WSR 09-16-110

PERMANENT RULES

DEPARTMENT OF

LABOR AND INDUSTRIES

[ Filed August 4, 2009, 1:01 p.m. , effective October 1, 2009 ]


Effective Date of Rule: October 1, 2009.

Purpose: The purpose of this rule making is to make amendments to the reporting requirements in chapter 296-17 WAC and to the classifications in chapter 296-17A WAC. The amendments are being made to correct some grammatical or typographical errors, rearrange information for better readability, and adopt into rule the practice of classifying contractors performing portable snowblowing in classification 0308 landscaping.

Minor housekeeping changes will be made to the following reporting rules in chapter 296-17 WAC: WAC 296-17-31002 General definitions, adding definitions from 35202 to ensure all definitions are in one rule; WAC 296-17-31018 Exception classifications, adding two classifications in the list of exception classes which had inadvertently been left out of list of exceptions; WAC 296-17-35202 Definitions, repealing this rule and placing these definitions into the general definition rule; and WAC 296-17-35203 (6)(b), special reporting instructions, replaced an exclamation mark with a dash.

Minor housekeeping changes will be made to the following classifications in chapter 296-17A WAC: WAC 296-17A-0308 Landscaping, include snow blowers in description previously classed by analogy in this classification and WAC 296-17A-3603 Painting in shop NOC, change reference from WAC 296-17-675 to 296-17A-5206.

Citation of Existing Rules Affected by this Order: Repealing WAC 296-17-35202; and amending WAC 296-17-31002, 296-17-31018, 296-17-35203, 296-17A-0308, and 296-17A-3603.

Statutory Authority for Adoption: RCW 51.16.035, 51.16.100, 51.04.020(1).

Adopted under notice filed as WSR 09-12-101 on June 2, 2009.

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Comply with Federal Statute: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; Federal Rules or Standards: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; or Recently Enacted State Statutes: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted at Request of a Nongovernmental Entity: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted on the Agency's Own Initiative: New 0, Amended 5, Repealed 1.

Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Clarify, Streamline, or Reform Agency Procedures: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

Number of Sections Adopted Using Negotiated Rule Making: New 0, Amended 5, Repealed 1; Pilot Rule Making: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; or Other Alternative Rule Making: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

Date Adopted: August 4, 2009.

Judy Schurke

Director

OTS-2323.2


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 07-12-045, filed 5/31/07, effective 7/1/07)

WAC 296-17-31002   General rule definitions.   In developing the general reporting rules and classifications which govern Washington's workers' compensation classification plan, we have used certain words or phrases which could have several meanings. Many of these words or phrases are defined by law in the Revised Code of Washington (Title 51 RCW) and can be found in Appendix A of this manual. Some words, however, are not defined by law. To reduce the misunderstanding which can result by our use of certain words or phrases not defined in law (Title 51 RCW), we have developed definitions which will govern what these words and phrases mean for purposes of ((this)) these chapters (chapters 296-17 and 296-17A of the Washington Administrative Code(WAC)).

The following words or phrases mean:

Account: A unique numerical reference that we assign to you that identifies your business or businesses and allows us to track exposure that you report to us and losses (claims) which we pay on your behalf.

Account manager: An individual who works in the underwriting section of the department of labor and industries and manages an employer's workers' compensation insurance account. An account manager is also referred to as an underwriter.

Actual hours worked: A worker's composite work period beginning with the starting time of day that the employee's work day commenced, and includes the entire work period, excluding any nonpaid lunch period, and ending with the quitting time each day work was performed by an employee. The following example is provided to illustrate how work hours are to be reported. If you have questions on reporting please contact our underwriting section at 360-902-4817.

Example: A carpet installer arrives at the employer's place of business at 8:00 a.m. to pick up supplies, carpet, and the job assignment. The carpet installer arrives at the job site at 9:00 a.m. and works until 12 noon. The installer takes a half hour nonpaid lunch period and resumes working from 12:30 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. The installer then returns to the employer's premise to drop off supplies and carpet waste. The installer leaves the employer's premise at 5:30 p.m. The employer is to report nine hours of work time regardless of whether the employee is paid by the hour or by the number of yards of carpet installed.

All: When a classification contains a descriptive phrase beginning with "all" such as in "all employees," "all other employees," "all operations," or "all work to completion," it includes all operations and employments which are normally associated with the type of business covered by the classification. This condition applies even if the operations or employments are physically separated or conducted at a separate location. Operations or employments are to be classified separately when the classification wording requires it, or when the operations or employments are not incidental to, and not usually associated with, the business described by the classification.

And: When this word is contained in any rule it is to be considered the same as the phrase "and/or."

Basic classification: A grouping of businesses or industries having common or similar exposure to loss without regard to the separate employments, occupations or operations which are normally associated with the business or industry. Basic classifications describe a specific type of business operation or industry such as mechanical logging, sawmills, aircraft manufacturing, or restaurants. In most business operations some workers are exposed to very little hazard, while others are exposed to greater hazard. Since a basic classification reflects the liability (exposure to hazard) of a given business or industry, all the operations and occupations that are common to an industry are blended together and included in the classification. The rate for a basic classification represents the average of the hazards within the classification. All classifications contained in this manual are considered basic classifications with the exception of classifications 4806, 4900, 4904, 5206, 6301, 6302, 6303, 7100, 7101, and temporary help classifications 7104 through 7122. Classification descriptions contained in WAC 296-17A-0101 through 296-17A-7400 establish the intended purpose or scope of each classification. These descriptions will routinely include types of businesses, operations, processes or employments which are either included or excluded from the classification. These references are not to be considered an all inclusive listing unless the classification wording so specifies.

Bone fide officer: Any person empowered in good faith by stockholders or directors, in accordance with articles of incorporation or bylaws, to discharge the duties of such officer.

But not limited to: When this phrase is used in any rule in this manual it is not to be interpreted as an all inclusive list. Such a list is meant to provide examples of operations, employments, processes, equipment or types of businesses which are either included or excluded from the scope of the classification.

Excludes or excluding: When a classification contains a descriptive phrase beginning with "excludes" or "excluding" such as "excluding drivers or delivery," "excluding second hand appliance stores," or "excludes construction operations," you must report those operations in a separate classification. If a business fails to keep the records required in the auditing recordkeeping section of this manual and we discover this, we will assign all workers hours for which records were not maintained to the highest rated classification applicable to the work which was performed.

Exposure: Worker hours, worker days, licenses, material, payroll or other measurement which we use to determine the extent to which an employer's workers have been exposed to the hazards found within a particular business or industry classification.

Free from direction or control: The contracted individual has the responsibility to deliver a finished product or service without the contracting firm or individual either exercising direct supervision over the work hours or the methods and details of performance or having the right to exercise that authority under the contract.

Governing classification: Is the basic classification assigned to a business that produces the largest number of worker hours during a calendar year (twelve months). The governing classification rule applies only to situations where a business has been assigned two or more basic classifications and is used for the sole purpose of determining what classification applies to employees and covered owners who support two or more operations. The governing classification rule is not to be used to determine the basic classification of a business.

Includes or including: When a classification contains a descriptive phrase beginning with "includes" or "including" such as "including clerical office," "including meter readers," or "includes new construction or extension of lines," you must report these operations in that basic classification even though they may be specifically described by some other classification contained in this manual or may be conducted at a separate location.

Industrial insurance: Refer to the definition of "workers' compensation insurance."

N.O.C.: This abbreviation stands for not otherwise classified. Classifications are often worded in this way when there are many variations of the same general type of business and it would be nearly impossible to list all the variations. Before a classification designated with N.O.C. is used, all other related classifications must be reviewed to determine if the business or industry is specified in another classification.

Example: You operate a retail store that sells greeting cards. In our search to classify your business we come across a classification that covers retail stores N.O.C. Before our underwriter assigns this classification to your business, they would look at other retail store classifications to see if a more precise classification could be found. In our review we note several classifications such as grocery and department stores where greeting cards are sold. None of these classifications, however, specify that they include stores that exclusively sell greeting cards. Classification 6406 "Retail stores, N.O.C.," on the other hand, contains language in its description that states it includes stores that sell items such as greeting cards, table top appliances, tropical fish and birds, and quick print shops. We would assign classification 6406 "Retail stores, N.O.C." to your business.

Or: Refer to the definition of the word "and."

Premium: The total amount of money owed to the department of labor and industries as calculated by multiplying the assigned classification composite rate by the total units of exposure.

Principal place of business: The physical location of the business from which the contract of service is directed and controlled.

Rate: The amount of premium due for each unit of exposure. All rates are composite rates per worker hour except as otherwise provided for by other rules in this manual.

Related by blood within the third degree: The degree of kinship as computed according to the rules of civil law.

Related by marriage: The union subject to legal recognition under the domestic relations laws of this state.

Risk: All insured operations of one employer within the state of Washington.

Temporary help: The term "temporary help" means the same as temporary service contractors defined in (Title 19 RCW) and applies to any person, firm, association or corporation conducting a business which consists of employing individuals directly for the purpose of furnishing such individuals on a part-time or temporary help basis to others.

Underwriter: Refer to the definition of an "account manager."

Within a reasonable period: Establishing an account with state agencies shall be the time prior to the first date on which the individual begins performance of service toward the contract or the date upon which the individual is required to establish an account with a state agency, as otherwise required by law, whichever event shall last occur.

Work day: Any consecutive twenty-four hour period.

Work hour: Refer to the definition of "actual hours worked."

Workers' compensation insurance: The obligation imposed on an employer by the industrial insurance laws (Title 51 RCW) of the state of Washington to insure the payment of benefits prescribed by such laws.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 51.06.035, 51.08.010, 51.04.020. 07-12-045, 296-17-31002, filed 5/31/07, effective 7/1/07. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035, 51.16.100. 05-12-031, 296-17-31002, filed 5/24/05, effective 7/1/05. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020 and 51.16.035. 04-18-025, 296-17-31002, filed 8/24/04, effective 10/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020, 51.16.035, and 51.12.120. 03-23-025, 296-17-31002, filed 11/12/03, effective 1/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. 98-18-042, 296-17-31002, filed 8/28/98, effective 10/1/98.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 07-12-045, filed 5/31/07, effective 7/1/07)

WAC 296-17-31018   Exception classifications.   (1) What are exception classifications?

In WAC 296-17-31012 we discussed our classification policy. We described the process used to classify risk and stated that we assign the basic classification or basic classifications that best describe the nature of your company's business. While this policy is modeled after the policy used by private insurance carriers and is geared to administrative ease for you, we recognize that there are some duties or operations where your employees do not share the same general workplace hazards that your other employees are exposed to. To provide for those operations that are outside the scope of a basic classification, we have created three types of exception classifications listed below:

Standard exception classifications,
Special exception classifications, and
General exclusion classifications.
(2) What are the standard exception classifications?

Standard exception classifications cover those employments that are administrative in nature and common to many industries. Employees covered by a standard exception classification cannot be exposed to any operative hazard of the business. If the language of the basic classification assigned to your business does not include these employments, you may be able to report them separately. The standard exception classifications are:

Classification 4904 (WAC 296-17A-4904) "clerical office employment." This classification includes clerical, administrative, and drafting employees.
Sales personnel classifications 6301 (WAC 296-17A-6301), and 6303 (WAC 296-17A-6303) includes outside sales personnel and messengers.
Classification 7101 (WAC 296-17A-7101) applies to corporate officers who have elected optional coverage. A corporate officer as used in these rules is a person who is an officer in the corporation, such as the president, who also serves on the corporation's board of directors and owns stock in the corporation.
Classification 7100 (WAC 296-17A-7100) applies to members of a limited liability company who have elected optional coverage.
Clerical office employees are defined as employees whose duties are limited to: Answering telephones; handling correspondence; creating or maintaining financial, employment, personnel, or payroll records; composing informational material on a computer; creating or maintaining computer software; and technical drafting. Their work must be performed in a clerical office which is restricted to:

A work area which is physically separated by walls, partitions, or other physical barriers, from all other work areas of the employer, and
Where only clerical office work as described in this rule is performed.
A clerical office does not include any work area where inventory is located, where products are displayed for sale, or area where the customer brings products for payment. Clerical office employees can perform cashiering and telephone sales work if they do not provide any retail or wholesale customer service that involves handling, showing, demonstrating, or delivering any product sold by the employer. Clerical office employees can make bank deposits, pick up and deliver mail at the post office, or purchase office supplies, if their primary work duties are clerical office duties as defined in this rule.

Sales personnel are defined as employees whose duties are limited to: Soliciting new customers by telephone or in person; servicing existing customer accounts; showing, selling, or explaining products or services; completing correspondence; placing orders; performing public relations duties; and estimating. Although some of sales person's duties may be performed in a clerical office, most of their work is conducted away from the employer's physical business location or in showrooms. We refer to work that takes place away from the employer's premises as "outside sales." Sales personnel whose duties include customer service activities such as, but not limited to, the delivery of product, stocking shelves, handling inventory, or otherwise merchandising products sold to retail or wholesale customers are excluded from all standard exception classifications. Sales personnel with duties such as delivery and stocking of shelves are to be reported in the basic classification applicable to the business unless the basic classification assigned to the business requires another treatment.

Messengers are defined as employees whose duties are delivering interoffice mail, making deposits, and similar duties that are exclusively for the administration of the employer's business. Classification 6303 "messengers" does not include delivering mail or packages to the employer's customer or as a service to the public. If a messenger is engaged in delivering mail or packages as a service to the public they are to be assigned to the basic classification of the business or classification 1101 as applicable.

Corporate officers duties in classification 7101 must be limited to: Clerical duties; outside sales duties as described above; administrative duties such as hiring staff, attending meetings, negotiating contracts, and performing public relations work. To qualify for this classification, a corporate officer must:

Be a shareholder in the corporation,
Be elected as a corporate officer and empowered in accordance with the articles of incorporation or bylaws of the corporation,
Serve on the corporation's board of directors,
Not have any exposure to any operative hazard of the business, and
Not directly supervise employees who have any exposure to any operative hazard of the business.

Members of a limited liability company (LLC) duties in classification 7100 must be limited to: Clerical duties; outside sales duties as described above; administrative duties such as hiring staff, attending meetings, negotiating contracts, and performing public relations work. This includes only those members who have duties and authority similar to the exemption criteria of corporate officers in RCW 51.12.020.

Classification 6303 may apply to a corporate officer or member of a limited liability company whose duties are limited to outside sales activities as described in the sales personnel section of this rule. Under no circumstance is classification 4904 to be assigned to any corporate officer or member of a limited liability company. You cannot divide the work hours of an employee between a standard exception classification and a basic classification unless it is permitted by another rule. If an employee works part of their time in a standard exception classification and part of their time in your basic classification, then all exposure (hours) must be reported in the highest rated basic classification applicable to the work being performed.

(3) What are the special exception classifications?

Special exception classifications represent operations found within an employer's business that are allowed to be reported separately when certain conditions are met. Assuming the conditions noted under each exception below have been met, the following classifications may be used even if your basic classification includes the phrases "all operations" or "all employees." These special exceptions are subject to a division of worker hours in connection with all other basic classifications unless specifically prohibited in an individual classification WAC rule.

Farms: Hand harvesting crops - classification 4806 (WAC 296-17A-4806) will apply if the employee:

Is hand harvesting crops such as nuts, berries, prunes, field flowers, or bulbs, and
Is harvesting by picking from trees while standing on the ground or harvesting from the ground while sitting, kneeling, bending, or stooping.
Security guards - classification 6601 (WAC 296-17A-6601) will apply if the security guard:

Is an employee of an employer engaged in logging or construction,
Is for the purpose of guarding the employer's logging or construction sites,
Is employed at the site only during the hours the employer is not conducting any other operations at the site,
Has no other duties during their work shift as a security guard.
If all of the above conditions are not met, the security guard is to be reported in the basic classification applicable to the construction or logging operation being conducted.

Janitors - classification 6602 (WAC 296-17A-6602) will apply if:

The janitorial/cleaning activities being performed are limited to the employer's clerical office,
The clerical office meets the criteria described earlier in this rule, and
The employer's office employment is assigned to be reported in classification 4904.
Construction: Superintendent or project manager - classification 4900 (WAC 296-17A-4900) will apply if the superintendent or project manager:

Is an employee of a licensed contractor engaged in construction,
Has no direct control over work crews,
Performs no construction labor at the construction site or project location.
If all of the conditions are not met, the superintendent or project manager is to be reported in the basic classification applicable to the construction project.

Construction: Estimator - classification 4911 (WAC 296-17A-4911) will apply if the estimator:

Is the employee of a licensed contractor engaged in construction, and
Has no duties other than estimating during their work shift.
If these conditions are not met, the estimator is to be reported in the basic classification applicable to their employer's business or the construction project.

Permanent yard or shop operations - classification 5206 (WAC 296-17A-5206) will apply if:

The permanent yard or shop is maintained exclusively for the storage and maintenance of materials or equipment used in the business of logging, log hauling, construction, or trucking.
Log truck drivers - classification 5003 (WAC 296-17A-5003) will apply if the log truck driver has no other duties during their work shift that are subject to the logging classification 5001 (WAC 296-17A-5001).

(4) What are the general exclusion classifications?

General exclusion classifications represent operations that are so exceptional or unusual that they are excluded from the scope of all basic classifications. If you have these operations, we will assign a separate classification to cover them. You must keep accurate records of the work hours your employees work in these classifications. If you do not keep accurate time records for each employee performing work covered by a general exclusion classification, we will assign the work hours in question to the highest rated classification applicable to those hours. The general exclusion classifications are:

Aircraft operations: All operations of the flying crew.
Racing operations: All operations of the drivers and pit crews.
Diving operations: All operations of diving personnel and ship tenders who assist in diving operations.
New construction or alterations of the business premises.
Musicians and entertainers.
A division of work time is permitted between a standard exception classification and flight crew operations, racing operations, or diving operations. If you fail to keep original time records that clearly show the time spent in the office or in sales work, we will assign all work hours in question to the highest rated classification applicable to the work hours in question.

Example: Assume a corporate officer performs duties which are described in classification 7101. Occasionally, the officer flies a plane to attend a meeting. You would report the flying exposure (hours) of the corporate officer in classification 6803. The remainder of the corporate officer's time would continue to be reported in classification 7101.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 51.06.035, 51.08.010, 51.04.020. 07-12-045, 296-17-31018, filed 5/31/07, effective 7/1/07. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035, 51.16.100. 06-12-075, 296-17-31018, filed 6/6/06, effective 1/1/07. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020, 51.16.035, and 51.12.120. 03-23-025, 296-17-31018, filed 11/12/03, effective 1/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020, 51.16.035 and 51.32.073. 99-24-055, 296-17-31018, filed 11/29/99, effective 12/31/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. 98-18-042, 296-17-31018, filed 8/28/98, effective 10/1/98.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 08-20-133, filed 10/1/08, effective 11/1/08)

WAC 296-17-35203   Special reporting instruction.   (1) Professional and semiprofessional athletic teams. Athletes assigned to a Washington-domiciled sports team are mandatorily covered by Washington industrial insurance: Provided, That a professional athlete who is under contract with a parent team domiciled outside of the state of Washington while assigned to a team domiciled within Washington is subject to mandatory coverage by Washington industrial insurance unless the player and employer (parent team) have agreed in writing as to which state shall provide coverage in accordance with RCW 51.12.120(6).

The following rules shall apply to the written agreement:

(a) Agreement must be in writing and signed by the employer and the individual athlete.

(b) Agreement must specify the state that is to provide coverage. The state agreed upon to provide coverage must be a state in which the player's team, during the course of the season, will engage in an athletic event. For example, if the Washington-based team is a part of a league with teams in only Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, the player and the employer can agree to any of those three states to provide coverage. However, they could not agree to have California provide the coverage as this would not qualify as a state in which the player regularly performs assigned duties.

(c) The state agreed upon accepts responsibility for providing coverage and acknowledges such to the department by certified mail.

(d) Agreement and certification by the other state must be received by this department's underwriting section prior to any injury incurred by the athlete.

(e) Agreement will be for one season only commencing with the assigning of the player to a particular team. A separate agreement and certification must be on file for each additional season.

Failure to meet all of these requirements will result in the athlete being considered a Washington worker for premium and benefit purposes until such time as all requirements have been met.

Professional sports teams who are domiciled outside the state of Washington and who participate in sporting events with Washington-domiciled teams are not subject to Washington industrial insurance for their team members while in this state. These out-of-state teams are not considered employers subject to Title 51 on the basis that they are not conducting a business within this state.

(2) Excluded employments. Any employer having any person in their employ excluded from industrial insurance whose application for coverage under the elective adoption provisions of RCW 51.12.110 or authority of RCW 51.12.095 or 51.32.030 has been accepted by the director shall report and pay premium on the actual hours worked for each such person who is paid on an hourly, salaried-part time, percentage of profit or piece basis; or one hundred sixty hours per month for any such person paid on a salary basis employed full time. In the event records disclosing actual hours worked are not maintained by the employer for any person paid on an hourly, salaried-part time, percentage of profits or piece basis the worker hours of such person shall be determined by dividing the gross wages of such person by the state minimum wage for the purpose of premium calculation. However, when applying the state minimum wage the maximum number of hours assessed for a month will be one hundred sixty.

(3) Special trucking industry rules. The following subsection shall apply to all trucking industry employers as applicable.

(a) Insurance liability. Every trucking industry employer operating as an intrastate carrier or a combined intrastate and interstate carrier must insure their workers' compensation insurance liability through the Washington state fund or be self-insured with the state of Washington.

Washington employers operating exclusively in interstate or foreign commerce or any combination of interstate and foreign commerce must insure their workers' compensation insurance liability for their Washington employees with the Washington state fund, be self-insured with the state of Washington, or provide workers' compensation insurance for their Washington employees under the laws of another state when such other state law provides for such coverage.

Interstate or foreign commerce trucking employers who insure their workers' compensation insurance liability under the laws of another state must provide the department with copies of their current policy and applicable endorsements upon request.

Employers who elect to insure their workers' compensation insurance liability under the laws of another state and who fail to provide updated policy information when requested to do so will be declared an unregistered employer and subject to all the penalties contained in Title 51 RCW.

(b) Reporting. Trucking industry employers insuring their workers' compensation insurance liability with the Washington state fund shall keep and preserve all original time records/books including supporting information from drivers' logs for a period of three calendar years plus three months.

Employers are to report actual hours worked, including time spent loading and unloading trucks, for each driver in their employ. For purposes of this section, actual hours worked does not include time spent during lunch or rest periods or overnight lodging.

Failure of employers to keep accurate records of actual hours worked by their employees will result in the department estimating work hours by dividing gross payroll wages by the state minimum wage for each worker for whom records were not kept. However, in no case will the estimated or actual hours to be reported exceed five hundred twenty hours per calendar quarter for each worker.

(c) Exclusions. Trucking industry employers meeting all of the following conditions are exempted from mandatory coverage.

(i) Must be engaged exclusively in interstate or foreign commerce.

(ii) Must have elected to cover their Washington workers on a voluntary basis under the Washington state fund and must have elected such coverage in writing on forms provided by the department.

(iii) After having elected coverage, withdrew such coverage in writing to the department on or before January 2, 1987.

If all the conditions set forth in (i), (ii), and (iii) of this subsection have not been met, employers must insure their workers' compensation insurance liability with the Washington state fund or under the laws of another state.

(d) Definitions. For purposes of interpretation of RCW 51.12.095(1) and administration of this section, the following terms shall have the meanings given below:

(i) "Agents" means individuals hired to perform services for the interstate or foreign commerce carrier that are intended to be carried out by the individual and not contracted out to others but does not include owner operators as defined in RCW 51.12.095(1).

(ii) "Contacts" means locations at which freight, merchandise, or goods are picked up or dropped off within the boundaries of this state.

(iii) "Doing business" means having any terminals, agents or contacts within the boundaries of this state.

(iv) "Employees" means the same as the term "worker" as contained in RCW 51.08.180.

(v) "Terminals" means a physical location wherein the business activities (operations) of the trucking company are conducted on a routine basis. Terminals will generally include loading or shipping docks, warehouse space, dispatch offices and may also include administrative offices.

(vi) "Washington" shall be used to limit the scope of the term "employees." When used with the term "employees" it will require the following test for benefit purposes (all conditions must be met).

The individual must be hired in Washington or must have been transferred to Washington; and
The individual must perform some work in Washington (i.e., driving, loading, or unloading trucks).
(4) Forest, range, or timber land services -- Industry rule. Washington law (RCW 51.48.030) requires every employer to make, keep, and preserve records which are adequate to facilitate the determination of premiums (taxes) due to the state for workers' compensation insurance coverage for their covered workers. In the administration of Title 51 RCW, and as it pertains to the forest, range, or timber land services industry, the department of labor and industries has deemed the records and information required in the various subsections of this section to be essential in the determination of premiums (taxes) due to the state fund. The records so specified and required, shall be provided at the time of audit to any representative of the department who has requested them.

Failure to produce these required records within thirty days of the request, or within an agreed upon time period, shall constitute noncompliance of this rule and RCW 51.48.030 and 51.48.040. Employers whose premium computations are made by the department in accordance with (d) of this subsection are barred from questioning, in an appeal before the board of industrial insurance appeals or the courts, the correctness of any assessment by the department on any period for which such records have not been kept, preserved, or produced for inspection as provided by law.

(a) General definitions. For purpose of interpretation of this section, the following terms shall have the meanings given below:

(i) "Actual hours worked" means each workers' composite work period beginning with the starting time of day that the employees' work day commenced, and includes the entire work period, excluding any nonpaid lunch period, and ending with the quitting time each day work was performed by the employee.

(ii) "Work day" shall mean any consecutive twenty-four-hour period.

(b) Employment records. Every employer shall with respect to each worker, make, keep, and preserve original records containing all of the following information for three full calendar years following the calendar year in which the employment occurred:

(i) The name of each worker;

(ii) The Social Security number of each worker;

(iii) The beginning date of employment for each worker and, if applicable, the separation date of employment for each such worker;

(iv) The basis upon which wages are paid to each worker;

(v) The number of units earned or produced for each worker paid on a piece-work basis;

(vi) The risk classification(s) applicable to each worker;

(vii) The number of actual hours worked by each worker, unless another basis of computing hours worked is prescribed in WAC 296-17-31021. For purposes of chapter 296-17 WAC, this record must clearly show, by work day, the time of day the employee commenced work, and the time of day work ended;

(viii) A summary time record for each worker showing the calendar day or days of the week work was performed and the actual number of hours worked each work day;

(ix) In the event a single worker's time is divided between two or more risk classifications, the summary contained in (b)(viii) of this subsection shall be further broken down to show the actual hours worked in each risk classification for the worker;

(x) The workers' total gross pay period earnings;

(xi) The specific sums withheld from the earnings of each worker, and the purpose of each sum withheld;

(xii) The net pay earned by each such worker.

(c) Business, financial records, and record retention. Every employer is required to keep and preserve all original time records completed by their employees for a three-year period. The three-year period is specified in WAC 296-17-352 as the composite period from the date any such premium became due.

Employers who pay their workers by check are required to keep and preserve a record of all check registers and canceled checks; and employers who pay their workers by cash are required to keep and preserve records of these cash transactions which provide a detailed record of wages paid to each worker.

(d) Recordkeeping - estimated premium computation. Any employer required by this section to make, keep, and preserve records containing the information as specified in (b) and (c) of this subsection, who fails to make, keep, and preserve such records, shall have premiums calculated as follows:

(i) Estimated worker hours shall be computed by dividing the gross wages of each worker for whom records were not maintained and preserved, by the state's minimum wage, in effect at the time the wages were paid or would have been paid. However, the maximum number of hours to be assessed under this provision will not exceed five hundred twenty hours for each worker, per quarter for the first audited period. Estimated worker hours computed on all subsequent audits of the same employer that disclose a continued failure to make, keep, or preserve the required payroll and employment records shall be subject to a maximum of seven hundred eighty hours for each worker, per quarter.

(ii) In the event an employer also has failed to make, keep, and preserve the records containing payroll information and wages paid to each worker, estimated average wages for each worker for whom a payroll and wage record was not maintained will be determined as follows: The employer's total gross income for the audit period (earned, received, or anticipated) shall be reduced by thirty-five percent to arrive at "total estimated wages." Total estimated wages will then be divided by the number of employees for whom a record of actual hours worked was not made, kept, or preserved to arrive at an "estimated average wage" per worker. Estimated hours for each worker will then be computed by dividing the estimated average wage by the state's minimum wage in effect at the time the wages were paid or would have been paid as described in (d)(i) of this subsection.

(e) Reporting requirements and premium payments.

(i) Every employer who is awarded a forest, range, or timber land services contract must report the contract to the department promptly when it is awarded, and prior to any work being commenced, except as provided in (e)(iii) of this subsection. Employers reporting under the provisions of (e)(iii) of this subsection shall submit the informational report with their quarterly report of premium. The report shall include the following information:

(I) The employers' unified business identification account number (UBI).

(II) Identification of the landowner, firm, or primary contractor who awarded the contract, including the name, address, and phone number of a contact person.

(III) The total contract award.

(IV) Description of the forest, range, or timber land services work to be performed under terms of the contract.

(V) Physical location/site where the work will be performed including legal description.

(VI) Number of acres covered by the contract.

(VII) Dates during which the work will be performed.

(VIII) Estimated payroll and hours to be worked by employees in performance of the contract.

(ii) Upon completion of every contract issued by a landowner or firm that exceeds a total of ten thousand dollars, the contractor primarily responsible for the overall project shall submit in addition to the required informational report described in (e)(i) of this subsection, report the payroll and hours worked under the contract, and payment for required industrial insurance premiums. In the event that the contracted work is not completed within a calendar quarter, interim quarterly reports and premium payments are required for each contract for all work done during the calendar quarter. The first such report and payment is due at the end of the first calendar quarter in which the contract work is begun. Additional interim reports and payments will be submitted each quarter thereafter until the contract is completed. This will be consistent with the quarterly reporting cycle used by other employers. Premiums for a calendar quarter, whether reported or not, shall become due and delinquent on the day immediately following the last day of the month following the calendar quarter.

(iii) A contractor may group contracts issued by a landowner, firm, or other contractor that total less than ten thousand dollars together and submit a combined quarterly report of hours, payroll, and the required premium payment in the same manner and periods as nonforestation, range, or timber land services employers.

(f) Out-of-state employers. Forest, range, or timber land services contractors domiciled outside of Washington state must report on a contract basis regardless of contract size for all forest, range, or timber land services work done in Washington state. Out-of-state employers will not be permitted to have an active Washington state industrial insurance account for reporting forest, range, or timber land services work in the absence of an active Washington forest, range, or timber land services contract.

(g) Work done by subcontract. Any firm primarily responsible for work to be performed under the terms of a forest, range, or timber land services contract, that subcontracts out any work under a forest, range, or timber land services contract must send written notification to the department prior to any work being done by the subcontractor. This notification must include the name, address, Social Security number, farm labor contractor number, (UBI) of each subcontractor, and the amount and description of contract work to be done by subcontract.

(h) Forest, range, or timber land services contract release - verification of hours, payroll, and premium. The department may verify reporting of contractors by way of an on-site visit to an employers' work site. This on-site visit may include close monitoring of employees and employee work hours. Upon receipt of a premium report for a finished contract, the department may conduct an audit of the firm's payroll, employment, and financial records to validate reporting. The entity that awarded the contract can verify the status of the contractors' account online at the department's web site (www.lni.wa.gov) or by calling the account manager. The landowner, firm, or contractor will not be released from premium liability until the final report for the contract from the primary contractor and any subcontractors has been received and verified by the department.

(i) Premium liability - work done by contract. Washington law (RCW 51.12.070) places the responsibility for industrial insurance premium payments primarily and directly upon the person, firm, or corporation who lets a contract for all covered employment involved in the fulfillment of the contract terms. Any such person, firm, or corporation letting a contract is authorized to collect from the contractor the full amount payable in premiums. The contractor is in turn authorized to collect premiums from any subcontractor they may employ his or her proportionate amount of the premium payment.

To eliminate premium liability for work done by contract permitted by Title 51 RCW, any person, firm, or corporation who lets a contract for forest, range, or timber land services work must submit a copy of the contract they have let to the department and verify that all premiums due under the contract have been paid.

Each contract submitted to the department must include within its body, or on a separate addendum, all of the following items:

(I) The name of the contractor who has been engaged to perform the work;

(II) The contractor's UBI number;

(III) The contractor's farm labor contractor number;

(IV) The total contract award;

(V) The date the work is to be commenced; a description of the work to be performed including any pertinent acreage information;

(VI) Location where the work is to be performed;

(VII) A contact name and phone number of the person, firm, or corporation who let the contract;

(VIII) The total estimated wages to be paid by the contractor and any subcontractors;

(IX) The amount to be subcontracted out if such subcontracting is permitted under the terms of the contract;

(X) The total estimated number of worker hours anticipated by the contractor and his/her subcontractors in the fulfillment of the contract terms;

(j) Reports to be mailed to the department. All contracts, reports, and information required by this section are to be sent to:


The Department of Labor and Industries

Reforestation Team 8

P.O. Box 44168

Tumwater, Washington 98504-4168


(k) Rule applicability. If any portion of this section is declared invalid, only that portion is repealed. The balance of the section shall remain in effect.

(5) Logging and/or tree thinning -- Mechanized operations -- Industry rule. The following subsection shall apply to all employers assigned to report worker hours in risk classification 5005, WAC 296-17A-5005.

(a) Every employer having operations subject to risk classification 5005 "logging and/or tree thinning - mechanized operations" shall have their operations surveyed by labor and industries insurance services staff prior to the assignment of risk classification 5005 to their account. Annual surveys may be required after the initial survey to retain the risk classification assignment.

(b) Every employer assigned to report exposure (work hours) in risk classification 5005 shall supply an addendum report with their quarterly premium report which lists the name of each employee reported under this classification during the quarter, the Social Security number of such worker, the piece or pieces of equipment the employee operated during the quarter, the number of hours worked by the employee during the quarter, and the wages earned by the employee during the quarter.

(6) Special drywall industry rule.

(a) What is the unit of exposure for drywall reporting? Your premiums for workers installing and finishing drywall (reportable in risk classifications 0540, 0541, 0550, and 0551) are based on the amount of material installed and finished, not the number of hours worked.

The amount of material installed equals the amount of material purchased or taken from inventory for a job. No deduction can be made for material scrapped (debris). A deduction is allowed for material returned to the supplier or inventory.

The amount of material finished for a job equals the amount of material installed. No deduction can be made for a portion of the job that is not finished (base layer of double-board application or unfinished rooms).

Example: Drywall installation firm purchases 96 4' x 8' sheets of material for a job which includes some double-wall installation. The firm hangs all or parts of 92 sheets, and returns 4 sheets to the supplier for credit. Drywall finishing firm tapes, primes and textures the same job. Both firms should report 2,944 square feet (4 x 8 x 92) for the job.

(b) I do some of the work myself. Can I deduct material I as an owner install or finish? Yes. Owners (sole proprietors, partners, and corporate officers) who have not elected coverage may deduct material they install or finish.

When you as an owner install (including scrap) or finish (including tape and prime or texture) only part of a job, you may deduct an amount of material proportional to the time you worked on the job, considering the total time you and your workers spent on the job.

To deduct material installed or finished by owners, you must report to the department by job, project, site or location the amount of material you are deducting for this reason. You must file this report at the same time you file your quarterly report:

Total owners hours (owners hours + workers hours) =

% of owner discount.

% of owner discount x (total footage of job − subcontracted footage, if any) = Total owner deduction of footage.


(c) Can I deduct material installed or finished by subcontractors? You may deduct material installed or taped by subcontractors you are not required to report as your workers. You may not deduct for material only scrapped or primed and textured by subcontractors.

To deduct material installed or taped by subcontractors, you must report to the department by job, project, site or location the amount of material being deducted. You must file this report at the same time you file your quarterly report. You must have and maintain business records that support the number of square feet worked by the subcontractor.

(d) I understand there are discounted rates available for the drywall industry. How do I qualify for them? To qualify for discounted drywall installation and finishing rates, you must:

(i) Have an owner attend two workshops the department offers (one workshop covers claims and risk management, the other covers premium reporting and recordkeeping);

(ii) Provide the department with a voluntary release authorizing the department to contact material suppliers directly about the firm's purchases;

(iii) Have and keep all your industrial insurance accounts in good standing (including the accounts of other businesses in which you have an ownership interest), which includes fully and accurately reporting and paying premiums as they come due, including reporting material deducted as owner or subcontractor work;

(iv) Provide the department with a supplemental report (filed with the firm's quarterly report) showing by employee the employee's name, Social Security number, the wages paid them during the quarter, how they are paid (piece rate, hourly, etc.), their rate of pay, and what work they performed (installation, scrapping, taping, priming/texturing); and

(v) Maintain accurate records about work you subcontracted to others and materials provided to subcontractors (as required by WAC 296-17-31013), and about payroll and employment (as required by WAC 296-17-35201).

The discounted rates will be in effect beginning with the first quarter your business meets all the requirements for the discounted rates.


Note: If you are being audited by the department while your application for the discounted classifications is pending, the department will not make a final decision regarding your rates until the audit is completed.

(e) Can I be disqualified from using the discounted rates? Yes. You can be disqualified from using the discounted rates for three years if you:

(i) Do not file all reports, including supplemental reports, when due;

(ii) Do not pay premiums on time;

(iii) Underreport the amount of premium due; or

(iv) Fail to maintain the requirements for qualifying for the discounted rates.

Disqualification takes effect when a criterion for disqualification exists.

Example: A field audit in 2002 reveals that the drywall installation firm underreported the amount of premium due in the second quarter of 2001. The firm will be disqualified from the discounted rates beginning with the second quarter of 2001, and the premiums it owed for that quarter and subsequent quarters for three years will be calculated using the nondiscounted rates.

If the drywall underwriter learns that your business has failed to meet the conditions as required in this rule, your business will need to comply to retain using the discounted classifications. If your business does not comply promptly, the drywall underwriter may refer your business for an audit.

If, as a result of an audit, the department determines your business has not complied with the conditions in this rule, your business will be disqualified from using the discounted classifications for three years (thirty-six months) from the period of last noncompliance.

(f) If I discover I have made an error in reporting or paying premium, what should I do? If you discover you have made a mistake in reporting or paying premium, you should contact the department and correct the mistake. Firms not being audited by the department who find errors in their reporting and paying premiums, and who voluntarily report their errors and pay any required premiums, penalties and interest promptly, will not be disqualified from using the discounted rates unless the department determines they acted in bad faith.

(7) Safe patient handling rule. The following subsection will apply to all hospital industry employers as applicable.

(a) Definitions. For the purpose of interpretation of this section, the following terms shall have the meanings given below:

(i) "Hospital" means an "acute care hospital" as defined in (a)(ii) of this subsection, a "mental health hospital" as defined in (a)(iii) of this subsection, or a "hospital, N.O.C. (not otherwise classified)" as defined in (a)(iv) of this subsection.

(ii) "Acute care hospital" means any institution, place, building, or agency providing accommodations, facilities, and services over a continuous period of twenty-four hours or more for observation, diagnosis, or care of two or more individuals not related to the operator who are suffering from illness, injury, deformity, or abnormality, or from any other condition for which obstetrical, medical, or surgical services would be appropriate for care or diagnosis. "Hospital" as used in this rule does not include:

Hotels, or similar places furnishing only food and lodging, or simply domiciliary care; nor does it include

Clinics, or physicians' offices where patients are not regularly kept as bed patients for twenty-four hours or more; nor does it include

Nursing homes, as defined and which come within the scope of chapter 18.51 RCW; nor does it include

Birthing centers, which come within the scope of chapter 18.46 RCW; nor does it include

Psychiatric or alcoholism hospitals, which come within the scope of chapter 71.12 RCW; nor

Any other hospital or institution specifically intended for use in the diagnosis and care of those suffering from mental illness, mental retardation, convulsive disorders, or other abnormal mental conditions.

Furthermore, nothing in this chapter will be construed as authorizing the supervision, regulation, or control of the remedial care or treatment of residents or patients in any hospital conducted for those who rely primarily upon treatment by prayer or spiritual means in accordance with the creed or tenets of any well-recognized church or religious denominations.

(iii) "Mental health hospital" means any hospital operated and maintained by the state of Washington for the care of the mentally ill.

(iv) "Hospitals, N.O.C." means health care facilities that do not qualify as acute care or mental health hospitals and may be privately owned facilities established for purposes such as, but not limited to, treating psychiatric disorders and chemical dependencies or providing physical rehabilitation.

(v) "Safe patient handling" means the use of engineering controls, lifting and transfer aids, or assistance devices, by lift teams or other staff, instead of manual lifting to perform the acts of lifting, transferring and repositioning health care patients.

(vi) "Lift team" means hospital employees specially trained to conduct patient lifts, transfers, and repositioning using lifting equipment when appropriate.

(vii) "Department" means the department of labor and industries.

(b) Hospitals will report worker hours in the risk classification that describes the nature of their operations and either their level of implementation of, or need for, the safe patient handling program.

(c) A fully implemented safe patient handling program must include:

(i) Acquisition of at least the minimum number of lifts and/or appropriate equipment for use by lift teams as specified in chapters 70.41 and 72.23 RCW.

(ii) An established safe patient handling committee with at least one-half of its membership being front line, nonmanagerial direct care staff to design and recommend the process for implementing a safe patient handling program.

(iii) Implementation of a safe patient handling policy for all shifts and units.

(iv) Conducting patient handling hazard assessments to include such variables as patient-handling tasks, types of nursing units, patient populations, and the physical environment of patient care areas.

(v) Developing a process to identify appropriate use of safe patient handling policy based on a patient's condition and availability of lifting equipment or lift teams.

(vi) Conducting an annual performance evaluation of the program to determine its effectiveness with results reported to the safe patient handling committee.

(vii) Consideration, when appropriate, to incorporate patient handling equipment or the physical space and construction design needed to incorporate that equipment at a later date during new construction or remodeling.

(viii) Development of procedures that allow employees to choose not to perform or participate in patient handling activities that the employee believes will pose a risk to him/herself or to the patient.

(d) Department staff will conduct an on-site survey of each acute care and mental health hospital before assigning a risk classification. Subsequent surveys may be conducted to confirm whether the assigned risk classification is still appropriate.

(e) To remain in classification 6120-00 or 7200-00, a hospital must submit a copy of the annual performance evaluation of their safe patient handling program, as required by chapters 70.41 and 72.23 RCW, to the Employer Services Program, Department of Labor and Industries, P.O. Box 44140, Olympia, Washington, 98504.

(8) Rules concerning work by Washington employers outside the state of Washington (extraterritorial coverage).

(a) General definitions. For purposes of this section, the following terms mean:

(i) "Actual hours worked" means the total hours of each Washington worker's composite work period during which work was performed by the worker beginning with the time the worker's work day commenced, and ending with the quitting time each day excluding any nonpaid lunch period.

(ii) "Work day" means any consecutive twenty-four-hour period.

(iii) "Temporary and incidental" means work performed by Washington employers on jobs or at job sites in another state for thirty or fewer consecutive or nonconsecutive full or partial work days within a calendar year. Temporary and incidental work days are calculated on a per state basis. The thirty-day temporary and incidental period begins on January 1 of each year.

(iv) "Proof of out-of-state coverage" means a copy of a valid certificate of liability insurance for workers' compensation issued by:

(A) An insurer licensed to write workers compensation insurance coverage in that state; or

(B) A state workers' compensation fund in the state in which the employer will be working.


Note: Most certificates are written for a one-year period. The employer must provide the department with a current certificate of liability insurance for workers' compensation covering all periods the employer works in another state. If the policy is canceled, the employer must provide the department with a current in-force policy.

(v) "Worker" means every person in this state who is engaged in the employment of an employer under Title 51 RCW whether by way of manual labor or otherwise in the course of his or her employment; also every person in this state who is engaged in the employment of or who is working under an independent contract, the essence of which is his or her personal labor for an employer whether by way of manual labor or otherwise.

(vi) "Employer" means any person, body of persons, corporate or otherwise, and the legal representatives of a deceased employer, all while engaged in this state in any work covered by the provisions of Title 51 RCW, by way of trade or business, or who contracts with one or more workers, the essence of which is the personal labor of such worker or workers.

(b) Does a Washington employer have to pay premiums in both states while Washington workers are temporarily working in another state? A Washington employer must continue to pay Washington premiums for Washington workers performing temporary and incidental work in another state. If the Washington employer has Washington workers who work for more than thirty days in another state, it will not need to pay premiums in Washington for work in the other state during the calendar year, as long as it fulfills the following requirements:

(i) Provides the department with proof of out-of-state coverage for the Washington workers working out-of-state.

(ii) Keeps the policy continuously in force from the date the Washington employer's work exceeds the temporary and incidental period until the date the Washington employer no longer has Washington workers working in the other state. Failure to maintain a policy at the required level of workers' compensation coverage for the number of Washington workers working out-of-state may subject the Washington employer to payment of all premiums, penalties, and interest dues in the state of Washington.

(iii) For the first quarterly reporting period and all subsequent quarters during the same calendar year following the date the Washington employer's work exceeds the temporary and incidental period in the other state, the Washington employer must file a supplemental report of out-of-state work with their workers' compensation employer's quarterly report with the department. This supplemental report is available at: http://www.LNI.wa.gov/ClaimsIns/Insurance/File/ExtraTerritorial/Default.asp

(iv) Subitems (b)(i), (ii), and (iii) of this subsection must be met in each state in which the Washington employer has Washington workers working in excess of the temporary and incidental period.


Note: Workers' compensation coverage requirements vary widely among states. Washington employers should contact the regulatory agency in other states to determine the appropriate premium and coverage obligations in those states.

(c) What if a Washington employer knows the Washington workers work in another state will exceed the temporary and incidental period? If the Washington employer knows their Washington workers will be working in another state in excess of the temporary and incidental period, it must immediately provide the department with proof of out-of-state coverage in order to avoid Washington premium liability for hours worked during the temporary and incidental period.

Reminder: The temporary and incidental period applies separately to each state in which the Washington employer worked.

(d) What if a Washington employer anticipates its out-of-state work will exceed the temporary and incidental period, but it does not occur? If a Washington employer did not pay workers compensation premium to Washington during the temporary and incidental period, and at the end of the calendar year Washington workers of the Washington employer had worked fewer than thirty consecutive or nonconsecutive days in another state, by the filing of the fourth quarter report, the Washington employer must file amended reports for the calendar year. The employer may be required to pay Washington premiums, penalties, and interest. The fourth quarter report is due by January 31 of the following year.

(e) What records must the employer keep while employing Washington workers in another state? In addition to filing the supplemental report of out-of-state work, the Washington employer is required to keep the same records that are kept for Washington workers working in Washington. The records are listed in WAC 296-17-35201 and must be provided at the time of audit to any authorized representative of the department who has requested them.

(f) What reports does a Washington employer file to avoid paying Washington workers' compensation premiums when employing Washington workers in another state for work that exceeds temporary and incidental? A Washington employer must submit the workers' compensation employer's quarterly report and a supplemental report of out-of-state work to the department for each state in which it has Washington workers performing work. The supplemental report must include the following information:

(i) The Washington employer's unified business identification number (UBI).

(ii) The Washington employer's department account identification number.

(iii) The Social Security numbers for those Washington worker(s) performing work out-of-state.

(iv) The last name, first name, and middle initial of those Washington worker(s) performing work out-of-state.

(v) The gross payroll paid during the quarter for those Washington worker(s) performing work out-of-state.

(vi) The Washington workers' compensation risk classification(s) that would have applied for each Washington worker performing work out-of-state.

(vii) The total number of hours that each Washington worker performed work out-of-state during the quarter.

(viii) In addition to completing the supplemental report of out-of-state work, the Washington employer must keep a record of all contracts awarded and worked under each state. Copies of pertinent records must be made available to auditors in the event of an audit.

(g) Where do Washington workers file their workers' compensation claims if injured in the course of employment outside of Washington state? Washington workers may file their claim in the state where they were injured or in Washington state.

Washington employers must inform their Washington workers of their right to file for workers' compensation benefits in Washington or the state of injury.

The cost of these claims, if accepted by the department and assigned to the Washington employer's account, will be used in the calculations that determine the employer's experience factor and the appropriate risk classification base rate.

(h) If the Washington employer's work in another state exceeds the temporary and incidental period, may the Washington employer obtain a credit or refund for the temporary and incidental period that workers' compensation premiums were paid to Washington? Yes, but only if the Washington employer:

(i) Obtained workers' compensation insurance for all hours worked in the other state during the calendar year;

(ii) Provides proof of out-of-state coverage;

(iii) Filed the appropriate quarterly reports with the department when due; and

(iv) Otherwise complied with all statutory and regulatory requirements of Washington state.

[Statutory Authority: 2008 c 88, RCW 51.12.120, 51.16.035, and Title 51 RCW. 08-20-133, 296-17-35203, filed 10/1/08, effective 11/1/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035, 51.16.100, and 2007 c 324. 07-24-045, 296-17-35203, filed 12/1/07, effective 1/1/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.06.035, 51.08.010, 51.04.020. 07-12-045, 296-17-35203, filed 5/31/07, effective 7/1/07. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035 and 51.16.100. 06-23-127, 296-17-35203, filed 11/21/06, effective 1/1/07; 05-23-161, 296-17-35203, filed 11/22/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020, 51.16.035, and 51.12.120. 03-23-025, 296-17-35203, filed 11/12/03, effective 1/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020, 51.16.035, 51.32.073. 02-09-093, 296-17-35203, filed 4/17/02, effective 7/1/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. 01-23-059, 296-17-35203, filed 11/20/01, effective 1/1/02; 99-18-068, 296-17-35203, filed 8/31/99, effective 10/1/99; 98-18-042, 296-17-35203, filed 8/28/98, effective 10/1/98.]


REPEALER

     The following section of the Washington Administrative Code is repealed:
WAC 296-17-35202 Definitions.

OTS-2322.2


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 07-01-014, filed 12/8/06, effective 12/8/06)

WAC 296-17A-0308   Classification 0308.  


0308-00 Chemical spraying and fumigating

Applies to establishments engaged in providing chemical spraying and fumigating services only to established residential landscaping and commercial properties. Work contemplated by this classification includes, but is not limited to, the application of various liquid and granular chemicals (fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides, insecticides, iron, nitrogen, slow release food stakes) for use on grass, plants, shrubs, flowers, trees, moss, ivy or weeds. Employees of establishments subject to this classification arrive at the location site in a tank truck equipped with a premixed solution that is dispensed with a spray hose, or by fertilizer spreaders, injection guns, and back pack dispensers.

This classification excludes chemical spraying of roadway median strips by nonmunicipal employees adjacent to state, city or town roadways which is to be reported separately in classification 0101; chemical spraying done in connection with forest roads or reforestation projects which is to be reported in the applicable forestry classification; pest and termite control which is to be reported separately in classification 6602; chemical spraying and fumigating by employees of cities, counties, state agencies, or other municipalities which is to be reported in the classification applicable to the type of municipality performing the work; chemical spraying of agricultural farms or orchards which may be reported separately in classification 4808 or in the agricultural classification applicable to the employer's operation; and crop dusting by aircraft which is to be reported separately in classification 6903.


0308-01 Lawn care maintenance

Applies to contractors engaged in maintenance of established lawns and gardens. Work contemplated by this classification includes, but is not limited to, mowing and thatching lawns, edging, weeding flower beds, raking, rototilling gardens, application of fertilizers, and spraying and trimming of shrubs. Also included is minor landscape renovation and/or restoration activities incidental to, and performed as part of, the lawn care maintenance contract for an existing lawn or landscape such as the removal and replacement of plants, turf repair or reseeding of grass, and the spreading of decorative rock, topsoil, or bark. This classification includes replacement of sprinkler heads and cleaning of lawn type sprinkler systems only when performed in connection with and incidental to the lawn care maintenance contract. Contractors who provide snow blowing and snow removal services using hand-held or push-propelled equipment are included in this classification. Equipment used by contractors subject to this classification includes, but is not limited to, riding or power lawn mowers, power sweepers, edgers, thatchers, weed eaters, grass blowers, fertilizer spreaders, sprayers, gas or electric power tools, and hand tools.

This classification excludes new landscape construction which is to be reported separately in classification 0301; tree care and pruning services which are to be reported separately in classification 0101; grading, clearing, or contouring of land which is to be reported separately in classification 0101; installation, service or repair of lawn type sprinkler systems which is to be reported separately in classification 0301; and the installation, service or repair of above or below ground agricultural irrigation systems which is to be reported separately in classification 0301.

Special notes: Classifications 0308 and 0301 may be assigned to the same business provided that the conditions of the general reporting rule covering the operation of a secondary business have been met.

Care should be exercised in the assignment of this classification when tree services are included. Tree care service contracts generally call for the radical topping, pruning or cutting of tree limbs to remove or eliminate a hazard to buildings, property, or power lines. Tree trimming as part of this classification is only for the purpose of shaping and maintaining healthy trees and to control size for the visual relationship to other landscape material.

[07-01-014, recodified as 296-17A-0308, filed 12/8/06, effective 12/8/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. 98-18-042, 296-17-51301, filed 8/28/98, effective 10/1/98; 96-12-039, 296-17-51301, filed 5/31/96, effective 7/1/96.]

OTS-2343.1


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 07-01-014, filed 12/8/06, effective 12/8/06)

WAC 296-17A-3603   Classification 3603.  


3603-10 Furniture stripping and refinishing; metal plating or polishing, rustproofing, N.O.C.

Applies to establishments engaged in stripping and refinishing wood or metal furniture, or metal plating (a coating of metal on an object), polishing, and rustproofing that is not covered by another classification (N.O.C.). Furniture refinishing contemplated by this classification includes, but is not limited to, preparing articles for finishing or refinishing by dipping in chemical solutions/acid baths to remove the old finish or dirt, sanding and wire brushing as needed, thoroughly removing all residues, applying new finish by brushing, rolling, spraying or dipping, air or oven drying, and any appropriate finish work such as waxing, polishing and buffing when done by employees of an employer having operations subject to this classification. Metal plating contemplated by this classification may be done by dipping in hot solution or spraying with a very high pressure, heated gun. Electroless plating is another type of dipping process which can be used to plate metals, plastics, and other materials by first preparing the surface with a chemical to ensure adhesion of the metal plating material. Rustproofing, as contemplated by this classification, is usually applied by dipping or spraying. Plated items may be finished by lacquering and polishing. Polishing may also be conducted as a separate contract on metal and nonmetal items.

This classification excludes furniture finishing/refinishing done in conjunction with manufacturing or repair which is to be reported separately in classification 2905; metal plating, polishing, rustproofing and finishing done in conjunction with manufacturing of metal or a metal product which is to be reported separately as applicable to the product; undercoating of automobiles or other vehicles which is to be reported separately in classification 3411; metal plating done by an electrolytic method and rustproofing by anodizing method which are to be reported separately in classification 3603-11.


3603-11 Electroplating and detinning, N.O.C.

Applies to establishments engaged in providing electroplating or detinning services that are not covered by another classification (N.O.C.). Work contemplated by this classification includes, but is not limited to, preparing items by dipping in chemical solution/acid baths to remove old finish or dirt, sanding and wire brushing as needed, removing all residues thoroughly, electroplating to create the new finish, air or oven drying, any appropriate finish work such as polishing and buffing, and electrolytic or chemical baths for detinning processes, when done by employees of an employer having operations subject to this classification. Electroplating (including galvanizing and tinning) to achieve a protective or decorative coating is done by immersing the metal object in a solution which contains the desired metallic particles (metals commonly used are gold, silver, nickel, zinc and chromium) and passing an electric charge through the solution which causes the metal particles to adhere to the object being plated. Typical items plated include, but are not limited to, jewelry, plumbing hardware and components, silverware, eyeglass frames, medical instruments, and various specialized industrial components of any size. Plated items may be polished and lacquered as part of the finishing process. This classification includes anodizing to rustproof aluminum and some aluminum alloys by immersion in an acid bath and applying an electric charge to the metal which causes the finish to form on it. Detinning is the process of recovering tin from tin plated scrap. The "chemical process" involves using caustics and an oxidizing agent which causes the tin to separate from the metal it was plated to. A variation of this method introduces electrolysis to achieve a purer reclamation. The "chlorine process" uses chlorine applied under pressure to dissolve the tin and separate it from the tin plated scrap.

This classification excludes any electroplating or rustproofing by electrolytic methods done in conjunction with the manufacturing of metal or a metal product which is to be reported separately as applicable to the product; metal plating, polishing or rustproofing not using electrolytic methods which is to be reported separately in classification 3603-10; galvanizing or tinning done by hot dip process which is to be reported separately in classification 3604; and any detinning not done by a specialty shop as described above.


3603-12 Painting in shop, N.O.C.

Applies to establishments engaged in providing painting services at their shop, that are not covered by another classification (N.O.C.). This includes painting wood, metal, plastic, glass or other items. Customers include manufacturers, cabinetmakers or millwork manufacturers who do not do their own finish painting/staining/varnishing, or individuals who need only one item painted. Work contemplated by this classification includes, but is not limited to, preparing items for finishing by cleaning, sanding and wire brushing as needed, applying new finish by brushing, rolling, spraying or dipping, air or oven drying, and any appropriate finish work such as waxing, polishing and buffing when done by employees of an employer having operations subject to this classification. This classification includes application of nonmetallic coatings by dipping (such as nonstick surfaces) and painting with an electrostatic paint gun.

This classification excludes sign painting when done by establishments who do not manufacture the sign, which is to be reported separately in classification 4109; any painting done in conjunction with the manufacture of a sign which is to be reported separately in classification 2903, 3402, 3503 or 3510 as applicable; painting done in conjunction with the repair of an exterior sign which is to be reported separately in classification 0403; furniture stripping and refinishing services which are to be reported in classification 3603-10; furniture finishing done in conjunction with manufacturing or repair which is to be reported separately in classification 2905; automobile painting which is to be reported separately in classification 3412; the permanent yard or shop of a painting contractor which is to be reported separately in classification 5206 provided the conditions set forth in WAC ((296-17-675)) 296-17A-5206 have been met; and the painting/staining/varnishing of any item done in conjunction with the manufacturing of that item which is to be reported separately as applicable to the product.

[07-01-014, recodified as 296-17A-3603, filed 12/8/06, effective 12/8/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035, 51.16.100. 06-12-075, 296-17-595, filed 6/6/06, effective 1/1/07. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. 98-18-042, 296-17-595, filed 8/28/98, effective 10/1/98; 85-24-032 (Order 85-33), 296-17-595, filed 11/27/85, effective 1/1/86; 83-24-017 (Order 83-36), 296-17-595, filed 11/30/83, effective 1/1/84; 81-24-042 (Order 81-30), 296-17-595, filed 11/30/81, effective 1/1/82; Order 73-22, 296-17-595, filed 11/9/73, effective 1/1/74.]

Washington State Code Reviser's Office