WSR 10-12-087

PROPOSED RULES

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR

STANDARDS BOARD

[ Filed June 1, 2010, 9:55 a.m. ]

Original Notice.

Preproposal statement of inquiry was filed as WSR 10-03-013.

Title of Rule and Other Identifying Information: Revises WAC 181-78A-255, 181-78A-264, and 181-78A-270. Amends approval standards for preparation programs adding calibrated teacher standards to the skills and knowledge section. Also addresses governance and program design.

Hearing Location(s): Red Lion Hotel, 2300 Evergreen Park Drive S.W., Olympia, WA 98502, on July 21, 2010, at 8:30 a.m.

Date of Intended Adoption: July 21, 2010.

Submit Written Comments to: David Brenna, Legislative and Policy Coordinator, P.O. Box 47236, Olympia, WA 98504, e-mail david.brenna@k12.wa.us, fax (360) 586-4548, by July 14, 2010.

Assistance for Persons with Disabilities: Contact David Brenna by July 14, 2010, TTY (360) 664-3631 or (360) 725-6238.

Purpose of the Proposal and Its Anticipated Effects, Including Any Changes in Existing Rules: Standards for college educator preparation programs are amended to reflect calibrated standards for teacher candidates for first residency certificates. Governance and program design standards are also revised to reflect changed [changes] in approval requirements.

Reasons Supporting Proposal: Stakeholder recommendations.

Statutory Authority for Adoption: RCW 28A.410.210.

Rule is not necessitated by federal law, federal or state court decision.

Name of Proponent: Professional educator standards board, governmental.

Name of Agency Personnel Responsible for Drafting, Implementation and Enforcement: David Brenna, P.O. Box 42736 [47236], Olympia, WA 98504, (360) 725-6238.

No small business economic impact statement has been prepared under chapter 19.85 RCW. The proposed amendment does not have an impact on small business and therefore does not meet the requirements for a statement under RCW 19.85.030 (1) or (2).

A cost-benefit analysis is required under RCW 34.05.328. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis may be obtained by contacting David Brenna, P.O. Box 47236, Olympia, WA 98504, phone (360) 725-6238, fax (360) 586-3631, e-mail david.brenna@k12.wa.us.

June 1, 2010

David Brenna

Legislative and

Policy Coordinator

OTS-3192.3


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 06-14-010, filed 6/22/06, effective 7/23/06)

WAC 181-78A-255   Approval standard -- Accountability.   Building on the mission to prepare educators who demonstrate a positive impact on student learning, the following evidence shall be evaluated to determine whether each preparation program is in compliance with the program approval standards of WAC 181-78A-220(2). ((Each college and university shall:

(1) Submit for approval to the professional educator standards board a performance-based program for the preparation of teachers, administrators, and educational staff associates that identifies:

(a) A comprehensive set of learner expectations for each preparation program;

(b) An assessment system that reflects the conceptual framework(s) and state standards, and collects and analyzes data on applicant qualifications, candidate and graduate performance, unit operations and program quality;

(c) Explicit connections between professional, state, and institutional standards, and candidate assessments.

(2) During the first year following program completion, solicit feedback from program completers employed in education, and their supervisors, regarding the program's effectiveness.

(3) Maintain placement records for all program completers during the first year following program completion.

(4) Submit an annual report to the professional educator standards board for each approved program to include:

(a) An executive summary of the activities of each professional education advisory board, including membership, meeting attendance, meeting expenditure information, PEAB recommendations, and program responses to the recommendations.

(b) The number of students completing each approved program during the period from September 1 - August 31 of the previous year.

(c) Other information related to the preparation programs requested by the professional educator standards board.

(5) Collect and maintain exemplar candidate work samples that document a positive impact on student learning.))

(1) Each approved educator preparation program shall maintain an assessment system that:

(a) Assesses outcomes in alignment with the conceptual framework and state standards.

(b) Systematically and comprehensively gathers evidence on:

(i) Candidate learning;

(ii) Program operations, including placement rates, clinical experiences, and candidate characteristics.

(c) Collects candidate work samples that document positive impact on student learning.

(d) Aggregates key data over time.

(e) Incorporates perspectives of faculty, candidates, and P-12 partners.

(f) Includes processes and safeguards that ensure fair and unbiased assessment of candidates.

(g) Provides for regular analysis of assessment results.

(h) Is systematically linked to program decision-making processes.

(2) Each approved program shall reach agreement with the professional educator standards board on the delivery of data as described in a memorandum of understanding. The memorandum will detail the minimum data requirements for approved programs.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. 06-14-010, 181-78A-255, filed 6/22/06, effective 7/23/06. 06-02-051, recodified as 181-78A-255, filed 12/29/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 (1) through (4). 02-04-014, 180-78A-255, filed 1/24/02, effective 2/24/02; 01-13-106, 180-78A-255, filed 6/20/01, effective 7/21/01. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 (1) and (2), 28A.410.010 and 28A.150.220(4). 99-01-174, 180-78A-255, filed 12/23/98, effective 1/23/99.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 10-07-077, filed 3/17/10, effective 4/17/10)

WAC 181-78A-264   Approval standard -- Program design.   Building on the mission to prepare educators who demonstrate a positive impact on student learning, ((the following)) evidence shall be evaluated to determine whether each preparation program is in compliance with the program design standard of WAC 181-78A-220(4):

(1) The conceptual framework establishes the shared vision for the unit's efforts in preparing educators to work effectively in P-12 schools. ((It provides the basis for coherence among curriculum, instruction, field experiences, clinical practice, assessment, and evaluation. The conceptual framework is based on current research and best practice, is cohesive and integrated, supports the state's student learning goals and for teacher preparation programs, and reflects the essential academic learning requirements. The conceptual framework reflects the unit's commitment to preparing candidates to support learning for all students and the unit's commitment to preparing candidates who are able to use educational technology to help all students learn.

(2) Candidates who demonstrate potential for acquiring the content and pedagogical knowledge and skills for success as educators in schools are recruited, admitted, and retained (see WAC 181-78A-200 Candidate admission policies). These candidates include members from under represented groups.

(3) Programs shall assure that candidates are provided with opportunities to learn the pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills required for the particular certificate, and for teacher preparation programs, the competencies for endorsement areas.

(4) A set of learner expectations for program completion are identified and published.

(5)(a) The unit and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical practices so that candidates develop and demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to help all students learn. Provided, That candidates for an administrator certificate shall complete an internship pursuant to WAC 181-78A-325, candidates for a school psychologist certificate shall complete an internship pursuant to WAC 181-78A-317, and candidates for a school counselor certificate shall complete an internship pursuant to WAC 181-78A-315, and candidates for a school social worker certificate shall complete an internship pursuant to WAC 181-78A-319.

(b) Field experiences are integrated throughout the preparation program and occur in settings with students representing diverse populations.

(c) Clinical practice is sufficiently extensive and intensive for candidates to demonstrate competence in the professional roles for which they are preparing.

(6) The preparing institution shall assure that candidates are provided with appropriate course work and experiences in teaching methods for each endorsement area. The methods should include:

(a) Instructional strategies.

(b) Curriculum frameworks (essential academic learning requirements).

(c) Assessment strategies, including performance-based measurements of student work.

(d) Unit/lesson planning.

(7) Entry and exit criteria exist for candidates in clinical practice.

(8) Programs reflect ongoing collaboration with P-12 schools.

(9) Candidates for a teacher certificate shall hold/obtain a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university pursuant to WAC 181-79A-030(5).

(10) Beginning fall 2003, approved programs shall administer the pedagogy assessment adopted by the professional educator standards board and published by the superintendent of public instruction to all candidates in a residency certificate program.

Candidates must take the pedagogy assessment as a condition of residency program completion. However, passage is not required for program completion as long as the program can provide other evidence, separately or in combination with the results of the pedagogy assessment, that the candidate has satisfied all program completion requirements.

(11) Collaboration. The unit ensures faculty collaborate with others to improve the program.

(a) Faculty within the unit;

(b) Faculty from other units;

(c) P-12 school personnel;

(d) Members of the broader professional community.

(12) Interactions with diverse populations. The unit ensures candidates interact with diverse populations.

(a) Diverse higher education faculty;

(b) Diverse candidates;

(c) Diverse P-12 students;

(d) Diverse individuals who work with students in P-12 classrooms.)) The conceptual framework:

(a) Provides coherence among curriculum, instruction, field experiences, clinical practice, candidate assessment, and program evaluation;

(b) Establishes the philosophy, purpose, goals, and standards of the program or unit;

(c) Reflects renewing commitment to current research and best practices; and

(d) Supports the state's goals for P-12 student learning and program approval Standard V.

(2) Recruitment, admission, retention, and transition to the field.

(a) Programs recruit, admit, retain, and transition candidates to the field who:

(i) Demonstrate the content and pedagogical knowledge and skills for success as educators in schools;

(ii) Demonstrate the dispositions of a professional educator;

(iii) Address the state and partner districts' goals for diversifying the workplace;

(iv) Meet the content areas identified by work force data of the state and region.

(b) Learner expectations for program requirements, progression, and completion are identified, published, and accessible.

(3) Field experiences and clinical practice.

(a) The program(s) and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical practices.

(b) Field experiences are integrated throughout the preparation program.

(i) Field experiences provide opportunity to plan, practice and reflect on methods of instruction and differentiation;

(ii) Field experiences provide opportunity to work in communities with populations dissimilar to the background of the candidate;

(iii) Faculty supervision, including on-site visits, will be provided on an on-going basis.

(c) Mentors are instructional leaders identified collaboratively with the partner school of district.

(i) Mentors and principals are provided with a set of internship expectations;

(ii) Mentors receive or provide evidence of training on mentoring of adult learners;

(iii) Mentors must be fully certificated school personnel and have a minimum of three years of professional experience in the role they are supervising;

(iv) Effectiveness of mentor preparation and communication are reviewed annually by faculty.

(d) All Washington educator preparation programs operating field experiences in Washington state shall establish and maintain field placement agreements with all Washington school districts in which candidates are placed for field experiences leading to certification or endorsement under WAC 181-78A-125.

(e) Entry and exit criteria and a process for mitigating concerns during clinical practice are provided for candidates and the mentor teacher.

(f) Requirements for specific educator preparation programs.

(i) Teacher programs.

(A) Programs shall administer the pedagogy assessment adopted by the professional educator standards board to all candidates in a residency certificate program.

(B) Clinical practice (defined as supervised planning, instruction, and reflection) for teacher candidates should consist of no less than four hundred fifty hours in classroom settings.

(ii) School counselor programs.

(A) Candidates complete a supervised internship in the schools that includes a minimum of four hundred hours of on the job professional service and one hour per week of individual supervision provided by the mentor.

(B) Prior to the internship, the candidate will complete a faculty supervised practicum (a distinctly defined clinical experience intended to enable the candidate to develop basic counseling skills and integrate professional knowledge).

(iii) School psychology programs.

(A) Candidates complete a supervised internship in the schools that includes a minimum of one thousand two hundred hours of on the job professional service and one hour per week of individual supervision provided by the mentor.

(B) Prior to the internship, the candidate will complete a faculty supervised practicum (a distinctly defined clinical experience intended to enable the candidate to develop basic school psychology skills and integrate professional knowledge).

(iv) School social worker programs.

(A) Candidates complete a supervised internship in the schools that includes a minimum of three hundred hours of on the job professional service and one hour per week of individual supervision provided by the mentor.

(B) Prior to the internship, the candidate will complete a faculty supervised practicum (a distinctly defined clinical experience intended to enable the candidate to develop basic school social work skills and integrate professional knowledge).

(v) Administrator programs.

(A) The internship for administrators shall take place in an education setting serving under the general supervision of a certificated practitioner who is performing in the role for which certification is sought.

(B) Components of the required internship shall include demonstration by the candidate that he or she has the appropriate, specific relevant skills pursuant to WAC 181-78A-270.

(C) An approved preparation program for superintendents shall require an internship of at least three hundred sixty hours.

(D) An approved preparation program for principals shall require for those persons beginning their internship August 1, 2009, and after, an internship which requires practice as an intern during the full school year. A "full school year" shall mean five hundred forty hours of which at least one-half shall be during school hours, when students and/or staff are present: Provided further, That an approved preparation program for principals shall require an internship that shall include demonstration by the candidate that she or he has the appropriate, specific skills pursuant to the standards identified in WAC 181-78A-270(2) and meets, at minimum, the standards-based benchmarks approved and published by the professional educator standards board. The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval.

(4) Program and faculty collaboration.

(a) Faculty within the program and unit collaborate for continuous program improvement.

(b) Faculty collaborate with content area specialists.

(c) Programs collaborate with P-12 schools to assess and respond to work force, student learning, and professional development needs.

(d) Faculty collaborate with members of the broader professional community.

(e) Faculty collaborate with members of under-represented populations for program improvement.

(5) Diversity in learning experiences.

(a) Candidates have significant interaction with diverse populations including colleagues, faculty, P-12 practitioners, and P-12 students and families.

(i) Candidates reflect on interactions with diverse populations in order to integrate professional growth in cultural competency as a habit of practice.

(ii) Candidates integrate their cultural and linguistic backgrounds into classroom activities in order to build the multicultural capacity of the preparation program cohort.

(b) Faculty model equity pedagogy through:

(i) Interaction with diverse populations;

(ii) Reflective practice on their own professional growth in cultural competency;

(iii) Culturally relevant communication and problem solving; and

(iv) Personalized instruction that addresses cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. 10-07-077, 181-78A-264, filed 3/17/10, effective 4/17/10; 06-14-010, 181-78A-264, filed 6/22/06, effective 7/23/06. 06-02-051, recodified as 181-78A-264, filed 12/29/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010. 05-23-040, 180-78A-264, filed 11/9/05, effective 12/10/05; 04-21-038, 180-78A-264, filed 10/15/04, effective 11/15/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010. 03-19-021, 180-78A-264, filed 9/5/03, effective 10/6/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 (1) through (4). 02-04-014, 180-78A-264, filed 1/24/02, effective 2/24/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010, 28A.305.130 (1) and (2). 01-03-153, 180-78A-264, filed 1/24/01, effective 2/24/01; 99-23-023, 180-78A-264, filed 11/9/99, effective 12/10/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 (1) and (2), 28A.410.010 and 28A.150.220(4). 99-01-174, 180-78A-264, filed 12/23/98, effective 1/23/99.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 07-23-046, filed 11/14/07, effective 12/15/07)

WAC 181-78A-270   Approval standard -- Knowledge and skills.   Building on the mission to prepare educators who demonstrate a positive impact on student learning based on the Improvement of Student Achievement Act of 1993 (1209), the following evidence shall be evaluated to determine whether each preparation program is in compliance with the program approval standards of WAC 181-78A-220(5):

(1) TEACHER RESIDENCY CERTIFICATION.

((Knowledge of subject matter and curriculum goals

(a) Teacher candidates positively impact student learning that is:

(i) Content driven. All students develop understanding and problem-solving expertise in the content area(s) using reading, written and oral communication, and technology.

(ii) Aligned with curriculum standards and outcomes. All students know the learning targets and their progress toward meeting them.

(iii) Integrated across content areas. All students learn subject matter content that integrates mathematical, scientific, and aesthetic reasoning.

Knowledge of teaching

(b) Teacher candidates positively impact student learning that is:

(i) Informed by standards-based assessment. All students benefit from learning that is systematically analyzed using multiple formative, summative, and self-assessment strategies.

(ii) Intentionally planned. All students benefit from standards-based planning that is personalized.

(iii) Influenced by multiple instructional strategies. All students benefit from personalized instruction that addresses their ability levels and cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

(iv) Informed by technology. All students benefit from instruction that utilizes effective technologies and is designed to create technologically proficient learners.

Knowledge of learners and their development in social contexts

(c) Evidence of teacher candidate practice reflects planning, instruction and communication that is:

(i) Learner centered. All students engage in a variety of culturally responsive, developmentally, and age appropriate strategies.

(ii) Classroom/school centered. Student learning is connected to communities within the classroom and the school, including knowledge and skills for working with others.

(iii) Family/neighborhood centered. Student learning is informed by collaboration with families and neighborhoods.

(iv) Contextual community centered. All students are prepared to be responsible citizens for an environmentally sustainable, globally interconnected, and diverse society.

Understanding teaching as a profession

(d) Teacher candidates positively impact student learning that is:

(i) Informed by professional responsibilities and policies. All students benefit from a collegial and professional school setting.

(ii) Enhanced by a reflective, collaborative, professional growth-centered practice. All students benefit from the professional growth of their teachers.

(iii) Informed by legal and ethical responsibilities. All students benefit from a safe and respectful learning environment.)) (a) EFFECTIVE TEACHING.

(i) Using multiple instructional strategies, including the principles of second language acquisition, to address student academic language ability levels and cultural and linguistic backgrounds;

(ii) Applying the theories of language acquisition and stages of language development in the integration of subject matter across the content areas of mathematical, scientific, and aesthetic reasoning;

(iii) Using standards-based assessment that is systematically analyzed using multiple formative, summative, and self-assessment strategies to monitor and improve instruction;

(iv) Implementing classroom/school centered instruction, including sheltered instruction that is connected to communities within the classroom and the school, and includes knowledge and skills for working with other;

(v) Planning and/or adapting standards-based curricula that are personalized to the diverse needs of each student;

(vi) Aligning instruction to the learning standards and outcomes so all students know the learning targets and their progress toward meeting them;

(vii) Planning and/or adapting curricula that are standards driven so students develop understanding and problem-solving expertise in the content area(s) using reading, written and oral communication, and technology;

(viii) Preparing students to be responsible citizens for an environmentally sustainable, globally interconnected, and diverse society;

(ix) Planning and/or adapting learner centered curricula that engage students in a variety of culturally responsive, developmentally, and age appropriate strategies;

(x) Using technology that is effectively integrated to create technologically proficient learners; and

(xi) Informing, involving, and collaborating with families/neighborhoods, and communities in each student's educational process, including using information about student cultural identity, achievement and performance.

(b) PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. Developing reflective, collaborative, professional growth-centered practices through regularly evaluating the effects of his/her teaching through feedback and reflection.

(c) TEACHING AS A PROFESSION.

(i) Participating collaboratively and professionally in school activities and using appropriate and respectful verbal and written communication.

(ii) Demonstrating knowledge of professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities and policies.

(d) PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT. An approved preparation program for teachers shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process approved by the professional educator standards board. The assessment will verify that the candidate for a residency teacher certificate can meet the teacher standards in (a), (b) and (c) of this subsection and understands teacher impact on student learning.

(2) PRINCIPAL AND PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR.

(a) Effective August 31, 1997, through August 31, 2004, principal and program administrator candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete a well-planned sequence of courses and/or experiences in an approved preparation program which shall include:

(i) Specific performance domains. An approved preparation program shall require the candidate to demonstrate in course work and the internship the following:

(A) Leadership: Formulating goals with individuals or groups; initiating and maintaining direction with groups and guiding them to the accomplishment of tasks; setting priorities for one's school in the context of community and district priorities and student and staff needs; integrating own and others' ideas for task accomplishment; initiating and planning organizational change.

(B) Information collection: Gathering data, facts, and impressions from a variety of sources about students, parents, staff members, administrators, and community members; seeking knowledge about policies, rules, laws, precedents, or practices; managing the data flow; classifying and organizing information for use in decision making and monitoring.

(C) Problem analysis: Identifying the important elements of a problem situation by analyzing relevant information; framing problems; identifying possible causes; identifying additional needed information; framing and reframing possible solutions; exhibiting conceptual flexibility; assisting others to form reasoned opinions about problems and issues.

(D) Judgment: Reaching logical conclusions and making high quality, timely decisions given the best available information.

(E) Organizational oversight: Planning and scheduling one's own and others' work so that resources are used appropriately, and short-term and long-term priorities and goals are met; monitoring projects to meet deadlines.

(F) Implementation: Making things happen; putting programs and plans into action; applying management technologies; applying methods of organizational change including collaborative processes; facilitating tasks; establishing progress checkpoints; considering alternative approaches; providing "mid-course" corrections when actual outcomes start to diverge from intended outcomes; adapting to new conditions.

(G) Delegation: Assigning projects or tasks together with clear authority to accomplish them and responsibility for their timely and acceptable completion.

(H) Instructional program: Envisioning and enabling instructional and auxiliary programs for the improvement of teaching and learning; recognizing the developmental needs of students; insuring appropriate instructional methods that address students' gender and cultural differences; designing positive learning experiences; accommodating differences in cognition and achievement; mobilizing the participation of appropriate people or groups to develop these programs and to establish a positive learning environment.

(I) Curriculum design: Interpreting school district curricula; planning and implementing with staff a framework for instruction that shall include the implementation of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements; initiating needs analyses and monitoring social and technological developments as they affect curriculum; responding to international content levels; adjusting content as needs and conditions change.

(J) Student guidance and development: Providing for student guidance, counseling, and auxiliary services; utilizing community organizations; responding to family needs; enlisting the participation of appropriate people and groups to design and conduct these programs and to connect schooling with plans for adult life; planning for a comprehensive program of student activities.

(K) Staff development: Identifying with participants the professional needs of individuals and groups; planning and organizing programs to improve staff effectiveness; supervising individuals and groups; engaging staff and others to plan and participate in recruitment and development; initiating self-development.

(L) Measurement and evaluation: Determining what diagnostic information is needed about students, staff, and the school environment; examining the extent to which outcomes meet or exceed previously defined standards, goals, or priorities for individuals or groups; drawing inferences for program revisions; interpreting measurements or evaluations for others; relating programs to desired outcomes; developing equivalent measures of competence.

(M) Resource allocation: Planning and developing the budget with appropriate staff; seeking, allocating, and adjusting fiscal, human, and material resources; utilizing the physical plant; monitoring resource use and reporting results.

(N) Motivating others: Building commitment to a course of action; creating and channeling the energy of self and others; planning and encouraging participation; supporting innovation; recognizing and rewarding effective performance; providing coaching, guidance, or correction for performance that needs improvement; serving as a role model.

(O) Sensitivity: Perceiving the needs and concerns of others; dealing with others tactfully; working with others in emotionally stressful situations or in conflict; managing conflict; obtaining feedback; recognizing multicultural sensibilities.

(P) Oral expression: Making oral presentations that are clear and easy to understand; clarifying and restating questions; responding, reviewing, and summarizing for groups; utilizing appropriate communicative aids; adapting for audiences.

(Q) Written expression: Expressing ideas clearly in writing; writing appropriately for different audiences such as students, teachers, and parents; preparing brief memoranda.

(R) Philosophical and cultural values: Acting with a reasoned understanding of the role of education in a democratic society and in accord with accepted ethical standards; recognizing philosophical and historical influences in education; reflecting an understanding of American culture, including current social and economic issues related to education; recognizing global influences on students and society.

(S) Legal and regulatory applications: Acting in accordance with relevant federal and Washington state laws, rules, and policies; recognizing governmental influences on education; working within local rules, procedures, and directives; administering contracts.

(T) Policy and political influences: Identifying relationships between public policy and education; recognizing policy issues; examining and affecting policies individually and through professional and public groups; relating policy initiatives to the welfare of students; addressing ethical issues.

(U) Public and media relationships: Developing common perceptions about school issues; interacting with parental and community opinion leaders; understanding and responding skillfully to the electronic and printed news media; initiating and reporting news through appropriate channels; enlisting public participation; recognizing and providing for market segments.

(ii) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for principals shall require that prior to the internship each candidate shall engage in a performance assessment through a process determined by each preparation program. The results of this assessment shall be utilized by the college/university supervisor, the cooperating principal, and the principal candidate to cooperatively design the internship plan.

(b) Effective September 1, 2004, principal and program administrator candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:

(i) Successful demonstration of standards. A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by:

(A) Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community;

(B) Advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth;

(C) Ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment;

(D) Collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources;

(E) Acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner; and

(F) Understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.

(ii) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for principals shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board and published by the office of the superintendent of public instruction. The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan.

(3) SUPERINTENDENT. Superintendent candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete a well-planned sequence of courses and/or experiences in an approved preparation program for superintendents which shall include specific performance domains for superintendents. An approved preparation program for superintendents shall require the candidate to demonstrate in course work and the internship the following:

(a) Strategic leadership: The knowledge, skills and attributes to identify contexts, develop with others vision and purpose, utilize information, frame problems, exercise leadership processes to achieve common goals, and act ethically for educational communities. This includes:

(i) Professional and ethical leadership.

(ii) Information management and evaluation.

(b) Instructional leadership: The knowledge, skills and attributes to design with others appropriate curricula and instructional programs which implement the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, to develop learner centered school cultures, to assess outcomes, to provide student personnel services, and to plan with faculty professional development activities aimed at improving instruction. This includes:

(i) Curriculum, instruction, supervision, and learning environment.

(ii) Professional development and human resources.

(iii) Student personnel services.

(c) Organizational leadership: The knowledge, skills and attributes to understand and improve the organization, implement operational plans, manage financial resources, and apply decentralized management processes and procedures. This includes:

(i) Organizational management.

(ii) Interpersonal relationships.

(iii) Financial management and resource allocation.

(iv) Technology and information system.

(d) Political and community leadership: The knowledge, skills and attributes to act in accordance with legal provisions and statutory requirements, to apply regulatory standards, to develop and apply appropriate policies, to be conscious of ethical implications of policy initiatives and political actions, to relate public policy initiatives to student welfare, to understand schools as political systems, to involve citizens and service agencies, and to develop effective staff communications and public relations programs. This includes:

(i) Community and media relations.

(ii) Federal and Washington state educational law, public policy and political systems.

(4) SCHOOL COUNSELOR. Effective August 31, 1997 through August 31, 2005, school counselor candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete a well-planned sequence of courses and/or experiences in which they acquire and apply knowledge about:

(a) Human growth and development (studies that provide an understanding of the nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels).

(b) Social and cultural foundations (studies that provide an understanding of issues and trends in a multicultural and diverse society).

(c) Helping relationships (studies that provide an understanding of counseling and consultation processes).

(d) Group work (studies that provide an understanding of group development, dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods and skills, and other group work approaches).

(e) Career and lifestyle development (studies that provide an understanding of career development and related life factors).

(f) Appraisal (studies that provide an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation), including assessment of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements.

(g) Research and program evaluation (studies that provide an understanding of types of research methods, basic statistics, and ethical and legal considerations in research).

(h) Professional orientation (studies that provide an understanding of all aspects of professional functioning including history, roles, organizational structures, ethics, standards, and credentialing).

(i) Foundations of school counseling including:

(i) History, philosophy, and trends in school counseling;

(ii) Role and function of the school counselor in conjunction with the roles of the professional and support personnel in the school;

(iii) Knowledge of the school setting and curriculum including the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements;

(iv) Ethical standards and guidelines of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA);

(v) State and federal policies, laws, and legislation relevant to school counseling; and

(vi) Implications of sociocultural, demographic, and lifestyle diversity relevant to school counseling.

(j) Studies that provide an understanding of the coordination of counseling program components as they relate to the total school community including:

(i) Referral of children and adolescents for specialized help;

(ii) Coordination efforts with resource persons, specialists, businesses, and agencies outside the school to promote program objectives;

(iii) Methods of integration of guidance curriculum in the total school curriculum;

(iv) Promotion of the use of counseling and guidance activities and programs by the total school community to enhance a positive school climate; and

(v) Methods of planning and presenting guidance-related educational programs for school personnel and parents.

(k) Theory, knowledge and skills for the practice of school counseling including:

(i) Program development, implementation and evaluation. Studies in this area include:

(A) Use of surveys, interviews, and needs assessments;

(B) Design, implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive, developmental school program;

(C) Implementation and evaluation of specific strategies designed to meet program goals and objectives;

(D) Preparation of a counseling schedule reflecting appropriate time commitments and priorities in a developmental school counseling program; and

(E) Use of appropriate technology and information systems.

(ii) Counseling and guidance. Studies in this area include:

(A) Individual and group counseling and guidance approaches appropriate for the developmental stage and needs of children and adolescents;

(B) Group guidance approaches that are systematically designed to assist children and adolescents with developmental tasks;

(C) Approaches to peer helper programs;

(D) Issues which may affect the development and function of children and adolescents (e.g., abuse, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, exceptionality, substance abuse, violence, suicide, dropout);

(E) Developmental approaches to assist students and parents at points of educational transition (e.g., postsecondary education, career and technical education, and career options);

(F) Crisis intervention and referral; and

(G) System dynamics, including family, school, community, etc.

(iii) Consultation. Studies in this area shall include:

(A) Methods of enhancing teamwork within the school community; and

(B) Methods of involving parents, teachers, administrators, support staff and community agency personnel.

(5) SCHOOL COUNSELOR. Effective September 1, 2005, school counselor candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:

(a) Successful demonstration of standards:

(i) Foundations of the school counseling profession: Certified school counselors design, deliver, and evaluate student-centered, data-driven school counseling programs that advance the mission of the school in light of recognized theory, research, exemplary models, community context, and professional standards.

(ii) School counseling and student competencies: Certified school counselors integrate academic, career, and personal/social student competencies, including Washington state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, into the school counseling program; teach counseling and guidance related material by using effective curriculum, instructional strategies, and instructional management; support teachers and parents in helping students develop knowledge and skill for learning, living, and working; and provide information about best practices to a school community.

(iii) Human growth and development: Certified school counselors apply comprehensive, in-depth knowledge of human growth and development to improve student learning, well-being, and to enhance resiliency; provide guidance to parents and teachers about developmentally appropriate practices that support students throughout their schooling experience.

(iv) Counseling theories and technique: Certified school counselors demonstrate an understanding of established and emerging counseling theories through effective use of individual and group techniques for working with a diverse population.

(v) Equity, fairness, and diversity: Certified school counselors value and show respect for all members of the community; demonstrate fairness, equity, and sensitivity to every student, and advocate for equitable access to instructional programs and activities; use data for designing and implementing plans that remove barriers to learning; and help to close achievement gaps among subgroups of students.

(vi) School climate: Certified school counselors establish and foster a safe, inclusive, and nurturing learning environment for students, staff, and families and use strategies designed to prevent or resolve problems that could limit or diminish the capacity of students to learn and achieve at their highest levels.

(vii) Collaboration with school staff, family, and community: Certified school counselors work collaboratively with school staff, families and community members to achieve common goals for the education of students, improvement of schools, and advancement of the larger community; know appropriate behavior management strategies and can team with staff and families to improve student achievement; and use their knowledge of community resources to make appropriate referrals based on the needs of students.

(viii) Information resources and technology: Certified school counselors select and use informational resources and technology to facilitate delivery of a comprehensive school counseling program that meets student needs; and skillfully use technology to enhance communication.

(ix) Student assessment and program evaluation: Certified school counselors understand the basic principles and purposes of assessment; collection and use of data; regularly monitor student progress and are able to communicate the purposes, design, and results of assessments to various audiences; know basic principles of research design, action research, and program evaluation for purposes of program improvement and accountability.

(x) Leadership and advocacy: Certified school counselors support practices and policies that promote academic rigor-skills for learning, living, and working; provide leadership that enhances student academic, career, and personal/social development and advocate for guidance as an integral part of a school's educational system; model practices that help students, parents, teachers, and policy makers understand how curriculum, instruction and assessment can help students see the relationship between effort, performance, and success beyond high school. Certified school counselors help promote understanding of graduation requirements, WASL scores, and development of the high school and beyond plan.

(xi) Professionalism, ethics, and legal mandates: Certified school counselors develop a professional identity congruent with knowledge of all aspects of professional functions, professional development, and state and national school counselor organizations. They adhere strictly to the profession's codes of ethics, especially those that have been established by the American Counseling Association (ACA), the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC), and other relevant codes of ethics. They are familiar with state and federal policies, laws, and legislation relevant to school counseling.

(xii) Reflective practice: Certified school counselors integrate knowledge, skills, and life experiences to respond effectively to new or unexpected critical events and situations; serve as change agents by using their understanding of schools as social, cultural and political systems within a larger organizational context; monitor practice with continuous, in-depth reflection; and make adjustments as needed.

(b) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for school counselors shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board and published by the office of the superintendent of public instruction. The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan.

(6) SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST. Effective August 31, 1997, through August 31, 2005, school psychologist candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete a well-planned sequence of courses and/or experiences in which they acquire and apply knowledge about:

(a) Knowledge of the field. The candidate has knowledge and skill in relevant fields of study, including:

(i) Learning theory.

(ii) Personality theory and development.

(iii) Individual and group testing and assessment.

(iv) Individual and group counseling and interviewing theory and techniques.

(v) Basic statistics.

(vi) Child development.

(vii) Exceptional children.

(viii) Social and cultural factors.

(ix) Deviant personality.

(x) Curriculum, including the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements.

(xi) Research design.

(xii) Physiological and biological factors.

(b) Assessment and diagnosis. The candidate has knowledge and skill necessary to select, administer, score, and interpret instruments and techniques in the following areas:

(i) Intellectual and cognitive assessment.

(ii) Individual and group academic skills: Standardized norm-referenced and criteria-referenced measurements and curriculum-based measurements.

(iii) Personality assessment.

(iv) Assessment of perceptual skills.

(v) Assessment of adaptive behavior; assessment of language skills.

(c) Behavioral observation and analysis. The candidate has knowledge and skill in behavior observation, including:

(i) Data taking.

(ii) Frequency measures.

(iii) Qualitative and quantitative analysis of classroom behavior.

(iv) Developmental and personality analysis, including perceptual, cognitive, social, and affective and language development in children.

(d) Counseling and interviewing. The candidate has the knowledge and skill necessary to:

(i) Provide individual and group counseling to students and parents.

(ii) Conduct interviews essential to information collecting from parents, teachers, and other professionals.

(e) Program development. The candidate has the knowledge and skill to make educational prescriptions, including specification of remedial environmental changes, both curricular and behavioral, for a particular student.

(f) Consultation. The candidate has the knowledge and skill to:

(i) Function on multidisciplinary teams in evaluating and placing students.

(ii) Confer with and make recommendations to parents, specialists, teachers, referral personnel, and others relative to student's characteristics and needs in the educational and home environments.

(g) Program evaluation and recordkeeping. The candidate has the knowledge and skill necessary to develop and implement program evaluation and maintain required records.

(h) Professionalism. The candidate has knowledge of professional standards regarding ethical and legal practices relevant to the practice of school psychology. The candidate demonstrates knowledge and skill in written and oral reporting of assessment and remedial recommendations which will meet ethical and legal standards.

(i) Research. The candidate has knowledge and skill to:

(i) Evaluate and perform research.

(ii) Apply school-oriented research.

(iii) Construct criterion-referenced instruments with reference to such educational decisions as:

(A) Retention in grade.

(B) Acceleration and early entrance.

(C) Early entrance.

(7) School psychologist. Effective September 1, 2005, school psychologist candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:

(a) Successful demonstration of standards:

(i) Data-based decision making and accountability: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment that yield information useful in identifying strengths and needs, in understanding problems, and in measuring progress and accomplishments; use such models and methods as part of a systematic process to collect data and other information, translate assessment results into empirically based decisions about service delivery, evaluate the outcomes of services; and data-based decision making permeates every aspect of professional practice.

(ii) Consultation and collaboration: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of behavioral, mental health, collaborative, and/or other consultation models and methods and of their application to particular situations; collaborate effectively with others in planning and decision-making processes at the individual, group, and system levels.

(iii) Effective instruction and development of cognitive/academic skills: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of human learning processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of cognitive and academic skills; collaborate with others, develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions, including, but not limited to, instructional interventions and consultation.

(iv) Socialization and development of life skills: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of human developmental processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social skills; collaborate with others, develop appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions, including, but not limited to, consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling.

(v) Student diversity in development and learning: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, and disabilities and of the potential influence of biological, social, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socioeconomic, gender-related, and linguistic factors in development and learning; demonstrate the sensitivity and skills needed to work with individuals of diverse characteristics and to implement strategies selected and/or adapted based on individual characteristics, strengths, and needs.

(vi) School and systems organization, policy development, and climate: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of general education, special education, and other educational and related services; understanding of schools and other settings as systems; work with individuals and groups to facilitate policies and practices that create and maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning environments for children and others.

(vii) Prevention, crisis intervention, and mental health: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of human development and psychopathology and of associated biological, cultural, and social influences on human behavior; provide or contribute to prevention and intervention programs that promote the mental health and physical well-being of students.

(viii) Home/school/community collaboration: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on student development, learning, and behavior, and of methods to involve families in education and service delivery; work effectively with families, educators, and others in the community to promote and provide comprehensive services to children and families.

(ix) Research and program evaluation: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods; evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of services.

(x) School psychology practice and development: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of their profession; of various service models and methods; of public policy development applicable to services to children and families; and of ethical, professional, and legal standards, including the Washington Administrative Code; practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards, are involved in their profession, and have the knowledge and skills needed to acquire career-long professional development.

(xi) Information technology: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of information sources and technology relevant to their work; access, evaluate, and utilize information sources and technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services.

(b) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for school psychologists shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board and published by the office of the superintendent of public instruction. The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan.

(8) SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKER. Effective August 31, 1997, through August 31, 2005, school social worker candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete a well-planned sequence of courses and/or experiences in which they acquire and apply knowledge about:

(a) Knowledge for social work practice. The candidate has knowledge and skills in relevant fields of study including:

(i) Values.

(A) Knowledge of profession including values, skills, and ethics; and

(B) National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and school social work guidelines for practice.

(ii) Human behavior and the social environment.

(A) Community theory and community change (e.g., community organization and development, social planning, networking, and case management);

(B) Systems and organizational theory (e.g., school as a bureaucracy);

(C) Social disorganization (e.g., poverty, family and community violence, unemployment, addictions, multiple losses), and context of family in a changing society;

(D) Family dynamics and theories of family therapy;

(E) Human/child growth and development;

(F) Diverse populations of: Race, culture, social class, life style, age, gender and the disabled;

(G) Theories of personality; and

(H) Use of computer technology for social work practice.

(b) Service delivery and program development. The candidate will have knowledge and skills in the following activities:

(i) Direct practice.

(A) Referring, developing, and coordinating resources and services in the local education agency and community;

(B) Knowledge and skills related to families;

(C) Case management;

(D) Working with vulnerable and "hard to reach" individuals and families, including those from diverse populations;

(E) Crisis intervention, conflict resolution, stress management and decision-making skills;

(F) Individual and group counseling to improve students' self-knowledge and interactional skills for personal empowerment;

(G) Interviewing and counseling students in relation to social-personal problems adjudged to be impairing student's ability to learn;

(H) Family interventions including parent education; referral to resources; family counseling;

(I) Teaching children communication and interpersonal relationship skills through individual/group/classroom interventions;

(J) Collaborating and consulting with parents and community to assure readiness to learn for all students;

(K) Multidimensional assessment of student's social-emotional adjustment, adaptive behaviors, individual strengths, and environmental assets;

(L) Intervention case planning processes; and

(M) Career and academic guidance to students in their school to work transitions.

(ii) Indirect practice.

(A) Liaison and facilitator between and among home, school and community;

(B) Collaborate and consult with other educational staff to assure student progress;

(C) Use computer technology for practice and efficiency;

(D) Develop strategies for increased parental and community involvement with the school;

(E) Develop programs of remediation for students and their families;

(F) Design, coordinate and facilitate programs such as suicide prevention, truancy and drop-out prevention, and prevention of teenage pregnancy;

(G) Provide staff development programs;

(H) Work collaboratively with educational staff to develop programs to address school-community identified needs; and

(I) Function as change agents.

(c) Research and evaluation. The candidate will have necessary skills and knowledge to:

(i) Collect and interpret data in order to evaluate student, school, and community needs;

(ii) Evaluate own practice;

(iii) Become consumer of research findings;

(iv) Understand use of program evaluation methods; and

(v) Utilize computer technology for research and evaluation.

(d) Context for educational system. The candidate will have necessary knowledge and skills to apply the following:

(i) State learning goals and essential academic learning requirements;

(ii) Theories of learning;

(iii) School law and professional ethics;

(iv) Computer technology in the workplace; and

(v) Understanding of policies, laws, and procedures.

(9) School social workers. Effective September 1, 2005, school social worker candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:

(a) Successful demonstration of standards:

(i) Core concepts and professional practice foundations: The certified school social worker understands and applies the core concepts, tools of inquiry, theories, and skills and values of the general field of social work to the educational system; relates these core concepts to the Washington state learning goals, essential academic learning requirement (EALRS), Revised Code of Washington (RCW), Washington Administrative Code (WAC) and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA); and utilizes these constructs to facilitate the educational, social and emotional development of students by working towards reducing the impact of nonacademic barriers to academic success.

(ii) Planning, ecological assessment and evaluation: The certified school social worker understands and knows how to apply various formal and informal assessment tools to identify student, family, school and community needs using a strengths and systems perspective; engage students (individually or in groups), families, school staff and/or the larger community in designing interventions and developing programs, which bolsters the strengths and meets the needs identified; uses best practices in evaluation criteria to monitor the success of the intervention; revisions to the intervention plan are based on systematic data collection; and to utilize the principles of research design and program evaluation to improve student learning outcomes.

(iii) Prevention/intervention services: The certified school social worker has knowledge of and ability to provide prevention education and skill building in such areas as violence, mediation, bullying, substance misuse and abuse, conflict resolution/management, and stress management; provide direct intervention services to students through crisis management, case management, counseling, skill building, behavior management, teaching of psycho-educational curriculums, personal development skills and classroom presentations; and provide both prevention and intervention services to students individually, in small group or classroom settings as well as with students' families.

(iv) Home, school and community consultation and collaboration: The certified school social worker understands and has the ability to develop consultative and collaborative relationships both individually and on a systemic level with students, colleagues, families and the community to support students' learning and social/emotional development; assist students and their families in networking with various social support systems in order to benefit student learning; and use their extensive knowledge of community resources to appropriately refer students and families to various community services.

(v) Advocacy and facilitation: The certified school social worker understands and has the ability to advocate and facilitate changes that empower students, families, educators and others to gain access to and effectively use school and community resources.

(vi) Diversity and school climate: The certified school social worker understands how a student's learning is influenced and impacted by culture, family dynamics, community values, individual learning styles, talents, gender, sexual orientation, language, prior learning, economics and disabilities; utilize this knowledge to design, implement and evaluate programs that enhance student learning and social interaction in school, family and community settings; and how to create and support a safe, nurturing and secure learning environment by designing and using strategies to prevent or resolve ecological barriers that could limit or diminish the capacity of students to learn and achieve at their highest levels.

(vii) Professional development: The certified school social worker understands and values the need for professional development and is able to use supervision, consultation, collaboration, continuing education and professional research to evaluate and enhance their practice.

(viii) Information resources and technology: The certified school social worker uses informational resources and technology to communicate, monitor student progress and evaluate programs; and access, appraise and utilize information sources and technology in ways that safeguard and enhance their quality of services.

(ix) Professional code of conduct and ethics: The certified school social worker understands, maintains and applies the professional codes of conduct and ethical practice guidelines embodied in the National Association of Social Work (NASW) code of ethics and School Social Work standards developed for the field of education; and are familiar with district, state and federal laws and policies relevant to the educational setting.

(b) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for school social workers shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board and published by the office of the superintendent of public instruction. The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. 07-23-046, 181-78A-270, filed 11/14/07, effective 12/15/07; 06-14-010, 181-78A-270, filed 6/22/06, effective 7/23/06. 06-02-051, recodified as 181-78A-270, filed 12/29/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.401.010 [28A.410.010]. 04-21-038, 180-78A-270, filed 10/15/04, effective 11/15/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010. 04-04-089, 180-78A-270, filed 2/3/04, effective 3/5/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 and 28A.410.010. 02-18-037, 180-78A-270, filed 8/26/02, effective 9/26/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010 and 28A.305.130 (1) through (4). 02-04-018, 180-78A-270, filed 1/24/02, effective 2/24/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010 and 28A.305.130 (1) and (2). 99-23-023, 180-78A-270, filed 11/9/99, effective 12/10/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 (1) and (2), 28A.410.010 and 28A.150.220(4). 99-01-174, 180-78A-270, filed 12/23/98, effective 1/23/99.]


REPEALER

     The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:
WAC 181-78A-315 Program approval requirement -- Field experience for school counselors.
WAC 181-78A-317 Program approval requirement -- Field experience for school psychologists.
WAC 181-78A-319 Program approval requirement -- Field experience for school social workers.
WAC 181-78A-325 Program approval requirement -- Field experience for all administrators.

Washington State Code Reviser's Office