WSR 10-18-081

EXPEDITED RULES

DEPARTMENT OF

LABOR AND INDUSTRIES

[ Filed August 31, 2010, 3:17 p.m. ]

     Title of Rule and Other Identifying Information: Chapter 296-307 WAC, Safety standards for agriculture.

NOTICE

     THIS RULE IS BEING PROPOSED UNDER AN EXPEDITED RULE-MAKING PROCESS THAT WILL ELIMINATE THE NEED FOR THE AGENCY TO HOLD PUBLIC HEARINGS, PREPARE A SMALL BUSINESS ECONOMIC IMPACT STATEMENT, OR PROVIDE RESPONSES TO THE CRITERIA FOR A SIGNIFICANT LEGISLATIVE RULE. IF YOU OBJECT TO THIS USE OF THE EXPEDITED RULE-MAKING PROCESS, YOU MUST EXPRESS YOUR OBJECTIONS IN WRITING AND THEY MUST BE SENT TO Naomi Goodman, Department of Labor and Industries, P.O. Box 44001, Olympia, WA 98504-4001 , AND RECEIVED BY November 2, 2010.


     Purpose of the Proposal and Its Anticipated Effects, Including Any Changes in Existing Rules: The department is responding to a Federal Register notice where Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated their respirator requirements for the controlled negative pressure REDON fit testing protocol. We are updating our rule to be identical to OSHA's rule.

     In addition there are some minor typos and language changes that will be made to make this rule consistent with other division of occupational safety and health (DOSH) rules.

     The proposed language in chapter 296-307 WAC will meet L&I's statutory mandate to be as-effective-as the federal equivalent.

     Reasons Supporting Proposal: By law, L&I's DOSH is required to have laws at-least-as-effective-as OSHA.

     Statutory Authority for Adoption: RCW 49.17.050.

     Statute Being Implemented: Chapter 49.17 RCW.

     Rule is not necessitated by federal law, federal or state court decision.

     Name of Proponent: Department of labor and industries, governmental.

     Name of Agency Personnel Responsible for Drafting: Tracy Spencer, Tumwater, (360) 902-5530; Implementation and Enforcement: Michael Silverstein, Tumwater, (360) 902-4805.

August 31, 2010

Judy Schurke

Director

OTS-3473.1


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-018   What are the employer's responsibilities?  

     You must:

     (1) Provide a safe and healthful working environment.

     (2) Ensure that employees do not use defective or unsafe tools and equipment, including tools and equipment that may be furnished by the employee.

     (3) Implement a written accident prevention program as required by these standards.

     (4) Implement a hazard communication program as required by WAC 296-307-550.

     (5) Establish a system for reporting and recording accidents on the OSHA ((200)) 300 log. (See chapter 296-27 WAC.)

     (6) Provide safety education and training programs.

     (7) Implement the requirements of WAC 296-62-074 through 296-62-07451 to ensure the safety of employees who are exposed to cadmium in the workplace.

     (8) Implement the requirements of WAC 296-307-642 through 296-307-656 to ensure the safety of employees who are exposed to confined spaces in the workplace.

     (9) Control chemical agents.

     You must:

     • Control chemical agents in a manner that they will not present a hazard to your workers; or

     • Protect workers from the hazard of contact with, or exposure to, chemical agents.

Reference: Pesticides are chemical agents and are covered by chapter 296-307 WAC Part I, Pesticides (worker protection standard). Pesticides may also be covered by WAC 296-307-594, Respirators.
     (10) Protect employees from biological agents.

     You must:

     • Protect employees from exposure to hazardous concentrations of biological agents that may result from processing, handling or using materials or waste.

Note: Examples of biological agents include:
– Animals or animal waste
– Body fluids
– Biological agents in a medical research lab
– Mold or mildew.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-018, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05; 03-10-068, § 296-307-018, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-307-018, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040. 98-24-096, § 296-307-018, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99. 97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-018, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-018, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 98-24-096, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99)

WAC 296-307-12010   Exemptions -- Standards for workers -- 40 CFR, § 170.104.   The workers listed in this section are exempt from the specified provisions of WAC 296-307-120.

     (1) Owners of agricultural establishments.

     (a) The owner of an agricultural establishment is not required to provide to himself/herself or members of his/her immediate family who are performing tasks related to the production of agricultural plants on their own agricultural establishment the protections of:

     (i) WAC 296-307-12020 (3)(e) through (i);

     (ii) ((WAC 296-307-12020 (3)(e) through (i); as referenced in WAC 296-307-12020 (4)(b)(iii) and (5);

     (iii))) WAC 296-307-12025;

     (((iv))) (iii) WAC 296-307-12030;

     (((v))) (iv) WAC 296-307-12040;

     (((vi))) (v) WAC 296-307-12045;

     (((vii))) (vi) WAC 296-307-12050;

     (((viii))) (vii) WAC 296-307-12055.

     (b) The owner of the agricultural establishment must provide the protections listed in (a)(i) through (((viii))) (vii) of this subsection to other workers and other persons who are not members of his/her immediate family.

     (2) Crop advisors.

     (a) Provided that the conditions of this section are met, a person who is certified or licensed as a crop advisor by a program acknowledged as appropriate in writing by EPA or a state or tribal lead agency for pesticide enforcement, and persons performing crop advising tasks under such qualified crop advisor's direct supervision, are exempt from the provisions of:

     (i) WAC 296-307-12050.

     (ii) WAC 296-307-12055.

     A person is under the direct supervision of a crop advisor when the crop advisor exerts the supervisory controls set out in (b)(iii) and (iv) of this subsection. Direct supervision does not require that the crop advisor be physically present at all times, but the crop advisor must be readily accessible to the employees at all times.

     (b) Conditions of exemption.

     (i) The certification or licensing program requires pesticide safety training that includes, at least, all the information in WAC 296-307-13025 (3)(d).

     (ii) Applies only when performing crop advising tasks in the treated area.

     (iii) The crop advisor must make specific determinations regarding the appropriate PPE, appropriate decontamination supplies, and how to conduct the tasks safely. The crop advisor must convey this information to each person under his direct supervision in a language that the person understands.

     (iv) Before entering a treated area, the certified or licensed crop advisor must inform, through an established practice of communication, each person under his/her direct supervision of the pesticide product and active ingredient(s) applied, method of application, time of application, the restricted entry interval which tasks to undertake, and how to contact the crop advisor.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040. 98-24-096, § 296-307-12010, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99. 97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-12010, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, § 296-306A-12010, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-594   Scope.   This part applies to all use of respirators at work.

     (1) Respirators are required whenever respiratory hazards (including oxygen-deficient conditions) are present. For example, use respirators at any of the following times:

     (a) While exposure controls are being evaluated or put in place;

     (b) When it is not feasible to use exposure controls to remove or reduce the airborne hazard to below the PEL.

     (2) This chapter applies whenever respirators are used at work.

     IMPORTANT:

     Before you decide to use respirators, you are required to evaluate respiratory hazards and implement control methods as outlined in WAC 296-307-624 through 296-307-628, Respiratory hazards.

     The term "respiratory hazards" will be used throughout this part to refer to oxygen deficient conditions and harmful airborne hazards.

     Definition:

     Respirators are a type of personal protective equipment designed to protect the wearer from respiratory hazards.

     You can use Table 1 for general guidance on which sections apply to you.

Table 1
Sections that apply to your workplace

If employees... Then the sections marked with an "X" apply...
596 598 600 602-618 620 622
Request and are permitted to voluntarily use filtering-facepiece respirators, and are not exposed to a respiratory hazard X X
Request and are permitted to voluntarily use respirators that are NOT filtering-facepiece respirators, and are not exposed to a respiratory hazard X X X X
Are required to use any respirator by WISHA or the employer X X X X X
Would use an escape respirator in an emergency X X X X X

Reference: See WAC 296-307-100, Personal protective equipment (PPE) to find requirements for other types of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as eye, hand, and head protection.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-594, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 06-08-087, filed 4/4/06, effective 9/1/06)

WAC 296-307-62625   Permissible exposure limits of air contaminants.  

     IMPORTANT:

     The following information applies to Table 3, Permissible Exposure Limits for Air Contaminants.

     • Exposure needs to be determined from personal air samples taken in the breathing zone or from monitoring representative of the employee's breathing zone.

     • Ppm refers to parts of vapor or gas per million parts of air by volume, at 25 degrees C and 760 mm Hg pressure.

     • Mg/m3 refers to milligrams of substance per cubic meter of air.

     • For a metal that is measured as the metal itself, only the CAS number for the metal is given. The CAS numbers for individual compounds of the metal are not provided. For more information about CAS registry numbers see the web site: http://www.cas.org.

     • Time weighted averages (TWA8) represent the maximum allowed average exposure for any 8-hour time period. For work periods longer than 8 hours the TWA8 needs to be determined using the 8 continuous hours with the highest average concentration.

     • Short-term exposure limits (STEL) represent maximum allowed average exposure for any fifteen-minute period, unless another time period is noted in Table 3.

     • The ceiling represents the maximum allowed exposure for the shortest time period that can feasibly be measured.

     • An "X" in the "skin" column indicates the substance can be absorbed through the skin, either by airborne or direct contact.

     • Requirements for the use of gloves, coveralls, goggles, and other personal protective equipment can be found in WAC 296-307-100.

     • The respirable fraction of particulate is measured by sampling with a size-selector having the following characteristics:


Mean aerodynamic diameter in micrometers Percent passing the selector
1 97
2 91
3 74
4 50
5 30
6 17
7 9
8 5
10 1

Table 3 "Permissible Exposure Limits for Air Contaminants"

Substance CAS TWA8 STEL Ceiling Skin
Abate (Temephos) 3383-96-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Acetic acid 64-19-7 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 ---- ---- 5 ppm ----
Acetone 67-64-1 750 ppm 1,000 ppm ---- ----
Acetonitrile 75-05-8 40 ppm 60 ppm ---- ----
2-Acetylaminofluorene 53-96-3 ---- ---- ---- ----
Acetylene 74-86-2 Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Acetylene dichloride

     (1,2-Dichloroethylene)

540-59-0 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Acetylene tetrabromide 79-27-6 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) 50-78-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Acrolein 107-02-8 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Acrylamide 79-06-1 0.03 mg/m3 0.09 mg/m3 ---- X
Acrylic acid 79-10-7 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Acrylonitrile (Vinyl cyanide) 107-13-1 2 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Aldrin 309-00-2 0.25 mg/m3 0.75 mg/m3 ---- X
Allyl alcohol 107-18-6 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Allyl chloride 107-05-1 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Allyl glycidyl ether (AGE) 106-92-3 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Allyl propyl disulfide 2179-59-1 2 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
alpha-Alumina (Aluminum oxide) 1344-28-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Aluminum (as Al) 7429-90-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Pyro powders ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Welding fumes ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Soluble salts ---- 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Alkyls (NOC) ---- 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Aluminum oxide (Alundum, Corundum) 7429-90-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
4-Aminodiphenyl 92-67-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
2-Aminoethanol (Ethanolamine) 141-43-5 3 ppm 6 ppm ---- ----
2-Aminopyridine 504-29-0 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
Amitrole 61-82-5 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Ammonia 7664-41-7 25 ppm 35 ppm ---- ----
Ammonium chloride, fume 12125-02-9 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Ammonium sulfamate (Ammate) 7773-06-0 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5.0 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
n-Amyl acetate 628-63-7 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
sec-Amyl acetate 626-38-0 125 ppm 156 ppm ---- ----
Aniline and homologues 62-53-3 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Anisidine (o, p-isomers) 29191-52-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Antimony and compounds (as Sb) 7440-36-0 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
ANTU (alpha Naphthyl thiourea) 86-88-4 0.3 mg/m3 0.9 mg/m3 ---- ----
Argon 7440-37-1 Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Arsenic, organic compounds (as As) 7440-38-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Arsenic, inorganic compounds (as As)

     (when use is covered by

     WAC 296-62-07347)

7440-38-2 0.01 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Arsenic, inorganic compounds (as As)

     (when use is not covered by WAC

     296-62-07347)

7440-38-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Arsine 7784-42-1 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Asbestos ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Asphalt (Petroleum fumes) 8052-42-4 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Atrazine 1912-24-9 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Azinphos methyl (Guthion) 86-50-0 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Azodrin (Monocrotophos) 6923-22-4 0.25 mg/m3 0.75 mg/m3 ---- ----
Barium, soluble compounds (as Ba) 7440-39-3 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Barium sulfate 7727-43-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Baygon (Propoxur) 114-26-1 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Benomyl 17804-35-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Benzene 71-43-2 1 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Benzidine 92-87-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
p-Benzoquinone (Quinone) 106-51-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Benzo(a) pyrene (Coal tar pitch volatiles) 65996-93-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Benzoyl peroxide 94-36-0 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Benzyl chloride 100-44-7 1ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Beryllium and beryllium

     compounds (as Be)

7440-41-7 0.002 mg/m3 0.005 mg/m3

(30 min.)

0.025 mg/m3 ----
Biphenyl (Diphenyl) 92-52-4 0.2 ppm 0.6 ppm ---- ----
Bismuth telluride, undoped 1304-82-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Bismuth telluride, Se-doped ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Borates, tetra, sodium salts ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Anhydrous 1330-43-4 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Decahydrate 1303-96-4 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Pentahydrate 12179-04-3 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Boron oxide 1303-86-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Boron tribromide 10294-33-4 ---- ---- 1 ppm ----
Boron trifluoride 6737-07-2 ---- ---- 1 ppm ----
Bromacil 314-40-9 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Bromine 7726-95-6 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Bromine pentafluoride 7789-30-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Bromochloromethane

     (Chlorobromomthane)

74-97-5 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Bromoform 15-25-2 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- X
Butadiene (1,3-butadiene) 106-99-0 1 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Butane 106-97-8 800 ppm 1,000 ppm ---- ----
Butanethiol (Butyl mercaptan) 109-79-5 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
2-Butanone (Methyl ethyl ketone) 78-93-3 200 ppm 300 ppm ---- ----
2-Butoxy ethanol (Butyl cellosolve) 111-76-2 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- X
n-Butyl acetate 123-86-4 150 ppm 200 ppm ---- ----
sec-Butyl acetate 105-46-4 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
tert-Butyl acetate 540-88-5 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Butyl acrylate 141-32-2 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
n-Butyl alcohol 71-36-3 ---- ---- 50 ppm X
sec-Butyl alcohol 78-92-2 100 ppm 150 ppm -- -- ----
tert-Butyl alcohol 75-65-0 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Butylamine 109-73-9 ---- ---- 5 ppm X
Butyl cellosolve (2-Butoxy ethanol) 111-76-2 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
tert-Butyl chromate (as CrOs) 1189-85-1 ---- ---- 0.1 mg/m3 X
n-Butyl glycidyl ether (BGE) 2426-08-6 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
n-Butyl lactate 138-22-7 5 ppm 10 ppm --- ----
Butyl mercaptan 109-79-5 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
o-sec-Butylphenol 89-72-5 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
p-tert-Butyl-toluene 98-51-1 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Cadmium oxide fume (as Cd) 1306-19-0 0.005 mg/m3 ---- -- -- ----
Cadmium dust and salts (as Cd) 7440-43-9 0.005 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Calcium arsenate ---- 0.01 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Calcium carbonate 1317-65-3 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium cyanamide 156-62-7 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium hydroxide 1305-62-0 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium oxide 1305-78-8 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium silicate 1344-95-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium sulfate 7778-18-9 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Camphor (synthetic) 76-22-2 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Caprolactam 105-60-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Dust ---- 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Vapor ---- 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Captafol (Difolatan) 2425-06-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Captan 133-06-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Carbaryl (Sevin) 63-25-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Carbofuran (Furadon) 1563-66-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Carbon black 1333-86-4 3.5 mg/m3 7 mg/m3 ---- ----
Carbon dioxide 124-38-9 5,000 ppm 30,000 ppm ---- ----
Carbon disulfide 75-15-0 4 ppm 12 ppm ---- X
Carbon monoxide 630-08-0 35 ppm 200 ppm (5 min.) 1,500 ppm ----
Carbon tetrabromide 558-13-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Carbon tetrachloride

     (Tetrachloromethane)

56-23-5 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Carbonyl chloride (Phosgene) 7803-51-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Carbonyl fluoride 353-50-4 2 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Catechol (Pyrocatechol) 120-80-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Cellosolve acetate

     (2-Ethoxyethylacetate)

111-15-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Cellulose (paper fiber) 9004-34-6 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cesium hydroxide 21351-79-1 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chlordane 57-74-9 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Chlorinated camphene (Toxaphen) 8001-35-2 0.5 mg/m3 1 mg/m3 ---- X
Chlorinated diphenyl oxide 55720-99-5 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chlorine 7782-50-5 0.5 ppm ---- 1 ppm ----
Chlorine dioxide 10049-04-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Chlorine trifluoride 7790-91-2 ---- ---- 0.1 ppm ----
Chloroacetaldehyde 107-20-0 ---- ---- 1 ppm ----
a-Chloroacetophenone

     (Phenacyl chloride)

532-21-4 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Chloroacetyl chloride 79-04-9 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Chlorobenzene (Monochlorobenzene) 108-90-7 75 ppm 113 ppm ---- ----
o-Chlorobenzylidene

     malononitrile (OCBM)

2698-41-1 ---- ---- 0.05 ppm X
Chlorobromomethane 74-97-5 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
2-Chloro-1, 3-butadiene

     (beta-Chloroprene)

126-99-8 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Chlorodifluoromethane 75-45-6 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Chlorodiphenyl (42% Chlorine) (PCB)

     (Polychlorobiphenyls)

53469-21-9 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
Chlorodiphenyl (54% Chlorine)

     (Polychlorobiphenyls (PCB))

11097-69-1 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
1-Chloro-2, 3-epoxypropane

     (Epichlorhydrin)

106-89-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
2-Chloroethanol (Ethylene chlorohydrin) 107-07-3 ---- ---- 1 ppm X
Chloroethylene (vinyl chloride) 75-01-4 1 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Chloroform (Trichloromethane) 67-66-3 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
1-Chloro-1-nitropropane 600-25-9 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
bis-Chloromethyl ether 542-88-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
Chloromethyl methyl ether

     (Methyl chloromethyl ether)

107-30-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
Chloropentafluoroethane 76-15-3 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Chloropicrin (Nitrotrichloromethane) 76-06-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
beta-Chloroprene (2-Chloro-1,

     3-butadiene)

126-99-8 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
o-Chlorostyrene 2039-87-4 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
o-Chlorotoluene 95-49-8 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
2-Chloro-6-trichloromethyl

     pyridine (Nitrapyrin)

1929-82-4 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chlorpyrifos 2921-88-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Chromic acid and chromates

     (as CrO3)

Varies with

compound

0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chromium, soluble, chromic and

     chromous salts (as Cr)

7440-47-3 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- -- --
Chromium (VI) compounds (as Cr) ---- 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chromium metal and insoluble salts 7440-47-3 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chromyl chloride 14977-61-8 0.025 ppm 0.075 ppm ---- ----
Chrysene (Coal tar pitch volatiles) 65996-93-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Clopidol 2971-90-6 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Coal dust (less than 5% SiO2) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Coal dust (greater than or

     equal to 5% SiO2)

---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Coal tar pitch volatiles

     (benzene soluble fraction)

     (Particulate polycyclic

     aromatic hydrocarbons)

65996-93-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cobalt, metal fume & dust (as Co) 7440-48-4 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cobalt carbonyl (as Co) 10210-68-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cobalt hydrocarbonyl (as Co) 16842-03-8 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Coke oven emissions ---- 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Copper (as Cu) 7440-50-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Fume ---- 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dusts and mists ---- 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cotton dust (raw) (waste sorting, blending, cleaning, willowing and garetting) ---- 1 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Corundum (Aluminum oxide) 7429-90-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Crag herbicide (Sesone, Sodium-2,

     4-dichloro-phenoxyethyl sulfate)

136-78-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cresol (all isomers) 1319-77-3 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Crotonaldehyde

    

123-73-9;

4170-30-3

2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
Crufomate 299-86-5 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cumene 98-82-8 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- X
Cyanamide 420-04-2 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cyanide (as CN) Varies with

compound

5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- X
Cyanogen 460-19-5 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Cyanogen chloride 506-77-4 ---- ---- 0.3 ppm ----
Cyclohexane 110-82-7 300 ppm 375 ppm ---- ----
Cyclohexanol 108-93-0 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- X
Cyclohexanone 108-94-1 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- X
Cyclohexene 110-83-8 300 ppm 375 ppm ---- ----
Cyclohexylamine 108-91-8 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Cyclonite (RDX) 121-82-4 1.5 mg/m3 3.0 mg/m3 ---- X
Cyclopentadiene 542-92-7 75 ppm 113 ppm ---- ----
Cyclopentane 287-92-3 600 ppm 750 ppm ---- ----
Cyhexatin (Tricyclohexyltin hydroxide) 13121-70-5 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
2,4-D (Dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid) 94-75-7 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
DBCP (1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane) 96-12-8 0.001 ppm ---- 0.005 ppm ----
DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltri-chloroethane) 50-29-3 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
DDVP, (Dichlorvos) 62-73-7 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Dasanit (Fensulfothion) 115-90-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Decaborane 17702-41-9 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- X
Demeton 8065-48-3 0.01 ppm 0.03 ppm ---- X
Diacetone alcohol (4-hydroxy-4-methyl-

     2-pentanone)

123-42-2 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
1, 2-Diaminoethane (Ethylenediamine) 107-15-3 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Diazinon 333-41-5 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Diazomethane 334-88-3 0.2 ppm 0.6 ppm ---- ----
Diborane 19287-45-7 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Dibrom (see Naled) 300-76-5 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- X
1, 2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) 96-12-8 0.001 ppm ---- 0.005 ppm ----
2-N-Dibutylamino ethanol 102-81-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Dibutyl phosphate 107-66-4 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Dibutyl phthalate 84-74-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dichloroacetylene 7572-29-4 ---- ----- 0.1 ppm ----
o-Dichlorobenzene 95-50-1 ---- ---- 50 ppm ----
p-Dichlorobenzene 106-46-7 75 ppm 110 ppm ---- ----
3, 3'-Dichlorobenzidine 91-94-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
Dichlorodiphenyltri-chloroethane (DDT) 50-29-3 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
Dichlorodifluoromethane 75-71-8 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
1, 3-Dichloro-5, 5-dimethyl hydantoin 118-52-5 0.2 mg/m3 0.4 mg/m3 ---- ----
1, 1-Dichloroethane (Ethylidine chloride) 75-34-3 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
1, 2-Dichloroethane

     (Ethylene dichloride)

107-06-2 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
1, 1-Dichloroethylene

     (Vinylidene chloride)

75-35-4 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
1, 2-Dichloroethylene (Acetylene

     dichloride)

540-59-0 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Dichloroethyl ether 111-44-4 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Dichlorofluoromethane 75-43-4 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Dichloromethane (Methylene chloride) 75-09-2 25 ppm 125 ppm ---- ----
1, 1-Dichloro-1-nitroethane 594-72-9 2 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) 94-75-7 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
1, 2-Dichloropropane

     (Propylene dichloride)

78-87-5 75 ppm 110 ppm ---- ----
Dichloropropene 542-75-6 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
2, 2-Dichloropropionic acid 75-99-0 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Dichlorotetrafluoroethane 76-14-2 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Dichlorvos (DDVP) 62-73-7 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Dicrotophos 141-66-2 0.25 mg/m3 0.75 mg/m3 ---- X
Dicyclopentadiene 77-73-6 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Dicyclopentadienyl iron 102-54-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dieldrin 60-57-1 0.25 mg/m3 0.75 mg/m3 ---- X
Diethanolamine 111-42-2 3 ppm 6 ppm ---- ----
Diethylamine 109-89-7 10 ppm 25 ppm ---- ----
2-Diethylaminoethanol 100-37-8 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Diethylene triamine 111-40-0 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
Diethyl ether (Ethyl ether) 60-29-7 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Diethyl ketone 96-22-0 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Diethyl phthalate 84-66-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Difluorodibromomethane 75-61-6 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Difolatan (Captafol) 2425-06-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Diglycidyl ether (DGE) 2238-07-5 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Dihydroxybenzene (Hydroquinone) 123-31-9 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 -- -- ----
Diisobutyl ketone (2, 6-

     Dimethylheptanone)

108-83-8 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Diisopropylamine 108-18-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Dimethoxymethane (Methylal) 109-87-5 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Dimethyl acetamide 127-19-5 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Dimethylamine 124-40-3 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
4-Dimethylaminoazo benzene 60-11-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
Dimethylaminobenzene (Xylidene) 1300-73-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Dimethylaniline (N, N-Dimethylaniline) 121-69-7 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Dimethylbenzene (Xylene) 1300-73-8 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Dimethyl-1, 2-dibromo-2,

     2-dichloroethyl phosphate (Naled)

300-76-5 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- X
Dimethylformamide 68-12-2 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
2, 6-Dimethylheptanone

     (Diisobutyl ketone)

108-83-8 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
1, 1-Dimethylhydrazine 57-14-7 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- X
Dimethyl phthalate 131-11-3 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dimethyl sulfate 77-78-1 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Dinitolmide (3, 5-Dinitro-o-toluamide) 148-01-6 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dinitrobenzene (all isomers -

     alpha, meta and para)

528-29-0;

99-65-0;

100-25-4

0.15 ppm 0.45 ppm ---- X
Dinitro-o-cresol 534-52-1 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
3, 5-Dinitro-o-toluamide (Dinitolmide) 148-01-6 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dinitrotoluene 25321-14-6 1.5 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
Dioxane (Diethylene dioxide) 123-91-1 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- X
Dioxathion 78-34-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Diphenyl (Biphenyl) 92-52-4 0.2 ppm 0.6 ppm ---- ----
Diphenylamine 122-39-4 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Diphenylmethane diisocyanate

     (Methylene bisphenyl           isocyanate (MDI))

101-68-8 ---- ---- 0.02 ppm ----
Dipropylene glycol methyl ether 34590-94-8 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- X
Dipropyl ketone 123-19-3 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Diquat 85-00-7 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Di-sec, Octyl phthalate

     (Di-2-ethylhexylphthalate)

117-81-7 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Disulfram 97-77-8 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Disulfoton 298-04-4 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
2, 6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol 128-37-0 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Diuron 330-54-1 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Divinyl benzene 1321-74-0 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Emery 12415-34-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Endosulfan (Thiodan) 115-29-7 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Endrin 72-20-8 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Epichlorhydrin (1-Chloro-2,

     3-epoxypropane)

106-89-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
EPN 2104-64-5 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
1, 2-Epoxypropane (Propylene oxide) 75-56-9 20 ppm 30 ppm ---- ----
2, 3-Epoxy-1-propanol (Glycidol) 556-52-5 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Ethane ---- Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Ethanethiol (Ethyl mercaptan) 75-08-1 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
Ethanol (Ethyl alcohol) 64-17-5 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Ethanolamine (2-Aminoethanol) 141-43-5 3 ppm 6 ppm ---- ----
Ethion 563-12-2 0.4 mg/m3 1.2 mg/m3 ---- X
2-Ethoxyethanol (Glycol

     monoethyl ether)

110-80-5 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
2-Ethoxyethyl acetate

     (Cellosolve acetate)

111-15-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Ethyl acetate 141-78-6 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl acrylate 140-88-5 5 ppm 25 ppm ---- X
Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) 64-17-5 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Ethylamine 75-04-07 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl amyl ketone

     (5-Methyl-3-hepatone)

541-85-5 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl benzene 100-41-4 100 ppm 125 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl bromide 74-96-4 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl butyl ketone (3-Heptanone) 106-35-4 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl chloride 75-00-3 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Ethylene 74-85-1 Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Ethylene chlorohydrin (2-Chloroethanol) 107-07-3 ---- ---- 1 ppm X
Ethylenediamine (1,2-Diaminoethane) 107-15-3 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Ethylene dibromide 106-93-4 0.1 ppm 0.5 ppm ---- ----
Ethylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloroethane) 107-06-2 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Ethylene glycol 107-21-1 ---- ---- 50 ppm ----
Ethylene glycol dinitrate 628-96-6 ---- 0.1 mg/m3 ---- X
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether

     acetate (Methyl cellosolve           acetate)

---- 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Ethyleneimine 151-56-4 ---- ---- ---- X
Ethylene oxide (see chapter 296-855 WAC) 75-21-8 1 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl ether (Diethyl ether) 60-29-7 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl formate 109-94-4 100 ppm 125 ppm ---- ----
Ethylidine chloride (1, 1-Dichloroethane) 107-06-2 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Ethylidene norbornene 16219-75-3 ---- ---- 5.0 ppm ----
Ethyl mercaptan (Ethanethiol) 75-08-1 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
n-Ethylmorpholine 100-74-3 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Ethyl sec-amyl ketone

     (5-methyl-3-heptanone)

541-85-5 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl silicate 78-10-4 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Fenamiphos 22224-92-6 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Fensulfothion (Dasanit) 115-90-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Fenthion 55-38-9 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Ferbam ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate 14484-64-1 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Ferrovanadium dust 12604-58-9 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Fluorides (as F) Varies with

compound

2.5 mg/m3 5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Fluorine 7782-41-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Fluorotrichloromethane

     (see Trichlorofluoro methane)

75-69-4 ---- ---- 1,000 ppm ----
Fonofos 944-22-9 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Formaldehyde 50-00-0 0.75 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Formamide 75-12-7 20 ppm 30 ppm ---- ----
Formic acid 64-18-6 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Furadon (carbofuran) 1563-66-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Furfural 98-01-1 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Furfuryl alcohol 98-00-0 10 ppm 15 ppm ---- X
Gasoline 8006-61-9 300 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Germanium tetrahydride 7782-65-2 0.2 ppm 0.6 ppm ---- ----
Glass, fibrous or dust ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Gluteraldehyde 111-30-8 ---- ---- 0.2 ppm ----
Glycerin mist 56-81-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Glycidol (2, 3-Epoxy-1-propanol) 556-52-5 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Glycol monoethyl ether

     (2-Ethoxyethanol)

110-80-5 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Grain dust (oat, wheat, barley) ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Graphite, natural 7782-42-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable particulate ---- 2.5 mg/m3 5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Graphite, synthetic ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Guthion (Azinphosmethyl) 86-50-0 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Gypsum 13397-24-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Hafnium 7440-58-6 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Helium ---- Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Heptachlor 76-44-8 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Heptane (n-heptane) 142-82-5 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
2-Heptanone (Methyl n-amyl ketone) 110-43-0 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
3-Heptanone (Ethyl butyl ketone) 106-35-4 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Hexachlorobutadiene 87-68-3 0.02 ppm 0.06 ppm ---- X
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene 77-47-4 0.01 ppm 0.03 ppm ---- ----
Hexachloroethane 67-72-1 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
Hexachloronaphthalene 1335-87-1 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Hexafluoroacetone 684-16-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Hexane ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     n-hexane 110-54-3 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
     other isomers Varies with

compound

500 ppm 1,000 ppm ---- ----
2-Hexanone (Methyl-n-butyl ketone) 591-78-6 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Hexone (Methyl isobutyl ketone) 108-10-1 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
sec-Hexyl acetate 108-84-9 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Hexylene glycol 107-41-5 ---- ---- 25 ppm ----
Hydrazine 302-01-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Hydrogen ---- Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Hydrogenated terphenyls 61788-32-7 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
Hydrogen bromide 10035-10-6 ---- ---- 3.0 ppm ----
Hydrogen chloride 7647-01-0 ---- ---- 5.0 ppm ----
Hydrogen cyanide 74-90-8 ---- 4.7 ppm ---- X
Hydrogen fluoride 7664-39-3 ---- ---- 3 ppm ----
Hydrogen peroxide 7722-84-1 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Hydrogen selenide (as Se) 7783-07-5 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Hydrogen sulfide 7783-06-4 10 ppm 15 ppm ---- ----
Hydroquinone (Dihydroxybenzene) 123-31-9 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
4-Hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone

     (Diacetone alcohol)

123-42-2 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
2-Hydroxypropyl acrylate 99-61-1 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- X
Indene 95-13-6 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Indium and compounds (as In) 7440-74-6 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Iodine 7553-56-2 ---- ---- 0.1 ppm ----
Iodoform 75-47-8 0.6 ppm 1.8 ppm ---- ----
Iron oxide dust and fume (as Fe) 1309-37-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Iron pentacarbonyl (as Fe) 13463-40-6 0.1 ppm 0.2 ppm ---- ----
Iron salts, soluble (as Fe) Varies with

compound

1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Isoamyl acetate 123-92-2 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Isoamyl alcohol (primary and secondary) 123-51-3 100 ppm 125 ppm ---- ----
Isobutyl acetate 110-19-0 150 ppm 188 ppm ---- ----
Isobutyl alcohol 78-83-1 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Isooctyl alcohol 26952-21-6 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- X
Isophorone 78-59-1 4 ppm ---- 5 ppm ----
Isophorone diisocyanate 4098-71-9 0.005 ppm 0.02 ppm ---- X
Isopropoxyethanol 109-59-1 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Isopropyl acetate 108-21-4 250 ppm 310 ppm ---- ----
Isopropyl alcohol 67-63-0 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Isopropylamine 75-31-0 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
N-Isopropylaniline 768-52-5 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Isopropyl ether 108-20-3 250 ppm 313 ppm ---- ----
Isopropyl glycidyl ether (IGE) 4016-14-2 50 ppm 75 ppm ----- ----
Kaolin ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Ketene 463-51-4 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Lannate (Methomyl) 16752-77-5 2.5 mg/m3 5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Lead, inorganic (as Pb) 7439-92-1 0.05 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Lead arsenate (as Pb) 3687-31-8 0.05 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Lead chromate (as Pb) 7758-97-6 0.05 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Limestone 1317-65-3 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Lindane 58-89-9 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Lithium hydride 7580-67-8 0.025 mg/m3 0.075 mg/m3 ---- ----
L.P.G. (liquified petroleum gas) 68476-85-7 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Magnesite 546-93-0 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Magnesium oxide fume 1309-48-4 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Malathion 121-75-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- X
Maleic anhydride 108-31-6 0.25 ppm 0.75 ppm ---- ----
Manganese and compounds (as Mn) 7439-96-5 ---- ---- 5 mg/m3 ----
Manganese cyclopentadienyl

     tricarbonyl (as Mn)

12079-65-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Manganese tetroxide and fume (as Mn) 7439-96-5 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Marble 1317-65-3 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
MBOCA (4, 4'-Methylene bis

     (2-chloro-aniline))

101-14-4 ---- ---- ---- X
MDA

     (4, 4-Methylene dianiline)

101-77-9 0.01 ppm 0.1 ppm ---- X
MDI (Methylene bisphenyl isocyanate)

     (Diphenylmethane diisocyanate)

101-68-8 ---- ---- 0.02 ppm ----
MEK

     (Methyl ethyl ketone)

     (2-Butanone)

78-93-3 200 ppm 300 ppm ---- ----
MEKP

     (Methyl ethyl ketone peroxide)

1338-23-4 ---- ---- 0.2 ppm ----
Mercury (as Hg) 7439-97-6 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Aryl and inorganic ---- 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
     Organo-alkyl compounds ---- 0.01 mg/m3 0.03 mg/m3 ---- X
     Vapor ---- 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- X
Mesityl oxide 141-79-7 15 ppm 25 ppm ---- ----
Methacrylic acid 79-41-4 20 ppm 30 ppm ---- X
Methane ---- Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Methanethiol (Methyl mercaptan) 74-93-1 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
Methanol (Methyl alcohol) 67-56-1 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- X
Methomyl (lannate) 16752-77-5 2.5 mg/m3 5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Methoxychlor 72-43-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
2-Methoxyethanol (Methyl cellosolve) 109-86-4 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
2-Methoxyethyl acetate

     (Methyl cellosolve acetate)

110-49-6 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
4-Methoxyphenol 150-76-5 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Methyl acetate 79-20-9 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Methyl acetylene (propyne) 74-99-7 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Methyl acetylene-propadiene

     mixture (MAPP)

---- 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Methyl acrylate 96-33-3 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Methylacrylonitrile 126-98-7 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
Methylal (Dimethoxy-methane) 109-87-5 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Methyl alcohol (methanol) 67-56-1 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- X
Methylamine 74-89-5 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Methyl amyl alcohol

     (Methyl isobutyl carbinol)

108-11-2 25 ppm 40 ppm ---- X
Methyl n-amyl ketone (2-Heptanone) 110-43-0 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
N-Methyl aniline (Monomethyl aniline) 100-61-8 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- X
Methyl bromide 74-83-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Methyl-n-butyl ketone (2-Hexanone) 591-78-6 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Methyl cellosolve (2-Methoxyethanol) 109-86-4 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Methyl cellosolve acetate

     (2-Methoxyethyl acetate)

110-49-6 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Methyl chloride 74-87-3 50 ppm 100 ppm ---- ----
Methyl chloroform

     (1, 1, 1-trichlorethane)

71-55-6 350 ppm 450 ppm ---- ----
Methyl chloromethyl ether

     (chloromethyl methyl ether)

107-30-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
Methyl 2-cyanoacrylate 137-05-3 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
Methylcyclohexane 108-87-2 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Methylcyclohexanol 25639-42-3 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Methylcyclohexanone 583-60-8 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- X
Methylcyclopentadienyl

     manganese tricarbonyl (as           Mn)

12108-13-3 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Methyl demeton 8022-00-2 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Methylene bisphenyl isocyanate (MDI)

     (Diphenylmethane diisocyanate)

101-68-8 ---- ---- 0.02 ppm ----
4, 4'-Methylene bis

     (2-chloro-aniline) (MBOCA)

101-14-4 ---- ---- ---- X
Methylene bis (4-cyclohexylisocyanate) 5124-30-1 ---- ---- 0.01 ppm ----
Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) 75-09-2 25 ppm 125 ppm ---- ----
4, 4-Methylene dianiline (MDA) 101-77-9 0.01 ppm 0.1 ppm ---- X
Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)

     (2-Butanone)

78-93-3 200 ppm 300 ppm ---- ----
Methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) 1338-23-4 ---- ---- 0.2 ppm ----
Methyl formate 107-31-3 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
5-Methyl-3-heptanone

     (Ethyl amyl ketone)

541-85-5 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Methyl hydrazine

     (Monomethyl hydrazine)

60-34-4 ---- ---- 0.2 ppm X
Methyl iodide 74-88-4 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Methyl isoamyl ketone 110-12-3 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Methyl isobutyl carbinol

     (Methyl amyl alcohol)

108-11-2 25 ppm 40 ppm ---- X
Methyl isobutyl ketone (Hexone) 108-10-1 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Methyl isocyanate 624-83-9 0.02 ppm 0.06 ppm ---- X
Methyl isopropyl ketone 563-80-4 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Methyl mercaptan (Methanethiol) 74-93-1 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
Methyl methacrylate 80-62-6 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Methyl parathion 298-00-0 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Methyl propyl ketone (2-Pentanone) 107-87-9 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Methyl silicate 684-84-5 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
alpha-Methyl styrene 98-83-9 50 ppm 100 ppm ---- ----
Mevinphos (Phosdrin) 7786-34-7 0.01 ppm 0.03 ppm ---- X
Metribuzin 21087-64-9 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Mica (Silicates) Respirable fraction 12001-26-2 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Molybdenum (as Mo) 7439-98-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Soluble compounds ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Insoluble compounds ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Monochlorobenzene (Chlorobenzene) 108-90-7 75 ppm 113 ppm ---- ----
Monocrotophos (Azodrin) 6923-22-4 0.25 mg/m3 0.75 mg/m3 ---- ----
Monomethyl aniline (N-Methyl aniline) 100-61-8 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- X
Monomethyl hydrazine ---- ---- ---- 0.2 ppm ----
Morpholine 110-91-8 20 ppm 30 ppm ---- X
Naled (Dibrom) 300-76-5 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- X
Naphtha 8030-30-6 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- X
Naphthalene 91-20-3 10 ppm 15 ppm ---- ----
alpha-Naphthylamine 134-32-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
beta-Naphthylamine 91-59-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
Neon 7440-01-9 Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Nickel carbonyl (as Ni) 13463-39-3 0.001 ppm 0.003 ppm ---- ----
Nickel (as Ni) 7440-02-0 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Metal and insoluble compounds ---- 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Soluble compounds ---- 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Nicotine 54-11-5 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Nitrapyrin (2-Chloro-6

     trichloromethyl pyridine)

1929-82-4 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Nitric acid 7697-37-2 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
Nitric oxide 10102-43-9 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
p-Nitroaniline 100-01-6 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- X
Nitrobenzene 98-95-3 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
4-Nitrobiphenyl 92-93-3 ---- ---- ---- ----
p-Nitrochlorobenzene 100-00-5 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
4-Nitrodiphenyl ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Nitroethane 79-24-3 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Nitrogen 7727-37-9 Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Nitrogen dioxide 10102-44-0 ---- 1 ppm ---- ----
Nitrogen oxide (Nitrous oxide) 10024-97-2 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Nitrogen trifluoride 7783-54-2 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Nitroglycerin 55-63-0 ---- 0.1 mg/m3 ---- X
Nitromethane 75-52-5 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
1-Nitropropane 108-03-2 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
2-Nitropropane 79-46-9 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
N-Nitrosodimethylamine 62-75-9 ---- ---- ---- ----
Nitrotoluene ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     o-isomer 88-72-2 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
     m-isomer 98-08-2 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
     p-isomer 99-99-0 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Nitrotrichloromethane (Chloropicrin) 76-06-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Nitrous oxide (Nitrogen oxide) 10024-97-2 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Nonane 111-84-2 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Octachloronaphthalene 2234-13-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Octane 111-65-9 300 ppm 375 ppm ---- ----
Oil mist mineral (particulate) 8012-95-1 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Osmium tetroxide (as Os) 20816-12-0 0.0002 ppm 0.0006 ppm ---- ----
Oxalic acid 144-62-7 1 mg/m3 2 mg/m3 ---- ----
Oxygen difluoride 7783-41-7 ---- ---- 0.05 ppm ----
Ozone 10028-15-6 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Paper fiber (Cellulose) 9004-34-6 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Paraffin wax fume 8002-74-2 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Paraquat ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction 4685-14-7 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
1910-42-5
2074-50-2
Parathion 56-38-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Particulate polycyclic

     aromatic hydrocarbons

     (benzene soluble fraction)

     (coal tar pitch volatiles)

65996-93-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Particulates not otherwise regulated ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Pentaborane 19624-22-7 0.005 ppm 0.015 ppm ---- ----
Pentachloronaphthalene 1321-64-8 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Pentachlorophenol 87-86-5 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Pentaerythritol 115-77-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Pentane 109-66-0 600 ppm 750 ppm ---- ----
2-Pentanone (methyl propyl ketone) 107-87-9 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) 127-18-4 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Perchloromethyl mercaptan 594-42-3 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Perchloryl fluoride 7616-94-6 3 ppm 6 ppm ---- ----
Perlite ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Petroleum distillates

     (Naptha, rubber solvent)

---- 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Phenacyl chloride

     (a-Chloroacetophenone)

532-21-4 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Phenol 108-95-2 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Phenothiazine 92-84-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- X
p-Phenylene diamine 106-50-3 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Phenyl ether (vapor) 101-84-8 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Phenyl ether-diphenyl mixture (vapor) ---- 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Phenylethylene (Styrene) 100-42-5 50 ppm 100 ppm ---- ----
Phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) 122-60-1 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Phenylhydrazine 100-63-0 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Phenyl mercaptan 108-98-5 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
Phenylphosphine 638-21-1 ---- ---- 0.05 ppm ----
Phorate 298-02-2 0.05 mg/m3 0.2 mg/m3 ---- X
Phosdrin (Mevinphos) 7786-34-7 0.01 ppm 0.03 ppm ---- X
Phosgene (carbonyl chloride) 75-44-5 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Phosphine 7803-51-2 0.3 ppm 1 ppm ---- ----
Phosphoric acid 7664-38-2 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Phosphorus (yellow) 7723-14-0 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Phosphorous oxychloride 10025-87-3 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Phosphorus pentachloride 10026-13-8 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Phosphorus pentasulfide 1314-80-3 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Phosphorus trichloride 12-2-19 0.2 ppm 0.5 ppm ---- ----
Phthalic anhydride 85-44-9 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
m-Phthalodinitrile 626-17-5 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Picloram 1918-02-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Picric acid (2, 4, 6-Trinitrophenol) 88-89-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Pindone

     (2-Pivalyl-1, 3-indandione,

     Pival)

83-26-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Piperazine dihydrochloride 142-64-3 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Pival (Pindone) 83-26-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Plaster of Paris 26499-65-0 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Platinum (as Pt) 7440-06-4 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Metal ---- 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Soluble salts ---- 0.002 mg/m3 0.006 mg/m3 ---- ----
Polychlorobiphenyls

     (Chlorodiphenyls)

---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     42% Chlorine (PCB) 53469-21-9 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
     54% Chlorine (PCB) 11097-69-1 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Portland cement 65997-15-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Potassium hydroxide 1310-58-3 ---- ---- 2 mg/m3 ----
Propane 74-98-6 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Propargyl alcohol 107-19-7 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
beta-Propiolactone 57-57-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
Propionic acid 79-09-4 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Propoxur (Baygon) 114-26-1 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
n-Propyl acetate 109-60-4 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
n-Propyl alcohol 71-23-8 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- X
n-Propyl nitrate 627-13-4 25 ppm 40 ppm ---- ----
Propylene ---- Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Propylene dichloride

     (1, 2-Dichloropropane)

78-87-5 75 ppm 110 ppm ---- ----
Propylene glycol dinitrate 6423-43-4 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- X
Propylene glycol monomethyl ether 107-98-2 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Propylene imine 75-55-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Propylene oxide (1,2-Epoxypropane) 75-56-9 20 ppm 30 ppm ---- ----
Propyne (Methyl acetylene) 74-99-7 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Pyrethrum 8003-34-7 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Pyridine 110-86-1 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Pyrocatachol (Catechol) 120-80-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Quinone (p-Benzoquinone) 106-51-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
RDX (Cyclonite) ---- 1.5 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
Resorcinol 108-46-3 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Rhodium (as Rh) 7440-16-6 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Insoluble compounds,

     metal fumes and dusts

---- 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Soluble compounds, salts ---- 0.001 mg/m3 0.003 mg/m3 ---- ----
Ronnel 299-84-3 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Rosin core solder, pyrolysis

     products (as formaldehyde)

8050-09-7 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Rotenone 83-79-4 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Rouge ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Rubber solvent (naphtha) 8030-30-6 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Selenium compounds (as Se) 7782-49-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Selenium hexafluoride (as Se) 7783-79-1 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Sesone (Crag herbicide) 136-78-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Sevin (Carbaryl) 63-25-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silane (see Silicon tetrahydride) 7803-62-5 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Silica, amorphous, precipitated and gel 112926-00-8 6 mg/m3 12 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silica, amorphous, diatomaceous

     earth, containing less than

     1% crystalline silica

61790-53-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 6 mg/m3 12 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silica, crystalline cristobalite ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction 14464-46-1 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silica, crystalline quartz ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction 14808-60-7 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silica, crystalline tripoli (as quartz) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction 1317-95-9 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silica, crystalline tridymite ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction 15468-32-3 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silica, fused ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction 60676-86-0 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silicates (less than 1% crystalline silica ) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Mica ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
          Respirable fraction 12001-26-2 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Soapstone ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
          Total particulate ---- 6 mg/m3 12 mg/m3 ---- ----
          Respirable fraction ---- 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Talc (containing asbestos) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Talc (containing no      asbestos) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
          Respirable fraction 14807-96-6 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Tremolite ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Silicon 7440-21-3 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silicon carbide 409-21-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Silicon tetrahydride (Silane) 7803-62-5 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Silver, metal dust and soluble

     compounds (as Ag)

7440-22-4 0.01 mg/m3 0.03 mg/m3 ---- ----
Soapstone ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 6 mg/m3 12 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Sodium azide (as HN3 or NaN3) 26628-22-8 ---- ---- 0.1 ppm X
Sodium bisulfite 7631-90-5 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Sodium-2,

     4-dichloro-phenoxyethyl

     sulfate (Crag herbicide)

136-78-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Sodium fluoroacetate 62-74-8 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- X
Sodium hydroxide 1310-73-2 ---- ---- 2 mg/m3 ----
Sodium metabisulfite 7681-57-4 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Starch 9005-25-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Stibine 7803-52-3 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Stoddard solvent 8052-41-3 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Strychnine 57-24-9 0.15 mg/m3 0.45 mg/m3 ---- ----
Styrene (Phenylethylene,

     Vinyl benzene)

100-42-5 50 ppm 100 ppm ---- ----
Subtilisins 9014-01-1 ---- 0.00006 mg/m3 ---- ----
(60 min.)
Sucrose 57-50-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Sulfotep (TEDP) 3689-24-5 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Sulfur dioxide 7446-09-5 2 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Sulfur hexafluoride 2551-62-4 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Sulfuric acid 7664-93-9 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Sulfur monochloride 10025-67-9 ---- ---- 1 ppm ----
Sulfur pentafluoride 5714-22-1 ---- ---- 0.01 ppm ----
Sulfur tetrafluoride 7783-60-0 ---- ---- 0.1 ppm ----
Sulfuryl fluoride 2699-79-8 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Sulprofos 35400-43-2 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Systox (Demeton) 8065-48-3 0.01 ppm 0.03 ppm ---- X
2, 4, 5-T 93-76-5 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Talc (containing asbestos) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Talc (containing no asbestos) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction 14807-96-6 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Tantalum ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Metal and oxide dusts 7440-25-7 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
TDI

     (Toluene-2, 4-diisocyanate)

584-84-9 0.005 ppm 0.02 ppm ---- ----
TEDP (Sulfotep) 3689-24-5 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Tellurium and compounds (as Te) 13494-80-9 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Tellurium hexafluoride (as Te) 7783-80-4 0.02 ppm 0.06 ppm ---- ----
Temephos (Abate) 3383-96-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
TEPP 107-49-3 0.004 ppm 0.012 ppm ---- X
Terphenyls 26140-60-3 ---- ---- 0.5 ppm ----
1, 1, 1, 2-Tetrachloro-2,

     2-difluoroethane

76-11-0 500 ppm 625 ppm ---- ----
1, 1, 2, 2-Tetrachloro-1,

     2-difluoroethane

76-12-0 500 ppm 625 ppm ---- ----
1, 1, 2, 2-Tetrachloroethane 79-34-5 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
Tetrachloroethylene

     (Perchloroethylene)

127-18-4 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Tetrachloromethane

     (Carbon tetrachloride)

56-23-5 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Tetrachloronaphthalene 1335-88-2 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- X
Tetraethyl lead (as Pb) 78-00-2 0.075 mg/m3 0.225 mg/m3 ---- X
Tetrahydrofuran 109-99-9 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Tetramethyl lead (as Pb) 75-74-1 0.075 mg/m3 0.225 mg/m3 ---- X
Tetramethyl succinonitrile 3333-52-6 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- X
Tetranitromethane 509-14-8 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Tetrasodium pyrophosphate 7722-88-5 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Tetryl (2, 4, 6-trinitrophenyl-

     methylnitramine)

479-45-8 1.5 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
Thallium (soluble compounds) (as Tl) 7440-28-0 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
4, 4-Thiobis

     (6-tert-butyl-m-cresol)

96-69-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Thiodan (Endosulfan) 115-29-7 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Thioglycolic acid 68-11-1 1 ppm 3 ppm ----- X
Thionyl chloride 7719-09-7 ---- ---- 1 ppm ----
Thiram 137-26-8 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Tin (as Sn) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Inorganic compounds 7440-31-5 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Tin (as Sn) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Organic compounds 7440-31-5 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Tin oxide (as Sn) 21651-19-4 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Titanium dioxide 13463-67-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
TNT (2, 4, 6-Trinitrotoluene) 118-96-7 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Toluene 108-88-3 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Toluene-2, 4-diisocyanate (TDI) 584-84-9 0.005 ppm 0.02 ppm ----- ----
m-Toluidine 108-44-1 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
o-Toluidine 95-53-4 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
p-Toluidine 106-49-0 2.0 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Toxaphene (Chlorinated camphene) 8001-35-2 0.5 mg/m3 1 mg/m3 ---- X
Tremolite ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Tributyl phosphate 126-73-8 0.2 ppm 0.6 ppm ---- ----
Trichloroacetic acid 76-03-9 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
1, 2, 4-Trichlorobenzene 120-82-1 ---- ---- 5 ppm ----
1, 1, 1-Trichloroethane

     (Methyl chloroform)

71-55-6 350 ppm 450 ppm ---- ----
1, 1, 2-Trichloroethane 79-00-5 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 50 ppm 200 ppm ---- ----
Trichlorofluoromethane

     (Fluorotrichloromethane)

75-69-4 ---- ---- 1,000 ppm ----
Trichloromethane (Chloroform) 67-66-3 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
Trichloronaphthalene 1321-65-9 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- X
1, 2, 3-Trichloropropane 96-18-4 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
1, 1, 2-Trichloro-1, 2, 2-trifluoroethane 76-13-1 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Tricyclohexyltin hydroxide (Cyhexatin) 13121-70-5 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Triethylamine 121-44-8 10 ppm 15 ppm ---- ----
Trifluorobromomethane 75-63-8 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Trimellitic anhydride 552-30-7 0.005 ppm 0.015 ppm ---- ----
Trimethylamine 75-50-3 10 ppm 15 ppm ---- ----
Trimethyl benzene 25551-13-7 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Trimethyl phosphite 121-45-9 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
2, 4, 6-Trinitrophenol (Picric acid) 88-89-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
2, 4, 6-Trinitrophenyl-methylnitramine

     (Tetryl)

479-45-8 1.5 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ----- X
2, 4, 6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) 118-96-7 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Triorthocresyl phosphate 78-30-8 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Triphenyl amine 603-34-9 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Triphenyl phosphate 115-86-6 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Tungsten (as W) 7440-33-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Soluble compounds ---- 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Insoluble compounds ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Turpentine 8006-64-2 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Uranium (as U) 7440-61-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Soluble compounds ---- 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Insoluble compounds ---- 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
n-Valeraldehyde 110-62-3 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Vanadium (as V2O5) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction 1314-62-1 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ----
Vegetable oil mist ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Vinyl acetate 108-05-1 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Vinyl benzene (Styrene) 100-42-5 50 ppm 100 ppm ---- ----
Vinyl bromide 593-60-2 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Vinyl chloride (Chloroethylene) 75-01-4 1 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Vinyl cyanide (Acrylonitrile) 107-13-1 2 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide 106-87-6 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Vinyl toluene 25013-15-4 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Vinylidene chloride

     (1, 1-Dichloroethylene)

75-35-4 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
VM & P Naphtha 8032-32-4 300 ppm 400 ppm ---- ----
Warfarin 81-81-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Welding fumes (total particulate) ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Wood dust ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Nonallergenic;

          (All woods except

          allergenics)

---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Allergenics (e.g. cedar,

          mahogany and teak)

---- 2.5 mg/m3 5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Xylenes (ortho, meta, and

     para isomers) (Dimethylbenzene)

1330-20-7 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
m-Xylene alpha, alpha-diamine 1477-55-0 ---- ---- 0.1 mg/m3 X
Xylidine

     (Dimethylaminobenzene)

1300-73-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Yttrium 7440-65-5 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Zinc chloride fume 7646-85-7 1 mg/m3 2 mg/m3 ---- ----
Zinc chromate (as CrO3) Varies with compound 0.05 mg/m3 ---- 0.1 mg/m3 ----
Zinc oxide 1314-13-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m ---- ----
Zinc oxide fume 1314-13-2 5 mg/g3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Zinc stearate 557-05-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Zirconium compounds (as Zr) 7440-67-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 06-08-087, § 296-307-62625, filed 4/4/06, effective 9/1/06; 05-01-166, § 296-307-62625, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-628   Definitions.  

     Ceiling - An exposure limit, measured over the shortest time period feasible, that must not be exceeded during any part of the employee's workday.

     Dust - Solid particles suspended in air. Dusts are generated by handling, drilling, crushing, grinding, rapid impact, detonation, or decrepitation of organic or inorganic materials such as rock, ore, metal, coal, wood, grain, etc.

     Exposed or exposure - The contact an employee has with a toxic substance, harmful physical agent or oxygen deficient condition. Exposure can occur through various routes of entry, such as inhalation, ingestion, skin contact, or skin absorption.

     Fume - Solid particles suspended in air, generated by condensation from the gaseous state, generally after volatilization from molten metals, etc.

     Gas - A normally formless fluid which can be changed to the liquid or solid state by the effect of increased pressure or decreased temperature or both.

     Mist - Liquid droplets suspended in air, generated by condensation from the gaseous to the liquid state or by breaking up a liquid into a dispersed state, such as by splashing, foaming, spraying or atomizing.

     Oxygen deficient - An atmosphere with an oxygen content below 19.5% by volume.

     Permissible exposure limits (PEL) - Permissible exposure limits (PELs) are employee exposures to toxic substances or harmful agents that must not be exceeded. PELs are specified in applicable ((WISHA)) DOSH rules.

     Short-term exposure limit (STEL) - An exposure limit averaged over a short time period (usually measured for 15 minutes) that must not be exceeded during any part of an employee's workday.

     Time weighted average (TWA8) - An exposure limit averaged over 8 hours that must not be exceeded during an employee's workday.

     Toxic substance - Any chemical substance or biological agent, such as bacteria, virus, and fungus, which is any of the following:

     • Listed in the latest edition of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS)

     • Shows positive evidence of an acute or chronic health hazard in testing conducted by, or known to, the employer.

     The subject of a material safety data sheet kept by or known to the employer showing the material may pose a hazard to human health.

     Vapor - The gaseous form of a substance that is normally in the solid or liquid state.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-628, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]

OTS-3476.1


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 98-24-096, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99)

WAC 296-307-40007   What requirements apply to systems mounted on farm wagons (implements of husbandry) for the transportation of ammonia?   All anhydrous ammonia containers with a capacity of 3,000 gallons or less and equipment mounted on farm wagons (implements of husbandry) that is used to transport ammonia must meet the requirements of this section.

     WAC 296-307-40011 through 296-307-40037 also apply unless otherwise noted.

     (1) Containers must meet the following mounting requirements:

     (a) The farm wagon or container has a stop so the container does not dislodge from its mounting when a farm wagon stops suddenly.

     (b) The container is anchored to the farm wagon at one or more places on each side of the container.

     (c) The weight of containers mounted on four-wheel farm wagons, is distributed evenly over both axles.

     (d) When the cradle and the container are not welded together, material between them eliminates metal-to-metal friction.

     (2) Container accessories must meet the following requirements:

     (a) Each container has a fixed maximum liquid-level gauge.

     (b) All containers with more than 250-gallon capacity have a pressure gauge with a dial graduated from 0-400 psi.

     (c) The filling connection is fitted with one of the following:

     (i) A combination back-pressure check valve and excess-flow valve; or

     (ii) One double or two single back-pressure check valves; or

     (iii) A positive shut-off valve that has either an internal back-pressure check valve or an internal excess flow valve.

     (d) All containers with more than 250-gallon capacity are equipped for spray loading or with an approved vapor return valve.

     (e) All vapor and liquid connections have approved excess flow valves or quick-closing internal valves that are only open for operating.


Exception: Safety-relief valves and connections that are specifically exempted by WAC 296-307-40019(5) are exempt from this requirement.

     (f) Fittings are protected from physical damage by a rigid guard. The guard is designed to withstand force from any direction, equal to twice the weight of the container and lading, at a safety factor of four. If the guard is fully enclosed, the safety-relief valves are properly vented through the guard.

     (g) If a liquid withdrawal line is installed in the bottom of a container, the connections and hose are at least as high as the lowest horizontal edge of the farm wagon axle.

     (h) Both ends of the hose are secure while in transit.

     (3) Each side and the rear end of the container must be marked in letters at least four inches high, with the words "ANHYDROUS AMMONIA" or, "CAUTION -- AMMONIA," or marked according to DOT regulations.

     (4) Farm wagons (implements of husbandry) must meet all state regulations and the following requirements:

     (a) All farm wagons must be securely attached to the vehicle drawing them by drawbars with safety chains.

     (b) A farm wagon must be constructed so that it will follow the path of the towing vehicle and will prevent the towed wagon from whipping or swerving dangerously from side to side.

     (c) All farm wagons must have five gallons or more of readily available clean potable water.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040. 98-24-096, § 296-307-40007, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99. 97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-40007, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-40007, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]

OTS-3477.1


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 98-24-096, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99)

WAC 296-307-41049   What requirements apply to liquid-level gauging devices?   (1) Each container manufactured after December 31, 1965, and filled on a volumetric basis must have a fixed liquid-level gauge to indicate the maximum permitted filling level according to subsection (5) of this section. Each container manufactured after December 31, 1969, must have permanently attached to the container adjacent to the fixed level gauge a marking showing the percentage full that will be shown by that gauge. When used with a variable liquid-level gauge, the fixed liquid-level gauge will act as a check on the variable gauge. Gauges must be used in charging containers as required in WAC ((296-307-41034)) 296-307-41037.

     (2) All variable gauging devices must be arranged so that the maximum liquid level for butane, for a 50/50 mixture of butane and propane, and for propane, to which the container may be charged, is easily determined. Liquid levels from empty to full must be marked on the system nameplate or gauging device. Dials of magnetic or rotary gauges must show whether they are for cylindrical or spherical containers and whether for aboveground or underground service. The dials of gauges for aboveground containers of over 1,200 gallons water capacity must be so marked.

     (3) Gauging devices that require bleeding of the product to the atmosphere, such as the rotary tube, fixed tube, and slip tube, shall be designed so that the bleed valve maximum opening is not larger than a No. 54 drill size, unless provided with excess flow valve.

     (4) Gauging devices must have a design working pressure of at least 250 psig.

     (5) Length of tube or position of fixed liquid-level gauge must be designed to indicate the maximum level to which the container may be filled for the product contained. This level shall be based on the volume of the product at 40°F at its maximum permitted filling density for aboveground containers and at 50°F for underground containers. You must calculate the filling point for which the fixed liquid level gauge must be designed according to this section.


Note:
It is impossible to set out in a table the length of a fixed dip tube for various tank capacities because of the various tank diameters and lengths, and because the tank may be installed either vertically or horizontally. If you know the maximum permitted filling volume in gallons, however, you can determine the length of the fixed tube by using a strapping table from the container manufacturer.
The fixed tube should be long enough so that when its lower end touches the surface of the liquid in the container, the contents of the container will be the maximum permitted volume as determined by the following formula:

Water capacity of container1 (gals.)

X filling density2


=


Maximum

volume

of LP-gas

Specific gravity of LP-gas1 x volume

correction factor3 x 100


1Measure at 60°F.
2From WAC 296-307-41037(1).
3For aboveground containers the liquid temperature is assumed to be 40°F and for underground containers the liquid temperature is assumed to be 50°F. To correct the liquid volumes at these temperatures to 60°F, use the following factors:

     (a) To determine maximum volume of LP-gas for which a fixed length of dip tube must be set:

TABLE U-6
VOLUME CORRECTION FACTORS

Specific gravity Aboveground Underground

0.500

1.033

1.017
.510 1.031 1.016
.520 1.029 1.015
.530 1.028 1.014
.540 1.026 1.013
.550 1.025 1.013
.560 1.024 1.012
.570 1.023 1.011
.580 1.021 1.011
.590 1.020 1.010

     (b) To calculate the maximum volume of LP-gas that can be placed in a container when determining the length of the dip tube expressed as a percentage of total water content of the container, use the formula in (c) of this subsection.

     (c) Determine the maximum weight of LP-gas that may be placed in a container for determining the length of a fixed dip tube by multiplying the maximum volume of LP-gas from Table U-6 by the pounds of LP-gas in a gallon at 40°F for aboveground and at 50°F for underground containers. Typical pounds per gallon are specified below:

Example: Assume a one hundred gallon total water capacity tank for aboveground storage of propane having a specific gravity of 0.510 of 60°F.

100 (gals.) x 42 (filling density)

=


4200
0.510 x 1.031 (correction factor from Table U-6) x 100 52.6

4200


=


79.8 gallons propane, the

maximum amount permitted

to be placed in a 100-gallon total water capacity above

ground container equipped

with a fixed dip tube.

52.6

Maximum volume of LP-gas (from

formula in (a) of this subsection)

          x 100

=

Maximum

percent

of LP-gas

     Total water content of

     container in gallons


Aboveground,

pounds per

gallon


Underground,

pounds per

gallon


Propane

4.37

4.31
N Butane 4.97 4.92

     (6) Fixed liquid-level gauges used on non-DOT containers must be stamped on the exterior of the gauge with the letters DT followed by the vertical distance (expressed in inches and carried out to one decimal place) from the top of container to the end of the dip tube or to the centerline of the gauge when located at the maximum permitted filling level. For portable containers that may be filled in the horizontal and/or vertical position the letters DT must be followed by V with the vertical distance from the top of the container to the end of the dip tube for vertical filling, and with H followed by the proper distance for horizontal filling. For DOT containers the stamping must be placed both on the exterior of the gauge and on the container. On aboveground or cargo containers where the gauges are positioned at specific levels, the marking may be specified in percent of total tank contents and the marking must be stamped on the container.

     (7) Columnar gauge glasses must be restricted to charging plants where the fuel is withdrawn in the liquid phase only. They must have valves with metallic handwheels, excess flow valves, and extra-heavy glass adequately protected with a metal housing applied by the gauge manufacturer. They must be shielded against the direct rays of the sun. Columnar gauge glasses are prohibited on tank trucks, motor fuel tanks, and containers used in domestic, commercial, and industrial installations.

     (8) Float gauging devices or equivalent that do not require flow for their operation and that have connections extending outside the container do not have to have excess flow valves if the piping and fittings are adequately designed to withstand the container pressure and are properly protected against physical damage and breakage.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040. 98-24-096, § 296-307-41049, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99. 97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-41049, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-41049, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]

OTS-3492.1


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)

WAC 296-307-53017   How can an employer order the OSHA charts?   OSHA charts are available through OSHA area offices. You may find the address and telephone number of the nearest OSHA office in the local telephone directory under U.S. Government, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Single copies are available without charge.

     If you want multiple copies of these charts, you may order them from the Publications Office, U.S. Department of Labor, Room N3101, Washington, D.C. 20210. Telephone: (((202) 523-9667)) 202-693-1888.

[97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-53017, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-53017, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]

OTS-3475.1


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-55060   Definitions.  

     Chemical

     • An element or mixture of elements

     OR

     • A compound or mixture of compounds

     OR

     • A mixture of elements and compounds

     Included are manufactured items (such as bricks, welding rods, and sheet metal) that are not exempt as an article.

     Chemical manufacturer

     An employer with a workplace where one or more chemicals are produced for use or distribution.

     Chemical name

     • The scientific designation of a chemical developed by the:

     – International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)

     OR

     – Chemical abstracts service (CAS) rules of nomenclature

     OR

     – A name that clearly identifies the chemical for the purpose of conducting a hazard evaluation.

     Combustible liquid

     Liquids with a flashpoint of at least 100°F (37.8°C) and below 200°F (93.3°C). A mixture with at least 99% of its components having flashpoints of 200°F (93.3°C), or higher, is not considered a combustible liquid.

     Commercial account

     An arrangement where a retailer is selling hazardous chemicals to an employer

     • Generally in large quantities over time

     OR

     • At costs below regular retail price.

     Common name

     Any designation or identification used to identify a chemical other than the chemical name, such as a:

     • Code name or number

     OR

     • Trade or brand name

     OR

     • Generic name.

     Compressed gas

     A contained gas or mixture of gases with an absolute pressure greater than:

     • 40 psi at 70°F (21.1°C)

     OR

     • 104 psi at 130°F (54.4°C) regardless of the pressure at 70°F (21.1°C)

     OR

     A liquid with a vapor pressure greater than 40 psi at 100°F (37.8°C) as determined by ASTM D323-72.

     Container

     A vessel, other than a pipe or piping system, that holds a hazardous chemical. Examples include:

     • Bags

     • Barrels

     • Bottles

     • Boxes

     • Cans

     • Cylinders

     • Drums

     • Rail cars

     • Reaction vessels

     • Storage tanks.

     Designated representative

     • An individual or organization with written authorization from an employee.

     OR

     • A recognized or certified collective bargaining agent (not necessarily authorized by an employee).

     OR

     • A legal representative of a deceased or legally incapacitated employee.

     Director

     The director means the director of the department of labor and industries or their designee.

     Distributor

     A business, other than a chemical manufacturer or importer, that supplies hazardous chemicals to other distributors or to employers. ((See WAC 296-307-560 through 296-307-56050 for requirements dealing with manufacturers, distributors and importers - hazard communication.))

     Employee

     The term employee and other terms of like meaning, unless the context of the provision containing such term indicates otherwise, means an employee of an employer who is employed in the business of his or her employer whether by way of manual labor or otherwise and every person in this state who is engaged in the employment of or who is working under an independent contract the essence of which is personal labor for an employer under this standard whether by way of manual labor or otherwise.

     Employer

     An employer is any person, firm, corporation, partnership, business trust, legal representative, or other business entity which engages in any business, industry, profession, or activity in this state and employs one or more employees or who contracts with one or more persons, the essence of which is the personal labor of such person or persons and includes the state, counties, cities, and all municipal corporations, public corporations, political subdivisions of the state, and charitable organizations: Provided, That any persons, partnership, or business entity not having employees, and who is covered by the Industrial Insurance Act must be considered both an employer and an employee.

     Explosive

     A chemical that causes a sudden, almost instant release of pressure, gas, and heat when exposed to a sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature.

     Exposure or exposed

     An employee has been, or may have possibly been, subjected to a hazardous chemical, toxic substance or harmful physical agent while working. An employee could have been exposed to hazardous chemicals, toxic substances, or harmful physical agents in any of the following ways:

     • Inhalation

     • Ingestion

     • Skin contact

     • Absorption

     • Related means.

     The terms exposure and exposed only cover workplace exposure involving a toxic substance or harmful physical agent in the workplace different from typical nonoccupational situations in the way it is:

     • Used

     • Handled

     • Stored

     • Generated

     OR

     • Present.

     Flammable

     A chemical in one of the following categories:

     • Aerosols that, when tested using a method described in 16 CFR 1500.45, yield either a:

     – Flame projection of more than eighteen inches at full valve opening

     OR

     – A flashback (a flame extending back to the valve) at any degree of valve opening

     • Gases that, at the temperature and pressure of the surrounding area, form a:

     – Flammable mixture with air at a concentration of thirteen percent, by volume, or less

     OR

     – Range of flammable mixtures with air wider than twelve percent, by volume, regardless of the lower limit

     • Liquids with a flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C). A mixture with at least ninety-nine percent of its components having flashpoints of 100°F (37.8°C), or higher, is not considered a flammable liquid

     • Solids, other than blasting agents or explosives, as defined in WAC 296-52-417 or 29 CFR 1910.109(a), that:

     – Is likely to cause fire through friction, moisture, absorption, spontaneous chemical change or retained heat from manufacturing or processing

     OR

     – That can be readily ignited (and when ignited burns so vigorously and persistently that it creates a serious hazard)

     OR

     – When tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.44, ignite and burn with a self-sustained flame at a rate greater than one-tenth of an inch per second along its major axis.

     Flashpoint

     • The minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off an ignitable concentration of vapor, when tested by any of the following measurement methods:

     – Tagliabue closed tester. Use this for liquids with a viscosity less than 45 Saybolt Universal Seconds (SUS) at 100°F (37.8°C), that do not contain suspended solids and do not tend to form a surface film under test. See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Tag Closed Tester, Z11.24.1979 (ASTM D 56-79)

     – Pensky-Martens closed tester for liquids with a viscosity equal to, or greater than, 45 SUS at 100°F (37.8°C), or for liquids that contain suspended solids, or have a tendency to form a surface film under test. See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Pensky-Martens Closed Tester, Z11.7.1979 (ASTM D 93-79)

     – Setaflash closed tester: See American National Standard Method of Test for Flash Point by Setaflash Closed Tester (ASTM D 3278-78).

     Organic peroxides, which undergo auto accelerating thermal decomposition, are excluded from any of the flashpoint measurement methods specified above.

     Foreseeable emergency

     Any potential event that could result in an uncontrolled release of a hazardous chemical into the workplace. Examples of foreseeable emergencies include equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment.

     Hazardous chemical

     A chemical, which is a physical or health hazard.

     Hazard warning

     Words, pictures, or symbols (alone or in combination), that appear on labels (or other forms of warning such as placards or tags) that communicate specific physical and health hazard(s), (including target organ effects), associated with chemical(s) in a container.

     Health hazard

     A chemical, mixture, biological agent, or physical agent that may cause health effects in short or long-term exposed employees. Based on statistically significant evidence from ((a single)) at least one study conducted by using established scientific principles. Health hazards include((, but are not limited to, any of the following)):

     • Carcinogens

     • Toxic or highly toxic ((substances)) agents

     • Reproductive toxins

     • Irritants

     • Corrosives

     • Sensitizers

     • Hepatotoxins (liver toxins)

     • Nephrotoxins (kidney toxins)

     • Neurotoxins (nervous system toxins)

     • Substances that act on the hematopoietic system (blood or blood forming system)

     • Substances that can damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes

     • Hot or cold conditions.

     Identity

     A chemical or common name listed on the material safety data sheet (MSDS) and label.

     Importer

     The first business within the Customs Territory of the USA that:

     • Receives hazardous chemicals produced in other countries

     AND

     • Supplies them to manufacturers, distributors or employers within the USA.

     Material safety data sheet (MSDS)

     Written, printed, or electronic information (on paper, microfiche, or on-screen) that informs manufacturers, distributors ((or)), employers or employees about ((the)) a hazardous chemical, its hazards, and protective measures as required by ((this rule)) material safety data sheet and label preparation, chapter 296-839 WAC.

     Mixture

     A combination of 2 or more chemicals that retain their chemical identity after being combined.

     Organic peroxide

     An organic compound containing the bivalent-0-0-structure. It may be considered a structural derivative of hydrogen peroxide if one or both of the hydrogen atoms has been replaced by an organic radical.

     Oxidizer

     A chemical, other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in WAC 296-52-417 or CFR 1910.109(a), that starts or promotes combustion in other materials, causing fire either of itself or through the release of oxygen or other gases.

     Permissible exposure limits (PELs)

     See WAC 296-307-628 for the definition of this term.

     Physical hazard

     A chemical that has scientifically valid evidence to show it is one of the following:

     • A combustible liquid

     • A compressed gas

     • Explosive

     • Flammable

     • An organic peroxide

     • An oxidizer

     • Pyrophoric

     • Unstable (reactive)

     • Water reactive.

     Produce

     To do one or more of the following:

     • Manufacture

     • Process

     • Formulate

     • Blend

     • Extract

     • Generate

     • Emit

     • Repackage.

     Purchaser

     An employer who buys one or more hazardous chemicals to use in their workplace.

     Pyrophoric

     Chemicals that ignite spontaneously in the air at a temperature of 130°F (54.4°C) or below.

     Responsible party

     Someone who can provide more information about the hazardous chemical and appropriate emergency procedures.

     Specific chemical identity

     This term applies to chemical substances. It can mean the:

     • Chemical name

     • Chemical abstracts service (CAS) registry number

     • Any other information that reveals the precise chemical designation of the substance.

     Trade secret

     Any confidential:

     • Formula

     • Pattern

     • Process

     • Device

     • Information

     • Collection of information.

     The trade secret is used in an employer's business and gives an opportunity to gain an advantage over competitors who do not know or use it.

     See WAC 296-62-053 for requirements dealing with trade secrets.

     Unstable (reactive)

     A chemical in its pure state, or as produced or transported, that will vigorously polymerize, decompose, condense, or become self-reactive under conditions of shocks, pressure or temperature.

     Use

     To do one or more of the following:

     • Package

     • Handle

     • React

     • Emit

     • Extract

     • Generate as a by-product

     • Transfer.

     Water-reactive

     A chemical that reacts with water to release a gas that is either flammable or presents a health hazard.

     Work area

     A room or defined space in a workplace where hazardous chemicals are produced or used, and where employees are present.

     Workplace

     The term workplace means an establishment, job site, or project, at one geographical location containing one or more work areas.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-55060, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-307-55060, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01.]

OTS-3472.1


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-56050   Definitions.   The following definitions apply to this chapter:

     Article (manufactured item)

     A manufactured item that

     • Is not a fluid or particle

     AND

     • Is formed to a specific shape or design during manufacture for a particular end use function

     AND

     • Releases only trace amounts of a hazardous chemical during normal use and does not pose a physical or health risk to employees.

     Chemical

     • An element or mixture of elements

     OR

     • A compound or mixture of compounds

     OR

     • A mixture of elements and compounds

     Included are manufactured items (such as bricks, welding rods and sheet metal) that are not exempt as an article.

     Chemical name

     • The scientific designation of a chemical developed by the

     – International union of pure and applied chemistry (IUPAC)

     OR

     – Chemical abstracts service (CAS) rules of nomenclature

     OR

     • A name that clearly identifies the chemical for the purpose of conducting a hazard evaluation.

     Combustible liquid

     Liquids with a flashpoint of at least 100°F (37.8°C) and below 200°F (93.3°C). A mixture with at least 99% of its components having flashpoints of 200°F (93.3°C), or higher, is not considered a combustible liquid.

     Commercial account

     An arrangement where a retailer is selling hazardous chemicals to an employer

     • Generally in large quantities over time

     OR

     • At costs below regular retail price.

     Common name

     Any designation or identification used to identify a chemical other than the chemical name, such as a

     • Code name or number

     OR

     • Trade or brand name

     OR

     • Generic name.

     Compressed gas

     • A contained gas or mixture of gases with an absolute pressure greater than:

     – 40 psi at 70°F (21.1°C)

     OR

     – 104 psi at 130°F (54.4°C) regardless of the pressure at 70°F (21.1°C)

     OR

     • A liquid with a vapor pressure greater than 40 psi at 100°F (37.8°C), as determined by ASTM D323-72.

     Container

     A vessel, other than a pipe or piping system, that holds a hazardous chemical. Examples include:

     • Bags

     • Barrels

     • Bottles

     • Boxes

     • Cans

     • Cylinders

     • Drums

     • Reaction vessels

     • Storage tanks

     • Rail cars.

     Designated representative

     • An individual or organization with written authorization from an employee

     OR

     • A recognized or certified collective bargaining agent (not necessarily authorized by an employee)

     OR

     • A legal representative of a deceased or legally incapacitated employee.

     Distributor

     A business that supplies hazardous chemicals to other employers. Included are employers who conduct retail and wholesale transactions.

     Explosive

     A chemical that causes a sudden, almost instant release of pressure, gas, and heat when exposed to a sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature.

     Flammable

     A chemical in one of the following categories:

     • Aerosols that, when tested using a method described in 16 CFR 1500.45, yield either a:

     – Flame projection of more than eighteen inches at full valve opening

     OR

     – A flashback (a flame extending back to the valve) at any degree of valve opening

     • Gases that, at the temperature and pressure of the surrounding area, form a:

     – Flammable mixture with air at a concentration of thirteen percent, by volume, or less

     OR

     – Range of flammable mixtures with air wider than twelve percent, by volume, regardless of the lower limit

     • Liquids with a flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C). A mixture with at least ninety-nine percent of its components having flashpoints of 100°F (37.8°C), or higher, is not considered a flammable liquid

     • Solids, other than blasting agents or explosives, as defined in WAC 296-52-417 or 29 CFR 1910.109(a), that:

     – Is likely to cause fire through friction, moisture, absorption, spontaneous chemical change or retained heat from manufacturing or processing

     OR

     – That can be readily ignited (and when ignited burns so vigorously and persistently that it creates a serious hazard)

     OR

     – When tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.44, ignite and burn with a self-sustained flame at a rate greater than 1/10th of an inch per second along its major axis.

     Flashpoint

     The minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off an ignitable concentration of vapor, when tested by any of the following measurement methods:

     • Tagliabue closed tester. Use this for liquids with a viscosity less than 45 Saybolt Universal Seconds (SUS) at 100°F (37.8°C), that do not contain suspended solids and do not tend to form a surface film under test. See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Tag Closed Tester, Z11.24-1979 (ASTM D 56-79)

     • Pensky-Martens closed tester. Use this for liquids with a viscosity equal to, or greater than, 45 SUS at 100°F (37.8°C) or for liquids that contain suspended solids or have a tendency to form a surface film under test. See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Pensky-Martens Closed Tester, Z11.7-1979 (ASTM D 93-79)

     • Setaflash closed tester. See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Setaflash Closed Tester (ASTM D 3278-78)

     Organic peroxides, which undergo auto accelerating thermal decomposition, are excluded from any of the flashpoint measurement methods specified above.

     Hazardous chemical

     A chemical, which is a physical or health hazard.

     Hazard warning

     Words, pictures or symbols (alone or in combination) that appear on labels (or other forms of warning such as placards or tags) that communicate specific physical and health hazards (including target organ effects) associated with chemicals in a container.

     Health hazard

     A chemical that may cause health effects in short or long-term exposed employees based on statistically significant evidence from a single study conducted by using established scientific principles.

     Health hazards include, but are not limited to, any of the following:

     • Carcinogens

     • Toxic or highly toxic substances

     • Reproductive toxins

     • Irritants

     • Corrosives

     • Sensitizers

     • Hepatotoxins (liver toxins)

     • Nephrotoxins (kidney toxins)

     • Neurotoxins (nervous system toxins)

     • Substances that act on the hematopoietic system (blood or blood forming system)

     • Substances that can damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes.

     Identity

     A chemical or common name listed on the material safety data sheet (MSDS) and label.

     Importer

     The first business, within the Customs Territory of the United States, that receives hazardous chemicals produced in other countries and supplies them to manufacturers, distributors or employers within the United States.

     Label

     Written, printed, or graphic material displayed on, or attached to, a container of hazardous chemicals.

     Manufacturer

     An employer with a workplace where one or more chemicals (including items not exempt as "articles," see Table 1 in this part) are produced for use or distribution.

     Material safety data sheet (MSDS)

     Written, printed or electronic information (on paper, microfiche, or on-screen) that informs manufacturers, distributors or employers about the chemical, its hazards and protective measures as required by this rule.

     Mixture

     A combination of two or more chemicals that retain their chemical identify after being combined.

     Organic peroxide

     An organic compound containing the bivalent-O-O-structure. It may be considered a structural derivative of hydrogen peroxide if one or both of the hydrogen atoms has been replaced by an organic radical.

     Oxidizer

     A chemical, other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in WAC ((296-52-417)) 296-52-60130 or 29 CFR 1910.109(a), that starts or promotes combustion in other materials, causing fire either of itself or through the release of oxygen or other gases.

     Permissible exposure limits

     See WAC 296-307-628, for definition of this term.

     Physical hazards

     A chemical that has scientifically valid evidence to show it is one of the following:

     • A combustible liquid

     • A compressed gas

     • Explosive

     • Flammable

     • An organic peroxide

     • An oxidizer

     • Pyrophoric

     • Unstable (reactive)

     • Water-reactive.

     Produce

     To do one or more of the following:

     • Manufacture

     • Process

     • Formulate

     • Blend

     • Extract

     • Generate

     • Emit

     • Repackage.

     Pyrophoric

     Chemicals that ignite spontaneously in the air at a temperature of 130°F (54.4°C) or below.

     Responsible party

     Someone who can provide more information about the hazardous chemical and appropriate emergency procedures.

     Retailer

     See "distributor."

     Threshold limit values (TLVs)

     Airborne concentrations of substances established by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), and represent conditions under which it is believed that nearly all workers may be repeatedly exposed day after day without adverse health effects.

     TLVs are specified in the most recent edition of the Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices and include the following categories:

     • Threshold limit value-time-weighted average (TLV-TWA)

     • Threshold limit value-short-term exposure limit (TLV-STEL)

     • Threshold limit value-ceiling (TLV-C).

     Unstable (reactive)

     A chemical in its pure state, or as produced or transported, that will vigorously polymerize, decompose, condense, or become self-reactive under conditions of shocks, pressure or temperature.

     Use

     To do one or more of the following:

     • Package

     • Handle

     • React

     • Emit

     • Extract

     • Generate as a by-product

     • Transfer.

     Water-reactive

     A chemical that reacts with water to release a gas that is either flammable or presents a heath hazard.

     Wholesaler

     See "distributor."

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-56050, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05; 03-10-068, § 296-307-56050, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03.]

OTS-3474.2


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-594   Scope.   This part applies to all use of respirators at work.

     (1) Respirators are required whenever respiratory hazards (including oxygen-deficient conditions) are present. For example, use respirators at any of the following times:

     (a) While exposure controls are being evaluated or put in place;

     (b) When it is not feasible to use exposure controls to remove or reduce the airborne hazard to below the PEL.

     (2) This chapter applies whenever respirators are used at work.

     IMPORTANT:

     Before ((you decide to use)) using respirators, ((you)) employers are required to evaluate respiratory hazards and implement control methods as outlined in WAC 296-307-624 through 296-307-628, Respiratory hazards.

     The term "respiratory hazards" will be used throughout this part to refer to oxygen deficient conditions and harmful airborne hazards.

     ((Definition:

     Respirators are a type of personal protective equipment designed to protect the wearer from respiratory hazards.))

     You ((can)) may use Table 1 for general guidance on which sections apply ((to you)).

Table 1
Sections that apply to your workplace

If employees... Then the sections marked with an "X" apply...
596 598 600 602-618 620 622
Request and are permitted to voluntarily use filtering-facepiece respirators, and are not exposed to a respiratory hazard X X
Request and are permitted to voluntarily use respirators that are NOT filtering-facepiece respirators, and are not exposed to a respiratory hazard X X X X
Are required to use any respirator by WISHA or the employer X X X X X
Would use an escape respirator in an emergency X X X X X

Reference: See WAC 296-307-100, Personal protective equipment (PPE) to find requirements for other types of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as eye, hand, and head protection.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-594, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-59605   Designate a program administrator.  

Exemption: You do not need to designate a program administrator if employees use only filtering-facepiece respirators and do so only as voluntary use.
     ((Definition:

     Voluntary use is respirator use that is requested by the employee AND permitted by the employer when NO respiratory hazard exists.))

     You must:

     • Designate a program administrator who has overall responsibility for your program and has sufficient training or experience to:

     – Oversee program development and coordinate implementation

     – Conduct required evaluations of program effectiveness outlined in WAC 296-307-60005.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-59605, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-59805   Make sure voluntary use of respirators is safe.  

     ((Definition:

     Voluntary use is respirator use that is requested by the employee AND permitted by the employer when NO respiratory hazard exists.))

     IMPORTANT: ((If you choose to require respirator use, use is NOT voluntary and the required use sections of this part apply.)) Respirator use is not voluntary, and the required use sections of this chapter apply, if:

     • An employer chooses to require respirator use;

     • A respiratory hazard, such as exposure to a substance over the permissible exposure limit (PEL) or hazardous exposure to an airborne biological hazard, is present. To evaluate respiratory hazards in your workplace, see chapter 296-841 WAC, Airborne contaminants.

     • Some requirements in this section do not apply if only filtering-facepiece respirators are used voluntarily;

     • Some filtering-facepiece respirators are equipped with a sorbent layer for absorbing "nuisance" organic vapors. These can be used for voluntary use, but are not NIOSH certified for protection against hazardous concentrations of organic vapor.

     You must:

     (1) Make sure voluntary respirator use does NOT:

     • Interfere with an employee's ability to work safely, such as restricting necessary vision or radio communication

     OR

     • Create health hazards.

    
Note: Examples of health hazards include:
• Skin irritation, dermatitis, or other health effects caused by using a dirty respirator
• Illness created by sharing contaminated respirators
• Health effects caused by use of an unsafe air supply, such as carbon monoxide poisoning.
     You must:

     (2) Provide all voluntary respirator users with the advisory information in Table 2 at no cost to them.

((Note: If you have provided employees with the advisory information required in the previous section, WAC 296-307-598, you do not need to provide the additional information in Table 2 to those employees.))
     You must:

     (3) Develop and maintain a written program that includes the following:

     • Medical evaluation provisions as specified in WAC 296-307-604.

     • Procedures to properly clean and disinfect respirators, according to WAC 296-307-62015, if they are reused.

     • How to properly store respirators, according to WAC 296-307-61010, so that using them does not create hazards.

     • Procedures to make sure there is a safe air supply, according to WAC 296-307-616, when using air-line respirators and SCBAs.

     • Training according to WAC 296-307-608 when necessary to ensure respirator use does NOT create a hazard.

    
((Note: • Pay for medical evaluations, training, travel related costs, and wages. You do NOT need to pay for respirators employees use only voluntarily.
• If you have both voluntary and required respirator users, you may choose to treat voluntary users as required users. Doing this exceeds the requirements in this section.))
Exemption: If employees use only filtering-facepiece respirators and do so only voluntarily, you do not need to develop and maintain a written program.
     Use Table 2 to provide information to employees who voluntarily use any type of respirator.

Table 2

Advisory Information for Employees Who Voluntarily Use Respirators
• Respirators protect against airborne hazards when properly selected and used. ((WISHA)) Respirator usage that is required by DOSH or your employer is not voluntary use. With required use, your employer will need to provide further training and meet additional requirements in this chapter. DOSH recommends voluntary use of respirators when exposure to substances is below ((WISHA)) DOSH permissible exposure limits (PELs) because respirators can provide you an additional level of comfort and protection.
• If you choose to voluntarily use a respirator (whether it is provided by you or your employer) be aware that respirators can create hazards for you, the user. You can avoid these hazards if you know how to use your respirator properly AND how to keep it clean. Take these steps:
– Read and follow all instructions provided by the manufacturer about use, maintenance (cleaning and care), and warnings regarding the respirator's limitations.
– Choose respirators that have been certified for use to protect against the substance of concern. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certifies respirators. If a respirator is not certified by NIOSH, you have no guarantee that it meets minimum design and performance standards for workplace use.
▪ A NIOSH approval label will appear on or in the respirator packaging. It will tell you what protection the respirator provides.
– Keep track of your respirator so you do not mistakenly use someone else's.
– DO NOT wear your respirator into:
▪ Atmospheres containing hazards that your respirator is not designed to protect against.
For example, a respirator designed to filter dust particles will not protect you against solvent vapor, smoke or oxygen deficiency.
▪ Situations where respirator use is required.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-59805, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-60205   Select and provide appropriate respirators.  


Exemption: This section does NOT apply to respirator use that is voluntary. See WAC 296-842-11005 for voluntary use program requirements.

     IMPORTANT:

     See WAC 296-307-624, Respiratory hazards, for:

     • Hazard evaluation requirements. Evaluation results are necessary for respirator selection.

     • A list of substance-specific rules that may also apply to you. Those listed rules have additional respirator selection requirements.

     You must:

     • A respirator shall be provided to each employee when such equipment is necessary to protect the health of the employee.

     • Select and provide, at no cost to employees, appropriate respirators for routine use, infrequent use, and reasonably foreseeable emergencies (such as escape, emergency, and spill response situations) by completing the following process:

Respirator Selection Process

     Step 1: If your only respirator use is for escape, skip to Step 8 to select appropriate respirators.

     Step 2: If the respiratory hazard is a biological aerosol, such as TB (tuberculosis), anthrax, psittacosis (parrot fever), or hanta virus, select a respirator appropriate for nonemergency activities recognized to present a health risk to workers AND skip to Step 8.

     • If respirator use will occur during emergencies, skip to Step 8 and document the analysis used to select the appropriate respirator.

     • Use Centers for Disease Control (CDC) selection guidance for exposures to specific biological agents when this guidance exists. Visit http://www.cdc.gov.

     Step 3: If the respiratory hazard is a pesticide, follow the respirator specification on the pesticide label AND skip to Step 9.

     Step 4: Determine the expected exposure concentration for each respiratory hazard of concern. Use the results from the evaluation required by WAC 296-307-624, Respiratory hazards.

     Step 5: Determine if the respiratory hazard is classified as IDLH; if it is NOT IDLH skip to Step 7.    

     • The respiratory hazard IS classified as IDLH if:

     – The atmosphere is oxygen deficient or oxygen enriched

     OR

     – You CANNOT measure or estimate your expected exposure concentration    

     OR

     – Your measured or estimated expected exposure concentration is greater or equal to the IDLH value in the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards

Note: • ((WISHA)) DOSH uses the IDLH values in the 1990 edition of the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Hazardous Chemicals to determine the existence of IDLH conditions. You may use more recent editions of this guide. Visit www.cdc.gov/niosh for more information.
((• If your measured or estimated expected exposure concentration is below NIOSH's IDLH values, proceed to Step 7.))
     Step 6: Select an appropriate respirator from one of the following respirators for IDLH conditions and skip to Step 8:     • Full-facepiece, pressure demand, self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) certified by NIOSH for a minimum service life of thirty minutes;

     OR

     • Full-facepiece, pressure demand air-line respirator equipped with an auxiliary self-contained air supply.

Exception: If the respiratory hazard is oxygen deficiency AND you can show oxygen concentrations can be controlled within the ranges listed in Table 4 under ALL foreseeable conditions, you are allowed to select ANY type of SCBA or air-line respirator.

Table 4
Concentration Ranges for Oxygen Deficiency

Altitude

(as ft. above sea level)

Oxygen Concentration Range

(as percent oxygen)

Below 3,001 16.0 - 19.5
3,001 - 4,000 16.4 - 19.5
4,001 - 5,000 17.1 - 19.5
5,001 - 6,000 17.8 - 19.5
6,001 - 8,000 19.3 - 19.5
Above 8,000 feet the exception does not apply.

     Step 7: Identify respirator types with assigned protection factors (APFs) from Table 5 that are appropriate to protect employees from the expected exposure concentration.


Note: • Using assigned protection factors (APFs) for respirator selection, found at the end of this chapter, uses the hazard-ratio approach established by ANSI Z88.2-1992 to determine which respirator types can provide a sufficient level of protection.
• If no permissible exposure limit (PEL) is established for an airborne contaminant, use relevant available information and informed professional judgment to determine an acceptable exposure limit value to use for calculating hazard ratios. For example, you may use exposure limit values established by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).

     Step 8: Consider hazards that could require selection of specific respirator types. For example, select full-facepiece respirators to prevent eye irritation or abrasive blasting helmets to provide particle rebound protection.

     Step 9: Evaluate user and workplace factors that might compromise respirator performance, reliability or safety.

     • If the respiratory hazard is a pesticide, follow the requirements on the pesticide label and skip to Step 11.

     Examples:

     • High humidity or temperature extremes in the workplace.

     • Necessary voice communication.

     • High traffic areas and moving machinery.

     • Time or distance for escape.

     Step 10: Follow Table 6 requirements to select an air-purifying respirator.

     • If Table 6 requirements cannot be met, you must select an air-line respirator or an SCBA.

     Step 11: Make sure respirators you select are certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

     • To maintain certification, make sure the respirator is used according to cautions and limitations specified on the NIOSH approval label.

Note: While selecting respirators, you will need to select a sufficient number of types, models or sizes to provide for fit testing. You can also consider other respirator use issues, such as accommodating facial hair with a loose fitting respirator.
     Use Table 5 to identify the assigned protection factor for different types of respirators.


Table 5
Assigned Protection Factors (APF) for Respirator Types

If the respirator is a(n) . . . Then the APF is . . .
Air-purifying respirator with a:
• Half-facepiece . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
• Full-facepiece . . . . . . . . . . . . ((100)) 50
Note: Half-facepiece includes 1/4 masks, filtering facepieces, and elastomeric facepieces.
Powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) with a:
• Loose-fitting facepiece . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
• Half-facepiece . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
• Full-facepiece, equipped with HEPA filters, chemical cartridges or canisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000
• Hood or helmet, equipped with HEPA filters, chemical cartridges or canisters . . . . . . . . . . . . ((1000)) 25/1000 (see note)
Note: PAPRs with helmets/hoods may receive an APF of 1,000 only when you have evidence that testing of these respirators demonstrates performance at a level of protection of 1,000 or greater. Such evidence must be provided by the respirator manufacturer. This level of performance can best be demonstrated by performing a workplace protection factor (WPF) or simulated workplace protection factor (SWPF) study or equivalent testing.
Air-line respirator with a:
• Half-facepiece and designed to operate in demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
• Loose-fitting facepiece and designed to operate in continuous flow mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
• Half-facepiece and designed to operate in continuous-flow, or pressure-demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
• Full-facepiece and designed to operate in demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . ((100)) 50
• Full-facepiece and designed to operate in continuous-flow OR pressure-demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000
• Helmet or hood and designed to operate in continuous-flow mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000
Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a tight fitting:
• Half-facepiece and designed to operate in demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
• Full-facepiece and designed to operate in demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
• Full-facepiece and designed to operate in pressure-demand

mode . . . . . . . . . . . .

10,000
Combination respirators:
• Find the APF for each type of respirator in the combination. The lowest value
• Use the lower APF to represent the combination.

     Use Table 6 to select air-purifying respirators for particle, vapor, or gas contaminants.

Table 6
Requirements for Selecting Any Air-purifying Respirator

If the contaminant is a . . . Then . . .
• Gas OR vapor • Provide a respirator with canisters or cartridges equipped with a NIOSH-certified, end-of-service-life indicator (ESLI)
OR
• If a canister or cartridge with an ESLI is NOT available, develop a cartridge change schedule to make sure the canisters or cartridges are replaced before they are no longer effective
OR
• Select an atmosphere-supplying respirator
• Particle, such as a dust, spray, mist, fog, fume, or aerosol • Select respirators with filters certified to be at least 95% efficient by NIOSH
– For example, N95s, R99s, P100s, or High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA)
((OR
• You may select respirators NIOSH certified as "dust and mist," "dust, fume, or mist," OR "pesticides." You can only use these respirators if particles primarily have a mass median aerodynamic diameter of at least two micrometers.
Note: These respirators are no longer sold for occupational use.))

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-60205, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-60405   Provide medical evaluations.  

     IMPORTANT:

     If ((you have provided)) an employee has been provided with a medical evaluation addressing respirator use, as required by another chapter, that evaluation will meet the requirements of this section.

     You must:

     • Follow the medical evaluation process, Steps 1 through 7 in this section, to provide medical evaluations for employees at no cost to them.

Medical Evaluation Process
     Step 1: Identify employees who need medical evaluations AND determine the frequency of evaluations from Table 7. Include employees who:

     • Are required to use respirators;

     OR

     • Voluntarily use respirators that are not filtering-facepiece respirators.

Note: You may use a previous employer's medical evaluation for an employee if you can:
• Show the employee's previous work and use conditions were substantially similar to yours
AND
• Obtain a copy of the licensed healthcare professional's (LHCP's) written recommendation approving the employee's use of the respirator chosen by you.
     Step 2: Identify a licensed healthcare professional (LHCP) to perform your medical evaluations.

Note: If you select a different LHCP, you do not need to have new medical evaluations done.
     Step 3: Make sure your LHCP has the following information before the evaluation is completed:

     • Information describing the respirators employees may use, including the weight and type.

     • How the respirators will be used, including:

     – How often the respirator will be used, for example, daily, or once a month;

     – The duration of respirator use, for example, a minimum of one hour, or up to twelve hours;

     – The employee's expected physical work effort;

     – Additional personal protective clothing and equipment to be worn;

     – Temperature and humidity extremes expected during use.

     • A copy of your written respiratory protection program and this part.

Note: • You may choose to send the questionnaire to the LHCP ahead of time, giving time to review it and add any necessary questions
• The LHCP determines what questions to add to the questionnaire, if any; however, questions in Parts 1-3 may not be deleted or substantially altered.
     Step 4: Administer the medical questionnaire in WAC 296-307-61605 to employees, OR provide them a medical exam that obtains the same information.

Note: You may use on-line questionnaires if the questions are the same and requirements of this section are met.
     • Administer the examination or questionnaire at no cost to employees:

     – During the employee's normal working hours;

     OR

     – At a time and place convenient to the employee.

     • Maintain employee confidentiality during examination or questionnaire administration:

     – Do not view employee's answers on the questionnaire;

     – Do not act in a manner that may be considered a breach of confidentiality.

Note: Providing confidentiality is important for securing successful medical evaluations. It helps make sure the LHCP gets complete and dependable answers on the questionnaire.
     • Make sure employees understand the content of the questionnaire.

     • Provide the employee with an opportunity to discuss the questionnaire or exam results with the LHCP.

     Step 5: Provide follow-up evaluation for employees when:

     • The LHCP needs more information to make a final recommendation;

     OR

     • An employee gives any positive response to questions 1-8 in Part 2 OR to questions 1-6 in Part 3 of the ((WISHA)) DOSH medical evaluation questionnaire in WAC 296-307-61605.

Note: Follow-up may include:
• Employee consultation with the LHCP such as a telephone conversation to evaluate positive questionnaire responses
• Medical exams
• Medical tests or other diagnostic procedures.
     Step 6: Obtain a written recommendation from the LHCP that contains only the following medical information:

     • Whether or not the employee is medically able to use the respirator;

     • Any limitations of respirator use for the employee;

     • What future medical evaluations, if any, are needed;

     • A statement that the employee has been provided a copy of the written recommendation.

     Step 7: Provide a powered, air-purifying respirator (PAPR) when the LHCP determines the employee should not wear a negative-pressure air-purifying respirator AND is able to wear a PAPR.

Reference: See WAC 296-307-602 for requirements regarding selection of air-purifying respirators.
Note: • You may discontinue medical evaluations for an employee when the employee no longer uses a respirator.
• If you have staff conducting your medical evaluations, they may keep completed questionnaires and findings as confidential medical records, if they are maintained separately from other records.
     Use Table 7 to determine medical evaluation frequency.

Table 7
Evaluation Frequency

Type of Evaluation: When required:
Initial medical evaluations • Before respirators are fit-tested or used in the workplace.
Subsequent medical evaluations • If any of these occur:
– Your licensed healthcare professional (LHCP) recommends them; for example, periodic evaluations at specified intervals.
– A respirator program administrator or supervisor informs you that an employee needs reevaluation.
– Medical signs or symptoms (such as breathing difficulties) are:
▪ Observed during fit-testing or program evaluation
OR
▪ Reported by the employee
– Changes in worksite conditions such as physical work effort, personal protective clothing, or temperature that could substantially increase the employee's physiological stress.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-60405, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-606   Fit testing.  

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure negative and positive-pressure tight-fitting respirators can provide an adequate fit and acceptable level of comfort to employees.


Exemption: This section does NOT apply to any respirators that are:
• Voluntarily used. See WAC 296-307-598 for voluntary use requirements.
• Mouthpiece respirators and other escape-only respirators.
• Loose-fitting respirators.

     IMPORTANT:

     • Fit testing is an activity where the seal of a respirator is tested to determine if it is adequate.

     • This section covers general requirements for fit testing. Fit-testing procedures are covered in WAC 296-307-62010 of this part.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-606, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-60605   Conduct fit testing.  

     You must:

     • Provide, at no cost to the employee, fit tests for ALL tight fitting respirators on the following schedule:

     – Before employees are assigned duties that may require the use of respirators;

     – At least every twelve months after initial testing;

     – Whenever any of the following occurs:

     ▪ A different respirator facepiece is chosen such as a different type, model, style, or size;

     ▪ You become aware of a physical change in an employee that could affect respirator fit. For example, you may observe, or be told about, facial scarring, dental changes, cosmetic surgery, or obvious weight changes;

     ▪ An employee notifies you, or your LHCP, that the respirator fit is unacceptable. During the retest, you must give an employee reasonable opportunity to select a different respirator facepiece (size, model, etc.).

Note: You may accept a fit test completed by a previous employer IF:
• You obtain written documentation of the fit test
AND
• The results of the fit test are not more than twelve months old
AND
• The employee will use the same respirator (the same type, model, style, and size)
AND
• The fit test was conducted in a way that meets the requirements of WAC 296-307-606 and 296-307-62010.
     You must:

     • Select and use an appropriate fit-testing procedure from WAC 296-307-62010 of this ((part AND:)) chapter.

     – Use quantitative fit-test methods when a negative pressure respirator will be used in concentrations requiring a protection factor greater than 10. This includes:

     ▪ Full facepiece air-purifying respirators

     ▪ SCBAs operated in demand (negative pressure) mode

     ▪ Air-line respirators operated in demand mode.

     – Make sure tight-fitting PAPRs, SCBAs, or air-line respirators are fit tested in negative-pressure mode.

     – Make sure tight-fitting PAPRs, SCBAs, or air-line respirators are fit-tested in negative-pressure mode. This must be done by either:

     (a) Temporarily converting the respirator user's actual facepiece into a negative pressure respirator using the appropriate filters;

     OR

     (b) Using an identical negative pressure air-purifying respirator facepiece as a surrogate for the SCBA, air-line of PAPR. The surrogate facepiece must have the same sealing surfaces as the SCBA, air-line, or PAPR.

     Remove any modifications made to the respirator facepiece for fit-testing and return the facepiece to the NIOSH approved configuration before the facepiece is used in the workplace.

     • Make sure the person conducting fit testing is able to do ALL of the following:

     – Prepare test solutions if required;

     – Make sure equipment works properly;

     – Perform tests properly;

     – Recognize invalid tests;

     – Calculate fit factors properly if required.

Note: • No specific training program or certification is required for those who conduct fit tests.
• You should consider evaluating these individuals to determine their proficiency in the fit-testing method to be used.
• You can use an evaluation form such as the form included in the American National Standard for Respirator Fit Testing Methods, ANSI/AIHA Z88.10-2001 to determine if the individual meets these requirements. Visit www.ansi.org or www.aiha.org.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-60605, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-608   Training.  


Exemption: This section does not apply to respirators that are voluntarily used. See WAC 296-842-11005 for voluntary use requirements.

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure employees who are required to use respirators understand and can demonstrate proper respirator use and maintenance.

     IMPORTANT:

     This section applies to employees who voluntarily use respirators only when training is necessary to prevent the respirator from creating a hazard. See WAC 296-307-598 for voluntary use requirements.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-608, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-612   Safe use and removal of respirators.  

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure respirator use and removal is safe.

Exemption: ((These sections do NOT apply to employees who voluntarily use any type of respirator.)) See WAC 296-307-598 for voluntary use requirements.
     You must:

     Prevent sealing problems with tight-fitting respirators

     WAC 296-307-61205

     Make sure employees leave the use area before removing respirators

     WAC 296-307-61210.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-612, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-61405   Provide standby assistance in immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) conditions.  

     IMPORTANT:

     ((WISHA)) DOSH currently uses the IDLH values in the 1990 NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards to determine the existence of IDLH conditions. You may use more recent editions of this guide. Visit www.cdc.gov/niosh for more information.

     You must:

     • Provide at least two standby employees outside the IDLH area.

Note: You need only one standby employee if the IDLH condition is well characterized, will remain stable AND you can show one employee can adequately do ALL of the following:
• Monitor employees in the IDLH area;
• Implement communication; and
• Initiate rescue duties.
     • Train and equip standby employees to provide effective emergency rescue. Equip them with:

     – A pressure-demand SCBA or a pressure-demand air-line respirator with an auxiliary SCBA, for each standby employee;

     – Appropriate retrieval equipment, when it would help with the effective rescue of the entrant, or an equivalent means of rescue.

     • Make sure standby employees maintain visual, voice, or signal line communication with employees in the IDLH area

     • Make sure that in the event of an emergency:

     – Standby employees notify you or your designee before they enter the IDLH area to provide emergency rescue

     – You provide necessary assistance when notified.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-61405, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-62005   Use this medical questionnaire for medical evaluations.  

     You must:

     • Use the medical questionnaire in Table 10 when conducting medical evaluations.

Note: • You may use a physical exam instead of this questionnaire if the exam covers the same information as the questionnaire.
• You may use on-line questionnaires if the questions are the same and the requirements in WAC 296-307-604 of this part are met.
• You may choose to send the questionnaire to the LCHP ahead of time, giving time to review it and add any necessary questions.
• The LHCP determines what questions to add to the questionnaire, if any; however, questions in Parts 1-3 may not be deleted or substantially altered.

Table 10

((WISHA)) DOSH Medical Evaluation Questionnaire
Employer instructions:
• You may use on-line questionnaires if the requirements in WAC 296-307-60405 are met.
• You must tell your employee how to deliver or send the completed questionnaire to the healthcare provider you have selected.
• You must NOT review employees' questionnaires.
Healthcare provider's instructions:
• Review the information in this questionnaire and any additional information provided to you by the employer.
• You may add questions to this questionnaire at your discretion; HOWEVER, questions in Parts 1-3 may not be deleted or substantially altered.
• Follow-up evaluation is required for any positive response to questions 1-8 in Part 2, or questions 1-6 in Part 3. This might include: Phone consultations to evaluate positive responses, medical tests, and diagnostic procedures.
• When your evaluation is complete, send a copy of your written recommendation to the employer AND employee.
Employee information and instructions:
• Your employer must allow you to answer this questionnaire during normal working hours, or at a time and place that's convenient to you.
• Your employer or supervisor must not look at or review your answers at any time.

Part 1 - Employee Background Information
ALL employees must complete this part
Please print
1. Today's date:
2. Your name:
3. Your age (to nearest year):
4. Sex (circle one): Male / Female
5. Your height: ft. in.
6. Your weight: lbs.
7. Your job title:
8. A phone number where you can be reached by the healthcare professional who reviews this questionnaire (include Area Code):
9. The best time to call you at this number:
10. Has your employer told you how to contact the healthcare professional who will review this questionnaire? Yes / No
11. Check the type of respirator(s) you will be using:
a. N, R, or P filtering-facepiece respirator (for example, a dust mask, OR an N95 filtering-facepiece respirator).
b. Check all that apply.
Half mask Full facepiece mask Helmet hood Escape
Nonpowered cartridge or canister Powered air-purifying cartridge respirator (PAPR)
Supplied-air or Air-line
Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA): Demand or Pressure demand
Other:
12. Have you previously worn a respirator? Yes / No
If "yes," describe what type(s):
Part 2 - General Health Information
ALL employees must complete this part
Please circle "Yes" or "No"
1. Do you currently smoke tobacco, or have you smoked tobacco in the last month? Yes / No
2. Have you ever had any of the following conditions?
a. Seizures (fits): Yes / No
b. Diabetes (sugar disease): Yes / No
c. Allergic reactions that interfere with your breathing: Yes / No
d. Claustrophobia (fear of closed-in places): Yes / No
e. Trouble smelling odors: Yes / No
3. Have you ever had any of the following pulmonary or lung problems?
a. Asbestosis: Yes / No
b. Asthma: Yes / No
c. Chronic bronchitis: Yes / No
d. Emphysema: Yes / No
e. Pneumonia: Yes / No
f. Tuberculosis: Yes / No
g. Silicosis: Yes / No
h. Pneumothorax (collapsed lung): Yes / No
i. Lung cancer: Yes / No
j. Broken ribs: Yes / No
k. Any chest injuries or surgeries: Yes / No
l. Any other lung problem that you have been told about: Yes / No
4. Do you currently have any of the following symptoms of pulmonary or lung illness?
a. Shortness of breath: Yes / No
b. Shortness of breath when walking fast on level ground or walking up a slight hill or incline: Yes / No
c. Shortness of breath when walking with other people at an ordinary pace on level ground: Yes / No
d. Have to stop for breath when walking at your own pace on level ground: Yes / No
e. Shortness of breath when washing or dressing yourself: Yes / No
f. Shortness of breath that interferes with your job: Yes / No
g. Coughing that produces phlegm (thick sputum): Yes / No
h. Coughing that wakes you early in the morning: Yes / No
i. Coughing that occurs mostly when you are lying down: Yes / No
j. Coughing up blood in the last month: Yes / No
k. Wheezing: Yes / No
l. Wheezing that interferes with your job: Yes / No
m. Chest pain when you breathe deeply: Yes / No
n. Any other symptoms that you think may be related to lung problems: Yes / No
5. Have you ever had any of the following cardiovascular or heart problems? Yes / No
a. Heart attack: Yes / No
b. Stroke: Yes / No
c. Angina: Yes / No
d. Heart failure: Yes / No
e. Swelling in your legs or feet (not caused by walking): Yes / No
f. Heart arrhythmia (heart beating irregularly): Yes / No
g. High blood pressure: Yes / No
h. Any other heart problem that you have been told about: Yes / No
6. Have you ever had any of the following cardiovascular or heart symptoms?
a. Frequent pain or tightness in your chest: Yes / No
b. Pain or tightness in your chest during physical activity: Yes / No
c. Pain or tightness in your chest that interferes with your job: Yes / No
d. In the past 2 years, have you noticed your heart skipping or missing a beat: Yes / No
e. Heartburn or indigestion that's not related to eating: Yes / No
f. Any other symptoms that you think may be related to heart or circulation problems: Yes / No
7. Do you currently take medication for any of the following problems? Yes / No
a. Breathing or lung problems: Yes / No
b. Heart trouble: Yes / No
c. Blood pressure: Yes / No
d. Seizures (fits): Yes / No
8. If you have used a respirator, have you ever had any of the following problems? (If you have never used a respirator, check the following space and go to question 9):
a. Eye irritation: Yes / No
b. Skin allergies or rashes: Yes / No
c. Anxiety: Yes / No
d. General weakness or fatigue: Yes / No
e. Any other problem that interferes with your use of a respirator? Yes / No
9. Would you like to talk to the healthcare professional who will review this questionnaire about your answers? Yes / No
Part 3 - Additional Questions for Users of Full-Facepiece Respirators or SCBAs
Please circle "Yes" or "No"
1. Have you ever lost vision in either eye (temporarily or permanently)? Yes / No
2. Do you currently have any of these vision problems?
a. Need to wear contact lenses: Yes / No
b. Need to wear glasses: Yes / No
c. Color blindness: Yes / No
d. Any other eye or vision problem: Yes / No
3. Have you ever had an injury to your ears, including a broken ear drum? Yes / No
4. Do you currently have any of these hearing problems?
a. Difficulty hearing: Yes / No
b. Need to wear a hearing aid: Yes / No
c. Any other hearing or ear problem: Yes / No
5. Have you ever had a back injury? Yes / No
6. Do you currently have any of the following musculoskeletal problems?
a. Weakness in any of your arms, hands, legs, or feet: Yes / No
b. Back pain: Yes / No
c. Difficulty fully moving your arms and legs: Yes / No
d. Pain or stiffness when you lean forward or backward at the waist: Yes / No
e. Difficulty fully moving your head up or down: Yes / No
f. Difficulty fully moving your head side to side: Yes / No
g. Difficulty bending at your knees: Yes / No
h. Difficulty squatting to the ground: Yes / No
i. Climbing a flight of stairs or a ladder carrying more than 25 lbs: Yes / No
j. Any other muscle or skeletal problem that interferes with using a respirator: Yes / No
Part 4 - Discretionary Questions
Complete questions in this part ONLY IF your employer's healthcare provider says they are necessary
1. In your present job, are you working at high altitudes (over 5,000 feet) or in a place that has lower than normal amounts of oxygen? Yes / No
If "yes," do you have feelings of dizziness, shortness of breath, pounding in your chest, or other symptoms when you are working under these conditions: Yes / No
2. Have you ever been exposed (at work or home) to hazardous solvents, hazardous airborne chemicals (such as gases, fumes, or dust), OR have you come into skin contact with hazardous chemicals? Yes / No
If "yes," name the chemicals, if you know them:
3. Have you ever worked with any of the materials, or under any of the conditions, listed below:
a. Asbestos? Yes / No
b. Silica (for example, in sandblasting)? Yes / No
c. Tungsten/cobalt (for example, grinding or welding this material)? Yes / No
d. Beryllium? Yes / No
e. Aluminum? Yes / No
f. Coal (for example, mining)? Yes / No
g. Iron? Yes / No
h. Tin? Yes / No
i. Dusty environments? Yes / No
j. Any other hazardous exposures? Yes / No
If "yes," describe these exposures:
4. List any second jobs or side businesses you have:
5. List your previous occupations:
6. List your current and previous hobbies:
7. Have you been in the military services? Yes / No
If "yes," were you exposed to biological or chemical agents (either in training or combat)? Yes / No
8. Have you ever worked on a HAZMAT team? Yes / No
9. Other than medications for breathing and lung problems, heart trouble, blood pressure, and seizures mentioned earlier in this questionnaire, are you taking any other medications for any reason (including over-the-counter medications)? Yes / No
If "yes," name the medications if you know them:
10. Will you be using any of the following items with your respirator(s)?
a. HEPA filters: Yes / No
b. Canisters (for example, gas masks): Yes / No
c. Cartridges: Yes / No
11. How often are you expected to use the respirator(s)?
a. Escape-only (no rescue): Yes / No
b. Emergency rescue only: Yes / No
c. Less than 5 hours per week: Yes / No
d. Less than 2 hours per day: Yes / No
e. 2 to 4 hours per day: Yes / No
f. Over 4 hours per day:
12. During the period you are using the respirator(s), is your work effort:
a. Light (less than 200 kcal per hour): Yes / No
If "yes," how long does this period last during the average

shift: hrs. mins.

Examples of a light work effort are sitting while writing, typing, drafting, or performing light assembly work; or standing while operating a drill press (1-3 lbs.) or controlling machines.
b. Moderate (200 to 350 kcal per hour): Yes / No
If "yes," how long does this period last during the average

shift: hrs. mins.

Examples of moderate work effort are sitting while nailing or filing; driving a truck or bus in urban traffic; standing while drilling, nailing, performing assembly work, or transferring a moderate load (about 35 lbs.) at trunk level; walking on a level surface about 2 mph or down a 5-degree grade about 3 mph; or pushing a wheelbarrow with a heavy load (about 100 lbs.) on a level surface.
c. Heavy (above 350 kcal per hour): Yes / No
If "yes," how long does this period last during the average

shift: hrs. mins.

Examples of heavy work are lifting a heavy load (about 50 lbs.) from the floor to your waist or shoulder; working on a loading dock; shoveling; standing while bricklaying or chipping castings; walking up an 8-degree grade about 2 mph; climbing stairs with a heavy load (about 50 lbs.).
13. Will you be wearing protective clothing and/or equipment (other than the respirator) when you are using your respirator? Yes / No
If "yes," describe this protective clothing and/or equipment:
14. Will you be working under hot conditions (temperature exceeding 77°F): Yes / No
15. Will you be working under humid conditions: Yes / No
16. Describe the work you will be doing while using your respirator(s):
17. Describe any special or hazardous conditions you might encounter when you are using your respirator(s) (for example, confined spaces, life-threatening gases):
18. Provide the following information, if you know it, for each toxic substance that you will be exposed to when you are using your respirator(s):
Name of the first toxic substance:
Estimated maximum exposure level per shift:
Duration of exposure per shift:
Name of the second toxic substance:
Estimated maximum exposure level per shift:
Duration of exposure per shift:
Name of the third toxic substance:
Estimated maximum exposure level per shift:
Duration of exposure per shift:
The name of any other toxic substances that you will be exposed to while using your respirator:
19. Describe any special responsibilities you will have while using your respirator(s) that may affect the safety and well-being of others (for example, rescue, security).

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-62005, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-62010   Follow these fit-testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators.  

     IMPORTANT:

     • This section contains procedural requirements that apply during actual fit testing.

     • See WAC 296-307-606 of this part for fit-testing requirements that apply to your overall program.

Exemptions: This section does NOT apply to employees who:
• Voluntarily use respirators
OR
• Are required to use mouthpiece respirators.
     You must:

     • Conduct fit testing according to all of the following:

     – Follow the procedure in Table 11 to choose a respirator for fit testing:

     ▪ Prior to conducting fit tests;

     AND

     ▪ Any time your employee must select a different respirator such as when a previously selected respirator fails a test.

     – Select and follow at least one of the following fit test procedures:

     ▪ Qualitative fit-test procedures:

     ♦ Isoamyl acetate vapor (IAA, banana oil) in Table 12;

     ♦ Saccharine aerosol in Table 13;

     ♦ Bitrex™ aerosol in Table 14;

     ♦ Irritant smoke in Table 15.

     ▪ Quantitative fit-test procedures:

     ♦ Ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter such as the Portacount™, in Table 16

     ♦ Controlled negative pressure (CNP) such as the FitTester 3000™, in Table 17

     ♦ Generated aerosol in Table 18

     – Make sure employees perform the appropriate fit-test exercises listed in Table 19.

     – Clean and maintain equipment according to the manufacturer's instructions.

     – Make sure during fit testing employees wear any safety equipment that could:

     ▪ Interfere with respirator fit

     AND

     ▪ Be worn in the workplace. For example, chemical splash goggles.

     – Check, prior to fit testing, for conditions that may interfere with the respirator seal or valve functions. If you find such conditions, do NOT conduct fit testing for that individual.

Note: Examples of conditions that may interfere with the respirator seal or valve functions include:
• Moustache, stubble, sideburns, bangs, hairline, and other types of facial hair in areas where the respirator facepiece seals or that interfere with valve function
• Temple bars of corrective eyewear or headgear that extend through the face seal area.
• Follow the appropriate fit test exercises in Table 19 as indicated.

Table 11

Procedure for Choosing a Respirator for Fit Testing
1. Inform the employee:
• To choose the most comfortable respirator that provides an adequate fit
• That each respirator sample represents a different size and, if more than one model is supplied, a different shape
• That if fitted and used properly, the respirator chosen will provide adequate protection
2. Provide a mirror and show the employee how to:
• Put on the respirator
• Position the respirator on the face
• Set strap tension.
Note:

This instruction does NOT take the place of the employee's formal training since it is only a review.

3. Review with the employee how to check for a comfortable fit around the nose, cheeks and other areas on the face.
• Tell the employee the respirator should be comfortable while talking or wearing eye protection.
4. Have the employee hold each facepiece against the face, taking enough time to compare the fit of each. The employee can then either:
• Reject any facepiece that clearly does not feel comfortable or fit adequately
OR
• Choose which facepiece is most acceptable and which is less acceptable, if any.
Note:

• Supply as many respirator models and sizes as needed to make sure the employee finds a respirator that's acceptable and fits correctly

• To save time later, during this step note the more acceptable facepieces in case the one chosen fails the fit test or proves unacceptable later.

5. Have the employee wear the most acceptable respirator for AT LEAST 5 minutes to evaluate comfort and fit. Do ALL of the following during this time:
• Ask the employee to observe and comment about the comfort and fit:
– Around the nose, cheeks, and other areas on the face
– When talking or wearing eye protection
• Have the employee put on the respirator and adjust the straps until they show proficiency
• Evaluate the respirator's general fit by checking:
– Proper chin placement
– Properly tightened straps (do NOT over tighten)
– Acceptable fit across the nose bridge
– Respirator size; it must span the distance from nose to chin
– To see if the respirator stays in position
• Have the employee complete a successful seal check as specified in WAC 296-307-62020 of this chapter
– Prior to the seal check they must settle the respirator on their face by taking a few slow deep breaths WHILE SLOWLY:
▪ Moving their head from side-to-side
AND
▪ Up and down.
6. If the employee finds the respirator unacceptable, allow the employee to select another one and return to Step 5. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.
7. Before starting the fit test, you must:
• Describe the fit test including screening procedures, employee responsibilities, and test exercises
AND
• Make sure the employee wears the respirator AT LEAST five minutes.

Table 12

Isoamyl Acetate (Banana Oil) Vapor Test Procedure
Important:
• This is a qualitative fit-test (QLFT) procedure
• The success of this test depends on preserving the employee's odor sensitivity to isoamyl acetate (IAA) vapor
– Vapor accumulations in ambient air can decrease odor sensitivity. To prevent this:
▪ Prepare ALL solutions in a location separate from screening and test areas
▪ Conduct screening and tests in separate well-ventilated rooms. For example, use an exhaust fan or laboratory hood to prevent IAA vapor from accumulating in the room air
– Always use odor-free water, for example, distilled or spring water that's 25°C (77°F).
• Isoamyl acetate is also known as isopentyl acetate.
Screening Preparations
Important:
Odor threshold screening determines if the employee can detect weak concentrations of IAA vapor.
1. Choose an appropriate location to conduct screening.
• Conduct screening and tests in separate well-ventilated rooms.
2. Prepare a stock solution AT LEAST weekly as follows:
• Add one milliliter (ml) of pure IAA to 800 ml of odor-free water in a one-liter glass jar with a metal lid using a measuring dropper or pipette
• Seal the jar with the lid and shake it for 30 seconds
• Clean the dropper or pipette.
3. Prepare the odor test solution daily as follows:
• Add 0.4 ml from the stock solution to 500 ml of water in a one liter glass jar with a metal lid using a clean pipette or dropper
• Seal the jar with the lid and shake it for 30 seconds
• Let this solution stand for 2-3 minutes so the IAA concentration above the liquid reaches equilibrium
• Label this jar so you know the contents but the employee cannot know its contents, for example, "1."
Note:

To maintain the integrity of the test, use labels that peel off easily AND periodically switch the labels.

4. Prepare a "test blank" solution as follows:
• Add 500 ml of odor-free water to a one liter glass jar with a metal lid
• Seal the jar
• Label the jar so you know the contents but the employee cannot know its contents.
5. Type or neatly print the following instructions on a card and place it on the table in front of the two test jars:
"The purpose of this test is to find out if you can smell banana oil at a low concentration. While both jars contain water, one ALSO contains a small amount of banana oil.
Make sure the lid is secure then pick up a jar and shake it for two seconds. Open the jar and sniff at the opening. Repeat this for the second jar.
Tell the individual conducting the fit test which jar contains banana oil."
Test Preparations
6. Choose an appropriate location to conduct fit testing.
• Conduct screening and tests in separate well-ventilated rooms.
7. Assemble the fit test enclosure in the room.
• Invert a clear 55-gallon drum liner over a circular 2-foot diameter frame made of plywood or other lightweight rigid material OR construct a similar enclosure using plastic sheeting
• Hang the frame with the plastic covering so the top of the enclosure is about six inches above the employee's head
• Attach a small hook inside top center of the enclosure
• Tape a copy of the test exercises (see Table 28) to the inside of the test enclosure where the employee can read it.
8. Have organic vapor cartridges or equivalent on hand for each employee's chosen respirator.
9. Have ready a 6 x 5-inch piece of paper towel or other porous absorbent single-ply material AND 0.75 ml of pure IAA. Do NOT apply IAA yet.
Note:

As an alternative to using the paper towel, you may use an IAA test swab OR ampoule if it has been demonstrated to generate an equivalent test concentration.

Screening
10. Have the employee, while NOT wearing a respirator, follow the instructions on the card provided.
• If the employee correctly identifies the jar containing IAA, proceed to conduct testing (Step 11)
• If the employee is NOT able to correctly identify the jar containing IAA, you must STOP and use a different fit test protocol.
Test
11. BEFORE entering the fit test room, have the employee attach cartridges, put on, properly adjust, and seal check the respirator. Have the employee enter the test enclosure.
12. Wet the paper towel with 0.75 ml of pure IAA AND fold it in half.
13. Pass the paper towel to the employee inside the enclosure AND instruct the employee to hang it on the hook at the top of the enclosure.
14. Wait two minutes for the IAA vapor to fill the enclosure.
• While waiting, explain the fit test, including the purpose of the test exercises, the importance of cooperation, and that you must be informed if a banana-like odor is detected during the test
• You may also demonstrate the test exercises.
15. Have the employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises in Table 19.
• If the employee does NOT detect IAA while performing test exercises, the fit test has been PASSED. Proceed as follows:
– BEFORE leaving the enclosure, have the employee break the respirator seal and inhale. If they detect IAA, the test is valid
– When exiting the employee must remove the paper towel and give it to the individual conducting the fit test. This prevents IAA vapor from building up in the enclosure during subsequent tests
– The individual conducting the fit test must keep used paper towels in a self-sealing plastic bag to prevent area contamination
• If the employee detects IAA during any test exercise, the fit test has FAILED. STOP and have the employee do the following:
– Quickly return to the selection room to remove the respirator. This avoids decreasing the employee's odor sensitivity
– Select another respirator
– Repeat screening and testing
▪ At this stage, if the employee fails the screening part of this procedure, the employee can repeat it AFTER waiting at least five minutes for odor sensitivity to return.

Table 13

Saccharin Aerosol Test Procedure
Screening Preparations
Important:
• This is a qualitative fit-test (QLFT) procedure
• Taste threshold screening determines whether the employee being tested can detect the taste of saccharin
– The employee must NOT eat, smoke, chew gum or drink anything but plain water for at least fifteen minutes BEFORE the fit test. Sweet foods or drink consumed before the test may make the employee unable to detect saccharin during screening
– Nebulizers must be thoroughly rinsed in water and shaken dry:
▪ Each morning and afternoon
OR
▪ At least every four hours.
• You may use commercially prepared solutions if they meet the requirements in this procedure.
1. Obtain a test enclosure (hood) that meets the following specifications:
• Twelve inches in diameter by fourteen inches tall
• A clear front portion
• Enough space inside to allow free movement of the head when a respirator is worn
• A 3/4 inch (or 1.9 centimeter) hole to accommodate the nebulizer nozzle. The hole must line up in front of the wearer's nose and mouth.
Note:

• An enclosure similar to the 3M hood assembly, parts #FT 14 and #FT 15 combined, meets these specifications

• This enclosure can also be used for testing.

2. Obtain and assemble two clean DeVilbiss Model 40 Inhalation Medication Nebulizers OR equivalent.
3. Prepare the screening solution as follows:
• Dissolve 83.0 milligrams of sodium saccharin USP in 100 ml of warm distilled water
OR
• IF you have already prepared the fit-test solution, you can make the screening solution by adding 1 ml of this solution to 100 ml of distilled water.
4. Add about 1 ml of the screening solution to one of the nebulizers.
• Mark this nebulizer to distinguish it from the one to be used for fit testing.
Test Preparations
5. Prepare the fit-test solution as follows:
• Add 83.0 grams of sodium saccharin to 100 ml of warm water.
6. Add about 1 ml of the test solution to the second nebulizer.
• Mark this nebulizer to distinguish it from the one used for screening
7. Have particulate filters ready for the employee's chosen respirator or have filtering-facepiece respirators ready.
Screening
8. Have the employee, while NOT wearing a respirator, put on the test enclosure.
9. Instruct the employee to:
• Breath through a slightly open mouth with tongue extended during screening AND testing
• Immediately report when a sweet taste is detected.
10. Insert the nebulizer into the front hole of the test enclosure AND administer saccharin as follows:
• Direct the nozzle away from the employee's nose and mouth
• Complete 10 squeezes in rapid succession
• Each time firmly squeeze the bulb so it collapses completely, then release and allow it to fully expand.
11. Ask the employee if a sweet taste is detected.
• If YES, screening is completed. Proceed to conduct testing, Step 14, AFTER you:
– Ask the employee to remember the taste for reference during the fit test
– Note the employee's taste threshold as "10" regardless of the number of squeezes actually completed
• If NO, screening must continue. Proceed to Step 12.
12. Repeat with 10 more squeezes. Then follow Step 11 again; EXCEPT this time note the employee's taste threshold as "20" IF a sweet taste is reported.
• If a sweet taste is still NOT detected, repeat with 10 more squeezes and follow Step 11 one last time; EXCEPT this time note "30" for the taste threshold IF a sweet taste is reported.
13. If NO sweet taste is reported after 30 squeezes, you must STOP and choose a different fit-test protocol for the employee.
Test
Important!
• Periodically check nebulizers to make sure they do not clog during use. A test is NOT valid if the nebulizer is clogged at the end of the test.
14. Have the employee attach particulate filters, put on, properly adjust, and seal check the respirator. Have the employee put on the test enclosure (hood).
15. Instruct the employee to immediately report if a sweet taste is detected.
16. Insert the nebulizer into the front hole of the test enclosure AND administer the same number of squeezes, either 10, 20, or 30, as noted during screening.
17. Have the employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises as described in Table 19. During this step:
• Replenish the aerosol in the hood EVERY 30 seconds using 1/2 the number of squeezes used in Step 16, either 5, 10, or 15
• The employee must report if a sweet taste is detected:
– If NO saccharin is tasted, the test has been PASSED
▪ If saccharin is tasted the test has FAILED, have the employee select another respirator
AND
▪ Repeat screening and testing.

Table 14

Bitrex™ Aerosol Test Procedure
Important!
• This is a qualitative fit-test (QLFT) procedure
• Bitrex™ (denatonium benzoate) is routinely used as a taste aversion agent in household liquids that children shouldn't drink and is endorsed by the American Medical Association, the National Safety Council, and the American Association of Poison Control Centers
• The employee must NOT eat, smoke, chew gum or drink anything but plain water for at least fifteen minutes BEFORE the fit test.
Screening Preparations
Important!
• Taste threshold screening determines whether the employee being tested can detect the taste of Bitrex™
• Nebulizers must be thoroughly rinsed in water and shaken dry:
– Each morning and afternoon
OR
– At least every four hours.
• You may use commercially prepared solutions if they meet the requirements in this procedure.
1. Obtain a test enclosure that meets the following specifications:
• Twelve inches in diameter by fourteen inches tall
• A clear front portion
• Enough space inside the front to allow free movement of the head when a respirator is worn
• 3/4 inch (or 1.9 centimeter) hole to accommodate the nebulizer nozzle. The hole must line up in front of the wearer's nose and mouth.
Note:

• An enclosure similar to the 3M hood assembly, parts #FT 14 and #FT 15 combined, meets these specifications

• This enclosure can also be used for testing.

2. Obtain and assemble two clean DeVilbiss Model 40 Inhalation Medication Nebulizers OR equivalent:
3. Prepare the screening solution as follows:
• Make up a 5% salt solution by dissolving 5.0 grams of salt (sodium chloride) into 100 ml of distilled water
• Dissolve 13.5 milligrams of Bitrex™ in the salt solution.
4. Add about 1 ml of the screening solution to one of the nebulizers.
• Mark this nebulizer to distinguish it from the one to be used for fit testing.
Test Preparations
5. Prepare the fit test solution.
• Dissolve 10.0 grams of salt (sodium chloride) into 200 ml of distilled water
• Add 337.5 milligrams of Bitrex™ to the warmed salt solution.
6. Add about 1 ml of the test solution to the second nebulizer.
• Mark this nebulizer to distinguish it from the one used for screening.
7. Have particulate filters ready for the employee's chosen respirator or have filtering-facepiece respirators ready.
Screening
Important:

The employee must NOT eat, smoke, chew gum or drink anything but plain water for at least fifteen minutes BEFORE the screening and test

8. Have the employee, while NOT wearing a respirator, put on the test enclosure.
9. Instruct the employee to:
• Breathe through a slightly opened mouth with tongue extended during screening AND testing
• Immediately report when a bitter taste is detected.
10. Insert the nebulizer into the front hole of the test enclosure AND administer Bitrex™ as follows:
• Direct the nozzle away from the employee's nose and mouth
• Complete 10 squeezes in rapid succession
• Each time firmly squeeze the bulb so it collapses completely, then release and allow it to fully expand.
11. Ask the employee whether a bitter taste is detected.
• If YES, screening is completed. Proceed to conduct testing, Step 14, AFTER you:
– Ask the employee to remember the taste for reference during the fit test
– Note the employee's taste threshold as "10," regardless of the number of squeezes actually completed
• If NO, screening must continue. Proceed to Step 12.
12. Repeat with 10 more squeezes. Then follow Step 11 again; EXCEPT this time note the employee's taste threshold as "20" IF a bitter taste is reported.
• If a bitter taste is still NOT detected repeat with 10 more squeezes and follow Step 11 one last time; EXCEPT this time note "30" for the taste threshold IF a bitter taste is reported.
13. If NO bitter taste is reported after 30 squeezes, you must STOP and choose a different fit-test protocol for the employee.
Test
14. Have the employee attach particulate filters, put on, properly adjust, and seal check the respirator. Have the employee put on the test enclosure.
15. Instruct the employee to:
• Breathe through a slightly opened mouth with tongue extended during screening AND testing
• Immediately report when a bitter taste is detected.
16. Insert the nebulizer into the front hole of the test enclosure AND administer the same number of squeezes, either 10, 20, or 30, as noted during screening.
17. Have the employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises as described in Table 19. During this step:
• Replenish the aerosol in the hood EVERY 30 seconds using 1/2 the number of squeezes used in Step 16, either 5, 10, or 15
• The employee must report if a bitter taste is detected:
– If NO Bitrex™ is tasted, the test has been PASSED
– If Bitrex™ is tasted the test has FAILED. Have the employee:
▪ Select another respirator
AND
▪ Repeat all screening and testing steps.

Table 15

Irritant Smoke (Stannic Chloride) Test Procedure
Important:
• DO NOT USE A TEST ENCLOSURE OR HOOD FOR THIS FIT TEST!
• This is a qualitative fit-test (QLFT) procedure
• During this test an employee is exposed to irritating smoke containing hydrochloric acid produced by a stannic chloride ventilation smoke tube to detect leakage. The smoke will irritate eyes, lungs, and nasal passages
• Employee sensitivity varies, and certain employees may respond more intensely than others exposed to irritant smoke. The individual conducting the fit test must take precautions to minimize the employees' exposure to irritant smoke
• Conduct fit testing in an area with adequate ventilation to prevent exposure of the individual conducting the fit test and build-up of irritant smoke in the ambient air.
Screening AND Test Preparations
Important:
Sensitivity screening is necessary to determine whether the employee can detect a weak concentration of irritant smoke AND whether any gross facepiece leakage is detected.
1. Obtain only stannic chloride (ventilation) smoke tubes, AND an aspirator squeeze bulb OR use a low-flow air pump set to deliver 200 milliliters of air flow per minute.
2. Equip the employee's chosen respirator with P100 series filters if a negative pressure air-purifying respirator will be tested. If a powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) will be tested equip the respirator with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters.
Screening
Important!
When performing sensitivity screening checks use only the MINIMUM amount of smoke necessary to elicit a response from the employee.
3. Advise the employee that the smoke can be irritating to eyes, lungs, and nasal passages AND instruct the employee to keep eyes closed while exposed.
4. Break both ends of the ventilation smoke tube AND fit a short piece of plastic tubing, for example, two-to-six inches of tygon tubing, over one end to prevent exposure to the sharp end of the tube. Connect the other end to an aspirator bulb or a low-flow air pump set to deliver a flow of 200 ml per minute.
5. While the employee is NOT wearing a respirator, have the employee smell a weak concentration of irritant smoke to become familiar with its irritating properties.
• Carefully direct a small amount of irritant smoke toward the employee.
Test
Test 6. Have the employee attach respirator filters, put on, adjust, and seal check the respirator without assistance. The employee must be proficient at these tasks.
7. Remind the employee to keep eyes closed during testing.
8. Direct a stream of irritant smoke toward the respirator's face seal area as follows:
• Begin at least 12 inches from the facepiece AND move the smoke around the whole perimeter of the mask
• Gradually make two more passes around the perimeter of the facepiece, moving to within 6 inches of the respirator
• STOP at any time the employee detects smoke in the facepiece. If this occurs a different respirator will need to be chosen and tested, beginning with sensitivity screening.
9. Have the employee perform appropriate fit-test exercises in Table 19 IF the employee has NOT had an involuntary response such as evidence of coughing, flinching, or other response, OR detected smoke in the facepiece.
• Continue to direct smoke from a distance of 6 inches around the facepiece perimeter
– If smoke is detected at any time the test has FAILED. A different respirator must be chosen and tested, starting with sensitivity screening
– If NO smoke is detected proceed to Step 10.
10. Have the employee remove the respirator AND perform another sensitivity screening check as follows:
• Continue to use the smoke tube used for fit testing
• Carefully direct a SMALL amount of irritant smoke toward the employee
– The test has been PASSED IF the employee responds to the smoke
– The fit test is VOIDED IF the employee does NOT respond to the smoke.

Table 16

Ambient Aerosol Condensation Nuclei Counter (Portacount™) Test Procedure
Important:
• This is a quantitative (QNFT) fit-test procedure
• This method uses a particle counting instrument that measures and compares the particle concentration both inside and outside the respirator facepiece while the employee performs a series of test exercises
• Particles in the ambient air are used as the test aerosol.
Test Preparations
1. Obtain a test instrument such as a Portacount™.
2. Have probed respirators available for each respirator model and size the employer uses, OR have a sampling adapter available if the employee's actual or chosen respirator will be tested.
Note:

• A probed respirator has a special fitting installed on the facepiece designed to connect with the end of the test instrument's plastic sampling tube so that air samples can be taken inside the facepiece. Probed respirators can be obtained from the respirator manufacturer, or distributor, AND can only be used for fit-testing purposes

• Contact TSI Inc., OR the respirator's manufacturer to obtain probed respirators or facepiece sampling adapters.

3. Follow the test instrument manufacturer's instructions for test preparation, including particle, zero, and system checks. Make sure the instrument's pass OR fail criterion is programmed to the following MINIMUM performance levels:
• For half-facepiece respirators, an overall minimum fit factor of 100 as a passing level
• For full-facepiece respirators, an overall minimum fit factor of 500 as a passing level
4. Have high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, OR other respirator filters available that are capable of preventing significant penetration by particles generated by the test instrument such as, P100 or N95 series filters.
• If you'll use a sampling adapter instead of probed respirators be sure to have the correct type for the respirators chosen.
Test
5. Properly attach the sampling line to the facepiece probe or sampling adapter.
6. Have the employee attach respirator filters, put on, properly adjust, and wear the respirator five minutes BEFORE the fit test. During this time you and the employee must evaluate the respirator's general fit by checking:
• Proper chin placement
• Properly tightened straps (do NOT over tighten)
• Acceptable fit across the nose bridge
• Respirator size. It must span the distance from nose to chin
• To see if the respirator stays in position.
Note:

Wearing the respirator for five minutes permits the employee to make certain the respirator is comfortable AND allows for purging of ambient particles trapped inside the facepiece.

7. Have the employee perform a seal check. Make sure the sampling line is crimped to avoid leakage during the seal check. If NO leakage is detected, proceed to Step 8. If leakage is detected:
• Determine the cause
AND
• If leakage is due to a poorly fitting facepiece, have the employee:
– Choose another respirator size or model
AND
– Start again at Step 6.
8. Start the fit test cycle.
• Follow the manufacturer's instructions for operating the test instrument
• Have the employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises in Table 19
– The test instrument will automatically stop and calculate the overall fit factor. Use this result to determine whether or not the test is passed
▪ The test has been PASSED if the overall fit factor is at least 100 for a half facepiece, OR 500 for a full facepiece
▪ The test has FAILED if the overall fit factor is below 100 for a half facepiece or 500 for a full facepiece.
Note:

If the test has failed, have the employee select another respirator model or size following Table 11 AND repeat this procedure.


Table 17

Controlled Negative Pressure (CNP) Test Procedure
Important!
• This is a quantitative fit-test (QNFT) procedure
• This method determines respirator fit by measuring how much the facepiece leaks when it is subject to a slight negative pressure AFTER various premeasurement activities
• Measurements occur while employees remain still AND hold their breath for 10 seconds
• No test aerosols are used. Respirator cartridges aren't needed for this test.
Test Preparations
1. Make sure the individual conducting the fit test is thoroughly trained to perform this test.
2. Obtain a CNP test instrument such as a FitTester 3000™. Make sure:
• Defaults are set at:
– -15mm (-0.58 inches) of water test pressure
AND
– A modeled inspiratory flow rate of 53.8 liters per minute
• It has an effective audio warning device or visual screen tracing that signals when employees fail to hold their breath.
Note:

• You are not required to obtain test recording and printing equipment such as computers OR printers. Hand recording results is acceptable

• To see default settings, check the instrument's "REDON protocol."

3. Obtain facepiece adapters appropriate for each test respirator.
Note:

• Adapters are either a one-piece (for SCBA facepieces), OR two-piece (for dual cartridge facepieces) device providing a manifold and breathing valve system. For positive pressure respirators, you will need to obtain an additional fitting, available from the respirator manufacturer, to convert the facepiece to negative pressure

• To obtain adapters, contact the CNP instrument's distributor, Occupational Health Dynamics, OR the respirator manufacturer.

Test
Important!
((After the test, you must ask the employee about the comfort of the respirator AND if the respirator has become unacceptable, another size or model must be chosen and tested.)) The respirator must not be adjusted once the fit test exercises begin. Any adjustment voids the test and the test must be repeated.
4. Explain the test procedure to the employee.
5. Train the employee on how to hold a breath for at least 20 seconds.
6. Prepare the respirator for the fit test as follows:
• Remove or prop open the inhalation valves. If a breathing tube is present, disconnect it
• Replace cartridges, if present, with the manifold and breathing valve adapter
– For positive pressure facepieces, mount the manufacturer's additional fitting followed by the manifold-breathing valve adapter
• Connect the respirator to the CNP device according to the CNP instrument manufacturer's directions.
7. Have the employee put on, adjust, and seal check the respirator.
8. Turn on the instrument AND have the employee stand and perform the fit-test exercises in Table 19. Once exercises begin, any adjustments will void the test and you must begin again.
9. ((Interpret the test results:)) Once test exercises are completed, ask the employee about facepiece comfort. If the employee states the respirator is unacceptable, repeat the fit test using another size or model.
10. Determine the overall fit factor for each employee by calculating the harmonic mean of the fit-testing exercises as follows:
Overall fit factor =
n

1/ffE1 + 1/ffE2 + 1/ffE3. . . + 1/ffEn
Where:
n = The number of exercises;
ffE1 = The fit factor for the first exercise;
ffE2 = The fit factor for the second exercise;
ffE3 = The fit factor for the third exercise; and
ffEn = The fit factor for the nth exercise.
• The test is PASSED IF the overall fit factor obtained is at least 100 for a half facepiece, or at least 500 for a full facepiece.
• The test has FAILED IF the fit factor is less than 100 for a half facepiece; 500 for a full facepiece
– If the test has FAILED you must have the employee select another respirator model or size following the steps in Table 11 AND repeat this procedure, starting at Step 6.

Table 18

Generated Aerosol Test Procedure
Important:
• This is a quantitative (QNFT) fit-test procedure
• In this method, a test aerosol is used to challenge the facepiece seal while aerosol concentrations inside and outside the facepiece are measured during test exercises
• Special equipment is needed to generate, disperse, detect, and measure test aerosols.
Test Preparations
1. Test aerosol.
• Use a particulate, for example, corn oil, polyethylene glycol 400, di-2-ethyl hexyl sebacate, or sodium chloride.
2. Instrumentation.
• Do ALL the following:
– Obtain and use aerosol generation, dilution, and measurement systems appropriate for particulates
– Use an aerosol-generating instrument that will maintain test concentrations within a 10% variation
– Select a sampling instrument that allows for a computer record or strip chart record to be created
▪ The record must show the rise and fall of test agent concentration during each inhalation and exhalation at fit factors of at least 2000.
Note: Integrators, or computers that integrate the amount of test agent penetration leakage into the respirator for each exercise, may be used if a record of the readings is made.
– Minimize the time interval between the activity and the recording of the activity so you can clearly connect what you see to what is being recorded. For example, use a small diameter and length of sampling line.
3. Test enclosure.
• Do ALL the following:
– Make sure the enclosure is equipped and constructed to effectively:
▪ Maintain a uniform concentration of the test agent inside the enclosure. For example, the enclosure must be large enough to allow ALL employees freedom of movement during testing WITHOUT disturbing the test concentration or measurement instrument
▪ Keep the test agent from contaminating the air outside the enclosure. For example, use a HEPA filter to purify exhausted air
▪ Allow the individual conducting the fit test to view the employee during the test
– Make sure the tubing used to collect samples from the enclosure AND respirator is the same material, diameter, AND length. This makes the effect of aerosol loss caused by deposition in each sample line equal
– If sodium chloride is used, relative humidity inside the enclosure must be kept below 50%.
4. Prepare test respirators.
• Do ALL the following:
– Inspect test respirators regularly for missing parts AND damage
– Keep test respirators in proper working order
– Make sure in-mask sampling probes are:
▪ Designed and installed so the air sample will be drawn from the employee's breathing zone; midway between the nose and mouth
AND
▪ The probe extends inside the facepiece at least 1/4 inch
– Make sure sampling ports such as probes, or adapters on respirators are constructed and installed so they do NOT:
▪ Block air flow into the sampling line
▪ Leak
▪ Interfere with the respirator's fit or performance
• Have high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters OR P100 series filter available
– Replace filters when increased breathing resistance is detected OR when the test agent has altered the filter material's integrity.
Test
Important!
• Throughout the test, maintain the employee's exposure to any test agent below the established exposure limit. Exposures allowed must be based on exposure time and exposure limit duration
• If a single peak penetration exceeds 5% for half facepieces OR 1% for full facepieces:
– STOP the test
AND
– Have the employee select another respirator for testing.
5. Have the employee attach filters, put on, adjust, and seal check the respirator.
• Be sure to crimp the sampling line to avoid pressure leaks during the seal check
AND
• Have the employee adjust the respirator straps, without assistance, so the fit is comfortable. Do NOT over tighten.
6. OPTIONAL Step. To save time conduct a screening test to quickly identify poorly fitting respirators.
Note:     You may use a qualitative screening test OR an ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter instrument in the count mode.
7. Make sure test aerosol concentration is reasonably stable.
• If a canopy or shower curtain enclosure is used, determine stability of the test aerosol concentration AFTER the employee enters the enclosure.
8. Have the employee enter the test enclosure and connect the respirator to the sample lines.
9. Immediately after entering the enclosure measure test aerosol concentration inside the respirator.
• Make sure the peak penetration does NOT exceed 5% for half facepieces, OR 1% for full facepieces.
10. Have employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises in Table 19.
• Do NOT adjust the respirator once exercises begin.
11. Calculate the overall fit factor as specified in Steps 12-13. The fit test is:
• PASSED IF the minimum fit factor of 100 for half facepieces OR 500 for full facepieces is obtained
OR
• IF a passing fit factor is NOT obtained, the test has FAILED and you must have the employee select and test another respirator.
Calculations
Important!
• Do NOT count the grimace exercise measurements during these calculations
• Take into account the limitations of instrument detection when determining fit factors.
12. Calculate individual fit factors for EACH exercise by applying the following:
Exercise fit factor (ffE) = Average test enclosure concentration

Test aerosol concentration inside the respirator
• To determine the average test enclosure concentration use one of the following methods:
– Arithmetic average of the concentration before and after each test (an average of two values per entire test)
– Arithmetic average of concentration before and after each exercise (an average of two values per exercise)
– True average measured continuously during the respirator sample
• Determine the test aerosol concentration inside the respirator in one of the following ways:
– Average peak penetration values. Determine aerosol penetration for each exercise by:
▪ Using integrators or computers that calculate the actual test agent penetration
OR
▪ Average the peak heights shown on the strip chart recording, graph, or by computer integration
– Maximum peak penetration. Use strip chart recordings to determine the highest peak penetration for each exercise and use this value
– Area under the peaks. Use computerized integration or other appropriate calculations to integrate the area under individual peaks for each exercise.
13. Using individual exercise fit factors (ffE) calculate the overall fit factor by doing ALL of the following:
• Convert each exercise fit factor to a penetration value
• Determine the average penetration value
• Convert the average penetration value back to a fit factor
OR
• Use this equation to calculate the overall fit factor:
Overall fit factor = n

1/ffE1 + 1/ffE2 + 1/ffE3. . . + 1/ffEn
Where:
n = The number of exercises;
ffE1 = The fit factor for the first exercise;
ffE2 = The fit factor for the second exercise;
ffE3 = The fit factor for the third exercise; and
ffEn = The fit factor for the nth exercise.

Table 19

Fit-Test Exercises
Important:
• This list applies when you use any fit test
• Employees tested must perform ALL exercises marked with an "X" as described for the fit-test procedure used
– Once exercises begin, any adjustments made void the test AND you must begin again
– After test exercises are completed, you must ask the employee about the comfort of the respirator. If it has become unacceptable, have the employee choose another one for testing
• When the controlled negative pressure procedure is used, STOP and repeat the test if the employee adjusts the respirator OR takes a breath and fails to hold it for 10 seconds
• Controlled negative pressure tests conducted according to the method published in 29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix A are an acceptable alternative to the method outlined below.
Description of Required Fit-Test Exercises Fit-Test Procedures
Qualitative Procedures Quantitative Procedures; EXCEPT the CNPP Controlled Negative Pressure Procedure (CNPP)
• Normal breathing
– Breathe normally, while standing for one minute X X
• Deep breathing
– Breathe slowly and deeply while standing for one minute X X
– Take caution to avoid hyperventilating
• Head side to side
– Slowly turn head from side to side while standing for one minute, pausing at each extreme position to inhale X X
– Be careful to NOT bump the respirator
• Head up and down
– Slowly move head up and down while standing for one minute, inhaling in the up position X X
– Be careful to NOT bump the respirator
• Talking
– Talk slowly and loud enough to be heard clearly by the individual conducting fit testing for one minute. Choose ONE of the following:
▪ Read from a prepared text such as the Rainbow Passage1 X X
▪ Count backward from 100
▪ Recite a memorized poem or song.
• Grimace
– Smile or frown for fifteen seconds. X
• Bending over
– Bend over to touch toes while standing. Repeat at a comfortable pace for one minute
OR X X
– Jog in place for one minute if the test enclosure, such as a hood, does not permit bending over
• Normal breathing
– Breathe normally while standing for one minute X X
• Face forward
– Premeasurement activity: Stand and breath normally, without talking X
– Measurement position: Face forward while holding breath for 10 seconds
• Bending over
– Premeasurement activity: While standing, bend over to touch toes X
– Measurement position: Hold the bending position with face parallel to the floor while holding breath for 10 seconds
• Head shaking
– Premeasurement activity: Vigorously shake head from side to side for 3 seconds while shouting ((or making the sound of "BRRRR" loudly)) X
– Measurement position: Face forward, while holding breath for 10 seconds
• Redon-1
– Premeasurement activity: Loosen all facepiece straps and remove the respirator completely ((and)), then put it back on X
– Measurement position: Face forward while holding breath for 10 seconds
• Redon-2
– Repeat the premeasurement activity and measurement position described in Redon-1 X

1The Rainbow Passage:
"When the sunlight strikes raindrops in the air, they act like a prism and form a rainbow. The rainbow is a division of white light into many beautiful colors. These take the shape of a long round arch, with its path high above, and its two ends apparently beyond the horizon. There is, according to legend, a boiling pot of gold at one end. People look, but no one ever finds it. When a man looks for something beyond reach, his friends say he is looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow."

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. 05-01-166, § 296-307-62010, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 05-01-166, filed 12/21/04, effective 4/2/05)

WAC 296-307-62020   Follow procedures established for seal checking respirators.  

     You must:

     • Make sure employees perform a user seal check as outlined in Table 21, EACH TIME the respirator is worn, to make sure the seal is adequate.

     IMPORTANT:

     • User seal checks are NOT a substitute for fit tests. See WAC 296-307-62010 for fit test procedures.

     • You may use a seal check procedure recommended by the respirator manufacturer INSTEAD of the procedure outlined in Table 21 if you can demonstrate the procedure is based on a scientific study that, for example, demonstrates the procedure effectively identifies respirators that fit poorly when put on or adjusted.

     ((You must:

     • Make sure employees perform a user seal check as outlined in Table 21, EACH TIME the respirator is worn, to make sure the seal is adequate.))

Table 21

User Seal Check Procedure
Important information for employees:
• You need to conduct a seal check each time you put your respirator on BEFORE you enter the respirator use area. The purpose of a seal check is to make sure your respirator (which has been previously fit tested by your employer) is properly positioned on your face to prevent leakage during use and to detect functional problems
• The procedure below has two parts; a positive pressure check and a negative pressure check. You must complete both parts each time. It should only take a few seconds to perform, once you learn it
– If you cannot pass both parts, your respirator is NOT functioning properly, see your supervisor for further instruction.
Positive pressure check:
1. Remove exhalation valve cover, if removable.
2. Cover the exhalation valve completely with the palm of your hand WHILE exhaling gently to inflate the facepiece slightly.
3. The respirator facepiece should remain inflated (indicating a build-up of positive pressure and NO outward leakage).
• If you detect NO leakage, replace the exhalation valve cover (if removed), and proceed to conduct the negative pressure check
• If you detect evidence of leakage, reposition the respirator (after removing and inspecting it), and try the positive pressure check again.
Negative pressure check:
4. Completely cover the inhalation opening(s) on the cartridges or canister with the palm(s) of your hands WHILE inhaling gently to collapse the facepiece slightly.
• If you cannot use the palm(s) of your hands to effectively cover the inhalation openings on cartridges or canisters, you may use:
– Filter seal(s) (if available)
OR
– Thin rubber gloves.
5. Once the facepiece is collapsed, hold your breath for 10 seconds WHILE keeping the inhalation openings covered.
6. The facepiece should remain slightly collapsed (indicating negative pressure and NO inward leakage).
• If you detect NO evidence of leakage, the tightness of the facepiece is considered adequate, the procedure is completed, and you may now use the respirator
• If you detect leakage, reposition the respirator (after removing and inspecting it) and repeat BOTH the positive and negative fit checks.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010,