and to any other party who submitted timely comments on the application, along with a notice advising parties of their rights of appeal to the pollution control hearings board.

(9) Construction time limitations. Approval to construct or modify a stationary source becomes invalid if construction is not commenced within eighteen months after receipt of the approval, if construction is discontinued for a period of eighteen months or more, or if construction is not completed within a reasonable time. The permitting authority may extend the eighteen-month period upon a satisfactory showing that an extension is justified. The extension of a project that is either a major stationary source in a nonattainment area or a major modification in a nonattainment area must also require LAER as it exists at the time of the extension. This provision does not apply to the time period between construction of the approved phases of a phased construction project. Each phase must commence construction within eighteen months of the projected and approved commence construction date.

(10) Change of conditions.

(a) The owner or operator may request, at any time, a change in conditions of an approval order and the permitting authority may approve the request provided the permitting authority finds that:

(i) The change in conditions will not cause the source to exceed an emissions standard;

(ii) No ambient air quality standard will be exceeded as a result of the change;

(iii) The change will not adversely impact the ability of ecology or the authority to determine compliance with an emissions standard;

(iv) The revised order will continue to require BACT, as defined at the time of the original approval, for each new source approved by the order except where the Federal Clean Air Act requires LAER; and

(v) The revised order meets the requirements of WAC 173-400-110, 173-400-112, 173-400-113 ((and)), 173-400-720 and 173-460-040(3), as applicable.

(b) Actions taken under this subsection are subject to the public involvement provisions of WAC 173-400-171 or the permitting authority's public notice and comment procedures.

(c) This rule does not prescribe the exact form such requests must take. However, if the request is filed as a notice of construction application, that application must be acted upon using the timelines found in subsections (6) and (7) of this section. The fee schedule found in WAC ((173-400-116 shall also apply)) 173-455-120 applies to requests filed with ecology as notice of construction applications.

(11) Enforcement. All persons who receive an order of approval must comply with all approval conditions contained in the order of approval.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.395 and 70.94.331. 07-11-039 (Order 06-03), 173-400-110, filed 5/8/07, effective 6/8/07. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.152. 05-03-033 (Order 03-07), 173-400-110, filed 1/10/05, effective 2/10/05. Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW, RCW 70.94.141, [70.94.]152, [70.94.]331, [70.94.]510 and 43.21A.080. 01-17-062 (Order 99-06), 173-400-110, filed 8/15/01, effective 9/15/01. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.860, 70.94.510 and 70.94.331. 98-15-129 (Order 98-04), 173-400-110, filed 7/21/98, effective 8/21/98. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.152. 98-01-183 (Order 96-01), 173-400-110, filed 12/23/97, effective 1/23/98. Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 93-18-007 (Order 93-03), 173-400-110, filed 8/20/93, effective 9/20/93; 91-05-064 (Order 90-06), 173-400-110, filed 2/19/91, effective 3/22/91. Statutory Authority: Chapters 43.21A and 70.94 RCW. 83-09-036 (Order DE 83-13), 173-400-110, filed 4/15/83. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331, 70.94.510, and 70.94.785. 81-03-002 (Order DE 80-53), 173-400-110, filed 1/8/81. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 80-11-059 (Order DE 80-14), 173-400-110, filed 8/20/80. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.21A.080 and 70.94.331. 79-06-012 (Order DE 78-21), 173-400-110, filed 5/8/79; Order DE 76-38, 173-400-110, filed 12/21/76. Formerly WAC 18-04-110.]

OTS-1836.2


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 90-62, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91)

WAC 173-460-010   Purpose.   (1) Pursuant to chapter 70.94 RCW, Washington Clean Air Act, the purpose of this chapter is to establish the systematic control of new or modified sources emitting toxic air pollutants (TAPs) in order to prevent air pollution, reduce emissions to the extent reasonably possible, and maintain such levels of air quality as will protect human health and safety. Toxic air pollutants include carcinogens and noncarcinogens listed in WAC 173-460-150 ((and 173-460-160)).

(2) This chapter establishes three major requirements:

(a) Best available control technology for toxics;

(b) Toxic air pollutant emission quantification;

(c) Human health and safety protection demonstration.

(3) Policy. It is the policy of ecology to reduce, avoid, or eliminate toxic air pollutants prior to their generation whenever economically and technically practicable.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-010, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 93-19, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94)

WAC 173-460-020   Definitions.   The definitions of terms contained in chapter 173-400 WAC are incorporated into this chapter by reference. ((In the event of a conflict between the definitions provided in chapter 173-400 WAC and the definitions provided in this section, the definitions in this section shall govern. Unless a different meaning is clearly required by context, the following words and phrases as used in this chapter shall have the following meanings. Note: For copies of the above mentioned rule and any other rule cited in this chapter, contact the Department of Ecology, Records Section, P.O. Box 47600, Olympia, WA 98504-7600.)) Terms specific to this chapter are defined as follows:

(1) "Acceptable source impact analysis" means a procedure for demonstrating compliance with WAC 173-460-070 ((and 173-460-080)), that compares maximum incremental ambient air impacts with applicable acceptable source impact levels (ASIL).

(2) "Acceptable source impact level (ASIL)" means a screening concentration of a toxic air pollutant in the ((outdoor atmosphere in any area which does not have restricted or controlled public access that is used to evaluate the air quality impacts of a single source. There are three types of acceptable source impact levels: Risk-based, threshold-based, and special. Concentrations for these three types of ASILs are determined as provided in WAC 173-460-110. ASILs are listed in WAC 173-460-150 and 173-460-160.

(3) "Authority" means an air pollution control authority activated pursuant to chapter 70.94 RCW that has jurisdiction over the subject source. Ecology is the authority if an air pollution control authority has not been activated or if ecology has jurisdiction over the source pursuant to RCW 70.94.395.

(4))) ambient air. The ASIL for each toxic air pollutant is listed in WAC 173-460-150.

(3) "Best available control technology for toxics (((T-BACT)) tBACT)" ((applies to each toxic air pollutant (TAP) discharged or mixture of TAPs, taking in account the potency quantity and toxicity of each toxic air pollutant or mixture of TAPs discharged in addition to the meaning given in WAC 173-400-030(10).

(5) "Carcinogenic potency factor" means the upper 95th percentile confidence limit of the slope of the dose-response curve and is expressed in units of (mg/kg-day)-1.

(6) "Class A toxic air pollutant (Class A TAP)" means a substance or group of substances listed in WAC 173-460-150.

(7) "Class B toxic air pollutant (Class B TAP)" means any substance that is not a simple asphyxiant or nuisance particulate and that is listed in WAC 173-460-160.

(8) "EPA's Dispersion Modeling Guidelines" means the United States Environmental Protection Agency Guideline on Air Quality Models, EPA (Revised) 40 CFR Part 51 Appendix W, and is hereby incorporated by reference.

(9) "EPA's Risk Assessment Guidelines" means the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Guidelines for Carcinogenic Risk Assessment, 51 FR 33992 (September 24, 1986) and is hereby incorporated by reference.

(10))) means best available control technology, as that term is defined in WAC 173-400-030, as applied to toxic air pollutants.

(4) "De minimis emissions" means trivial levels of emissions that do not pose a threat to human health or the environment. The de minimis emission threshold values are listed in WAC 173-460-150.

(5) "Increased cancer risk of one in one hundred thousand" means the 95th percent upper bound on the estimated risk of one additional cancer above the background cancer rate per one hundred thousand individuals continuously exposed to a ((Class A)) carcinogenic toxic air pollutant at a given average dose for a specified time.

(((11) "Increased cancer risk of one in one million" means the 95th percent upper bound on the estimated risk of one additional cancer above the background cancer rate per one million individuals continually exposed to a Class A toxic air pollutant at a given average dose for a specified time.

(12) "Inhalation Reference Concentration (Inhalation RfC)" means a reference concentration published in the United States Environmental Protection Agency Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).

(13) "Mixture" means a combination of two or more substances mixed in arbitrary proportions.

(14) "Modification" means any physical change in, or change in the method of operation of, a stationary source that increases the amount of any air contaminant emitted by such source or that results in the emission of any air contaminant not previously emitted. The term modification shall be construed consistent with the definition of modification in Section 7411, Title 42, United States Code, and with rules implementing that section. For purposes of this chapter, the term "air contaminant" shall mean "toxic air contaminant" or "toxic air pollutant" as defined in subsection (20) of this section.

(15))) (6) "New or modified toxic air pollutant source" means((:

(a))) the construction or modification of a stationary source that increases the amount of any toxic air pollutant emitted by such source or that results in the emission of any toxic air pollutant not previously emitted((; and

(b) Any other project that constitutes a new source under section 112 of the Federal Clean Air Act.

(16) "Second Tier Analysis" means an optional procedure used after T-BACT and acceptable source impact analysis for demonstrating compliance with WAC 173-460-070. The second tier analysis uses a health impact assessment as provided in WAC 173-460-090, instead of an acceptable source impact level.

(17) "Simple asphyxiant" means a physiologically inert gas or vapor that acts primarily by diluting atmospheric oxygen below the level required to maintain proper levels of oxygen in the blood. Examples of simple asphyxiants are given in Appendix X of the TLV Booklet referred to in subsection (19) of this section and incorporated by reference.

(18) "Threshold limit value-time weighted average (TLV-TWA)" means a concentration limit recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) for a normal eight-hour workday and forty-hour workweek.

(19) "TLV Booklet" means "TLVs, Threshold Limit Values and Biological Exposure Indices for 1991-92," published by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists and is hereby incorporated by reference.

(20))) (7) "Small quantity emission rate (SQER)" means a level of emissions below which dispersion modeling is not required to demonstrate compliance with acceptable source impact levels. SQERs are listed in WAC 173-460-150.

(8) "Toxic air pollutant (TAP)" ((or "toxic air contaminant")) means any ((Class A or Class B)) toxic air pollutant listed in WAC 173-460-150 ((and 173-460-160. The term toxic air pollutant may include particulate matter and volatile organic compounds if an individual substance or a group of substances within either of these classes is listed in WAC 173-460-150 and/or 173-460-160. The term toxic air pollutant does not include particulate matter and volatile organic compounds as generic classes of compounds.

(21) "Upper bound unit risk factor" means the 95 percent upper confidence limit of an estimate of the extra risk of cancer associated with a continuous 70 year exposure to 1 ug/m3 of a Class A toxic air pollutant)).

[Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 94-03-072 (Order 93-19), 173-460-020, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-020, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 93-19, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94)

WAC 173-460-030   ((Requirements,)) Applicability ((and exemptions)).   (((1) Applicability.

(a))) The provisions of this chapter ((shall)) apply statewide. ((The authority shall enforce WAC 173-460-010, 173-460-020, 173-460-030, 173-460-040, 173-460-050, 173-460-060, 173-460-070, 173-460-080, 173-460-130, 173-460-140, 173-460-150, and 173-460-160.

(b) Except as provided in this chapter, any new toxic air pollutant source listed in (b)(i), (ii), or (iii) of this subsection that may emit a Class A or Class B TAP into the ambient air is subject to these regulations:

(i) Standard industrial classifications:

(A) Major group 10-Metal mining.

(B) Major group 12-Bituminous coal and lignite mining.

(C) Major group 13-Oil and gas extraction.

(D) Manufacturing industries major groups 20-39.

(E) Major group 49-Electric, gas, and sanitary services except 4971 irrigation systems.

(F) Dry cleaning plants, 7216.

(G) General medical surgical hospitals, 8062.

(H) Specialty hospitals, 8069.

(I) National security, 9711.

(ii) Any source or source category listed in WAC 173-400-100, 173-400-115(2), or 173-490-030(1) except WAC 173-490-030 (1)(e) gasoline dispensing facilities.

(iii) Any of the following sources:

(A) Landfills.

(B) Sites subject to chapter 173-340 WAC Model Toxics Control Act -- Cleanup regulation.

(2) Exempt sources.

(a) Containers such as tanks, barrels, drums, cans, and buckets are exempt from the requirements of this chapter unless equipped with a vent other than those required solely as safety pressure release devices.

(b) Nonprocess fugitive emissions of toxic air pollutants from stationary sources, such as construction sites, unpaved roads, coal piles, waste piles, and fuel and ash handling operations are exempt from WAC 173-460-060.

(c) The following sources are generally exempt from the requirements of WAC 173-460-050, 173-460-070, 173-460-080, and 173-460-090. However, the authority may on a case-by-case basis, require compliance with these sections if the authority determines that the amount of emissions, nature of pollutant, or source location indicate that the ambient impact should be evaluated.

(i) Perchloroethylene dry cleaners

(ii) Petroleum solvent dry cleaning systems

(iii) Solvent metal cleaners

(iv) Chromic acid plating and anodizing

(v) Abrasive blasting

(d) Demolition and renovation projects involving asbestos removal and disposal are exempt from the requirements of this chapter.

(e) Process vents subject to 40 C.F.R. Parts 264 and 265, Subpart AA are exempt from the requirements of this chapter.)) WAC 173-460-090 and 173-460-100 must be implemented solely by ecology.

[Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 94-03-072 (Order 93-19), 173-460-030, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-030, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 93-19, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94)

WAC 173-460-040   New source review.   (1) Applicability and exemptions. This chapter supplements the new source review requirements of WAC 173-400-110 by adding ((additional new source)) review requirements for new and modified toxic air pollutant sources. ((If a notice of construction is required under both chapter 173-400 WAC and this chapter, the written applications shall be combined. A notice of construction is a written application to permit construction of a new source.

(a) The owner or operator of a new toxic air pollutant source listed in WAC 173-460-030(1) shall notify the authority prior to the construction, installation, or establishment of a new toxic air pollutant source and shall file a notice of construction application with the authority for the proposed emission unit(s). Notification and notice of construction are not required if the source is an exempt source listed in WAC 173-460-030(2) or subsection (2) of this section.

(b) The notice of construction and new source review applies only to the affected emission unit(s) and the contaminants emitted from the emission unit(s).

(c) New source review of a modification shall be limited to the emission unit or units proposed to be modified and the toxic air contaminants whose emissions would increase as a result of the modification.

(2) The owner or operator of a new toxic air pollutant source listed in WAC 173-460-030(1) is not required to notify or file a notice of construction with the authority if any of the following conditions are met:

(a) Routine maintenance or repair requires equivalent replacement of air pollution control equipment; or

(b) The new source is a minor process change that does not increase capacity and total toxic air pollutant emissions do not exceed the emission rates specified in small quantity emission rate tables in WAC 173-460-080; or

(c) The new source is the result of minor changes in raw material composition and the total toxic air pollutant emissions do not exceed the emission rates specified in the small quantity emission rate tables in WAC 173-460-080.

(3) Additional information. Within thirty days of receipt of a notice of construction, the authority may require the submission of additional plans, specifications, and other information necessary for the review of the proposed new or modified source.

(4) Requirements for new toxic air pollutant sources. The authority shall review notice(s) of construction, plans, specifications, and other associated information to determine that:

(a) The source will be in accord with applicable federal, state, and authority air pollution control rules and regulations;

(b) The source will)) An action that is exempt from new source review under WAC 173-400-110 (4) or (5) is exempt under this chapter as well, except that a local air authority may adopt its own list of exemptions in accordance with RCW 70.94.331 (2)(b) to operate in lieu of or in addition to the exemptions in WAC 173-400-110 (4) and (5). An action that requires a notice of construction application under WAC 173-400-110 is subject to the review requirements of this chapter, unless the emissions before control equipment of each toxic air pollutant from a new source or the increase in emissions from each modification is less than the applicable de minimis emission threshold for that TAP listed in WAC 173-460-150.

(2) New source review of a modification is limited to the emission unit or units proposed to be modified and the TAPs whose emissions would increase as a result of the modification.

(3) The permitting authority that is reviewing a notice of construction application for a new or modified toxic air pollutant source must ensure that:

(a) The new or modified emission units use ((T-BACT)) tBACT for emissions control for the toxic air pollutants which are likely to increase; and

(((c) Sources required to use T-BACT for emission control demonstrate compliance)) (b) The project complies with WAC 173-460-070 as demonstrated by using the procedures established in WAC 173-460-080 or, failing that, demonstrates compliance((,)) by using the additional procedures in WAC 173-460-090 and/or 173-460-100.

(((5) Preliminary determination. Within thirty days after receipt of all information required, the authority shall:

(a) Make preliminary determinations on the matters set forth in this section; and

(b) Initiate compliance with the provisions of WAC 173-400-171 relating to public notice and public comment, as applicable.

(6) Final determination. If, after review of all information received including public comment, the authority finds that all the conditions in this section are satisfied, the authority shall issue a regulatory order to approve the notice of construction for the proposed new source or modification. If the authority finds that the conditions in this section are not satisfied, the authority shall issue an order for the prevention of construction, installation, or establishment of the toxic air pollution source(s). Where ecology has jurisdiction, it will endeavor to make final determinations as promptly as possible.

(7) Appeal of decision. A final notice of construction decision may be appealed to the pollution control hearings board pursuant to chapter 43.21B RCW.

(8) Commencement of construction. The owner(s) or operator(s) of the new source shall not commence construction until the applicable notice of construction has been approved.

(9) Operation and maintenance plan. As a condition of notice of construction approval, prior to start up, the authority may require a plan for the operation and maintenance of all equipment and procedures to assure continuous compliance with this chapter.

(a) A copy of the plan shall be filed with the authority upon request.

(b) The plan shall reflect good industrial practice and may include operating parameters and maintenance procedures, and shall be updated to reflect any changes in good industrial practice.

(c) Submittal of all plans should coincide with the authorities reporting requirements where applicable.

(10) Jurisdiction. Emission of toxic air pollutants that exceed the acceptable source impact levels listed in WAC 173-460-150 and 173-460-160 requires ecology and, if applicable, authority approval as specified in WAC 173-460-090 and 173-460-100.))

[Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 94-03-072 (Order 93-19), 173-460-040, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-040, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 93-19, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94)

WAC 173-460-050   Requirement to quantify emissions.   (1) New sources.

(((a) When applying for a notice of construction, an owner or operator of)) A notice of construction application for a new or modified toxic air ((pollution)) pollutant source ((shall)) must quantify ((those emissions of each TAP or combination of TAPs that:

(i) Will be used for the modeling procedures in WAC 173-460-080; and

(ii) That may be discharged after applying required control technology. The information shall be submitted to the authority.

(b) Emissions shall be quantified in sufficient detail to determine whether the source complies with the requirements of this chapter)) the increase in the emissions of each TAP, after application of tBACT, emitted by the new or modified emission units.

(2) Small quantity ((sources)) emission rates.

((Sources that choose to use small quantity emission rate tables instead of using)) A notice of construction application that relies on SQERs rather than dispersion modeling ((shall)) to demonstrate compliance with WAC 173-460-070 must quantify the aggregate increase in emissions ((as required under WAC 173-460-080, in)) of each TAP emitted by the new or modified emission units after application of tBACT. The quantification must contain sufficient detail to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the permitting authority that the emissions are less than the applicable small quantity emission rates listed in WAC ((173-460-080)) 173-460-150.

(3) Level of detail.

An acceptable source impact level analysis under WAC 173-460-080((,)) may be based on a conservative estimate of emissions that represents good engineering judgment. If compliance with WAC 173-460-070 and 173-460-080 cannot be demonstrated, more precise emission estimates ((shall)) may be used to demonstrate compliance with WAC 173-460-090.

(((4) Mixtures of toxic air pollutants.

(a) An owner or operator of a source that may discharge more than one toxic air pollutant may demonstrate compliance with WAC 173-460-070 and 173-460-080 by:

(i) Quantifying emissions and performing modeling for each TAP individually; or

(ii) Calculating the sum of all TAP emissions and performing modeling for the total TAP emissions and comparing maximum ambient levels to the smallest ASIL; or

(iii) Equivalent procedures may be used if approved by ecology.

(b) Dioxin and furan emissions shall be considered together as one TAP and expressed as an equivalent emission of 2,3,7,8 TCDD based on the relative potency of the isomers in accordance with United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines.


Note: Copies of EPA "Interim procedures for estimating risks associated with exposures to mixtures of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (CDDs and CDFs). 1989 Update" are available by requesting EPA /625/3-89/016, March 1989 from ORD Publications (513) 684-7562.

(c) Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions. The owner or operator of a source that may emit a mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbon emissions shall quantify the following PAHs and shall consider them together as one TAP equivalent in potency to benzo(a)pyrene: benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, chrysene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, indenol(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene. The acceptable source impact analysis shall be conducted using the polyaromatic hydrocarbon emission ASIL contained in WAC 173-460-150(3).

(d) Uncontrolled roof vent emissions from primary aluminum smelters. The owner or operator of a primary aluminum smelter that may emit a mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbons from uncontrolled roof vents shall quantify PAH emissions using either of the following methods:

(i) Quantify PAH emissions using the procedures in (c) of this subsection; or

(ii) Multiply the total particulate emission mass from the uncontrolled roof vents by the percent of the particulate that is extractable organic matter. The percent extractable organic matter shall be considered one percent of total particulate matter unless ecology determines that there is compelling scientific data which demonstrates that the use of this value is inappropriate. The acceptable source impact analysis shall be conducted using the primary aluminum smelter uncontrolled roof vent PAH emission ASIL contained in WAC 173-460-150(3). Note: For example, 100 grams of particulate air emission mass times one percent yields one gram of PAH emissions.))

[Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 94-03-072 (Order 93-19), 173-460-050, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-050, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 98-04, filed 7/21/98, effective 8/21/98)

WAC 173-460-060   Control technology requirements.   (1) Except as provided for in WAC 173-460-040, a person shall not establish, operate, or cause to be established or operated any new or modified toxic air pollutant source which is likely to increase TAP emissions without installing and operating ((T-BACT)) tBACT. ((Satisfaction of the performance requirements listed below fulfill the T-BACT requirement for those particular sources. Local air pollution authorities may develop and require performance requirements in lieu of T-BACT provided that ecology approves the performance requirements as equivalent to T-BACT.

(1) Perchloroethylene dry cleaners. The requirements for perchloroethylene dry cleaners found in WAC 173-400-075 are considered T-BACT.

(2) Petroleum solvent dry cleaning systems. A petroleum solvent dry cleaning system shall include the following:

(a) All cleaned articles are dried in a solvent recovery dryer or the entire dryer exhaust is vented through a properly functioning control device which will reduce emissions to no more than 3.5 kg of VOC per 100 kg dry weight of cleaned articles; and

(b) All cartridge filtration systems are drained in their sealed housing or other enclosed container before discarding the cartridges; and

(c) All leaking components shall be repaired immediately.

(3) Chromic acid plating and anodizing. The facility-wide uncontrolled hexavalent chromium emissions from plating or anodizing tanks shall be reduced by at least ninety-five percent using either of the following control techniques:

(a) An antimist additive or other equally effective control method approved by ecology or authority; or

(b) The tank is equipped with:

(i) A capture system which represents good engineering practice and which shall be in place and in operation at all times electrical current is applied to the tank; and

(ii) An emission control system which limits hexavalent chromium emissions to no more than 0.15 milligrams per ampere-hour of electrical charge applied to the tank or uncontrolled emissions shall be reduced by ninety-five percent.

(4) Chromic acid plating and anodizing (greater than 1 kilogram). If the facility-wide hexavalent chromium emissions from chromic acid plating and anodizing are greater than 1 kilogram per year after the application of control techniques required by subsection (3) of this section, the facility-wide hexavalent chromium emissions shall be reduced by at least ninety-nine percent using either of the following control techniques:

(a) An antimist additive or other equally effective control method approved by ecology or authority; or

(b) The tank is equipped with:

(i) A capture system which represents good engineering practice and which shall be in place and in operation at all times electrical current is applied to the tank; and

(ii) An emissions control system which limits hexavalent chromium emissions to no more than 0.03 milligrams per ampere-hour of electrical charge applied to the tank or uncontrolled emissions shall be reduced by ninety-nine percent.

(5) Solvent metal cleaners.

(a) Any solvent metal cleaner shall include all of the following equipment:

(i) A cover for the solvent tank which shall be closed at all times except when processing work in the degreaser. However, the cover shall be closed to the maximum extent possible when parts are being degreased;

(ii) A facility for draining cleaned parts such that the drained solvent is returned to the solvent tank;

(iii) For cold solvent cleaners, a freeboard ratio greater than or equal to 0.75;

(iv) Vapor degreasers shall have:

(A) A high vapor cutoff thermostat with manual reset; and

(B) For degreasers with spray devices, a vapor-up thermostat which will allow spray operation only after the vapor zone has risen to the design level; and

(C) Either a freeboard ratio greater than or equal to 1.00 or a refrigerated freeboard chiller; and

(v) Conveyorized vapor degreasers shall have:

(A) A drying tunnel or a rotating basket sufficient to prevent cleaned parts from carrying liquid solvent out of the degreaser; and

(B) A high vapor cutoff thermostat with manual reset; and

(C) A vapor-up thermostat which will allow conveyor movement only after the vapor zone has risen to the design vapor level.

(b) The operation of any solvent metal cleaner shall meet the following requirements:

(i) Solvent shall not leak from any portion of the degreasing equipment;

(ii) Solvent, including waste solvent, shall be stored in closed containers and shall be disposed of in such a manner as to prevent its evaporation into the atmosphere;

(iii) For cold cleaners, cleaned parts shall be drained until dripping ceases; and

(iv) Degreasers shall be constructed to allow liquid solvent from cleaned parts to drain into a trough or equivalent device and return to the solvent tank.

(c) For open-top vapor degreasers, solvent drag-out shall be minimized by the following measures:

(i) Racked parts shall be allowed to drain fully;

(ii) The work load shall be degreased in the vapor zone until condensation ceases;

(iii) Spraying operations shall be done within the vapor layer;

(iv) When using a powered hoist, the vertical speed of parts in and out of the vapor zone shall be less than three meters per minute (ten feet per minute);

(v) When the cover is open, the lip of the degreaser shall not be exposed to steady drafts greater than 15.3 meters per minute (fifty feet per minute); and

(vi) When equipped with a lip exhaust, the fan shall be turned off when the cover is closed.

(d) For conveyorized vapor degreasers, solvent drag-out shall be minimized by the following measures:

(i) Racked parts shall be allowed to drain fully; and

(ii) Vertical conveyor speed shall be maintained at less than three meters per minute (ten feet per minute).

(6) Abrasive blasting.

(a) Abrasive blasting shall be performed inside a booth or hangar designed to capture the blast grit or overspray.

(b) Outdoor blasting of structures or items too large to be reasonably handled indoors shall employ control measures such as curtailment during windy periods and enclosure of the area being blasted with tarps.

(c) Outdoor blasting shall be performed with either steel shot or an abrasive containing less than one percent (by mass) which would pass through a No. 200 sieve.

(d) All abrasive blasting with sand shall be performed inside a blasting booth or cabinet.))

(2) A notice of construction application for a new or modified toxic air pollutant source must demonstrate that the new or modified emission units will employ tBACT for all TAPs for which the increase in emissions will exceed de minimis emission values as found in WAC 173-460-150. TAP emission increases from nonprocess fugitive emissions activities such as construction or demolition sites, unpaved and paved roads, coal piles, waste piles and fuel and ash handling operations are exempt from the requirement to apply tBACT.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.860, 70.94.510 and 70.94.331. 98-15-129 (Order 98-04), 173-460-060, filed 7/21/98, effective 8/21/98. Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.98 RCW. 98-04-062 (Order 97-38), 173-460-060, filed 2/2/98, effective 3/5/98. Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 94-03-072 (Order 93-19), 173-460-060, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-060, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 90-62, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91)

WAC 173-460-070   Ambient impact requirement.   ((When applying for)) A notice of construction ((under WAC 173-460-040, the owner or operator of a new toxic air pollutant source which is likely to increase TAP emissions shall)) application must demonstrate that the increase in emissions of toxic air pollutants from the new or modified emission units at the source are sufficiently low to protect human health and safety from potential carcinogenic and/or other toxic effects. Compliance ((shall)) must be demonstrated in any area to which the applicant does not ((have restricted)) restrict or ((controlled public)) control access. The ((source shall)) application must demonstrate compliance by using procedures established in this chapter after complying with the control technology requirements in WAC 173-460-060.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-070, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]


NEW SECTION
WAC 173-460-071   Voluntary limits on emissions.   (1) If requested by an applicant, the permitting authority may issue a regulatory order that limits emissions of a particular TAP to a level that is lower than the potential emissions of that particular TAP otherwise allowed under all applicable requirements of chapter 70.94 RCW and the federal Clean Air Act.

(2) Any order issued under this section is subject to the notice and comment procedures in WAC 173-400-171 or the permitting authority's public notice and commenting procedures.

(3) Any order issued under this section must include monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements sufficient to ensure that the applicant complies with any conditions established under this section. Monitoring requirements must use terms, test methods, units, averaging periods, and other statistical conventions consistent with the requirements of WAC 173-400-105.

[]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 93-19, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94)

WAC 173-460-080   ((Demonstrating ambient impact compliance.)) First tier review.   (1) ((When applying for)) A notice of construction ((under WAC 173-460-040, the owner or operator of)) application for a new or modified toxic air pollutant source ((which is likely to increase TAP emissions shall complete)) must include an acceptable source impact level analysis for ((Class A and Class B)) each TAP((s)) emitted by the new or modified emission units with an emission increase greater than the de minimis emission level specified in WAC 173-460-150. The permitting authority may complete this analysis.

(((2) Acceptable source impact analysis.

(a) Carcinogenic effects. The owner or operator shall use dispersion modeling to estimate the maximum incremental ambient impact of each Class A TAP from the source and compare the estimated incremental ambient values to the Class A acceptable source impact levels in WAC 173-460-150. If applicable, the source may use the small quantity emission rate tables in (e) of this subsection.

(b) Other toxic effects. The owner or operator shall use dispersion modeling to estimate the maximum incremental ambient impact of each Class B TAP from the source and compare the estimated ambient values to the Class B acceptable source impact levels in WAC 173-460-160. If applicable, the source may use the small quantity emission rate tables in (e) of this subsection.

(c) Dispersion modeling. The owner or operator shall use dispersion modeling techniques in accordance with EPA guidelines. If concentrations predicted by dispersion screening models exceed applicable acceptable source impact levels, more refined modeling and/or emission estimation techniques shall be used. Refined modeling techniques shall be approved by ecology and the authority. (Note: EPA's Guideline on Air Quality Models, EPA 450/2-78-027R, can be obtained through NTIS (703) 487-4650 or can be downloaded from the OAQPS Technology Transfer Network electronic bulletin board system).

(d) Averaging times. The owner or operator shall use the averaging times in (d)(i), (ii), (iii) of this subsection unless alternate averaging times are approved by ecology. Ecology may allow the use of an alternate averaging time if it determines that the operating procedures of the source may cause a high concentration of a TAP for a short period and that consideration of potential health effects due to peak exposures may be warranted for the TAP.

(i) An annual average shall be used for Class A TAPs listed in WAC 173-460-150(2).

(ii) The averaging times specified in WAC 173-460-150(3) shall be used for Class A TAPs listed in WAC 173-460-150(3).

(iii) A twenty-four-hour averaging time shall be used for Class B TAPs listed in WAC 173-460-160.

(e) Small quantity emission rates. Instead of using dispersion modeling to show compliance with ambient impact demonstration requirements in WAC 173-460-080 and 173-460-090, a source may use the small quantity emission rate tables for all toxic air pollutants with acceptable source impact levels equal to or greater than 0.001 ug/m3. A source must first meet control technology and emission quantification requirements of WAC 173-460-050 and 173-460-060, then demonstrate that the source emission rate does not exceed the rates specified in the appropriate table below.


((SMALL QUANTITY EMISSION RATES

CLASS A TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS

Acceptable Source Impact

Level (Annual ug/m3)

TAP Emissions

Pounds per Year

(10 meter stack

and downwash)


0.001 to 0.0099

0.5
0.01 to 0.06 10
0.07 to 0.12 20
0.13 to 0.99 50
1.0 to 10 500


SMALL QUANTITY EMISSION RATES

CLASS B TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS

Acceptable Source Impact

Level (24 hour ug/m3)


TAP Emissions
Pounds per Year Pounds per Hour
Less than 1 175 0.02
1 to 9.9 175 0.02
10 to 29.9 1,750 0.20
30 to 59.9 5,250 0.60
60 to 99.9 10,500 1.20
100 to 129.9 17,500 2.0
130 to 250 22,750 2.6
Greater than 250 43,748 5.0))

(3) Criteria for compliance. Compliance with WAC 173-460-070 is demonstrated if the authority determines that, on the basis of the acceptable source impact analysis, the source's maximum incremental ambient air impact levels do not exceed the Class A or Class B acceptable source impact levels in WAC 173-460-150 and 173-460-160; or, if applicable, the source TAP emission rates do not exceed the rates specified in subsection (2)(e) of this section.)) The acceptable source impact analysis requirement of WAC 173-460-070 can be satisfied for any TAP using either dispersion modeling or the small quantity emission rate.

(a) Dispersion modeling. The applicant who relies on dispersion modeling must model the aggregate increase in the emissions of each TAP emitted by the new or modified emission units, after application of tBACT. The notice of construction application must demonstrate that the modeled ambient impact of the aggregate emissions increase of each TAP does not exceed the ASIL for that TAP as listed in WAC 173-460-150. If concentrations predicted by dispersion screening models exceed applicable acceptable source impact levels, more refined modeling and/or emission techniques must be used. Refined modeling techniques must be approved by the permitting authority.

(b) Small quantity emission rates. An applicant may show for any TAP that the aggregate increase in emissions of that TAP, after application of tBACT, is less than the small quantity emission rate listed for that TAP in WAC 173-460-150.

(3) Reduction of TAPs from existing emission units. An applicant may include in a acceptable source impact analysis proposed reductions in actual emissions of a particular TAP from emission units at the source that are not new or modified for the purpose of offsetting emissions of that TAP caused by the new or modified source. The reductions in TAP emissions authorized by this subsection must be included in the approval order as enforceable emission limits and must meet all the requirements of WAC 173-460-071.

(4) Decision criteria.

(a) If the permitting authority finds that the modeled impact of the increase in emissions of a TAP from the new or modified emission units does not exceed the ASIL for that TAP then the authority may approve the notice of construction application.

(b) If the permitting authority finds that the modeled impact of the increase in emissions of a TAP from the new or modified emission units exceeds the ASIL for that TAP then the permitting authority may not approve the project. The applicant may file a second tier review application in compliance with WAC 173-460-090.

[Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 94-03-072 (Order 93-19), 173-460-080, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-080, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]

Reviser's note: The typographical error in the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency and appears in the Register pursuant to the requirements of RCW 34.08.040.
AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 93-19, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94)

WAC 173-460-090   Second tier ((analysis)) review.   (1) Applicability.

(((a) The owner or operator)) An applicant who cannot demonstrate ((class A or class B TAP source)) compliance with WAC 173-460-070 ((and 173-460-080)) using an acceptable source impact level analysis as provided in WAC 173-460-080(((2))), may submit a petition requesting that ecology perform a second tier ((analysis evaluation)) review to determine a means of compliance with WAC 173-460-070 ((and 173-460-080 by establishing allowable emissions for the source)). Petitions for second tier ((analysis evaluation shall)) review must be submitted to ecology with a copy to the ((local)) permitting authority ((or ecology if ecology has jurisdiction over the source. Petitions received by local authorities shall be submitted to ecology within ten days of receipt. A second tier analysis evaluation may be requested when a source wishes to more accurately characterize risks, to justify risks greater than acceptable source impact levels, or to otherwise modify assumptions to more accurately represent risks. Risks may be more accurately characterized by utilizing updated EPA unit risk factors, inhalation reference concentrations, or other EPA recognized or approved methods. Ecology shall specify the maximum allowable emissions of any class A or class B TAP source based on ecology's second tier analysis evaluation.

(b))) with jurisdiction.

(2) Second tier petition submittal requirements. Ecology ((shall)) will evaluate a ((source's)) second tier ((analysis)) petition only if:

(((i))) (a) The permitting authority ((has advised ecology that other conditions for processing the notice of construction have been met)) submits to ecology a preliminary order of approval that addresses all applicable new source review issues with the exception of the outcome of the second tier review, State Environmental Policy Act review, public notification, and prevention of significant deterioration review; and

(((ii))) (b) The emission controls contained in the ((conditional notice of construction)) preliminary order of approval represent at least ((T-BACT)) tBACT; and

(((iii))) (c) The applicant has developed a health impact assessment protocol that has been approved by ecology;

(d) The ambient ((concentrations)) impact of the aggregate emissions increase of each TAP that exceeds acceptable source impact levels ((after)) has been quantified using ((more)) refined ((emission quantification and)) air dispersion modeling techniques as approved in the health impact assessment protocol; and

(e) The petition contains a health impact assessment conducted in accordance with the approved health impact assessment protocol.


Note: Contact ecology's air quality program for a copy of a guidance document to assist in the preparation of the health impact assessment protocol.

(((c) Ecology shall determine whether the conditions in (b)(i), (ii), and (iii) of this subsection for a second tier analysis have been satisfied within ten working days of receipt of all information needed to make the determination. The matter shall be returned to the authority if ecology finds the conditions for a second tier analysis evaluation have not been met.

(2) Jurisdiction.

(a) Any second tier analysis application submitted by a source wishing to emit toxic air pollutants at levels greater than the acceptable source impact level contained in WAC 173-460-150 or 173-460-160 shall be approved or rejected by ecology.

(b) Any new emission limits approved by ecology as a result of the second tier analysis evaluation shall be enforced by the authority provided the authority approves the new emission limits.

(3) Approval criteria.

(a) Based on the second tier analysis, ecology may approve the emissions of TAPs from a source where ambient concentrations exceed acceptable source impact levels only if it determines that emission controls represent at least T-BACT and the source demonstrates that emissions of Class A TAPs are not likely to result in an increased cancer risk of more than one in one hundred thousand. The emission of Class A TAPs at levels likely to result in an increased cancer risk of more than one in one hundred thousand requires the approval of the director after complying with WAC 173-460-100.

(b) Ecology shall consider the second tier analysis and other information submitted by the applicant as well as department of health comments.

(i) Comments from other agencies and universities with appropriate expertise may also be considered in the decision to approve emissions that exceed acceptable source impact levels.

(ii) Public comments shall be considered if the source applies for a risk management decision under WAC 173-460-100.

(4) Contents of the second tier analysis.

(a) The second tier analysis consists of a health impact assessment. The applicant shall complete and submit a health impact assessment to ecology which includes the following information. Ecology may approve the submittal of less information if it determines that such information is sufficient to perform the second tier analysis evaluation. The health impact assessment shall be prepared in accordance with EPA's risk assessment guidelines as defined in WAC 173-460-020(9).

(i) Demographics such as population size, growth, and sensitive subgroups;

(ii) Toxicological profiles of all toxic air pollutants that exceed the ASIL;

(iii) Characterization of existing pathways and total daily intake for toxic air pollutants that exceed the ASIL;

(iv) Contribution of the proposed source toward total daily intake for toxic air pollutants that exceed the ASIL;

(v) Using existing data, characterization of risk from current exposure to the toxic air pollutants that exceed the ASIL. This includes existing TAP sources in the area, and anticipated risk from the new source;

(vi) Additive cancer risk for all Class A toxic air pollutants which may be emitted by the source;

(vii) Other information requested by ecology and pertinent to ecology's decision to approve the second tier application;

(viii) Uncertainty in the data; and

(ix) Length of exposure and persistence in the environment.

(b))) (3) Health impact assessment (HIA) protocol. The HIA presents data about the new or modified source and its built and natural environment. A HIA includes but is not limited to: Site description, TAP concentrations and toxicity, identification of exposed populations and an exposure assessment. The HIA protocol must be reviewed and approved by ecology prior to development of the HIA.

(4) The health impact assessment ((shall)) must utilize current scientific information. New scientific information on the toxicological characteristics of toxic air pollutants may be used by ecology to justify modifications of ((upper bound unit risk factors used to calculate ASILs in WAC 173-460-150 and/or absorption rates of individual toxic air pollutants if ecology determines there is compelling scientific data which demonstrates that the use of EPA recognized or approved methods are inappropriate.

(5) Additional information.

(a) If approved by ecology, newly discovered scientific information which was unavailable at the time of the original submission of the health assessment may be used to justify modifications of the original health assessment. Ecology may approve the additional information if the source exercised due diligence at the time of original submission.

(b) Within thirty days after receipt of the second tier analysis and all supporting data and documentation, ecology may require the submission of additional information needed to evaluate the second tier analysis.

(6) Determination.

(a) If the second tier analysis is approved by ecology, ecology will return the petition to the authority and the authority may approve the notice of construction.

(b) The authority shall specify allowable emissions consistent with ecology's second tier analysis evaluation determination expressed in weight of pollutant per unit time for each emissions unit involved in the application. The notice of construction shall also include all requirements necessary to assure that conditions of this chapter and chapter 173-400 WAC are satisfied.

(7) Public notification requirements.

Ecology decisions regarding second tier analysis or decisions under WAC 173-460-100 shall comply with public notification requirements contained in WAC 173-400-171.)) risk-based concentrations.

(5) Background concentrations of TAPs will be considered as part of a second tier review. Background concentrations can be estimated using:

(a) The latest National Ambient Toxics Assessment data for the appropriate census tracts; or

(b) Ambient monitoring data for the project's location; or

(c) Modeling of emissions of the TAPs subject to second tier review from all stationary sources within 1.5 kilometers of the source location.

(6) Reduction of TAPs from existing emission units. For the purpose of offsetting emissions of a particular TAP, an applicant may propose reductions in actual emissions of that TAP from existing, unmodified emission units at the source or existing, unmodified emission units at other nearby sources. The health impact analysis must evaluate the benefits of the emission reductions. The reductions in TAP emissions authorized by this subsection must be included in an approval order as enforceable emission limits and must meet all requirements of WAC 173-460-071.

(7) Approval criteria for second tier review. Ecology may recommend approval of a project that is likely to cause an exceedance of acceptable source impact levels for one or more TAPs only if it determines that the emission controls for the new and modified emission units represent tBACT and the applicant demonstrates that the increase in emissions of TAPs is not likely to result in an increased cancer risk of more than one in one hundred thousand and ecology determines that the noncancer hazard is found to be acceptable.

(8) Application processing. Within thirty days after receiving a second tier petition ecology must either notify the applicant in writing that the application is complete or notify the applicant in writing of all additional information required to make it complete.

(9) Public involvement. All notice of construction approval orders with a second tier component are subject to the public notice and comment requirements of WAC 173-400-171, which may be integrated with the permitting authority's public notice and comment procedures.

(10) Recommendation. Within sixty days of determining that a petition is complete ecology must make a recommendation to the permitting authority.

(a) If ecology recommends approval of the second tier petition, the permitting authority may approve the notice of construction application. Any new emission limits or conditions specified by ecology must be incorporated into the approval order.

(b) If ecology recommends denial of the second tier petition, then the permitting authority may not approve the project.

[Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 94-03-072 (Order 93-19), 173-460-090, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-090, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 93-19, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94)

WAC 173-460-100   ((Request for risk management decision.)) Third tier review.   (1) Applicability. ((The owner or operator of a source that emits Class A TAPs that are likely to result in an increased cancer risk of more than one in one hundred thousand may request)) An applicant for a project that exceeds the second tier review thresholds may submit a third tier petition requesting that the director of ecology ((establish allowable emissions for the source)) approve the project based on a risk management analysis.

(2) Contents of the ((application)) petition.

The ((applicant shall)) petition must meet the submittal requirements of WAC 173-460-090(((1) and submit all materials required under WAC 173-460-090 (4) and (5))). The applicant may submit the request for a risk management decision concurrently with the second tier ((analysis application)) petition. Prior denial of ((the)) a second tier ((analysis application)) petition submitted under WAC 173-460-090(((6))) (8) is not required.

(3) Criteria for approval. ((Ecology may approve the emissions of TAPs from a source where ambient concentrations are likely to result in an increased cancer risk of more than one in one hundred thousand only if the source first demonstrates the following)) Ecology's director must find that the following conditions are met before approving a third tier petition:

(a) Proposed emission controls represent ((all known available and reasonable technology)) at least tBACT; and

(b) ((Application of all known available toxic air pollution prevention methods to reduce, avoid, or eliminate toxic air pollutants prior to their generation including recycling, chemical substitution, and efforts to redesign processes)) A HIA has been completed as described in WAC 173-460-090(3); and

(c) ((The proposed changes)) Approval of the project will result in a greater environmental benefit to the ((environment as a whole)) state of Washington.

(4) Additional methods to reduce toxic air pollutants. In addition to the requirements in subsection (3) of this section, the ((owner or operator)) applicant may propose and ecology may consider measures that would reduce community exposure, especially exposure of that portion of the community subject to the greatest additional risk, to comparable toxic air pollutants provided that such measures are not already required.

(5) Application processing. Within thirty days of receiving a third tier petition ecology must determine if the petition includes the information required in WAC 173-460-090. If the petition is deemed complete, ecology must begin substantive review. If the petition is deemed incomplete, ecology must give written notification to the applicant of the information that is required to make the petition complete.

(6) Public involvement. Ecology will initiate public notice and comment within ((thirty)) sixty days of ((receipt of a completed risk management decision application)) determining that a third tier petition is complete. In addition to the public notice and comment requirements of WAC 173-400-171, the ((owner or operator shall)) applicant must hold a public hearing to:

(a) Present the results of the ((second tier)) health impact analysis, the proposed emission controls, pollution prevention methods, additional proposed measures, and remaining risks; and

(b) Participate in discussions and answer questions.

(((6) Time limitation. The owner or operator shall commence construction within eighteen months of the director's approval.)) (7) Recommendation.

(a) If ecology recommends approval of the third tier petition, the permitting authority may approve the notice of construction application. Any new emission limits or conditions specified by ecology must be incorporated into the approval order.

(b) If ecology recommends denial of the third tier petition then the permitting authority may not approve the project.

[Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 94-03-072 (Order 93-19), 173-460-100, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-100, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending Order 93-19, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94)

WAC 173-460-150   ((Class A toxic air pollutants: Known, probable and potential human carcinogens and acceptable source impact levels.)) Table of ASIL, SQER and de minimis emission values.  


(((1) TABLE I

CLASS A TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS

Known and Probable Carcinogens



((CAS #

SUBSTANCE

75-07-0

Acetaldehyde
53-96-3 2-Acetylaminofluorene
79-06-1 Acrylamide
107-13-1 Acrylonitrile
309-00-2 Aldrin
Aluminum smelter polyaromatic hydrocarbon emissions
117-79-3 2-Aminoanthraquinone
97-56-3 o-Aminoazotoluene
92-67-1 4-Aminobiphenyl
61-82-5 Amitrole
62-53-3 Aniline
90-04-0 o-Anisidine
C7440-38-2 Arsenic and inorganic arsenic compounds
1332-21-4 Asbestos
2465-27-2 Auramine (technical grade)
71-43-2 Benzene
92-87-5 Benzidine and its salts
56-55-3 Benzo(a)anthracene
50-32-8 Benzo(a)pyrene
205-99-2 Benzo(b)fluoranthene
205-82-3 Benzo(j)fluoranthene
207-08-9 Benzo(k)fluoranthene
1694-09-3 Benzyl violet 4b
7440-41-7 Beryllium and compounds
111-44-4 Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether
117-81-7 Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP)
542-88-1 Bis(chloromethyl)ether
75-25-2 Bromoform
106-99-0 1,3-Butadiene
3068-88-0 B-Butyrolactone
7440-43-9 Cadmium and compounds
56-23-5 Carbon tetrachloride
57-74-9 Chlordane
510-15-6 Chlorobenzilate
67-66-3 Chloroform
107-30-2 Chloromethyl methyl ether (technical-grade)
108-43-0 Chlorophenols
126-99-8 Chloroprene
C7440-47-3 Chromium, hexavalent metal and compounds
Coke oven emissions
8001-58-9 Creosote
135-20-6 Cupferron
94-75-7 2,4-D and esters
3547-04-4 DDE (p,p'-Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene)
50-29-3 DDT (1,1,1 Trichloro-2,2-Bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethane)
613-35-4 N,N-Diacetylbenzidine
101-80-4 4,4'-Diaminodiphenyl ether
226-36-8 Dibenz(a,h)acridine
53-70-3 Dibenz(a,h)anthracene
224-42-0 Dibenz(a,j)acridine
132-64-9 Dibenzofurans
189-64-0 Dibenzo(a,h)pyrene
191-30-0 Dibenzo(a,l)pyrene
189-55-9 1,2,7,8-Dibenzopyrene (dibenzo(a,i)pyrene)
192-65-4 Dibenzo(a,e)pyrene
764-41-0 1,4-Dichloro-2-butene
28434-86-8 3,3'-Dichloro-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether
106-46-7 1,4-Dichlorobenzene
91-94-1 3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine
107-06-2 1,2-Dichloroethane (ethylene chloride)
75-09-2 Dichloromethane (methylene chloride)
696-28-6 Dichlorophenylarsine (arsenic group)
78-87-5 1,2-Dichloropropane
60-57-1 Dieldrin
1615-80-1 1,2-Diethylhydrazine
101-90-6 Diglycidyl resorcinol ether
119-90-4 3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine (ortol-dianisidine)
119-93-7 3,3-Dimethyl benzidine
77-78-1 Dimethyl sulfate
540-73-8 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine
123-91-1 1,4-Dioxane
Dioxins and furans
122-66-7 1,2-Diphenylhydrazine
106-89-8 Epichlorohydrin
106-93-4 Ethylene dibromide (dibromethane)
75-21-8 Ethylene oxide
96-45-7 Ethylene thiourea
50-00-0 Formaldehyde
67-45-8

Furazolidone

Furium (nitrofuran group)

765-34-4 Glyciadaldehyde
76-44-8 Heptachlor
118-74-1 Hexachlorobenzene
319-84-6 Hexachlorocyclohexane (Lindane) Alpha BHC
319-85-7 Hexachlorocyclohexane (Lindane) Beta BHC
58-89-9 Hexachlorocyclohexane (Lindane) Gamma BHC
680-31-9 Hexamethylphosphoramide
302-01-2 Hydrazine
193-39-5 Indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene
Isopropyl oils
Lead compounds
301-04-2 Lead acetate
7446-27-7 Lead phosphate
129-15-7 2-Methyl-1-nitroanthraquinone
592-62-1 Methyl azoxymethyl acetate
3697-24-3 5-Methylchrysene
101-14-4 4,4'-Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline) (MBOCA)
838-88-0 4,4'-Methylenebis(2-methylaniline)
101-77-9 4,4-Methylene dianiline
13552-44-8 4,4-Methylenedianiline dihydrochloride
64091-91-4 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone
2385-85-5 Mirex
139-91-3 5-(Morpholinomethyl)-3-amino)-

2-oxazolidinone (furaltudone)

134-32-7 1-Napthylamine
C7440-02-0

Nickel and compounds (as nickel subsulfide or nickel

refinery dust)

531-82-8 N-(4-(5-Nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl)acetamide
602-87-9 5-Nitroacenaphthene
1836-75-5

Nitrofen

Nitrofurans

59-87-0 Nitrofurazone
555-84-9 1-(5-Nitrofurfurylidene)amino)-2-imidazolidinone
126-85-2 Nitrogen mustard N-oxide
302-70-5 Nitrogen mustard N-oxide hydrochloride
79-46-9 2-Nitropropane
924-16-3 N-Nitrosodi-n-butylamine
759-73-9 N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea (NEU)
615-53-2 N-Nitroso-N-methylurethane
621-64-1 N-Nitrosodi-n-propylamine
10595-95-6 N-Nitrosomethylethylamine
59-89-2 N-Nitrosomorpholine
86-30-6 N-Nitrosodiphenylamine
55-18-5 N-Nitrosodiethylamine (diethylnitrosoamine) (DEN)
62-75-9 N-Nitrosodimethylamine
2646-17-5 Oil orange SS
794-93-4 Panfuran S (dihydroxymethylfuratrizine)
87-86-5 Pentachlorophenol
127-18-4 Perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene)
63-92-3

Phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride

N-Phenyl-2-napthylamine

Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)
1336-36-3 Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
3761-53-3

Ponceau MX

P(p)(alpha, alpha, alpha)-Tetra-chlorotoluene

1120-71-4 1,3-Propane sultone
75-56-9 Propylene oxide
1746-01-6 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD)
139-65-1 4,4'-Thiodianiline
1314-20-1 Thorium dioxide
95-80-7 2,4-Toluene diamine
584-84-9 2,4-Toluene diisocyanate
95-53-4 o-Toluidine
636-21-5 o-Toluidine hydrochloride
8001-35-2 Toxaphene
55738-54-0

Trans-2((Dimethylamino)methylimino)-5-

(2-(5-nitro-2-furyl) vinyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole

79-01-6 Trichloroethylene
88-06-2 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
75-01-4 Vinyl chloride


(2) TABLE II

CLASS A TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS

WITH ESTABLISHED

ACCEPTABLE SOURCE IMPACT LEVELS



CAS #


SUBSTANCE


10-6 RISK

ASIL MICRO-

GRAMS/M3

ANNUAL

AVERAGE


75-07-0

Acetaldehyde

0.4500000
79-06-1 Acrylamide 0.0007700
107-13-1 Acrylonitrile 0.0150000
309-00-2 Aldrin 0.0002000
62-53-3 Aniline 6.3000000
C7440-38-2 Arsenic and inorganic arsenic compounds 0.0002300
1332-21-4 Asbestos (Note: fibers/ml) 0.0000044
71-43-2 Benzene 0.1200000
92-87-5 Benzidine and its salts 0.0000150
50-32-8 Benzo(a)pyrene 0.0004800
7440-41-7 Beryllium and compounds 0.0004200
111-44-4 Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether 0.0030000
117-81-7 Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) 2.5000000
542-88-1 Bis(chloromethyl)ether 0.0000160
75-25-2 Bromoform 0.9100000
106-99-0 1,3-Butadiene 0.0036000
7440-43-9 Cadmium and compounds 0.0005600
56-23-5 Carbon tetrachloride 0.0670000
57-74-9 Chlordane 0.0027000
510-15-6 Chlorobenzilate 0.2000000
67-66-3 Chloroform 0.0430000
108-43-0 Chlorophenols 0.1800000
C7440-47-3 Chromium, hexavalent metal and compounds 0.0000830
Coke oven emissions 0.0016000
3547-04-4 DDE (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene) 0.1000000
50-29-3

DDT (1,1,1 Trichloro-2,2-Bis-

(p-chlorophenyl)-ethane)

0.0100000
764-41-0 1,4-Dichloro-2-butene 0.0003800
106-46-7 1,4-Dichlorobenzene 1.5000000
91-94-1 3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine 0.0770000
107-06-2 1,2-Dichloroethane (ethylene chloride) 0.0380000
75-09-2 Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) 0.5600000
60-57-1 Dieldrin 0.0002200
119-93-7 3,3-Dimethyl benzidine 0.0038000
123-91-1 1,4-Dioxane 0.0320000
122-66-7 1,2-Diphenylhydrazine 0.0045000
106-89-8 Epichlorohydrin 0.8300000
106-93-4 Ethylene dibromide (dibromethane) 0.0045000
75-21-8 Ethylene oxide 0.0100000
96-45-7 Ethylene thiourea 1.0000000
50-00-0 Formaldehyde 0.0770000
76-44-8 Heptachlor 0.0007700
118-74-1 Hexachlorobenzene 0.0022000
58-89-9 Hexachlorocyclohexane (Lindane) gamma BHC 0.0026000
302-01-2 Hydrazine 0.0002000
C7440-02-0

Nickel and compounds (as nickel subsulfide or nickel refinery dust) 0.0021000
924-16-3 N-Nitrosodi-n-butylamine 0.0006300
55-18-5

N-Nitrosodiethylamine

(diethylnitrosoamine)(DEN)

0.0000230
62-75-9 N-Nitrosodimethylamine 0.0000710
79-46-9 2-Nitropropane 0.0003700
87-86-5 Pentachlorophenol 0.3300000
127-18-4 Perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) 1.1000000
1336-36-3 Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) 0.0045000
75-56-9 Propylene oxide 0.2700000
1746-01-6

2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

(2,3,7,8-TCDD)

0.00000003
95-80-7 2,4-Toluene diamine 0.0110000
95-53-4 o-Toluidine 0.1400000
636-21-5 o-Toluidine hydrochloride 0.1400000
8001-35-2 Toxaphene 0.0031000
79-01-6 Trichloroethylene 0.5900000
88-06-2 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol 0.3200000
75-01-4 Vinyl chloride 0.0120000


(3) TABLE III

CLASS A TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS

WITH SPECIAL ACCEPTABLE SOURCE

IMPACT LEVELS



CAS #


SUBSTANCE


ASIL

MICRO-

GRAMS/M3


AVERAGING

TIME



Primary aluminum smelter uncontrolled roof vent polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions (Note: Quantify according to WAC 173-460-050 (4)(d))

0.0013

Annual
61-82-5 Amitrole 0.06 24 hour
90-04-0 o-Anisidine 1.7 24 hour
126-99-8 &bgr;-Chloroprene 120 24 hour
94-75-7 2,4-D and esters 33 24 hour
78-87-5 1,2-Dichloropropane 4.0 24 hour
77-78-1 Dimethyl sulfate 1.7 24 hour
540-73-8 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine 4.0 24 hour
319-84-6

Hexachlorocyclohexane (Lindane) alpha BHC 1.7 24 hour
319-85-7

Hexachlorocyclohexane (Lindane) beta BHC 1.7 24 hour
Lead compounds 0.5 24 hour
101-14-4

4,4'-Methylenebis

(2-Chloroaniline) (MBOCA)

0.7 24 hour
101-77-9 4,4-Methylene dianiline 2.7 24 hour
Polyaromatic hydrocarbon

(PAH) emissions

(Note: Quantify according to WAC 173-460-050 (4)(d))

0.00048 Annual
584-84-9 2,4-Toluene diisocyanate 0.12 24 hour))


The following table lists the common name of toxic air pollutants, the chemical abstract service (CAS) number; the averaging period; the acceptable source impact level (ASIL); the small quantity emission rate (SQER); and de minimis emission values.


Common Name CAS # Averaging Period ASIL (g/m3) SQER (lb/averaging period) De Minimis (lb/averaging period)
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane 630-20-6 year 0.135 25.9 1.3
1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane 811-97-2 24-hr 8.00E+04 438 21.9
1,1,1-Trichloroethane 71-55-6 24-hr 1000 5.48 0.274
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 79-34-5 year 0.0172 3.3 0.165
1,1,2-Trichloroethane 79-00-5 year 0.0625 12 0.6
1,1-Dichloroethane 75-34-3 year 0.625 120 6
1,1-Dichloroethylene 75-35-4 24-hr 200 1.1 0.0548
1,1-Difluoroethane 75-37-6 24-hr 4.00E+04 219 11
1,1-Dimethylhydrazine 57-14-7 24-hr 0.5 0.00274 0.000137
1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-Octachlorodibenzofuran 39001-02-0 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-Octachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin 3268-87-9 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-Heptachlorodibenzofuran 67562-39-4 year 2.63E-06 0.000505 2.52E-05
1,2,3,4,7,8,9-Heptachlorodibenzofuran 55673-89-7 year 2.63E-06 0.000505 2.52E-05
1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzofuran 70648-26-9 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin 39227-28-6 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
1,2,3,6,7,8 Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin 57653-85-7 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzofuran 57117-44-9 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachlorodibenzofuran 72918-21-9 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin 19408-74-3 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
1,2,3,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran 57117-41-6 year 5.26E-07 0.000101 5.05E-06
1,2,3,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin 40321-76-4 year 2.63E-08 5.05E-06 2.52E-07
1,2,3-Trichloropropane 96-18-4 24-hr 1.84 0.0101 0.000504
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane 96-12-8 year 0.000526 0.101 0.00505
1,2-Dibromoethane 106-93-4 year 0.0141 2.71 0.135
1,2-Dichloroethane 107-06-2 year 0.0385 7.39 0.369
1,2-Dichloropropane 78-87-5 year 0.1 19.2 0.959
1,2-Dimethylhydrazine 540-73-8 year 6.25E-06 0.0012 6.00E-05
1,2-Diphenylhydrazine 122-66-7 year 0.004 0.768 0.0384
1,2-Epoxybutane 106-88-7 24-hr 20 0.11 0.00548
1,3-Butadiene 106-99-0 year 0.00588 1.13 0.0564
1,3-Dichloropropene 542-75-6 year 0.0625 12 0.6
1,3-Propane Sultone 1120-71-4 year 0.00145 0.278 0.0139
1,4-Dichlorobenzene 106-46-7 year 0.0909 17.4 0.872
1,4-Dioxane 123-91-1 year 0.13 24.9 1.25
1,6-Dinitropyrene 42397-64-8 year 9.09E-05 0.0174 0.000872
1,6-Hexamethylene diisocyanate 822-06-0 24-hr 0.07 0.000383 1.92E-05
1,8-Dinitropyrene 42397-65-9 year 0.000909 0.174 0.00872
1-[(5-Nitrofurfurylidene)-amino]-2-

imidazolidinone

555-84-0 year 0.00196 0.376 0.0188
1-Amino-2-methylanthraquinone 82-28-0 year 0.0233 4.47 0.224
1-Chloro-1,1-difluoroethane 75-68-3 24-hr 5.00E+04 274 13.7
1-Nitropyrene 5522-43-0 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
2,3,3',4,4',5'-Hexachlorobiphenyl 69782-90-7 year 5.26E-05 0.0101 0.000505
2,3,3',4,4',5-Hexachlorobiphenyl 38380-08-4 year 5.26E-05 0.0101 0.000505
2,3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl 32598-14-4 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
2,3,3',4,4',5,5'-Heptachlorobiphenyl 39635-31-9 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
2',3,4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl 65510-44-3 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl 31508-00-6 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
2,3,4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl 74472-37-0 year 5.26E-05 0.0101 0.000505
2,3,4,6,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzofuran 60851-34-5 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran 57117-31-4 year 5.26E-08 1.01E-05 5.05E-07
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

Related Compounds (TCDD)

C1746-01-6 year 2.63E-08 5.05E-06 2.52E-07
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran 51207-31-9 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin 1746-01-6 year 2.63E-08 5.05E-06 2.52E-07
2,3',4,4',5,5'-Hexachlorobiphenyl 52663-72-6 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol 88-06-2 year 0.05 9.59 0.48
2,4-Diaminoanisole 615-05-4 year 0.152 29.2 1.46
2,4-Diaminoanisole Sulfate 39156-41-7 year 0.27 51.8 2.59
2,4-Diaminotoluene 95-80-7 year 0.000909 0.174 0.00872
2,4-Dinitrotoluene 121-14-2 year 0.0112 2.15 0.107
2-Acetylaminofluorene 53-96-3 year 0.000769 0.148 0.00738
2-Amino-3-methyl-9H pyrido[2,3-b]indole 68006-83-7 year 0.00294 0.564 0.0282
2-Amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline 76180-96-6 year 0.0025 0.48 0.024
2-Amino-5-(5-Nitro-2-Furyl)-1,3,

4-Thiadiazol

712-68-5 year 0.000217 0.0416 0.00208
2-Aminoanthraquinone 117-79-3 year 0.106 20.3 1.02
2-Chloroacetophenone 532-27-4 24-hr 0.03 0.000164 8.21E-06
2-Ethoxyethanol 110-80-5 24-hr 70 0.383 0.0192
2-Methoxyethanol 109-86-4 24-hr 60 0.329 0.0164
2-Methyl-1-nitroanthraquinone 129-15-7 year 0.000833 0.16 0.00799
2-Methylphenol 95-48-7 24-hr 600 3.29 0.164
2-Naphthylamine 91-59-8 year 0.00196 0.376 0.0188
2-Nitrofluorene 607-57-8 year 0.0909 17.4 0.872
2-Nitropropane 79-46-9 24-hr 20 0.11 0.00548
3,3',4,4',5,5'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl 32774-16-6 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
3,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl 57465-28-8 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl 32598-13-3 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine 91-94-1 year 0.00294 0.564 0.0282
3,4,4',5-Tetrachlorobiphenyl 70362-50-4 year 0.000263 0.0505 0.00252
3-Amino-9-ethylcarbazole hydrochloride 6109-97-3 year 0.0455 8.73 0.437
3-Chloro-2-methyl-propene 563-47-3 year 0.025 4.8 0.24
3-Methylcholanthrene 56-49-5 year 0.000159 0.0305 0.00153
3-Methylphenol 108-39-4 24-hr 600 3.29 0.164
4,4'-Diaminodiphenyl Ether 101-80-4 year 0.025 4.8 0.24
4,4-Methylene bis(2-chloroaniline) 101-14-4 year 0.00233 0.447 0.0224
4,4-Methylene bis(2-Methylaniline) 838-88-0 year 0.00385 0.739 0.0369
4,4'-Methylene bis(n,n'-dimethyl)aniline 101-61-1 year 0.0769 14.8 0.738
4,4'-Methylenedianiline 101-77-9 year 0.00217 0.416 0.0208
4,4-Methylenedianiline Dihydrochloride 13552-44-8 year 0.00294 0.564 0.0282
4,4-Thiodianiline 139-65-1 year 0.000233 0.0447 0.00224
4-Aminobiphenyl 92-67-1 year 0.000167 0.032 0.0016
4-Chloro-o-phenylenediamine 95-83-0 year 0.217 41.6 2.08
4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene 60-11-7 year 7.69E+04 1.48E+07 7.38E+05
4-Methylphenol 106-44-5 24-hr 600 3.29 0.164
4-Nitropyrene 57835-92-4 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
5-Methylchrysene 3697-24-3 year 0.000909 0.174 0.00872
5-Nitroacenaphthene 602-87-9 year 0.027 5.18 0.259
5-Nitro-o-Anisidine 99-59-2 year 0.0714 13.7 0.685
6-Nitrochrysene 7496-02-8 year 9.09E-05 0.0174 0.000872
7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene 57-97-6 year 1.41E-05 0.00271 0.000135
7h-Dibenzo[c,g]carbazole 194-59-2 year 0.000909 0.174 0.00872
A-alpha-c(2-amino-9h-pyrido[2,3-b]indole) 26148-68-5 year 0.00877 1.68 0.0841
Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 year 0.37 71 3.55
Acetamide 60-35-5 year 0.05 9.59 0.48
Acetonitrile 75-05-8 year 60 1.15E+04 576
Acrolein 107-02-8 24-hr 0.06 0.000329 1.64E-05
Acrylamide 79-06-1 year 0.000769 0.148 0.00738
Acrylic Acid 79-10-7 24-hr 1 0.00548 0.000274
Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 year 0.00345 0.662 0.0331
Actinomycin D 50-76-0 year 4.00E-07 7.68E-05 3.84E-06
Alar 1596-84-5 year 0.196 37.6 1.88
Aldrin 309-00-2 year 0.000204 0.0391 0.00196
Allyl Chloride 107-05-1 year 0.167 32 1.6
alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane 319-84-6 year 0.0013 0.249 0.0125
Amitrole 61-82-5 year 0.0037 0.71 0.0355
Ammonia 7664-41-7 24-hr 70.8 0.388 0.0194
Ammonium bisulfate 7803-63-6 1-hr 120 0.263 0.0131
Ammonium sulfate 7783-20-2 1-hr 120 0.263 0.0131
Aniline 62-53-3 year 0.625 120 6
Antimony Trioxide 1309-64-4 24-hr 0.2 0.0011 5.48E-05
Aramite 140-57-8 year 0.116 22.3 1.11
Arsenic & Inorganic Arsenic Compounds C7440-38-2 year 0.000303 0.0581 0.00291
Arsine 7784-42-1 24-hr 0.05 0.000274 1.37E-05
Asbestos 1332-21-4 year 1.59E-05 0.00305 0.000153
Auramine 492-80-8 year 0.004 0.768 0.0384
Azaserine 115-02-6 year 0.000323 0.062 0.0031
Azathioprine 446-86-6 year 0.00196 0.376 0.0188
Azobenzene 103-33-3 year 0.0323 6.2 0.31
Barium Chromate 10294-40-3 year 1.49E-05 0.00286 0.000143
Benz[a]anthracene 56-55-3 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
Benzene 71-43-2 year 0.0345 6.62 0.331
Benzidine 92-87-5 year 7.14E-06 0.00137 6.85E-05
Benzo[a]pyrene 50-32-8 year 0.000909 0.174 0.00872
Benzo[b]fluoranthene 205-99-2 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
Benzo[j]fluoranthene 205-82-3 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
Benzo[k]fluoranthene 207-08-9 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
Benzyl Chloride 100-44-7 year 0.0204 3.91 0.196
Benzyl Violet 4B 1694-09-3 year 0.175 33.6 1.68
Beryllium & Compounds (NOS) C7440-41-7 year 0.000417 0.08 0.004
Beryllium Oxide 1304-56-9 year 0.000417 0.08 0.004
Beryllium Sulfate 13510-49-1 year 1.16E-06 0.000223 1.11E-05
beta-Butyrolactone 3068-88-0 year 0.00345 0.662 0.0331
Beta-hexachlorocyclohexane 319-85-7 year 0.00233 0.447 0.0224
beta-Propiolactone 57-57-8 year 0.00025 0.048 0.0024
Bis(chloroethyl)ether 111-44-4 year 0.00141 0.271 0.0135
Bis(chloromethyl)ether 542-88-1 year 7.69E-05 0.0148 0.000738
Bromodichloromethane 75-27-4 year 0.027 5.18 0.259
Bromoform 75-25-2 year 0.909 174 8.72
Butylated hydroxyanisole 25013-16-5 year 17.5 3360 168
C.I. Basic Red 9 Monohydrochloride 569-61-9 year 0.0141 2.71 0.135
Cadmium & Compounds 7440-43-9 year 0.000238 0.0457 0.00228
Captafol 2425-06-1 year 0.0233 4.47 0.224
Captan 133-06-2 year 1.52 292 14.6
Carbon disulfide 75-15-0 24-hr 800 4.38 0.219
Carbon monoxide 630-08-0 1-hr 2.30E+04 50.4 2.52
Carbon Tetrachloride 56-23-5 year 0.0238 4.57 0.228
Chlorambucil 305-03-3 year 7.69E-06 0.00148 7.38E-05
Chlordane 57-74-9 year 0.00294 0.564 0.0282
Chlordecone 143-50-0 year 0.000217 0.0416 0.00208
Chlorendic Acid 115-28-6 year 0.0385 7.39 0.369
Chlorinated Paraffins 108171-26-2 year 0.04 7.68 0.384
Chlorine 7782-50-5 24-hr 0.2 0.0011 5.48E-05
Chlorine dioxide 10049-04-4 24-hr 0.2 0.0011 5.48E-05
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 24-hr 1000 5.48 0.274
Chlorobenzilate 510-15-6 year 0.0323 6.2 0.31
Chlorodifluoromethane 75-45-6 24-hr 5.00E+04 274 13.7
Chloroform 67-66-3 year 0.0435 8.35 0.417
Chloromethyl methyl ether 107-30-2 year 0.00145 0.278 0.0139
Chloropicrin 76-06-2 24-hr 0.4 0.00219 0.00011
Chlorothalonil 1897-45-6 year 1.12 215 10.7
Chlorozotocin 54749-90-5 year 1.45E-05 0.00278 0.000139
Chromic Acid 11115-74-5 year 1.51E-05 0.0029 0.000145
Chromic Trioxide 1333-82-0 year 1.28E-05 0.00246 0.000123
Chromic(VI) Acid 7738-94-5 year 1.51E-05 0.0029 0.000145
Chromium Hexavalent: Soluble, except Chromic Trioxide C7440-47-3 year 6.67E-06 0.00128 6.40E-05
Chromium(VI) 18540-29-9 year 6.67E-06 0.00128 6.40E-05
Chrysene 218-01-9 year 0.0909 17.4 0.872
Cinnamyl Anthranilate 87-29-6 year 0.769 148 7.38
Cobalt 7440-48-4 24-hr 0.1 0.000548 2.74E-05
Coke Oven Emissions 8007-45-2 year 0.00162 0.311 0.0155
Copper & Compounds C7440-50-8 1-hr 100 0.219 0.011
Cumene 98-82-8 24-hr 400 2.19 0.11
Cupferron 135-20-6 year 0.0159 3.05 0.153
Cyclohexane 110-82-7 24-hr 6000 32.9 1.64
Cyclophosphamide (anhydrous) 50-18-0 year 0.00588 1.13 0.0564
Cyclophosphamide (Hydrated) 6055-19-2 year 0.00625 1.2 0.06
D & C Red No. 9 5160-02-1 year 0.667 128 6.4
Dacarbazine 4342-03-4 year 7.14E-05 0.0137 0.000685
Dantron 117-10-2 year 0.0455 8.73 0.437
DDD 72-54-8 year 0.0145 2.78 0.139
DDE 72-55-9 year 0.0103 1.98 0.0988
DDT 50-29-3 year 0.0103 1.98 0.0988
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 117-81-7 year 0.0417 8 0.4
Diazinon 333-41-5 24-hr 9 0.0493 0.00246
Dibenz[a,h]acridine 226-36-8 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
Dibenz[a,h]anthracene 53-70-3 year 0.000833 0.16 0.00799
Dibenz[a,j]acridine 224-42-0 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
Dibenzo[a,e]pyrene 192-65-4 year 0.000909 0.174 0.00872
Dibenzo[a,h]pyrene 189-64-0 year 9.09E-05 0.0174 0.000872
Dibenzo[a,i]pyrene 189-55-9 year 9.09E-05 0.0174 0.000872
Dibenzo[a,l]pyrene 191-30-0 year 9.09E-05 0.0174 0.000872
Dibromochloromethane 124-48-1 year 0.037 7.1 0.355
Dichloromethane 75-09-2 year 1 192 9.59
Dichlorvos 62-73-7 year 0.012 2.3 0.115
Dieldrin 60-57-1 year 0.000217 0.0416 0.00208
Diesel Engine Exhaust, Particulate CAS-NA-1 year 0.00333 0.639 0.032
Diethanolamine 111-42-2 24-hr 3 0.0164 0.000821
Diethyl mercury 627-44-1 24-hr 0 0.00E+00 0.00E+00
Diethylstilbestrol 56-53-1 year 1.00E-05 0.00192 9.59E-05
Diglycidyl Resorcinol Ether 101-90-6 year 0.00204 0.391 0.0196
Dihydrosafrole 94-58-6 year 0.0769 14.8 0.738
Dimethyl Mercury 593-74-8 24-hr 0 0.00E+00 0.00E+00
Dimethylcarbamoyl Chloride 79-44-7 year 0.00027 0.0518 0.00259
Dimethylvinylchloride 513-37-1 year 7.69 1480 73.8
Direct Black 38 1937-37-7 year 4.76E+04 9.13E+06 4.57E+05
Direct Blue 6 2602-46-2 year 0.000476 0.0913 0.00457
Direct Brown 95 16071-86-6 year 0.000526 0.101 0.00505
Disperse Blue 1 2475-45-8 year 0.769 148 7.38
Disulfoton 298-04-4 24-hr 6 0.0329 0.00164
Epichlorohydrin 106-89-8 year 0.0435 8.35 0.417
Estradiol 17b 50-28-2 year 9.09E-05 0.0174 0.000872
Ethyl Carbamate 51-79-6 year 0.00345 0.662 0.0331
Ethyl Chloride 75-00-3 24-hr 3.00E+04 164 8.21
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 year 0.4 76.8 3.84
Ethylene Glycol 107-21-1 24-hr 400 2.19 0.11
Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether 111-76-2 24-hr 1.30E+04 71.2 3.56
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate 111-15-9 24-hr 300 1.64 0.0821
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate 110-49-6 24-hr 90 0.493 0.0246
Ethylene oxide 75-21-8 year 0.0114 2.19 0.109
Ethylene Thiourea 96-45-7 year 0.0769 14.8 0.738
Ethyleneimine 151-56-4 year 5.26E-05 0.0101 0.000505
Ferric Sulfate 10028-22-5 1-hr 120 0.263 0.0131
Fluoride 16984-48-8 24-hr 13 0.0712 0.00356
Fluorine (soluble Fluoride) 7782-41-4 24-hr 15.8 0.0866 0.00433
Formaldehyde 50-00-0 year 0.167 32 1.6
Furmecyclox 60568-05-0 year 0.116 22.3 1.11
Furylfuramide 3688-53-7 year 0.0145 2.78 0.139
gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane 58-89-9 year 0.00323 0.62 0.031
Glu-P-1 67730-11-4 year 0.000714 0.137 0.00685
Glu-P-2 67730-10-3 year 0.0025 0.48 0.024
Glutaraldehyde 111-30-8 24-hr 0.08 0.000438 2.19E-05
Gyromitrin 16568-02-8 year 0.000345 0.0662 0.00331
HC Blue 1 2784-94-3 year 0.0667 12.8 0.64
Heptachlor 76-44-8 year 7.69E-05 0.0148 0.000738
Heptachlor epoxide 1024-57-3 year 0.000385 0.0739 0.00369
Heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxins 37871-00-4 year 2.63E-06 0.000505 2.52E-05
Hexachlorobenzene 118-74-1 year 0.00196 0.376 0.0188
Hexachlorobutadiene 87-68-3 year 0.0455 8.73 0.437
Hexachlorocyclohexane 608-73-1 year 0.000909 0.174 0.00872
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene 77-47-4 24-hr 0.2 0.0011 5.48E-05
Hexachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxins, Total 34465-46-8 year 2.63E-07 5.05E-05 2.52E-06
Hexachloroethane 67-72-1 year 0.0909 17.4 0.872
Hydrazine 302-01-2 year 0.000204 0.0391 0.00196
Hydrazine Sulfate 10034-93-2 year 0.00116 0.223 0.0111
Hydrogen chloride 7647-01-0 24-hr 9 0.0493 0.00246
Hydrogen Cyanide 74-90-8 24-hr 9 0.0493 0.00246
Hydrogen Fluoride 7664-39-3 24-hr 14 0.0767 0.00383
Hydrogen Selenide 7783-07-5 1-hr 5 0.011 0.000548
Hydrogen Sulfide 7783-06-4 24-hr 2 0.011 0.000548
Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene 193-39-5 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
Isophorone 78-59-1 24-hr 2000 11 0.548
Isopropyl Alcohol 67-63-0 1-hr 3200 7.01 0.35
Lasiocarpine 303-34-4 year 0.000455 0.0873 0.00437
Lead & Compounds (NOS) C7439-92-1 year 0.0833 16 0.799
Lead Acetate 301-04-2 year 0.0125 2.4 0.12
Lead Chromate 7758-97-6 year 4.14E-05 0.00794 0.000397
Lead Chromate Oxide 18454-12-1 year 7.01E-05 0.0135 0.000673
Lead Subacetate 1335-32-6 year 0.0909 17.4 0.872
Maleic Anhydride 108-31-6 24-hr 0.7 0.00383 0.000192
Manganese & Compounds C7439-96-5 24-hr 0.04 0.000219 1.10E-05
Melphalan 148-82-3 year 2.70E-05 0.00518 0.000259
Melphalan HCl 3223-07-2 year 2.70E-05 0.00518 0.000259
Mercury, Elemental 7439-97-6 24-hr 0.09 0.000493 2.46E-05
Methyl Alcohol 67-56-1 24-hr 4000 21.9 1.1
Methyl Bromide 74-83-9 24-hr 5 0.0274 0.00137
Methyl Chloride 74-87-3 24-hr 90 0.493 0.0246
Methyl Ethyl Ketone 78-93-3 24-hr 5000 27.4 1.37
Methyl Isobutyl Ketone 108-10-1 24-hr 3000 16.4 0.821
Methyl Isocyanate 624-83-9 24-hr 1 0.00548 0.000274
Methyl methacrylate 80-62-6 24-hr 700 3.83 0.192
Methyl Methanesulfonate 66-27-3 year 0.0357 6.85 0.343
Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether 1634-04-4 year 3.85 739 36.9
Methylene diphenyl isocyanate 101-68-8 24-hr 0.7 0.00383 0.000192
Methylthiouracil 56-04-2 year 0.00909 1.74 0.0872
Michler's ketone 90-94-8 year 0.004 0.768 0.0384
Mirex 2385-85-5 year 0.000196 0.0376 0.00188
Mitomycin C 50-07-7 year 4.35E-07 8.35E-05 4.17E-06
Monocrotaline 315-22-0 year 0.000345 0.0662 0.00331
m-Xylene 108-38-3 24-hr 221 1.21 0.0605
n,n-Dimethylformamide 68-12-2 24-hr 80 0.438 0.0219
n-[4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl]-acetamide 531-82-8 year 0.00233 0.447 0.0224
Naphthalene 91-20-3 year 0.0294 5.64 0.282
n-Hexane 110-54-3 24-hr 700 3.83 0.192
Nickel Refinery Dust C7440-02-0 year 0.0042 0.806 0.0403
Nickel Subsulfide 12035-72-2 year 0.00204 0.391 0.0196
Nifurthiazole 3570-75-0 year 0.00152 0.292 0.0146
Nitric Acid 7697-37-2 1-hr 86 0.188 0.00942
Nitrilotriacetic acid 139-13-9 year 0.667 128 6.4
Nitrilotriacetic acid, trisodium salt monohydrate 18662-53-8 year 0.345 66.2 3.31
Nitrofen 1836-75-5 year 0.0435 8.35 0.417
Nitrofurazone 59-87-0 year 0.0027 0.518 0.0259
Nitrogen dioxide 10102-44-0 1-hr 470 1.03 0.0515
n-Methyl-n-nitro-n-nitrosoguanidine 70-25-7 year 0.000417 0.08 0.004
n-Nitrosodiethanolamine 1116-54-7 year 0.00125 0.24 0.012
n-Nitrosodiethylamine 55-18-5 year 1.00E-04 0.0192 0.000959
n-Nitrosodimethylamine 62-75-9 year 0.000217 0.0416 0.00208
n-Nitroso-di-n-butylamine 924-16-3 year 0.000323 0.062 0.0031
n-Nitrosodi-n-propylamine 621-64-7 year 0.0005 0.0959 0.0048
n-Nitrosodiphenylamine 86-30-6 year 0.385 73.9 3.69
n-Nitrosomorpholine 59-89-2 year 0.000526 0.101 0.00505
n-Nitroso-n-ethylurea 759-73-9 year 0.00013 0.0249 0.00125
n-Nitroso-n-methylethylamine 10595-95-6 year 0.000159 0.0305 0.00153
n-Nitroso-n-methylurea 684-93-5 year 2.94E-05 0.00564 0.000282
n-Nitroso-n-Methylurethane 615-53-2 year 3.23E-05 0.0062 0.00031
n-Nitrosonornicotine 16543-55-8 year 0.0025 0.48 0.024
n-Nitrosopiperidine 100-75-4 year 0.00037 0.071 0.00355
n-Nitrosopyrrolidine 930-55-2 year 0.00167 0.32 0.016
o-Anisidine 90-04-0 year 0.025 4.8 0.24
o-Anisidine Hydrochloride 134-29-2 year 0.0323 6.2 0.31
o-Phenylphenate, Sodium 132-27-4 year 1.16 223 11.1
ortho-Aminoazotoluene 97-56-3 year 0.000909 0.174 0.00872
o-Toluidine 95-53-4 year 0.0196 3.76 0.188
o-Toluidine Hydrochloride 636-21-5 year 0.027 5.18 0.259
o-Xylene 95-47-6 24-hr 221 1.21 0.0605
Ozone 10028-15-6 1-hr 180 0.394 0.0197
para-Cresidine 120-71-8 year 0.0233 4.47 0.224
p-Chloro-o-toluidine 95-69-2 year 0.013 2.49 0.125
Pentabromodiphenyl Ether 32534-81-9 24-hr 6 0.0329 0.00164
Pentachlorophenol 87-86-5 year 0.217 41.6 2.08
Perchloroethylene 127-18-4 year 0.169 32.4 1.62
Phenacetin 62-44-2 year 1.59 305 15.3
Phenazopyridine 94-78-0 year 0.0204 3.91 0.196
Phenazopyridine hydrochloride 136-40-3 year 0.0233 4.47 0.224
Phenesterin 3546-10-9 year 2.33E-05 0.00447 0.000224
Phenobarbital 50-06-6 year 0.00769 1.48 0.0738
Phenol 108-95-2 24-hr 200 1.1 0.0548
Phenoxybenzamine 59-96-1 year 0.00112 0.215 0.0107
Phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride 63-92-3 year 0.0013 0.249 0.0125
Phosgene 75-44-5 24-hr 0.3 0.00164 8.21E-05
Phosphine 7803-51-2 24-hr 0.8 0.00438 0.000219
Phosphoric Acid 7664-38-2 24-hr 7 0.0383 0.00192
Phosphorus 7723-14-0 24-hr 20 0.11 0.00548
Phthalic Anhydride 85-44-9 24-hr 20 0.11 0.00548
p-Nitrosodiphenylamine 156-10-5 year 0.159 30.5 1.53
Polybrominated Biphenyls CAS-NA-2 year 0.000116 0.0223 0.00111
Polychlorinated Biphenyls 1336-36-3 year 0.00175 0.336 0.0168
Ponceau 3R 3564-09-8 year 0.217 41.6 2.08
Ponceau MX 3761-53-3 year 0.769 148 7.38
Potassium Bromate 7758-01-2 year 0.00714 1.37 0.0685
Procarbazine 671-16-9 year 0.00025 0.048 0.0024
Procarbazine Hydrochloride 366-70-1 year 0.000294 0.0564 0.00282
Propylene 115-07-1 24-hr 3000 16.4 0.821
Propylene Glycol 57-55-6 24-hr 28.5 0.156 0.0078
Propylene Glycol Dinitrate 6423-43-4 24-hr 0.276 0.00151 7.56E-05
Propylene glycol monomethyl ether 107-98-2 24-hr 7000 38.3 1.92
Propylene oxide 75-56-9 year 0.27 51.8 2.59
Propylthiouracil 51-52-5 year 0.00345 0.662 0.0331
p-Xylene 106-42-3 24-hr 221 1.21 0.0605
Refractory Ceramic Fibers CAS-NA-3 24-hr 0.03 0.000164 8.21E-06
Reserpine 50-55-5 year 0.000323 0.062 0.0031
Safrole 94-59-7 year 0.0159 3.05 0.153
Selenium & Selenium Compounds (other than Hydrogen Selenide) C7782-49-2 24-hr 20 0.11 0.00548
Short-chain (C10-13) chlorinated paraffins 85535-84-8 year 0.04 7.68 0.384
Silica (crystalline, Respirable) 7631-86-9 24-hr 3 0.0164 0.000821
Sodium Hydroxide 1310-73-2 1-hr 8 0.0175 0.000876
Sodium Sulfate 7757-82-6 1-hr 120 0.263 0.0131
Sterigmatocystin 10048-13-2 year 1.00E-04 0.0192 0.000959
Streptozotocin 18883-66-4 year 3.23E-05 0.0062 0.00031
Styrene 100-42-5 24-hr 900 4.93 0.246
Styrene Oxide 96-09-3 year 0.0217 4.16 0.208
Sulfallate 95-06-7 year 0.0185 3.55 0.178
Sulfur dioxide 7446-09-5 24-hr 26.7 0.146 0.0073
Sulfur Mustard 505-60-2 24-hr 0.7 0.00383 0.000192
Sulfuric Acid 7664-93-9 24-hr 1 0.00548 0.000274
Tetrabromodiphenyl Ether 40088-47-9 24-hr 6 0.0329 0.00164
Thioacetamide 62-55-5 year 0.000588 0.113 0.00564
Thiourea 62-56-6 year 0.0476 9.13 0.457
Titanium Tetrachloride 7550-45-0 24-hr 0.1 0.000548 2.74E-05
Toluene 108-88-3 24-hr 5000 27.4 1.37
Toluene-diisocyanates 26471-62-5 24-hr 0.07 0.000383 1.92E-05
Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate 584-84-9 24-hr 0.07 0.000383 1.92E-05
Toluene-2,6-diisocyanate 91-08-7 24-hr 0.07 0.000383 1.92E-05
Toxaphene 8001-35-2 year 0.00294 0.564 0.0282
Trans-1,2-dichloroethene 156-60-5 24-hr 807 4.42 0.221
Trans-2[(dimethylamino)-methylimino]-5-[2-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-vinyl]-1,3,4-oxadiazole 55738-54-0 year 0.00769 1.48 0.0738
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 year 0.5 95.9 4.8
Triethylamine 121-44-8 24-hr 200 1.1 0.0548
Tris-(1-Aziridinyl)phosphine sulfide 52-24-4 year 0.000294 0.0564 0.00282
Tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate 126-72-7 year 0.00152 0.292 0.0146
Tryptophan-P-1 62450-06-0 year 0.000135 0.0259 0.0013
Tryptophan-P-2 62450-07-1 year 0.0011 0.211 0.0106
Vanadium 7440-62-2 24-hr 0.2 0.0011 5.48E-05
Vanadium Pentoxide 1314-62-1 1-hr 30 0.0657 0.00329
Vinyl acetate 108-05-4 24-hr 200 1.1 0.0548
Vinyl Bromide 593-60-2 24-hr 3 0.0164 0.000821
Vinyl Chloride 75-01-4 year 0.0128 2.46 0.123

[Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. 94-03-072 (Order 93-19), 173-460-150, filed 1/14/94, effective 2/14/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. 91-13-079 (Order 90-62), 173-460-150, filed 6/18/91, effective 9/18/91.]

Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency and appear in the Register pursuant to the requirements of RCW 34.08.040.
REPEALER

     The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:
WAC 173-460-110 Acceptable source impact levels.
WAC 173-460-120 Scientific review and amendment of acceptable source impact levels and lists.
WAC 173-460-130 Fees.
WAC 173-460-160 Class B toxic air pollutants and acceptable source impact levels.

Washington State Code Reviser's Office