WSR 05-01-166

PERMANENT RULES

DEPARTMENT OF

LABOR AND INDUSTRIES

[ Filed December 21, 2004, 9:33 a.m. , effective April 2, 2005 ]


     Effective Date of Rule: April 2, 2005.

     Purpose: The Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) is continuing a long-term effort to provide one book for all the safety and health requirements for agriculture. This one-book requirement results from a 1995 legislative requirement that directed the department to publish all agriculture safety rules in one volume and a 2001 agreement between L&I and agricultural industry stakeholders to add applicable occupational health requirements to one book. The occupational health requirements in chapter 296-62 WAC are the focus of the current effort. Several rules from chapter 296-62 WAC were recently rewritten for clarity as part of the agency's plain language initiative. This rule making adopts these rewritten rules into the agriculture safety standard chapter 296-307 WAC.


AMENDED SECTIONS:

WAC 296-307-018 What are the employer's responsibilities?

• Subsection (8), updated a reference.
• Subsection (9), updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-039 First aid rule summary.

• Updated a reference in the note relating to where to find the bloodborne pathogen standard.
WAC 296-307-03920 Make sure appropriate first-aid supplies are readily available.

• Deleted language from the first-aid kit table.
WAC 296-307-061 What requirements apply to working around bins, bunkers, hoppers, tanks, pits, and trenches?

• Added a reference to confined space.
• Did not replace the words "safety belt with a lifeline attached" with "full body harness."
WAC 296-307-07013 What rules apply to vehicles used to transport employees?

• Subsection (12), updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-11015 Violations of this part -- Worker protection standards -- 40 CFR, § 170.9.

• Subsection (4), updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-13045 Personal protective equipment -- Standards for pesticide handlers -- 40 CFR, § 170.240.

• Subsection (3)(i), updated references.
WAC 296-307-16340 Electricity and lighting.

• Subsection (2)(b), corrected a reference.
WAC 296-307-445 Scope.

• Title of this part is U-3.
WAC 296-307-45010 Provide proper ventilation for the vapor area.

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-45035 Prepare dip tanks before cleaning.

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-45045 Protect employees during welding, burning, or other work using open flames.

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-50025 What requirements apply to welding beryllium?

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-50029 What requirements apply to welding mercury?

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-550 Employer chemical hazard communication--Introduction.

• Title of this part is Y-1.
• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-55015 Obtain and maintain material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each hazardous chemical used.

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-55030 Inform and train your employees about hazardous chemicals in your workplace.

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-55035 Follow these rules for laboratories using hazardous chemicals.

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-55060 Definitions.

• Clarified the following definitions: Chemical, chemical name, combustible liquid, commercial account, common name, compressed gas, container, designated representative, distributor, flammable, flashpoint, hazardous chemical, hazard warning, health hazard, identity, importer, material safety data sheets, mixture, organic peroxide, permissible exposure limits (PELs), physical hazard, produce, pyrophoric, responsible party, unstable (reactive), use, and water-reactive.
WAC 296-307-560 Scope.

• Title of this part is Y-2.
• Replaced the words "chapter" with "part."
WAC 296-307-56025 Develop or obtain material safety data sheets (MSDSs).

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-56050 Definitions.

• Updated a reference.
WAC 296-307-570 Lighting rule.

• Title of this part is Y-3.
WAC 296-307-590 Environmental tobacco smoke in the office.

• Title of this part is Y-4.

NEW SECTIONS:

WAC 296-307-594 Scope. This part applies to all use of respirators at work.

• Requirements relating to respirators have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this part.
WAC 296-307-596 Respirator program administrator.

• Requirements relating to respirators have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-59605 Designate a program administrator.

• Requirements relating to respirators have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-598 Voluntary respirator use requirements.

• Requirements relating to voluntary respirator use have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-59805 Make sure voluntary use of respirators is safe.

• Requirements relating to voluntary respirator use have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-59810 Keep voluntary use program records.

• Requirements relating to voluntary respirator use have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-600 Written respirator program and recordkeeping.

• Requirements relating to the written respirator program and recordkeeping have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-60005 Develop and maintain a written program.

• Requirements relating to the written respirator program have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-60010 Keep respirator program record.

• Requirements relating to the written respirator program records have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-602 Respirator selection.

• Requirements relating to respirator selection have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-60205 Select and provide appropriate respirators.

• Requirements relating to respirator selection have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-604 Medical evaluations.

• Requirements relating to medical evaluations have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-60405 Provide medical evaluations.

• Requirements relating to medical evaluations have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-606 Fit testing.

• Requirements relating to fit testing have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-60605 Conduct fit testing.

• Requirements relating to fit testing have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-608 Training.

• Requirements relating to training have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-60805 Provide effective training.

• Requirements relating to training have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-610 Maintenance.

• Requirements relating to maintenance have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61005 Maintain respirators in a clean and reliable condition.

• Requirements relating to maintenance have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61010 Store respirators properly.

• Requirements relating to storage have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61015 Inspect and repair respirators.

• Requirements relating to inspecting and repairing have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-612 Safe use and removal of respirators.

• Requirements relating to safe use and removal have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61205 Prevent sealing problems with tight-fitting respirators.

• Requirements relating to sealing problems have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61210 Make sure employees leave the use area before removing respirators.

• Requirements relating to leaving the use area have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-614 Standby requirements for immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) conditions.

• Requirements relating to IDLH and standby conditions have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61405 Provide standby assistance in immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) conditions.

• Requirements relating to IDLH and standby conditions have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-616 Air quality for self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) and air-line respirators.

• Requirements relating to air quality for SCBA and air-line respirators have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61605 Make sure breathing air and oxygen meet established specifications.

• Requirements relating to breathing air and oxygen have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61610 Prevent conditions that could create a hazardous breathing air supply.

• Requirements relating to hazardous breathing air supply have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61615 Make sure compressors do not create a hazardous breathing air supply.

• Requirements relating to hazardous breathing air supply have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-618 Labeling of air-purifying respirators filters, cartridges, and canisters.

• Requirements relating to labeling have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-61805 Keep labels readable on respirator filters, cartridges, and canisters during use.

• Requirements relating to labeling have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-620 Required procedures for respiratory protection program.

• Requirements relating to required procedures have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-62005 Use this medical questionnaire for medical evaluation.

• Requirements relating to the medical questionnaire have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-62010 Follow these fit-testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators.

• Requirements relating to the fit-testing procedures have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-62015 Follow procedures established for cleaning and disinfecting respirators.

• Requirements relating to cleaning and disinfecting have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-62020 Follow procedures established for seal checking respirators.

• Requirements relating to seal checking have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E to this section.
WAC 296-307-622 Definitions.

• Definitions applicable to this part are located in this section.
WAC 296-307-624 Scope.

• Requirements relating to respiratory hazards have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part H to this section.
WAC 296-307-626 Evaluate and control employee exposures.

• Requirements relating to evaluating and controlling employee exposures have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part H to this section.
WAC 296-307-62605 Identify and evaluate respiratory hazards.

• Requirements relating to respiratory hazards have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part H to this section.
WAC 296-307-62610 Control employee exposures.

• Requirements relating to respiratory hazards have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part H to this section.
WAC 296-307-62615 Use respirators.

• Requirements relating to respiratory hazards have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part H to this section.
WAC 296-307-62620 Notify employees.

• Requirements relating to respiratory hazards have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part H to this section.
WAC 296-307-62625 Permissible exposure limits of air contaminants.

• Requirements relating to respiratory hazards have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part H to this section.
WAC 296-307-628 Definitions.

• Definitions applicable to this part are located in this section.
WAC 296-307-630 Scope.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention (noise) have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-632 Summary.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63205 Conduct employee noise exposure monitoring.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63210 Control employee noise exposures that equal or exceed 90 dBA TWA8

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63215 Make sure employees use hearing protection when their noise exposure equals or exceeds 85 dBA TWA8.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63220 Make sure exposed employees receive training about noise and hearing protection.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63225 Make sure warning signs are posted for areas where noise levels equal or exceed 115 dBA.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63230 Arrange for oversight of audiometric testing.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63235 Identify and correct deficiencies in your hearing loss prevention program.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63240 Document your hearing loss prevention activities.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-634 Summary.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63405 Make sure that noise-measuring equipment meets recognized standards.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63410 Measure employee noise exposure.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63415 Use these equations when estimating full-day noise exposure from sound level measurements.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-636 Summary.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63605 Provide audiometric testing at no cost to employees.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63610 Establish a baseline audiogram for each exposed employee.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63615 Conduct annual audiograms.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63620 Review audiograms that indicate a standard threshold shift.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63625 Keep the baseline audiogram without revision, unless annual audiograms indicate a persistent threshold shift or a significant improvement in hearing.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63630 Make sure a record is kept of audiometric tests.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-63635 Make sure audiometric testing equipment meets these requirements.

• Requirements relating to hearing loss prevention have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K to this section.
WAC 296-307-638 Summary.

• Requirements relating to hearing protection audits have been moved to this section. These options are new but not required.
WAC 296-307-63805 Conduct hearing protection audits at least quarterly.

• Requirements relating to hearing protection audits have been moved to this section. These options are new but not required.
WAC 296-307-63810 Make sure staff conducting audits are properly trained.

• Requirements relating to hearing protection audits have been moved to this section. These options are new but not required.
WAC 296-307-63815 Assess the hearing protection used by each employee during audits.

• Requirements relating to hearing protection audits have been moved to this section. These options are new but not required.
WAC 296-307-63820 Document your hearing protection audits.

• Requirements relating to hearing protection audits have been moved to this section. These options are new but not required.
WAC 296-307-63825 Make sure third-party hearing loss prevention programs meet the following requirements.

• Requirements relating to hearing protection audits have been moved to this section. This options is new but not required.
WAC 296-307-640 Noise definitions.

• Definitions applicable to this part are located in this section.
WAC 296-307-642 Scope.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-644 Summary. Identifying and controlling permit-required confined spaces.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-64402 Identify permit-required confined spaces.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-64404 Inform employees and control entry to permit-required confined spaces.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-64406 Follow these requirements when you contract with another employer to enter your confined space.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-646 Summary.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-64602 Develop a written permit-required confined space program.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-64604 Meet these additional requirements if your employees enter another employer's confined space.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-648 Summary.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-64802 Provide employee training.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-64804 Certify employee proficiency.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-650 Summary.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65002 Implement procedures for entry permits.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65004 Use an entry permit that contains all required information.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65006 Keep and review your entry permits.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65008 Prevent unauthorized entry.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65010 Provide, maintain, and use proper equipment.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65012 Evaluate and control hazards for safe entry.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65014 Make sure you have adequate rescue and emergency services available.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65016 Use nonentry rescue systems or methods whenever possible.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65018 Make sure entry supervisors perform their responsibilities and duties.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65020 Provide an attendant outside the permit-required confined spaces.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65022 Make sure entrants know the hazardous conditions and their duties.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65024 Implement procedures for ending entry.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-652 Alternate entry procedures.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65202 Make sure the following conditions are met if using alternate entry procedures.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65204 Follow these alternate entry procedures for permit-required confined spaces.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-654 Nonpermit confined spaces requirements. Summary.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65402 Follow these requirements when classifying a confined space as a nonpermit confined space.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-65404 Reevaluate nonpermit confined spaces if hazards develop.

• Requirements relating to confined spaces have been moved from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M to this section.
WAC 296-307-656 Definitions.

• Definitions applicable to this part are located in this section.
WAC 296-307-704 Scope.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70410 Planning.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70415 Training.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70420 Medical surveillance.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70425 Keep records.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70430 Incident requirements.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70435 Implement and maintain an incident command system (ICS).

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70440 Prepare skilled support personnel.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70445 Make sure the incident commander oversees activities during the response.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70450 Use the buddy system in danger areas.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70455 Provide rescue and medical assistance.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70460 Personal protective equipment.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70465 Control hazards created by personal protective equipment.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70470 Use personal protective equipment (PPE) properly.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70475 Postemergency response.

• Requirements relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.
WAC 296-307-70480 Definitions.

• Definitions relating to emergency response have been moved from Part U-4 of this chapter to this part because of numbering errors.

REPEALED SECTIONS:

     The following sections were repealed from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E and moved to chapter 296-307 WAC, Part Y-5: WAC 296-62-071 Respiratory protection, 296-62-07101 To whom does chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E apply?, 296-62-07102 When are you allowed to rely on respirators to protect employees from breathing contaminated air?, 296-62-07103 What are your responsibilities as an employer?, 296-62-07105 Definitions, 296-62-07107 When is a respiratory protection program required?, 296-62-07109 When must you update your written respiratory protection program?, 296-62-07111 What must be included in your written respiratory protection program?, 296-62-07113 What are the requirements for a program administrator?, 296-62-07115 Who pays for the respirators, training, medical evaluations, and fit testing?, 296-62-07117 What must you do when employees choose to wear respirators when respirators are not required?, 296-62-07130 What must be considered when selecting any respirator?, 296-62-07131 What else must you consider when selecting a respirator for use in atmospheres that are not IDLH?, 296-62-07132 What else must you consider when selecting a respirator for use in IDLH atmospheres?, 296-62-07133 What else must you consider when selecting a respirator for emergency and rescue use?, 296-62-07150 What are the general requirements for medical evaluations?, 296-62-07151 Who must perform medical evaluations?, 296-62-07152 What information must you provide to the PLHCP in addition to the questionnaire?, 296-62-07153 How must the medical evaluations and the questionnaire be administered?, 296-62-07154 Who must review the questionnaire and determine what, if any, follow-up evaluations are needed?, 296-62-07155 What must be included in the PLHCP's written recommendations?, 296-62-07156 When are future medical evaluations required?, 296-62-07160 When is fit testing required?, 296-62-07161 What is required when an employee finds the respirator's fit unacceptable?, 296-62-07162 How must fit testing be done?, 296-62-07170 How must you prevent problems with the seal on tight-fitting facepieces?, 296-62-07171 How do you monitor continuing effectiveness of your employees' respirators?, 296-62-07172 What are the standby procedures when respirators are used in IDLH situations?, 296-62-07175 How must respirators be cleaned and disinfected?, 296-62-07176 How must respirators be stored?, 296-62-07177 When must respirators be inspected?, 296-62-07178 How must respirators be inspected and maintained?, 296-62-07179 How must respirators be repaired and adjusted?, 296-62-07182 What are the breathing gas requirements for atmosphere-supplying respirators?, 296-62-07184 How must filters, cartridges and canisters be labeled?, 296-62-07186 What are the general training requirements?, 296-62-07188 How do you know if you adequately trained your employees?, 296-62-07190 When must your employees be trained?, 296-62-07192 How must you evaluate the effectiveness of your respiratory protection program?, 296-62-07194 What are the record-keeping requirements?, 296-62-07201 Appendix A-1: General fit testing requirements for respiratory protection -- Mandatory, 296-62-07202 What are the general requirements for fit testing?, 296-62-07203 What are the fit test exercise requirements?, 296-62-07205 Appendix A-2: Qualitative fit testing (QLFT) protocols for respiratory protection -- Mandatory, 296-62-07206 What are the general qualitative fit testing (QLFT) protocols?, 296-62-07208 Isoamyl acetate protocol (a QLFT), 296-62-07209 What are the odor threshold screening procedures for isoamyl acetate (QLFT)?, 296-62-07210 What are the isoamyl acetate fit testing procedures (QLFT)?, 296-62-07212 Saccharin solution aerosol protocol (QLFT), 296-62-07213 What are the taste threshold screening procedures for saccarin (QLFT)?, 296-62-07214 What is the saccharin solution aerosol fit testing procedure (QLFT)?, 296-62-07217 BitrexTM solution (denatonium benzoate) solution aerosol qualitative fit testing (QLFT) protocol, 296-62-07218 What is the taste threshold screening procedure for BitrexTM (QLFT)?, 296-62-07219 What is the BitrexTM solution aerosol fit testing procedure (QLFT)?, 296-62-07222 Irritant smoke (stannic chloride) protocol (QLFT), 296-62-07223 What are the general requirements and precautions for irritant smoke fit testing (QLFT)?, 296-62-07224 What is the sensitivity screening check protocol for irritant smoke (QLFT)?, 296-62-07225 What is the irritant smoke fit testing procedure (QLFT)?, 296-62-07230 Appendix A-3: Quantitative fit testing (QNFT) protocols for respiratory protection -- Mandatory, 296-62-07231 What are the general requirements for quantitative fit testing (QNFT)?, 296-62-07233 Generated aerosol quantitative fit testing protocol (QNFT), 296-62-07234 What equipment is required for generated aerosol fit testing (QNFT)?, 296-62-07235 What are the procedures for generated aerosol quantitative fit testing (QNFT)?, 296-62-07236 How are fit factors calculated (QNFT)?, 296-62-07238 Ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter (CNC) quantitative fit testing protocol, 296-62-07239 General information about ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter (CNC) protocol (QNFT), 296-62-07240 What are the general requirements for ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter (CNC) protocol (QNFT)?, 296-62-07242 What are the Portacount fit testing procedures?, 296-62-07243 How is the Portacount test instrument used?, 296-62-07245 Controlled negative pressure (CNP) quantitative fit testing protocol (QNFT), 296-62-07246 How does controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit testing work (QNFT)?, 296-62-07247 What are the controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit testing requirements and procedures (QNFT)?, 296-62-07248 What test exercises are required for controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit testing (QNFT)?, 296-62-07251 Appendix B-1: User seal check procedures -- Mandatory, 296-62-07253 Appendix B-2: Respirator cleaning procedures -- Mandatory, 296-62-07255 Appendix C: WISHA respirator medical evaluation questionnaire -- Mandatory, 296-62-07257 Appendix D: Health care provider respirator recommendation form -- Nonmandatory, 296-62-07260 Appendix E: Additional information regarding respirator selection -- Nonmandatory, 296-62-07261 How do you classify respiratory hazards?, 296-62-07263 What are oxygen deficient respiratory hazards?, 296-62-07265 What needs to be considered when combinations of contaminants occur in the workplace?, 296-62-07267 What are two major types of respirators?, 296-62-07269 What are air-purifying respirators (APRs)?, 296-62-07271 What are the general limitations for air-purifying respirators (APRs)?, 296-62-07273 What are particulate-removing respirators?, 296-62-07275 What are vapor- and gas-removing respirators?, 296-62-07277 What are combination particulate- and vapor- and gas-removing respirators?, 296-62-07279 What types of filters, canisters and cartridges are available for air-purifying respirators (APRs)?, 296-62-07281 How do atmosphere-supplying respirators work?, 296-62-07283 What are the capabilities and limitations of atmosphere-supplying respirators?, 296-62-07285 What is a supplied-air respirator?, 296-62-07287 What are the general capabilities and limitations of supplied-air respirators?, 296-62-07289 What are combination supplied-air and air-purifying respirators?, 296-62-07291 What are combination supplied-air respirators with auxiliary self-contained air supply?, 296-62-07293 What is a self-contained breathing apparatus respirator (SCBA)?, and 296-62-07295 What are the limitations for self-contained breathing apparatus respirators (SCBA)?

     The following sections were repealed from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part H and moved to chapter 296-307 WAC, Part Y-6: WAC 296-62-075 Air contaminants, 296-62-07501 Airborne contaminants, 296-62-07503 Ceiling vs. time-weighted average limits, 296-62-07505 "Skin" notation, 296-62-07507 Mixtures, 296-62-07509 Nuisance dusts, 296-62-07510 Total particulate, 296-62-07511 Simple asphyxiants, 296-62-07513 Physical factors, and 296-62-07515 Control of chemical agents.

     The following sections were repealed from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part J: WAC 296-62-08001 Bloodborne pathogens and 296-62-08050 Appendix A -- Hepatitis B vaccine declination -- Mandatory.

     The following sections were repealed from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part K and moved to chapter 296-307 WAC, Part Y-7: WAC 296-62-09015 Hearing conservation, 296-62-09017 Definitions, 296-62-09019 Monitoring, 296-62-09021 Method of noise measurement, 296-62-09023 Calibration of monitoring equipment, 296-62-09024 Employee notification, 296-62-09025 Observation of monitoring, 296-62-09026 Noise control, 296-62-09027 Audiometric testing program, 296-62-09029 Audiometric test requirements, 296-62-09031 Hearing protectors, 296-62-09033 Hearing protector attenuation, 296-62-09035 Training program, 296-62-09037 Access to information and training materials, 296-62-09039 Warning signs, 296-62-09041, Recordkeeping, 296-62-09043 Appendices, 296-62-09045 Effective dates, 296-62-09047 Appendix A -- Audiometric measuring instruments, 296-62-09049 Appendix B -- Audiometric test rooms, 296-62-09051 Appendix C -- Acoustic calibration of audiometers, 296-62-09053 Appendix D -- Methods for estimating the adequacy of hearing protector attenuation, and 296-62-09055 Appendix E -- Noise exposure computation.

     The following sections were repealed from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part M and moved to chapter 296-307 WAC, Part Y-8: WAC 296-62-141 Permit-required confined spaces, 296-62-14100 Scope and application, 296-62-14105 Definitions, 296-62-14110 General requirements, 296-62-14115 Permit-required confined space program (permit space program), 296-62-14120 Permit system, 296-62-14125 Required entry permit information, 296-62-14130 Training, 296-62-14135 Duties of authorized entrants, 296-62-14140 Duties of attendants, 296-62-14145 Duties of entry supervisors, 296-62-14150 Rescue and emergency services, 296-62-14155 Employee participation, 296-62-14170 Appendices to WAC 296-62-141 -- Permit-required confined spaces, 296-62-14171 Appendix A -- Permit-required confined space decision flow chart, 296-62-14172 Appendix B -- Procedures for atmospheric testing, 296-62-14173 Appendix C -- Examples of permit-required confined space programs, 296-62-14174 Appendix D -- Sample permits, 296-62-14175 Appendix E -- Sewer system entry, and 296-62-14176 Appendix F -- Rescue team or rescue service evaluation criteria.

     The following sections were repealed from chapter 296-62 WAC, Part P: WAC 296-62-300 Hazardous waste operations and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, 296-62-30001 Scope and application, 296-62-30003 Definitions, 296-62-3010 Overview of a written safety and health program, 296-62-30105 Elements of a safety and health program, 296-62-30110 Safety considerations during the initial site excavation, 296-62-30115 Notifying contractors and subcontractors of procedures and hazards, 296-62-30120 Availability of the safety and health program, 296-62-30125 Organizational structure of the site safety and health program, 296-62-30130 Comprehensive workplan of the site program, 296-62-30135 Overview of a site-specific safety and health plan, 296-62-30140 Preentry briefing of the site-specific safety and health plan, 296-62-30145 Effectiveness of site safety and health plan, 296-62-3020 Site characterization and analysis, 296-62-30205 Preliminary evaluation, 296-62-30210 Hazard identification, 296-62-30215 Required information, 296-62-30220 Personal protective equipment, 296-62-30225 Monitoring, 296-62-30230 Risk identification, 296-62-30235 Employee notification, 296-62-3030 Site control, 296-62-30305 Site control program, 296-62-30310 Elements of the site control program, 296-62-30315 Site work zones, 296-62-3040 General training requirements and the employees covered, 296-62-30405 Elements covered in training, 296-62-30410 Initial training, 296-62-30415 Management and supervisor training, 296-62-30420 Law enforcement at illicit drug labs, 296-62-30425 Training course content for 40 and 80 hour hazardous waste cleanup courses, 296-62-30430 Training content for 24-hour hazardous waste cleanup course, 296-62-30435 16-hour supplemental training for hazardous waste sites, 296-62-30440 Additional 8 hours of training for supervisors and managers, 296-62-30445 Qualifications for trainers, 296-62-30450 Training certification, 296-62-30455 Training requirements for emergency response, 296-62-30460 Refresher training, 296-62-30465 Equivalent training, 296-62-3050 Medical surveillance, 296-62-30505 Employees covered, 296-62-30510 Frequency of medical examinations and consultations, 296-62-30515 Content of medical examinations and consultations, 296-62-30520 Examination by a physician and costs, 296-62-30525 Information provided to the physician, 296-62-30530 Physician's written opinion, 296-62-30535 Recordkeeping of medical surveillance activities, 296-62-3060 Engineering controls, work practices, and personal protective equipment for employee protection, 296-62-30605 Personal protective equipment (PPE) program, 296-62-30610 Totally encapsulating chemical protective suits, 296-62-30615 Personal protective equipment (PPE) program, 296-62-3070 Monitoring concentrations of hazardous substances, 296-62-30705 Monitoring during initial entry, 296-62-30710 Periodic monitoring, 296-62-30715 Monitoring of high-risk employees, 296-62-3080 Informational programs, 296-62-3090 General requirements for handling drums and containers, 296-62-30905 Opening drums and containers, 296-62-30910 Material handling equipment, 296-62-30915 Radioactive wastes, 296-62-30920 Shock-sensitive wastes, 296-62-30925 Laboratory waste packs, 296-62-30930 Sampling of drum and container contents, 296-62-30935 Shipping and transport of drums, 296-62-30940 Tanks and vaults procedures, 296-62-3100 Decontamination procedures, 296-62-31005 Location of decontamination areas, 296-62-31010 Decontamination of equipment and solvents, 296-62-31015 Decontamination of personal protective clothing and equipment, 296-62-31020 Showers and change rooms used for decontamination, 296-62-3110 Emergency response plan for employees at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites, 296-62-31105 Elements of an emergency response plan at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites, 296-62-31110 Procedures for handling emergency incidents at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites, 296-62-3120 Illumination, 296-62-3130 Sanitation at temporary workplaces, 296-62-31305 Potable water, 296-62-31310 Nonpotable water, 296-62-31315 Toilet facilities, 296-62-31320 Food handling, 296-62-31325 Temporary sleeping quarters, 296-62-31330 Washing facilities, 296-62-31335 Showers and change rooms, 296-62-3138 New technology programs, 296-62-3140 Certain operations conducted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), 296-62-31405 Safety and health program under RCRA, 296-62-31410 Hazard communication program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31415 Medical surveillance program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31420 Decontamination program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31425 New technology program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31430 Material handling program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31435 Training program for new employees under RCRA, 296-62-31440 Training program for current employees, 296-62-31445 RCRA requirements for trainers, 296-62-31450 Emergency response program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31455 Emergency response plan under RCRA, 296-62-31460 Elements of an emergency plan under RCRA, 296-62-31465 Training requirements for emergency response under RCRA, 296-62-31470 Procedures for handling emergency incidents under RCRA, 296-62-3152 Appendices to Part P -- Hazardous waste operations and TSD facilities, 296-62-3160 Appendix A -- Personal protective equipment test methods, 296-62-3170 Appendix B -- General description and discussion of the levels of protection and protective gear, 296-62-3180 Appendix C -- Compliance guidelines, 296-62-3190 Appendix D -- References, and 296-62-3195 Appendix E -- Training curriculum guidelines.

     The following sections were repealed from chapter 296-307 WAC, Part U-4 and moved to chapter 296-307 WAC, Part Y-10: WAC 296-307-452 Scope, 296-307-45210 Planning, 296-307-45220 Training, 296-307-45230 Medical surveillance, 296-307-45240 Keep records, 296-307-45400 Incident requirements, 296-307-45410 Implement and maintain an incident command system (ICS), 296-307-45420 Prepare skilled support personnel, 296-307-45430 Make sure the incident commander oversees activities during the response, 296-307-45440 Use the buddy system in danger areas, 296-307-45450 Provide rescue and medical assistance, 296-307-45600 Personal protective equipment, 296-307-45610 Control hazards created by personal protective equipment (PPE), 296-307-45620 Use personal protective equipment (PPE) properly, 296-307-45800 Postemergency response, and 296-307-46000 Definitions.

     Citation of Existing Rules Affected by this Order: Amending WAC 296-307-018 What are the employer's responsibilities?, 296-307-039 First aid rule summary, 296-307-03920 Make sure appropriate first-aid supplies are readily available, 296-307-061 What requirements apply to working around bins, bunkers, hoppers, tanks, pits, and trenches?, 296-307-07013 What rules apply to vehicles used to transport employees?, 296-307-11015 Violations of this part -- Worker protection standards -- 40 CFR, § 170.9, 296-307-13045 Personal protective equipment -- Standards for pesticide handlers -- 40 CFR, § 170.240, 296-307-16340 Electricity and lighting, 296-307-445 Scope, 296-307-45010 Provide proper ventilation for the vapor area, 296-307-45035 Prepare dip tanks before cleaning, 296-307-45045 Protect employees during welding, burning, or other work using open flames, 296-307-50025 What requirements apply to welding beryllium?, 296-307-50029 What requirements apply to welding mercury?, 296-307-550 Employer chemical hazard communication -- Introduction, 296-307-55015 Obtain and maintain material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each hazardous chemical used, 296-307-55030 Inform and train your employees about hazardous chemicals in your workplace, 296-307-55035 Follow these rules for laboratories using hazardous chemicals, 296-307-55060 Definitions, 296-307-560 Scope, 296-307-56025 Develop or obtain material safety data sheets (MSDSs), 296-307-56050 Definitions, 296-307-570 Lighting rule and 296-307-590 Environmental tobacco smoke in the office; and repealing WAC 296-62-071 Respiratory protection, 296-62-07101 To whom does chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E apply?, 296-62-07102 When are you allowed to rely on respirators to protect employees from breathing contaminated air?, 296-62-07103 What are your responsibilities as an employer?, 296-62-07105 Definitions, 296-62-07107 When is a respiratory protection program required?, 296-62-07109 When must you update your written respiratory protection program?, 296-62-07111 What must be included in your written respiratory protection program?, 296-62-07113 What are the requirements for a program administrator?, 296-62-07115 Who pays for the respirators, training, medical evaluations, and fit testing?, 296-62-07117 What must you do when employees choose to wear respirators when respirators are not required?, 296-62-07130 What must be considered when selecting any respirator?, 296-62-07131 What else must you consider when selecting a respirator for use in atmospheres that are not IDLH?, 296-62-07132 What else must you consider when selecting a respirator for use in IDLH atmospheres?, 296-62-07133 What else must you consider when selecting a respirator for emergency and rescue use?, 296-62-07150 What are the general requirements for medical evaluations?, 296-62-07151 Who must perform medical evaluations?, 296-62-07152 What information must you provide to the PLHCP in addition to the questionnaire?, 296-62-07153 How must the medical evaluations and the questionnaire be administered?, 296-62-07154 Who must review the questionnaire and determine what, if any, follow-up evaluations are needed?, 296-62-07155 What must be included in the PLHCP's written recommendations?, 296-62-07156 When are future medical evaluations required?, 296-62-07160 When is fit testing required?, 296-62-07161 What is required when an employee finds the respirator's fit unacceptable?, 296-62-07162 How must fit testing be done?, 296-62-07170 How must you prevent problems with the seal on tight-fitting facepieces?, 296-62-07171 How do you monitor continuing effectiveness of your employees' respirators?, 296-62-07172 What are the standby procedures when respirators are used in IDLH situations?, 296-62-07175 How must respirators be cleaned and disinfected?, 296-62-07176 How must respirators be stored?, 296-62-07177 When must respirators be inspected?, 296-62-07178 How must respirators be inspected and maintained?, 296-62-07179 How must respirators be repaired and adjusted?, 296-62-07182 What are the breathing gas requirements for atmosphere-supplying respirators?, 296-62-07184 How must filters, cartridges and canisters be labeled?, 296-62-07186 What are the general training requirements?, 296-62-07188 How do you know if you adequately trained your employees?, 296-62-07190 When must your employees be trained?, 296-62-07192 How must you evaluate the effectiveness of your respiratory protection program?, 296-62-07194 What are the recordkeeping requirements?, 296-62-07201 Appendix A-1: General fit testing requirements for respiratory protection -- Mandatory, 296-62-07202 What are the general requirements for fit testing?, 296-62-07203 What are the fit test exercise requirements?, 296-62-07205 Appendix A-2: Qualitative fit testing (QLFT) protocols for respiratory protection -- Mandatory, 296-62-07206 What are the general qualitative fit testing (QLFT) protocols?, 296-62-07208 Isoamyl acetate protocol (a QLFT), 296-62-07209 What are the odor threshold screening procedures for isoamyl acetate (QLFT)?, 296-62-07210 What are the isoamyl acetate fit testing procedures (QLFT)?, 296-62-07212 Saccharin solution aerosol protocol (QLFT), 296-62-07213 What are the taste threshold screening procedures for saccarin (QLFT)?, 296-62-07214 What is the saccharin solution aerosol fit testing procedure (QLFT)?, 296-62-07217 BitrexTM solution (denatonium benzoate) solution aerosol qualitative fit testing (QLFT) protocol, 296-62-07218 What is the taste threshold screening procedure for BitrexTM (QLFT)?, 296-62-07219 What is the BitrexTM solution aerosol fit testing procedure (QLFT)?, 296-62-07222 Irritant smoke (stannic chloride) protocol (QLFT), 296-62-07223 What are the general requirements and precautions for irritant smoke fit testing (QLFT)?, 296-62-07224 What is the sensitivity screening check protocol for irritant smoke (QLFT)?, 296-62-07225 What is the irritant smoke fit testing procedure (QLFT)?, 296-62-07230 Appendix A-3: Quantitative fit testing (QNFT) protocols for respiratory protection -- Mandatory, 296-62-07231 What are the general requirements for quantitative fit testing (QNFT)?, 296-62-07233 Generated aerosol quantitative fit testing protocol (QNFT), 296-62-07234 What equipment is required for generated aerosol fit testing (QNFT)?, 296-62-07235 What are the procedures for generated aerosol quantitative fit testing (QNFT)?, 296-62-07236 How are fit factors calculated (QNFT)?, 296-62-07238 Ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter (CNC) quantitative fit testing protocol, 296-62-07239 General information about ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter (CNC) protocol (QNFT), 296-62-07240 What are the general requirements for ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter (CNC) protocol (QNFT)?, 296-62-07242 What are the Portacount fit testing procedures?, 296-62-07243 How is the Portacount test instrument used?, 296-62-07245 Controlled negative pressure (CNP) quantitative fit testing protocol (QNFT), 296-62-07246 How does controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit testing work (QNFT)?, 296-62-07247 What are the controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit testing requirements and procedures (QNFT)?, 296-62-07248 What test exercises are required for controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit testing (QNFT)?, 296-62-07251 Appendix B-1: User seal check procedures -- Mandatory, 296-62-07253 Appendix B-2: Respirator cleaning procedures -- Mandatory, 296-62-07255 Appendix C: WISHA respirator medical evaluation questionnaire -- Mandatory, 296-62-07257 Appendix D: Health care provider respirator recommendation form -- Nonmandatory, 296-62-07260 Appendix E: Additional information regarding respirator selection -- Nonmandatory, 296-62-07261 How do you classify respiratory hazards?, 296-62-07263 What are oxygen deficient respiratory hazards?, 296-62-07265 What needs to be considered when combinations of contaminants occur in the workplace?, 296-62-07267 What are two major types of respirators?, 296-62-07269 What are air-purifying respirators (APRs)?, 296-62-07271 What are the general limitations for air-purifying respirators (APRs)?, 296-62-07273 What are particulate-removing respirators?, 296-62-07275 What are vapor- and gas-removing respirators?, 296-62-07277 What are combination particulate- and vapor- and gas-removing respirators?, 296-62-07279 What types of filters, canisters and cartridges are available for air-purifying respirators (APRs)?, 296-62-07281 How do atmosphere-supplying respirators work?, 296-62-07283 What are the capabilities and limitations of atmosphere-supplying respirators?, 296-62-07285 What is a supplied-air respirator?, 296-62-07287 What are the general capabilities and limitations of supplied-air respirators?, 296-62-07289 What are combination supplied-air and air-purifying respirators?, 296-62-07291 What are combination supplied-air respirators with auxiliary self-contained air supply?, 296-62-07293 What is a self-contained breathing apparatus respirator (SCBA)?, 296-62-07295 What are the limitations for self-contained breathing apparatus respirators (SCBA)?, 296-62-075 Air contaminants, 296-62-07501 Airborne contaminants, 296-62-07503 Ceiling vs. time-weighted average limits, 296-62-07505 "Skin" notation, 296-62-07507 Mixtures, 296-62-07509 Nuisance dusts, 296-62-07510 Total particulate, 296-62-07511 Simple asphyxiants, 296-62-07513 Physical factors, 296-62-07515 Control of chemical agents, 296-62-08001 Bloodborne pathogens, 296-62-08050 Appendix A -- Hepatitis B vaccine declination -- Mandatory, 296-62-09015 Hearing conservation, 296-62-09017 Definitions, 296-62-09019 Monitoring, 296-62-09021 Method of noise measurement, 296-62-09023 Calibration of monitoring equipment, 296-62-09024 Employee notification, 296-62-09025 Observation of monitoring, 296-62-09026 Noise control, 296-62-09027 Audiometric testing program, 296-62-09029 Audiometric test requirements, 296-62-09031 Hearing protectors, 296-62-09033 Hearing protector attenuation, 296-62-09035 Training program, 296-62-09037 Access to information and training materials, 296-62-09039 Warning signs, 296-62-09041 Recordkeeping, 296-62-09043 Appendices, 296-62-09045 Effective dates, 296-62-09047 Appendix A -- Audiometric measuring instruments, 296-62-09049 Appendix B -- Audiometric test rooms, 296-62-09051 Appendix C -- Acoustic calibration of audiometers, 296-62-09053 Appendix D -- Methods for estimating the adequacy of hearing protector attenuation, 296-62-09055 Appendix E -- Noise exposure computation, 296-62-141 Permit-required confined spaces, 296-62-14100 Scope and application, 296-62-14105 Definitions, 296-62-14110 General requirements, 296-62-14115 Permit-required confined space program (permit space program), 296-62-14120 Permit system, 296-62-14125 Required entry permit information, 296-62-14130 Training, 296-62-14135 Duties of authorized entrants, 296-62-14140 Duties of attendants, 296-62-14145 Duties of entry supervisors, 296-62-14150 Rescue and emergency services, 296-62-14155 Employee participation, 296-62-14170 Appendices to WAC 296-62-141 -- Permit-required confined spaces, 296-62-14171 Appendix A -- Permit-required confined space decision flow chart, 296-62-14172 Appendix B -- Procedures for atmospheric testing, 296-62-14173 Appendix C -- Examples of permit-required confined space programs, 296-62-14174 Appendix D -- Sample permits, 296-62-14175 Appendix E -- Sewer system entry, 296-62-14176 Appendix F -- Rescue team or rescue service evaluation criteria, 296-62-300 Hazardous waste operations and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, 296-62-30001 Scope and application, 296-62-30003 Definitions, 296-62-3010 Overview of a written safety and health program, 296-62-30105 Elements of a safety and health program, 296-62-30110 Safety considerations during the initial site excavation, 296-62-30115 Notifying contractors and subcontractors of procedures and hazards, 296-62-30120 Availability of the safety and health program, 296-62-30125 Organizational structure of the site safety and health program, 296-62-30130 Comprehensive workplan of the site program, 296-62-30135 Overview of a site-specific safety and health plan, 296-62-30140 Preentry briefing of the site-specific safety and health plan, 296-62-30145 Effectiveness of site safety and health plan, 296-62-3020 Site characterization and analysis, 296-62-30205 Preliminary evaluation, 296-62-30210 Hazard identification, 296-62-30215 Required information, 296-62-30220 Personal protective equipment, 296-62-30225 Monitoring, 296-62-30230 Risk identification, 296-62-30235 Employee notification, 296-62-3030 Site control, 296-62-30305 Site control program, 296-62-30310 Elements of the site control program, 296-62-30315 Site work zones, 296-62-3040 General training requirements and the employees covered, 296-62-30405 Elements covered in training, 296-62-30410 Initial training, 296-62-30415 Management and supervisor training, 296-62-30420 Law enforcement at illicit drug labs, 296-62-30425 Training course content for 40 and 80 hour hazardous waste cleanup courses, 296-62-30430 Training content for 24-hour hazardous waste cleanup course, 296-62-30435 16-hour supplemental training for hazardous waste sites, 296-62-30440 Additional 8 hours of training for supervisors and managers, 296-62-30445 Qualifications for trainers, 296-62-30450 Training certification, 296-62-30455 Training requirements for emergency response, 296-62-30460 Refresher training, 296-62-30465 Equivalent training, 296-62-3050 Medical surveillance, 296-62-30505 Employees covered, 296-62-30510 Frequency of medical examinations and consultations, 296-62-30515 Content of medical examinations and consultations, 296-62-30520 Examination by a physician and costs, 296-62-30525 Information provided to the physician, 296-62-30530 Physician's written opinion, 296-62-30535 Recordkeeping of medical surveillance activities, 296-62-3060 Engineering controls, work practices, and personal protective equipment for employee protection, 296-62-30605 Personal protective equipment (PPE) program, 296-62-30610 Totally encapsulating chemical protective suits, 296-62-30615 Personal protective equipment (PPE) program, 296-62-3070 Monitoring concentrations of hazardous substances, 296-62-30705 Monitoring during initial entry, 296-62-30710 Periodic monitoring, 296-62-30715 Monitoring of high-risk employees, 296-62-3080 Informational programs, 296-62-3090 General requirements for handling drums and containers, 296-62-30905 Opening drums and containers, 296-62-30910 Material handling equipment, 296-62-30915 Radioactive wastes, 296-62-30920 Shock-sensitive wastes, 296-62-30925 Laboratory waste packs, 296-62-30930 Sampling of drum and container contents, 296-62-30935 Shipping and transport of drums, 296-62-30940 Tanks and vaults procedures, 296-62-3100 Decontamination procedures, 296-62-31005 Location of decontamination areas, 296-62-31010 Decontamination of equipment and solvents, 296-62-31015 Decontamination of personal protective clothing and equipment, 296-62-31020 Showers and change rooms used for decontamination, 296-62-3110 Emergency response plan for employees at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites, 296-62-31105 Elements of an emergency response plan at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites, 296-62-31110 Procedures for handling emergency incidents at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites, 296-62-3120 Illumination, 296-62-3130 Sanitation at temporary workplaces, 296-62-31305 Potable water, 296-62-31310 Nonpotable water, 296-62-31315 Toilet facilities, 296-62-31320 Food handling, 296-62-31325 Temporary sleeping quarters, 296-62-31330 Washing facilities, 296-62-31335 Showers and change rooms, 296-62-3138 New technology programs, 296-62-3140 Certain operations conducted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), 296-62-31405 Safety and health program under RCRA, 296-62-31410 Hazard communication program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31415 Medical surveillance program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31420 Decontamination program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31425 New technology program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31430 Material handling program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31435 Training program for new employees under RCRA, 296-62-31440 Training program for current employees, 296-62-31445 RCRA requirements for trainers, 296-62-31450 Emergency response program requirements under RCRA, 296-62-31455 Emergency response plan under RCRA, 296-62-31460 Elements of an emergency plan under RCRA, 296-62-31465 Training requirements for emergency response under RCRA, 296-62-31470 Procedures for handling emergency incidents under RCRA, 296-62-3152 Appendices to Part P -- Hazardous waste operations and TSD facilities, 296-62-3160 Appendix A -- Personal protective equipment test methods, 296-62-3170 Appendix B -- General description and discussion of the levels of protection and protective gear, 296-62-3180 Appendix C -- Compliance guidelines, 296-62-3190 Appendix D -- References, 296-62-3195 Appendix E -- Training curriculum guidelines, 296-307-452 Scope, 296-307-45210 Planning, 296-307-45220 Training, 296-307-45230 Medical surveillance, 296-307-45240 Keep records, 296-307-45400 Incident requirements, 296-307-45410 Implement and maintain an incident command system (ICS), 296-307-45420 Prepare skilled support personnel, 296-307-45430 Make sure the incident commander oversees activities during the response, 296-307-45440 Use the buddy system in danger areas, 296-307-45450 Provide rescue and medical assistance, 296-307-45600 Personal protective equipment, 296-307-45610 Control hazards created by personal protective equipment (PPE), 296-307-45620 Use personal protective equipment (PPE) properly, 296-307-45800 Postemergency response, and 296-307-46000 Definitions.

     Statutory Authority for Adoption: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060.

      Adopted under notice filed as WSR 04-15-107 on August 4, 2004, and WSR 04-21-066 on October 19, 2004.

     Changes Other than Editing from Proposed to Adopted Version: As a result of written and oral comments received, the following sections are being withdrawn: WAC 296-307-686 Scope, 296-307-688 Planning. Summary, 296-307-68805 Determine if you have employees with occupational exposure, 296-307-68810 Develop and implement a written exposure control plan, 296-307-690 Training. Summary, 296-307-69005 Provide training to your employees, 296-307-69010 Provide additional training, 296-307-69015 Maintain training records, 296-307-692 Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccinations. Summary, 296-307-69205 Make hepatitis B vaccination available to employees, 296-307-69210 Obtain a copy of the healthcare professional's written opinion for hepatitis B vaccination and provide it to the employee, 296-307-694 Control employee exposure. Summary, 296-307-69405 Minimize splashing, spraying, splattering, and generation of droplets, 296-307-69410 Make sure items are appropriately labeled, 296-307-69415 Make sure employees clean their hands, 296-307-69420 Prohibit food, drink, and other personal activities in the work area, 296-307-69425 Examine and label contaminated equipment, 296-307-69430 Make sure your worksite is maintained in a clean and sanitary condition, 296-307-69435 Handle regulated waste properly and safely, 296-307-69440 Handle contaminated laundry properly and safely, 296-307-696 Personal protective equipment (PPE). Summary, 296-307-69605 Provide and make sure personal protective equipment is used when there is occupational exposure, 296-307-69610 Make sure gloves are worn, 296-307-69615 Make sure appropriate masks, eye protection, and face shields are worn, 296-307-69620 Wear appropriate protective clothing, 296-307-69625 Make resuscitator devices available, 296-307-69630 Maintain personal protective equipment, 296-307-698 Post-exposure requirements. Summary, 296-307-69805 Make a confidential medical evaluation and follow-up available to employees who experience an exposure incident, 296-307-69810 Test the blood of the source person, 296-307-69815 Provide the results of the source person's blood test to the exposed employee, 296-307-69820 Collect and test the blood of the exposed employee, 296-307-69825 Provide information to the healthcare professional evaluating the employee, 296-307-69830 Obtain and provide a copy of the healthcare professional's written opinion on post-exposure evaluation to the employee, 296-307-700, Records. Summary, 296-307-70005 Establish and maintain medical records, and 296-307-702 Definitions.

     As a result of written and oral comments received, the following sections are being changed as indicated below:

WAC 296-307-039 First-aid rule, Summary

• Corrected the reference in the note. It now reads, "Employers who require their employees to provide first aid must comply with the bloodborne pathogen rule, chapter 296-823 WAC."
WAC 296-307-061 What requirements apply to working around bins, bunkers, hoppers, tanks, pits, and trenches?

• The proposal indicated the words "safety belt with a lifeline attached" would be replaced with the words "full body harness." This change was not adopted.
WAC 296-307-55060 Definitions.

• The period was removed after the word "employer."
WAC 296-307-70420 Medical surveillance. Provide medical surveillance to employees.

• Corrected a reference in the note that follows table 7. It now reads, "A medical evaluation for respirator use is required by chapter 296-307 WAC, Part Y-5, Respiratory protection, for those employees who have not been cleared for respirator use during medical surveillance activities."
WAC 296-307-70455 Provide rescue and medical assistance.

• Corrected a reference in the last note. It now reads, "Employers who designate and train their employees to provide first aid are covered by chapter 296-823 WAC, Bloodborne pathogens."
WAC 296-307-70475 Postemergency response.

• Corrected an error in the table. It now reads, "Chapter 296-843 WAC, Hazardous waste operations."
• Corrected an error in the table. It now reads, "Chapter 296-307 WAC, Part Y-5, Respiratory protection."

     Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Comply with Federal Statute: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; Federal Rules or Standards: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; or Recently Enacted State Statutes: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

     Number of Sections Adopted at Request of a Nongovernmental Entity: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0.

     Number of Sections Adopted on the Agency's Own Initiative: New 122, Amended 24, Repealed 271.

     Number of Sections Adopted in Order to Clarify, Streamline, or Reform Agency Procedures: New 122, Amended 24, Repealed 271.

     Number of Sections Adopted Using Negotiated Rule Making: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0;      Pilot Rule Making: New 0, Amended 0, Repealed 0; or Other Alternative Rule Making: New 122, Amended 24, Repealed 271.

     Date Adopted: December 21, 2004.

Paul Trause

Director

OTS-7289.1


REPEALER

     The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:
WAC 296-62-071 Respiratory protection.
WAC 296-62-07101 To whom does chapter 296-62 WAC, Part E apply?
WAC 296-62-07102 When are you allowed to rely on respirators to protect employees from breathing contaminated air?
WAC 296-62-07103 What are your responsibilities as an employer?
WAC 296-62-07105 Definitions.
WAC 296-62-07107 When is a respiratory protection program required?
WAC 296-62-07109 When must you update your written respiratory protection program?
WAC 296-62-07111 What must be included in your written respiratory protection program?
WAC 296-62-07113 What are the requirements for a program administrator?
WAC 296-62-07115 Who pays for the respirators, training, medical evaluations, and fit testing?
WAC 296-62-07117 What must you do when employees choose to wear respirators when respirators are not required?
WAC 296-62-07130 What must be considered when selecting any respirator?
WAC 296-62-07131 What else must you consider when selecting a respirator for use in atmospheres that are not IDLH?
WAC 296-62-07132 What else must you consider when selecting a respirator for use in IDLH atmospheres?
WAC 296-62-07133 What else must you consider when selecting a respirator for emergency and rescue use?
WAC 296-62-07150 What are the general requirements for medical evaluations?
WAC 296-62-07151 Who must perform medical evaluations?
WAC 296-62-07152 What information must you provide to the PLHCP in addition to the questionnaire?
WAC 296-62-07153 How must the medical evaluations and the questionnaire be administered?
WAC 296-62-07154 Who must review the questionnaire and determine what, if any, follow-up evaluations are needed?
WAC 296-62-07155 What must be included in the PLHCP's written recommendation?
WAC 296-62-07156 When are future medical evaluations required?
WAC 296-62-07160 When is fit testing required?
WAC 296-62-07161 What is required when an employee finds the respirator's fit unacceptable?
WAC 296-62-07162 How must fit testing be done?
WAC 296-62-07170 How must you prevent problems with the seal on tight-fitting facepieces?
WAC 296-62-07171 How do you monitor continuing effectiveness of your employees' respirators?
WAC 296-62-07172 What are the standby procedures when respirators are used in IDLH situations?
WAC 296-62-07175 How must respirators be cleaned and disinfected?
WAC 296-62-07176 How must respirators be stored?
WAC 296-62-07177 When must respirators be inspected?
WAC 296-62-07178 How must respirators be inspected and maintained?
WAC 296-62-07179 How must respirators be repaired and adjusted?
WAC 296-62-07182 What are the breathing gas requirements for atmosphere-supplying respirators?
WAC 296-62-07184 How must filters, cartridges and canisters be labeled?
WAC 296-62-07186 What are the general training requirements?
WAC 296-62-07188 How do you know if you adequately trained your employees?
WAC 296-62-07190 When must your employees be trained?
WAC 296-62-07192 How must you evaluate the effectiveness of your respiratory protection program?
WAC 296-62-07194 What are the recordkeeping requirements?
WAC 296-62-07201 Appendix A-1: General fit testing requirements for respiratory protection -- Mandatory.
WAC 296-62-07202 What are the general requirements for fit testing?
WAC 296-62-07203 What are the fit test exercise requirements?
WAC 296-62-07205 Appendix A-2: Qualitative fit testing (QLFT) protocols for respiratory protection -- Mandatory.
WAC 296-62-07206 What are the general qualitative fit testing (QLFT) protocols?
WAC 296-62-07208 Isoamyl acetate protocol (a QLFT).
WAC 296-62-07209 What are the odor threshold screening procedures for isoamyl acetate (QLFT)?
WAC 296-62-07210 What are the isoamyl acetate fit testing procedures (QLFT)?
WAC 296-62-07212 Saccharin solution aerosol protocol (QLFT).
WAC 296-62-07213 What are the taste threshold screening procedures for saccharin (QLFT)?
WAC 296-62-07214 What is the saccharin solution aerosol fit testing procedure (QLFT)?
WAC 296-62-07217 BitrexTM (denatonium benzoate) solution aerosol qualitative fit testing (QLFT) protocol.
WAC 296-62-07218 What is the taste threshold screening procedure for BitrexTM (QLFT)?
WAC 296-62-07219 What is the BitrexTM solution aerosol fit testing procedure (QLFT)?
WAC 296-62-07222 Irritant smoke (stannic chloride) protocol (QLFT).
WAC 296-62-07223 What are the general requirements and precautions for irritant smoke fit testing (QLFT)?
WAC 296-62-07224 What is the sensitivity screening check protocol for irritant smoke (QLFT)?
WAC 296-62-07225 What is the irritant smoke fit testing procedure (QLFT)?
WAC 296-62-07230 Appendix A-3: Quantitative fit testing (QNFT) protocols for respiratory protection -- Mandatory.
WAC 296-62-07231 What are the general requirements for quantitative fit testing (QNFT)?
WAC 296-62-07233 Generated aerosol quantitative fit testing protocol (QNFT).
WAC 296-62-07234 What equipment is required for generated aerosol fit testing (QNFT)?
WAC 296-62-07235 What are the procedures for generated aerosol quantitative fit testing (QNFT)?
WAC 296-62-07236 How are fit factors calculated (QNFT)?
WAC 296-62-07238 Ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter (CNC) quantitative fit testing protocol.
WAC 296-62-07239 General information about ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter (CNC) protocol (QNFT).
WAC 296-62-07240 What are the general requirements for ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter (CNC) protocol (QNFT)?
WAC 296-62-07242 What are the Portacount fit testing procedures?
WAC 296-62-07243 How is the Portacount test instrument used?
WAC 296-62-07245 Controlled negative pressure (CNP) quantitative fit testing protocol (QNFT).
WAC 296-62-07246 How does controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit testing work (QNFT)?
WAC 296-62-07247 What are the controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit testing requirements and procedures (QNFT)?
WAC 296-62-07248 What test exercises are required for controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit testing (QNFT)?
WAC 296-62-07251 Appendix B-1: User seal check procedures -- Mandatory.
WAC 296-62-07253 Appendix B-2: Respirator cleaning procedures -- Mandatory.
WAC 296-62-07255 Appendix C: WISHA respirator medical evaluation questionnaire -- Mandatory.
WAC 296-62-07257 Appendix D: Health care provider respirator recommendation form -- Nonmandatory.
WAC 296-62-07260 Appendix E: Additional information regarding respirator selection -- Nonmandatory.
WAC 296-62-07261 How do you classify respiratory hazards?
WAC 296-62-07263 What are oxygen deficient respiratory hazards?
WAC 296-62-07265 What needs to be considered when combinations of contaminants occur in the workplace?
WAC 296-62-07267 What are the two major types of respirators?
WAC 296-62-07269 What are air-purifying respirators (APRs)?
WAC 296-62-07271 What are the general limitations for air-purifying respirators (APRs)?
WAC 296-62-07273 What are particulate-removing respirators?
WAC 296-62-07275 What are vapor- and gas-removing respirators?
WAC 296-62-07277 What are combination particulate-and vapor- and gas-removing respirators?
WAC 296-62-07279 What types of filters, canisters and cartridges are available for air-purifying respirators (APRs)?
WAC 296-62-07281 How do atmosphere-supplying respirators work?
WAC 296-62-07283 What are the capabilities and limitations of atmosphere-supplying respirators?
WAC 296-62-07285 What is a supplied-air respirator?
WAC 296-62-07287 What are the general capabilities and limitations of supplied-air respirators?
WAC 296-62-07289 What are combination supplied-air and air-purifying respirators?
WAC 296-62-07291 What are combination supplied-air respirators with auxiliary self-contained air supply?
WAC 296-62-07293 What is a self-contained breathing apparatus respirator (SCBA)?
WAC 296-62-07295 What are the limitations for self-contained breathing apparatus respirators (SCBA)?

OTS-7290.1


REPEALER

     The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:
WAC 296-62-075 Air contaminants.
WAC 296-62-07501 Airborne contaminants.
WAC 296-62-07503 Ceiling vs. time-weighted average limits.
WAC 296-62-07505 "Skin" notation.
WAC 296-62-07507 Mixtures.
WAC 296-62-07509 Nuisance dusts.
WAC 296-62-07510 Total particulate.
WAC 296-62-07511 Simple asphyxiants.
WAC 296-62-07513 Physical factors.
WAC 296-62-07515 Control of chemical agents.

OTS-7291.1


REPEALER

     The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:
WAC 296-62-08001 Bloodborne pathogens.
WAC 296-62-08050 Appendix A -- Hepatitis B vaccine declination -- Mandatory.

OTS-7292.1


REPEALER

     The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:
WAC 296-62-09015 Hearing conservation.
WAC 296-62-09017 Definitions.
WAC 296-62-09019 Monitoring.
WAC 296-62-09021 Method of noise measurement.
WAC 296-62-09023 Calibration of monitoring equipment.
WAC 296-62-09024 Employee notification.
WAC 296-62-09025 Observation of monitoring.
WAC 296-62-09026 Noise control.
WAC 296-62-09027 Audiometric testing program.
WAC 296-62-09029 Audiometric test requirements.
WAC 296-62-09031 Hearing protectors.
WAC 296-62-09033 Hearing protector attenuation.
WAC 296-62-09035 Training program.
WAC 296-62-09037 Access to information and training materials.
WAC 296-62-09039 Warning signs.
WAC 296-62-09041 Recordkeeping.
WAC 296-62-09043 Appendices.
WAC 296-62-09045 Effective dates.
WAC 296-62-09047 Appendix A -- Audiometric measuring instruments.
WAC 296-62-09049 Appendix B -- Audiometric test rooms.
WAC 296-62-09051 Appendix C -- Acoustic calibration of audiometers.
WAC 296-62-09053 Appendix D -- Methods for estimating the adequacy of hearing protector attenuation.
WAC 296-62-09055 Appendix E -- Noise exposure computation.

OTS-7293.1


REPEALER

     The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:
WAC 296-62-141 Permit-required confined spaces.
WAC 296-62-14100 Scope and application.
WAC 296-62-14105 Definitions.
WAC 296-62-14110 General requirements.
WAC 296-62-14115 Permit-required confined space program (permit space program).
WAC 296-62-14120 Permit system.
WAC 296-62-14125 Required entry permit information.
WAC 296-62-14130 Training.
WAC 296-62-14135 Duties of authorized entrants.
WAC 296-62-14140 Duties of attendants.
WAC 296-62-14145 Duties of entry supervisors.
WAC 296-62-14150 Rescue and emergency services.
WAC 296-62-14155 Employee participation.
WAC 296-62-14170 Appendices to WAC 296-62-141 -- Permit-required confined spaces.
WAC 296-62-14171 Appendix A -- Permit-required confined space decision flow chart.
WAC 296-62-14172 Appendix B -- Procedures for atmospheric testing.
WAC 296-62-14173 Appendix C -- Examples of permit-required confined space programs.
WAC 296-62-14174 Appendix D -- Sample permits.
WAC 296-62-14175 Appendix E -- Sewer system entry.
WAC 296-62-14176 Appendix F--Rescue team or rescue service evaluation criteria.

OTS-7294.1


REPEALER

     The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:
WAC 296-62-300 Hazardous waste operations and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities.
WAC 296-62-30001 Scope and application.
WAC 296-62-30003 Definitions.
WAC 296-62-3010 Overview of a written safety and health program.
WAC 296-62-30105 Elements of a safety and health program.
WAC 296-62-30110 Safety considerations during the initial site excavation.
WAC 296-62-30115 Notifying contractors and subcontractors of procedures and hazards.
WAC 296-62-30120 Availability of the safety and health program.
WAC 296-62-30125 Organizational structure of the site safety and health program.
WAC 296-62-30130 Comprehensive workplan of the site program.
WAC 296-62-30135 Overview of a site-specific safety and health plan.
WAC 296-62-30140 Preentry briefing of the site-specific safety and health plan.
WAC 296-62-30145 Effectiveness of site safety and health plan.
WAC 296-62-3020 Site characterization and analysis.
WAC 296-62-30205 Preliminary evaluation.
WAC 296-62-30210 Hazard identification.
WAC 296-62-30215 Required information.
WAC 296-62-30220 Personal protective equipment.
WAC 296-62-30225 Monitoring.
WAC 296-62-30230 Risk identification.
WAC 296-62-30235 Employee notification.
WAC 296-62-3030 Site control.
WAC 296-62-30305 Site control program.
WAC 296-62-30310 Elements of the site control program.
WAC 296-62-30315 Site work zones.
WAC 296-62-3040 General training requirements and the employees covered.
WAC 296-62-30405 Elements covered in training.
WAC 296-62-30410 Initial training.
WAC 296-62-30415 Management and supervisor training.
WAC 296-62-30420 Law enforcement at illicit drug labs.
WAC 296-62-30425 Training course content for 40 and 80 hour hazardous waste cleanup courses.
WAC 296-62-30430 Training content for 24-hour hazardous waste cleanup course.
WAC 296-62-30435 16-hour supplemental training for hazardous waste sites.
WAC 296-62-30440 Additional 8 hours of training for supervisors and managers.
WAC 296-62-30445 Qualifications for trainers.
WAC 296-62-30450 Training certification.
WAC 296-62-30455 Training requirements for emergency response.
WAC 296-62-30460 Refresher training.
WAC 296-62-30465 Equivalent training.
WAC 296-62-3050 Medical surveillance.
WAC 296-62-30505 Employees covered.
WAC 296-62-30510 Frequency of medical examinations and consultations.
WAC 296-62-30515 Content of medical examinations and consultations.
WAC 296-62-30520 Examination by a physician and costs.
WAC 296-62-30525 Information provided to the physician.
WAC 296-62-30530 Physician's written opinion.
WAC 296-62-30535 Recordkeeping of medical surveillance activities.
WAC 296-62-3060 Engineering controls, work practices, and personal protective equipment for employee protection.
WAC 296-62-30605 Personal protective equipment selection.
WAC 296-62-30610 Totally encapsulating chemical protective suits.
WAC 296-62-30615 Personal protective equipment (PPE) program.
WAC 296-62-3070 Monitoring concentrations of hazardous substances.
WAC 296-62-30705 Monitoring during initial entry.
WAC 296-62-30710 Periodic monitoring.
WAC 296-62-30715 Monitoring of high-risk employees.
WAC 296-62-3080 Informational programs.
WAC 296-62-3090 General requirements for handling drums and containers.
WAC 296-62-30905 Opening drums and containers.
WAC 296-62-30910 Material handling equipment.
WAC 296-62-30915 Radioactive wastes.
WAC 296-62-30920 Shock-sensitive wastes.
WAC 296-62-30925 Laboratory waste packs.
WAC 296-62-30930 Sampling of drum and container contents.
WAC 296-62-30935 Shipping and transport of drums.
WAC 296-62-30940 Tanks and vaults procedures.
WAC 296-62-3100 Decontamination procedures.
WAC 296-62-31005 Location of decontamination areas.
WAC 296-62-31010 Decontamination of equipment and solvents.
WAC 296-62-31015 Decontamination of personal protective clothing and equipment.
WAC 296-62-31020 Showers and change rooms used for decontamination.
WAC 296-62-3110 Emergency response plan for employees at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.
WAC 296-62-31105 Elements of an emergency response plan at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.
WAC 296-62-31110 Procedures for handling emergency incidents at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.
WAC 296-62-3120 Illumination.
WAC 296-62-3130 Sanitation at temporary workplaces.
WAC 296-62-31305 Potable water.
WAC 296-62-31310 Nonpotable water.
WAC 296-62-31315 Toilet facilities.
WAC 296-62-31320 Food handling.
WAC 296-62-31325 Temporary sleeping quarters.
WAC 296-62-31330 Washing facilities.
WAC 296-62-31335 Showers and change rooms.
WAC 296-62-3138 New technology programs.
WAC 296-62-3140 Certain operations conducted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).
WAC 296-62-31405 Safety and health program under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31410 Hazard communication program requirements under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31415 Medical surveillance program requirements under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31420 Decontamination program requirements under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31425 New technology programs requirements under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31430 Material handling program requirements under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31435 Training program for new employees under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31440 Training program for current employees.
WAC 296-62-31445 RCRA requirements for trainers.
WAC 296-62-31450 Emergency response program requirements under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31455 Emergency response plan under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31460 Elements of an emergency response plan under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31465 Training requirements for emergency response under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-31470 Procedures for handling emergency incidents under RCRA.
WAC 296-62-3152 Appendices to Part P -- Hazardous waste operations and TSD facilities.
WAC 296-62-3160 Appendix A -- Personal protective equipment test methods.
WAC 296-62-3170 Appendix B -- General description and discussion of the levels of protection and protective gear.
WAC 296-62-3180 Appendix C -- Compliance guidelines.
WAC 296-62-3190 Appendix D -- References.
WAC 296-62-3195 Appendix E -- Training curriculum guidelines.

OTS-7355.2


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 03-10-068, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03)

WAC 296-307-018   What are the employer's responsibilities?  

     You must:

     (1) Provide a safe and healthful working environment.

     (2) Ensure that employees do not use defective or unsafe tools and equipment, including tools and equipment that may be furnished by the employee.

     (3) Implement a written accident prevention program as required by these standards.

     (4) Implement a hazard communication program as required by WAC 296-307-550.

     (5) Establish a system for reporting and recording accidents on the OSHA 200 log. (See chapter 296-27 WAC.)

     (6) Provide safety education and training programs.

     (7) Implement the requirements of WAC 296-62-074 through 296-62-07451 to ensure the safety of employees who are exposed to cadmium in the workplace.

     (8) Implement the requirements of WAC ((296-62-145)) 296-307-642 through ((296-62-14529)) 296-307-656 to ensure the safety of employees who are exposed to confined spaces in the workplace.

     (9) Control chemical agents.

     You must:

     • Control chemical agents in a manner that they will not present a hazard to your workers; or

     • Protect workers from the hazard of contact with, or exposure to, chemical agents.

Reference: Pesticides are chemical agents and are covered by chapter 296-307 WAC Part I, Pesticides (worker protection standard). Pesticides may also be covered by ((chapter 296-62 WAC Part E, Respiratory protection)) WAC 296-307-594, Respirators.
     (10) Protect employees from biological agents.

     You must:

     • Protect employees from exposure to hazardous concentrations of biological agents that may result from processing, handling or using materials or waste.

Note: Examples of biological agents include:
– Animals or animal waste
– Body fluids
– Biological agents in a medical research lab
– Mold or mildew.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. 03-10-068, § 296-307-018, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-307-018, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040. 98-24-096, § 296-307-018, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99. 97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-018, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-018, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 04-07-160, filed 3/23/04, effective 5/1/04)

WAC 296-307-039   First-aid rule summary.   Your responsibility: Make sure first-aid trained personnel are available to provide quick and effective first aid.

     You must:

     Make sure that first-aid trained personnel are available to provide quick and effective first aid.

     WAC 296-307-03905.

     Make sure appropriate first-aid supplies are readily available.

     WAC 296-307-03920.

    
Note:
• Employers who require their employees to provide first aid must comply with the bloodborne pathogen rule, chapter 296-823 WAC ((296-62-080)).
• Additional requirements relating to first aid are also located in the following sections:
– WAC 296-307-07013(12), What rules apply to vehicles used to transport employees?
– WAC 296-307-16175, First-aid requirements for operators of temporary worker housing.
– WAC 296-307-16380, First-aid requirements for operators of cherry harvest camps.
Definitions:
First aid: The extent of treatment you would expect from a person trained in basic first aid, using supplies from a first-aid kit.
Emergency medical service: Medical treatment and care given at the scene of any medical emergency or while transporting any victim to a medical facility.
     You can get copies of these rules by calling 1-800-4BE SAFE (1-800-423-7233), or by going to http://www.lni.wa.gov.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. 04-07-160, § 296-307-039, filed 3/23/04, effective 5/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, [49.17].050. 02-12-098, § 296-307-039, filed 6/5/02, effective 8/1/02; 01-17-033, § 296-307-039, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01. 97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-039, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-039, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 01-17-033, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01)

WAC 296-307-03920   Make sure appropriate first-aid supplies are readily available.   You must:

     • Make sure first-aid supplies are readily available. (See first-aid kit table.)

     • Make sure first-aid supplies at your workplace are appropriate to:

     - Your occupational setting.

     – The response time of your emergency medical services.

First-Aid Kit Table

Number of employees normally assigned to worksite Minimum first-aid supplies required at worksite
1 - 15 Employees 1 First-aid kit
16 - 30 Employees 2 First-aid kits
31 - 50 Employees 3 First-aid kits
((Over 50 Employees (within 1/2 mile radius of supplies) First-aid station (see WAC 296-307-03925)))

Note: • First-aid kits from your local retailer or safety supplier should be adequate for most nonindustrial employers.
• The following is a list of suggested items for your first-aid kit:
– 1 absorbent compress, 4 x 8 inches
– 16 adhesive bandages, 1 x 3 inches
– 1 adhesive tape, 5 yards long
– 10 antiseptic single-use packages, 0.5 g application
– 6 burn treatment single-use packages, 0.5 g application
– 1 eye covering (for two eyes)
– 1 eye wash, 1 fluid ounce
– 4 sterile pads, 3 x 3 inches
– 2 pair of medical exam gloves
– 1 triangular bandage, 39 x 39 x 55 inches
Optional first-aid kit contents
– Bandage compresses, 2 x 2 inches, 3 x 3 inches and 5 x 5 inches
– Self-activating cold packs, 4 x 5 inches
– Roller bandages, 6 yards long
– Mouth-to-mouth barrier for CPR
• Kits should be checked at least weekly to ensure adequate number of needed items are available.
• Kits may be carried in any motor vehicle that is used near the crew.
     You must:

     • Make sure that first-aid supplies are:

     - Easily accessible to all your employees.

     - Stored in containers that protect them from damage, deterioration, or contamination. Containers must be clearly marked, not locked, and may be sealed.

     - Able to be moved to the location of an injured or acutely ill worker.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-307-03920, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)

WAC 296-307-061   What requirements apply to working around bins, bunkers, hoppers, tanks, pits, and trenches?   (1) Employees must be prohibited from entering any bin, bunker, hopper, or similar area when loose materials (such as chips, sand, grain, gravel, sawdust, etc.) may collapse, unless the employee wears a safety belt with a lifeline attached and is attended by a helper.


Note: Silage pits are exempt from this section.
Reference: For requirements relating to confined spaces, see WAC 296-307-642 through 296-307-656.

     (2) When employees are required to work in a trench or a pit 4 feet deep or more, the trench or the pit must be shored or sloped according to the following table:


SOIL OR ROCK TYPE

MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE


SLOPES (H:V) (1) FOR

EXCAVATIONS LESS

THAN 20 FEET DEEP

     (2)


STABLE ROCK

VERTICAL (90°)
TYPE A 3/4:1 (53°)
TYPE B 1:1 (45°)
TYPE C 1 1/2:1 (34°)

1 Numbers in parentheses next to maximum allowable slopes are angles in degrees from the horizontal. Angles have been rounded off.
2 Sloping or benching for excavations greater than 20 feet deep must be designed by a registered professional engineer.

     (3) Each soil and rock deposit must be classified by a competent person as Stable Rock, Type A, B, or C according to the definitions in WAC 296-155-66401. "Competent person" means someone who is able to identify working conditions that are hazardous to employees, and has authority to take prompt action to eliminate the hazards.

     (4) Classification of the deposits must be based on the results of at least one visual and at least one manual analysis. The analyses must be conducted by a competent person using tests in recognized methods of soil classification and testing such as those adopted by the American Society for Testing Materials, or the U.S. Department of Agriculture textural classification system.

[97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-061, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-061, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 01-17-033, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01)

WAC 296-307-07013   What rules apply to vehicles used to transport employees?   You must ensure that motor vehicles used regularly to transport employees meet the following requirements:

     (1) The vehicles are well equipped, covered against the weather, and maintained in good mechanical condition at all times.

     (2) A sufficient number of properly secured seats are provided in each vehicle to accommodate the number of employees transported. When emergency conditions make it necessary to transport more employees than the seating capacity can accommodate, all employees must ride within the vehicle. No employee may ride on fenders or running boards of the vehicle.

     (3) No employees may ride in or on any vehicle with their legs hanging over the end or sides. All trucks without tail gates should have safety bars.

     (4) The vehicles have storage strong enough to retain sharp tools that could present a hazard to employees being transported.

     (5) All dump-trucks used to transport employees have an adequate safety chain or locking device to ensure that the body of the truck is not raised while employees are riding in it.

     (6) Explosives or highly inflammable materials are not carried in or on the vehicle while it is used to transport employees.

     (7) Exhaust systems are installed and maintained in proper condition, and are designed to eliminate the employee exposure to exhaust gases and fumes.

     (8) Within the cab, crew trucks must carry only the number of passengers for which they are designed. In any seating arrangement, the driver must be able to maintain full freedom of motion. The driver's normal vision must be free from obstruction by passengers or the seating arrangement.

     (9) All enclosed crew trucks have an emergency exit in addition to the regular entrance.

     (10) Trucks used for hauling gravel may be used as crew trucks if they meet the following requirements:

     (a) Steps in proper places;

     (b) Wooden floors;

     (c) Securely fastened seats;

     (d) Truck is properly covered; and

     (e) Compliance with all other general regulations covering crew trucks.

     (11) Half-ton vehicles must haul no more than six persons including driver. Three-quarter-ton vehicles must haul no more than eight persons including driver.

     (12) The vehicle is equipped with the first-aid supplies required by WAC ((296-307-042)) 296-307-03920, two blankets, and a fire extinguisher.

Note: Additional requirements relating to first aid are located in WAC 296-307-039.
     (13) Heating units with open fires are not used in vehicles transporting crews.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-307-07013, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040. 98-24-096, § 296-307-07013, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99. 97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-07013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-07013, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)

WAC 296-307-11015   Violations of this part -- Worker protection standards -- 40 CFR, § 170.9.   (1) RCW 15.58.150 (2)(c) provides that it is unlawful for any person ". . . to use or cause to be used any pesticide contrary to label directions . . .." When 40 CFR, Part 170 is referenced on a label, users must comply with all of its requirements except those that are inconsistent with product specific instructions on the labeling. For purposes of this chapter, the term "use" is interpreted to include:

     (a) Preapplication activities, including, but not limited to:

     (i) Arranging for the application of the pesticide;

     (ii) Mixing and loading the pesticide; and

     (iii) Making necessary preparations for the application of the pesticide, including responsibilities related to worker notification, training of handlers, decontamination, use and care of personal protective equipment, emergency information, and heat stress management.

     (b) Application of the pesticide.

     (c) Post-application activities necessary to reduce the risks of illness and injury resulting from handlers' and workers' occupational exposures to pesticide residues during the restricted-entry interval plus thirty days. These activities include, but are not limited to, responsibilities related to worker training, notification, and decontamination.

     (d) Other pesticide-related activities, including, but not limited to, providing emergency assistance, transporting or storing pesticides that have been opened, and disposing of excess pesticides, spray mix, equipment wash waters, pesticide containers, and other pesticide-containing materials.

     (2) A person who has a duty under this chapter, as referenced on the pesticide product label, and who fails to perform that duty, violates RCW 15.58.330 and 17.21.315, and is subject to civil penalties under RCW 15.58.335, 15.58.260 and 17.21.315.

     (3) FIFRA section 14 (b)(4) provides that a person is liable for a penalty under FIFRA if another person employed by or acting for that person violates any provision of FIFRA. The term "acting for" includes both employment and contractual relationships.

     (4) The requirements of this chapter, including the decontamination requirements, shall not, for the purposes of section 653 (b)(1) of Title 29 of the U.S. Code, be deemed to be the exercise of statutory authority to prescribe or enforce standards or regulations affecting the general sanitary hazards addressed by ((the WISHA)) Field Sanitation ((Standard)), WAC ((296-24-120)) 296-307-095, or other agricultural, nonpesticide hazards.

[97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-11015, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, § 296-306A-11015, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 98-24-096, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99)

WAC 296-307-13045   Personal protective equipment -- Standards for pesticide handlers -- 40 CFR, § 170.240.   (1) Requirement. Any person who performs tasks as a pesticide handler shall use the clothing and personal protective equipment specified on the labeling for use of the product.

     (2) Definition.

     (a) Personal protective equipment (PPE) means devices and apparel that are worn to protect the body from contact with pesticides or pesticide residues, including, but not limited to, coveralls, chemical-resistant suits, chemical-resistant gloves, chemical-resistant footwear, respiratory protection devices, chemical-resistant aprons, chemical-resistant headgear, and protective eyewear.

     (b) Long-sleeved shirts, short-sleeved shirts, long pants, short pants, shoes, socks, and other items of work clothing are not considered personal protective equipment for the purposes of this section and are not subject to the requirements of this section, although pesticide labeling may require that such work clothing be worn during some activities.

     (3) Provision. When personal protective equipment is specified by the labeling of any pesticide for any handling activity, the handler employer shall provide the appropriate personal protective equipment in clean and operating condition to the handler.

     (a) When "chemical-resistant" personal protective equipment is specified by the product labeling, it shall be made of material that allows no measurable movement of the pesticide being used through the material during use.

     (b) When "waterproof" personal protective equipment is specified by the product labeling, it shall be made of material that allows no measurable movement of water or aqueous solutions through the material during use.

     (c) When a "chemical-resistant suit" is specified by the product labeling, it shall be a loose-fitting, one-piece or two-piece chemical-resistant garment that covers, at a minimum, the entire body except head, hands, and feet.

     (d) When "coveralls" are specified by the product labeling, they shall be a loose-fitting, one-piece or two-piece garment, such as a cotton or cotton and polyester coverall, that covers, at a minimum, the entire body except head, hands, and feet. The pesticide product labeling may specify that the coveralls be worn over another layer of clothing.

     (e) Gloves shall be of the type specified by the product labeling. Gloves or glove linings made of leather, cotton, or other absorbent material shall not be worn for handling activities unless such materials are listed on the product labeling as acceptable for such use.

     (f) When "chemical-resistant footwear" is specified by the product labeling, one of the following types of footwear must be worn:

     (i) Chemical-resistant shoes.

     (ii) Chemical-resistant boots.

     (iii) Chemical-resistant shoe coverings worn over shoes or boots.

     (g) When "protective eyewear" is specified by the product labeling, one of the following types of eyewear must be worn:

     (i) Goggles.

     (ii) Face shield.

     (iii) Safety glasses with front, brow, and temple protection.

     (iv) Full-face respirator.

     (h) When a "chemical-resistant apron" is specified by the product labeling, an apron that covers the front of the body from mid-chest to the knees shall be worn.

     (i) When a respirator is specified by the product labeling, it shall be appropriate for the pesticide product used and for the activity to be performed. The handler employer shall assure that the respirator fits correctly by using the procedures consistent with chapter ((296-62)) 296-307 WAC, Part ((E)) Y-5. If the label does not specify the type of respirator to be used, it shall meet the requirements of chapter ((296-62)) 296-307 WAC, Part ((E)) Y-5. The respiratory protection requirements of ((the general occupational health standards,)) chapter ((296-62)) 296-307 WAC, Part ((E)) Y-5, shall apply.

     (j) When "chemical-resistant headgear" is specified by the product labeling, it shall be either a chemical-resistant hood or a chemical-resistant hat with a wide brim.

     (4) Exceptions to personal protective equipment specified on product labeling.

     (a) Body protection.

     (i) A chemical-resistant suit may be substituted for "coveralls," and any requirement for an additional layer of clothing beneath is waived.

     (ii) A chemical-resistant suit may be substituted for "coveralls" and a chemical-resistant apron.

     (b) Boots. If chemical-resistant footwear with sufficient durability and a tread appropriate for wear in rough terrain is not obtainable, then leather boots may be worn in such terrain.

     (c) Gloves. If chemical-resistant gloves with sufficient durability and suppleness are not obtainable, then during handling activities with roses or other plants with sharp thorns, leather gloves may be worn over chemical-resistant glove liners. However, once leather gloves are worn for this use, thereafter they shall be worn only with chemical-resistant liners and they shall not be worn for any other use.

     (d) Closed systems. If handling tasks are performed using properly functioning systems that enclose the pesticide to prevent it from contacting handlers or other persons, and if such systems are used and are maintained in accordance with that manufacturer's written operating instructions, exceptions to labeling-specified personal protective equipment for the handling activity are permitted as provided in (d)(i) and (ii) of this subsection.

     (i) Persons using a closed system to mix or load pesticides with a signal word of DANGER or WARNING may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, socks, chemical-resistant apron, and any protective gloves specified on the labeling for handlers for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment.

     (ii) Persons using a closed system to mix or load pesticides other than those in (d)(i) of this subsection or to perform other handling tasks may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment.

     (iii) Persons using a closed system that operates under pressure shall wear protective eyewear.

     (iv) Persons using a closed system shall have all labeling-specified personal protective equipment immediately available for use in an emergency.

     (e) Enclosed cabs. If handling tasks are performed from inside a cab that has a nonporous barrier which totally surrounds the occupants of the cab and prevents contact with pesticides outside of the cab, exceptions to personal protective equipment specified on the product labeling for that handling activity are permitted as provided in (e)(i) through (iv) of this subsection.

     (i) Persons occupying an enclosed cab may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment. If a respiratory protection device is specified on the pesticide product labeling for the handling activity, it must be worn.

     (ii) Persons occupying an enclosed cab that has a properly functioning ventilation system which is used and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's written operating instructions and which is declared in writing by the manufacturer and by the Washington state department of labor and industries to provide respiratory protection equivalent to or greater than a dust/mist filtering respirator may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment. If a respiratory protection device other than a dust/mist-filtering respirator is specified on the pesticide product labeling, it must be worn.

     (iii) Persons occupying an enclosed cab that has a properly functioning ventilation system which is used and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's written operating instructions and which is declared in writing by the manufacturer and by the Washington state department of labor and industries to provide respiratory protection equivalent to or greater than the vapor-removing or gas-removing respirator specified on pesticide product labeling may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for the labeling-specified personal protective equipment. If an air-supplying respirator or a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) is specified on the pesticide product labeling, it must be worn.

     (iv) Persons occupying an enclosed cab shall have all labeling-specified personal protective equipment immediately available and stored in a chemical-resistant container, such as a plastic bag. They shall wear such personal protective equipment if it is necessary to exit the cab and contact pesticide-treated surfaces in the treated area. Once personal protective equipment is worn in the treated area, it must be removed before reentering the cab.

     (f) Aerial applications.

     (i) Use of gloves. Chemical-resistant gloves shall be worn when entering or leaving an aircraft contaminated by pesticide residues. In the cockpit, the gloves shall be kept in an enclosed container to prevent contamination of the inside of the cockpit.

     (ii) Open cockpit. Persons occupying an open cockpit shall use the personal protective equipment specified in the product labeling for use during application, except that chemical-resistant footwear need not be worn. A helmet may be substituted for chemical-resistant headgear. A visor may be substituted for protective eyewear.

     (iii) Enclosed cockpit. Persons occupying an enclosed cockpit may substitute a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks for labeling-specified personal protective equipment.

     (g) Crop advisors. Crop advisors entering treated areas while a restricted-entry interval is in effect may wear the personal protective equipment specified on the pesticide labeling for early entry activities instead of the personal protective equipment specified on the pesticide labeling for handling activities, provided:

     (i) Application has been completed for at least four hours.

     (ii) Any inhalation exposure level listed in the labeling has been reached or any ventilation criteria established by WAC 296-307-12015 (3)(c) or in the labeling have been met.

     (5) Use of personal protective equipment.

     (a) The handler employer shall assure that personal protective equipment is used correctly for its intended purpose and is used according to the manufacturer's instructions.

     (b) The handler employer shall assure that, before each day of use, all personal protective equipment is inspected for leaks, holes, tears, or worn places, and any damaged equipment is repaired or discarded.

     (6) Cleaning and maintenance.

     (a) The handler employer shall assure that all personal protective equipment is cleaned according to the manufacturer's instructions or pesticide product labeling instructions before each day of reuse. In the absence of any such instructions, it shall be washed thoroughly in detergent and hot water.

     (b) If any personal protective equipment cannot be cleaned properly, the handler employer shall dispose of the personal protective equipment in accordance with any applicable federal, state, and local regulations. Coveralls or other absorbent materials that have been drenched or heavily contaminated with an undiluted pesticide that has the signal word DANGER or WARNING on the label shall be not be reused.

     (c) The handler employer shall assure that contaminated personal protective equipment is kept separately and washed separately from any other clothing or laundry.

     (d) The handler employer shall assure that all clean personal protective equipment shall be either dried thoroughly before being stored or shall be put in a well ventilated place to dry.

     (e) The handler employer shall assure that all personal protective equipment is stored separately from personal clothing and apart from pesticide-contaminated areas.

     (f) The handler employer shall assure that when dust/mist filtering respirators are used, the filters shall be replaced:

     (i) When breathing resistance becomes excessive.

     (ii) When the filter element has physical damage or tears.

     (iii) According to manufacturer's recommendations or pesticide product labeling, whichever is more frequent.

     (iv) In the absence of any other instructions or indications of service life, at the end of each day's work period.

     (g) The handler employer shall assure that when gas-removing or vapor-removing respirators are used, the gas-removing or vapor-removing canisters or cartridges shall be replaced:

     (i) At the first indication of odor, taste, or irritation.

     (ii) According to manufacturer's recommendations or pesticide product labeling, whichever is more frequent.

     (iii) In the absence of any other instructions or indications of service life, at the end of each day's work period.

     (h) The handler employer shall inform any person who cleans or launders personal protective equipment:

     (i) That such equipment may be contaminated with pesticides.

     (ii) Of the potentially harmful effects of exposure to pesticides.

     (iii) Of the correct way(s) to clean personal protective equipment and to protect themselves when handling such equipment.

     (i) The handler employer shall assure that handlers have a clean place(s) away from pesticide storage and pesticide use areas where they may:

     (i) Store personal clothing not in use.

     (ii) Put on personal protective equipment at the start of any exposure period.

     (iii) Remove personal protective equipment at the end of any exposure period.

     (j) The handler employer shall not allow or direct any handler to wear home or to take home personal protective equipment contaminated with pesticides.

     (7) Heat-related illness. When the use of personal protective equipment is specified by the labeling of any pesticide for the handling activity, the handler employer shall assure that no handler is allowed or directed to perform the handling activity unless appropriate measures are taken, if necessary, to prevent heat-related illness.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040. 98-24-096, § 296-307-13045, filed 12/1/98, effective 3/1/99. 97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-13045, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-20-082, § 296-306A-13045, filed 9/30/96, effective 11/1/96.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 00-06-081, filed 3/1/00, effective 3/1/00)

WAC 296-307-16340   Electricity and lighting.   (1) General electricity requirements.

     (a) The operator must supply electricity to all dwelling units, kitchen facilities, bathroom facilities, common areas, and laundry facilities.

     (b) All electrical wiring, fixtures and electrical equipment must comply with department of labor and industries regulations, chapter 19.28 RCW and local ordinances, and maintained in a safe condition.

     (2) Electricity requirements in tents.

     (a) Each individual tent must have at least one separate floor-type or wall-type convenience outlet. If the operator provides a refrigerator in the tent, a dedicated outlet must be provided for it.

     (b) All electrical wiring and equipment installed in tents must meet the requirements of WAC ((296-46-100)) 296-45-045.

     (c) All electrical appliances to be connected to the electrical supply must meet the requirements for the load calculations as required by chapter 19.28 RCW.

     (d) Electrical wiring exiting the tent to connect to the GFI outside outlet must be placed in approved flexible conduit not to exceed six feet in length.

     (e) All wiring located inside the tent must be placed in conduit for protection and connected to a surface to secure the wiring to prevent movement. Wiring must be located to prevent tripping or safety hazards.

     (f) Receptacles and lighting fixtures must be UL Listed and approved by the department for use in the tent.

     (3) General lighting requirements.

     (a) The operator must provide adequate lighting sufficient to carry on normal daily activities in all common use areas.

     (b) Laundry and toilet rooms and rooms where people congregate must have at least one ceiling-type or wall-type fixture. Where portable toilets are used, lighting requirements can be met by area illumination.

     (c) The operator must provide adequate lighting for safe passage for camp occupants to handwashing sinks and toilets.

     (d) The operator must provide adequate lighting for shower rooms during hours of operation.

     Note: Lighting requirements may be met by natural or artificial means.

     (4) Lighting requirements in tents.

     (a) Tents must have adequate lighting sufficient to carry on all normal daily activities. For example: Three 100-watt bulbs located at the top ridge of the frame and are UL Listed or equivalent.

     (b) Each tent must have at least one ceiling-type light fixture.

     (c) Food preparation areas, if located in the tent, must have at least one lighting fixture located to provide task lighting over the food preparation area.

     (d) Alternate lighting appliances must provide adequate lighting. In addition, if using two or more propane, butane, or white gas lighting appliances, a carbon monoxide monitor must be provided and located not more than thirty inches from the floor.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050 and 1999 c 374. 00-06-081, § 296-307-16340, filed 3/1/00, effective 3/1/00.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)

WAC 296-307-50025   What requirements apply to welding beryllium?   Welding or cutting indoors, outdoors, or in confined spaces involving beryllium-containing base or filler metals must be done using local exhaust ventilation and airline respirators unless atmospheric tests under the most adverse conditions have established that employee exposure is within the acceptable concentrations defined by ((chapter 296-62)) WAC 296-307-62625. In all cases, employees in the immediate vicinity of the welding or cutting operations must be protected as necessary by local exhaust ventilation or airline respirators.

[97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-50025, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-50025, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 97-09-013, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97)

WAC 296-307-50029   What requirements apply to welding mercury?   Welding or cutting indoors or in a confined space involving metals coated with mercury-bearing materials, including paint, must be done using local exhaust ventilation or airline respirators unless atmospheric tests under the most adverse conditions have established that employee exposure is within the acceptable concentrations defined by ((chapter 296-62)) WAC 296-307-62625. Outdoors, such operations must be done using respiratory protective equipment approved by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for such purposes.

[97-09-013, recodified as § 296-307-50029, filed 4/7/97, effective 4/7/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 96-22-048, § 296-306A-50029, filed 10/31/96, effective 12/1/96.]

OTS-7356.1

Part U-3

Other Hazardous Materials

Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks)((Part U-3

Other Hazardous Materials))
AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 03-10-068, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03)

WAC 296-307-45010   Provide proper ventilation for the vapor area.  

     You must:

     • Make sure mechanical ventilation meets the requirements of one or more of the following standards:

     – NFPA 34-1995, Standard for Dipping and Coating Processes Using Flammable or Combustible Liquids

     – ACGIH's "Industrial Ventilation: A Manual of Recommended Practice" (22nd ed., 1995)

     – ANSI Z9.1-1971, Practices for Ventilation and Operation of Open-Surface Tanks and ANSI Z9.2-1979, Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems.

Note: Some, or all, of the consensus standards (such as ANSI and NFPA) may have been revised. If you comply with a later version of a consensus standard, you will be considered to have complied with any previous version of the same consensus standard.
     You must:

     • Limit the vapor area to the smallest practical space by using mechanical ventilation

     • Keep airborne concentration of any substance below twenty-five percent of its lower flammable limit (LFL)

     • Make sure mechanical ventilation draws the flow of air into a hood or exhaust duct

     • Have a separate exhaust system for each dip tank if the combination of substances being removed could cause a:

     – Fire

     – Explosion

     OR

     – Potentially hazardous chemical reaction.

Reference: You need to keep employee exposure within safe levels when the liquid in a dip tank creates an exposure hazard. See ((Air contaminants, WAC 296-62-075 through 296-62-07515)) Respiratory hazards, chapter 296-307 WAC, Part Y-6.
Note: You may use a tank cover or material that floats on the surface of the liquid to replace or assist ventilation. The method or combination of methods you choose has to maintain the airborne concentration of the hazardous material and the employee's exposure within safe limits.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. 03-10-068, § 296-307-45010, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 03-10-068, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03)

WAC 296-307-45035   Prepare dip tanks before cleaning.        You must:

     (1) Drain the contents of the tank and open any cleanout doors.

     (2) Ventilate the tank to clear any accumulated hazardous vapors.

Reference: There may be requirements that apply before an employee enters a dip tank. See ((Permit-required)) Confined spaces, WAC ((296-62-141)) 296-307-642 and safety procedures, WAC 296-307-320.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. 03-10-068, § 296-307-45035, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 03-10-068, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03)

WAC 296-307-45045   Protect employees during welding, burning, or other work using open flames.  

     You must:

     • Make sure the dip tank and the area around it are thoroughly cleaned of solvents and vapors before performing work involving:

     – Welding

     – Burning

     OR

     – Open flames.

Reference: There are additional requirements for this type of work. See Welding, cutting and brazing, WAC 296-307-475, and ((Respiratory protection)) Respirators, chapter ((296-62 WAC, Part E)) 296-307 WAC, Part Y-5.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. 03-10-068, § 296-307-45045, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03.]

((Part U-4

Emergency Response))
REPEALER

     The following sections of the Washington Administrative Code are repealed:
WAC 296-307-452 Scope.
WAC 296-307-45210 Planning.
WAC 296-307-45220 Training.
WAC 296-307-45230 Medical surveillance.
WAC 296-307-45240 Keep records.
WAC 296-307-45400 Incident requirements.
WAC 296-307-45410 Implement and maintain an incident command system (ICS).
WAC 296-307-45420 Prepare skilled support personnel.
WAC 296-307-45430 Make sure the incident commander oversees activities during the response.
WAC 296-307-45440 Use the buddy system in danger areas.
WAC 296-307-45450 Provide rescue and medical assistance.
WAC 296-307-45600 Personal protective equipment.
WAC 296-307-45610 Control hazards created by personal protective equipment (PPE).
WAC 296-307-45620 Use personal protective equipment (PPE) properly.
WAC 296-307-45800 Postemergency response.
WAC 296-307-46000 Definitions.

OTS-7357.2

Part Y-1

Employer Chemical Hazard Communication
AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 01-17-033, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01)

WAC 296-307-550   Employer chemical hazard communication -- Introduction.   Important:

     Thousands of chemicals can be found in today's workplaces. These chemicals may have the capacity to cause health problems, from minor skin irritations to serious injuries or diseases like cancer.

     The employer chemical hazard communication rule was developed to make sure employers and employees are informed about chemical hazards in the workplace.

     This rule applies to:

     • Employers engaged in businesses where chemicals are used, distributed, or produced for use or distribution.    

     • Contractors or subcontractors that work for employers engaged in businesses where chemicals are used, distributed, or produced for use or distribution.

Note:
• If you produce, import, distribute and/or repackage chemicals, or choose not to rely on labels or material safety data sheets provided by the manufacturer or importer, you must comply with ((Chemical hazard communication for manufacturers, importers and distributors, WAC 296-62-054)) Material safety data sheets and label preparation, WAC 296-307-560 through 296-307-56050.
• You may withhold trade secret information under certain circumstances, see Trade secrets, WAC 296-62-053, to find out what information may be withheld as a trade secret and what information must be released.
EXEMPTIONS:
• For the purposes of this employer hazard communication rule, if you are engaged in agricultural production of crops or livestock, "employee" does not mean:
- Immediate family members of the officers of any corporation, partnership, sole proprietorship or other business entity or officers of any closely held corporation.
• Certain products, chemicals, or items are exempt from this rule. Below is a summarized list of these exemptions. See WAC 296-307-55055 at the end of this rule to get complete information about these exemptions:
- Any hazardous waste or substance
- Tobacco or tobacco products
- Wood or wood products that are not chemically treated and will not be processed, for example, by sawing and sanding
- Food or alcoholic beverages
- Some drugs, such as retail or prescription medications
- Retail cosmetics
- Ionizing and nonionizing radiation
- Biological hazards
- Any consumer product or hazardous substance when workplace exposure is the same as that of a consumer
♦ Retail products used in offices in the same manner and frequency used by consumers can be termed "consumer products." Consumer products include things such as: Correction fluid, glass cleaner, and dishwashing liquid.
Example: If you use a household cleaner in your workplace in the same way that a consumer would use it when cleaning their house, the exposure should be the same as the consumer's. ("In the same way" means using the household cleaner in the same manner and frequency.) A janitor using a household cleaner, such as bleach, throughout the day, is not considered to be consumer use.
– Manufactured items that remain intact are exempt for this rule.
The following are examples:
Item Covered by this rule Not covered by this rule
Brick sawed or cut in half used whole or intact
Pipe cut by a torch bent with a tube bender
Nylon rope burning the ends tying a knot
– Manufactured items that are fluids or in the form of particles are not exempt for this rule.
     Your responsibility:

     To inform and train your employees about the hazards of chemicals they may be exposed to during normal working conditions, or in foreseeable emergencies by:

     • Making a list of the hazardous chemicals present in your workplace

     • Preparing a written Chemical Hazard Communication Program for your workplace

     • Informing your employees about this rule and your program

     • Providing training to your employees about working in the presence of hazardous chemicals

     • Getting and keeping the material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for the hazardous chemicals

     • Making sure that labels on containers of hazardous chemicals are in place and easy to read

     You must:

     Develop, implement, maintain, and make available a written Chemical Hazard Communication Program

     WAC 296-307-55005

     Identify and list all the hazardous chemicals present in your workplace

     WAC 296-307-55010

     Obtain and maintain material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each hazardous chemical used

     WAC 296-307-55015

     Make sure that material safety data sheets (MSDSs) are readily accessible to your employees

     WAC 296-307-55020

     Label containers holding hazardous chemicals

     WAC 296-307-55025

     Inform and train your employees about hazardous chemicals in your workplace

     WAC 296-307-55030

     Follow these rules for laboratories using hazardous chemicals

     WAC 296-307-55035

     Follow these rules for handling chemicals in factory sealed containers

     WAC 296-307-55040

     The department must:

     Translate certain chemical hazard communication documents upon request

     WAC 296-307-55045

     Attempt to obtain a material safety data sheet (MSDS) upon request

     WAC 296-307-55050

     Exemption: Items or chemicals exempt from the rule, and exemptions from labeling

     WAC 296-307-55055

     Definitions

     WAC 296-307-55060

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-307-550, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 01-17-033, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01)

WAC 296-307-55015   Obtain and maintain material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each hazardous chemical used.  

     You must:

     • Obtain a MSDS for each hazardous chemical used as soon as possible if the MSDS is not provided with the shipment of a hazardous chemical from the chemical manufacturer or importer.

Note:
• To obtain a MSDS, you may try calling the manufacturer or checking their website.
• If you have a commercial account with a retailer or wholesaler, you have the right to request and receive a MSDS about hazardous chemicals you purchase.
• If a chemical is purchased from a retailer with no commercial accounts, you have the right to request and receive the manufacturer's name and address so that you can contact them and request a MSDS for the chemical.
• Whoever prepares the MSDS is required to mark all blocks on the form, even if there is no relevant information for that section.
• If you have problems getting a MSDS within 30 calendar days after making a written request to the chemical manufacturer, importer, or distributor, you can get help from WISHA. You may contact your local regional office for assistance or make a written request for assistance to the:
Department of Labor and Industries
Right-to-Know Program

     P.O. Box 44610

Olympia, Washington 98504-4610
• Include in your request:
– A copy of the purchaser's written request to the chemical manufacturer, importer, or distributor
– The name of the product suspected of containing a hazardous chemical
– The identification number of the product, if available
– A copy of the product label, if available
– The name and address of the chemical manufacturer, importer, or distributor from whom the product was obtained
     You must:

     • Maintain a MSDS for each hazardous chemical:

     - Keep copies of the required MSDSs for each hazardous chemical present in your workplace. These may be kept in any form, including as a part of operating procedures.

     - Each MSDS must be in English. You may also keep copies in other languages.

Note:
• If you choose not to rely on MSDSs or labels provided by the manufacturer or importer, you must comply with the chemical hazard communication standard for manufacturers, importers, and distributors, WAC ((296-62-054)) 296-307-560 through 296-307-56050.
• It may be more appropriate to address the hazards of a process rather than individual hazardous chemicals. MSDSs can be designed to cover groups of hazardous chemicals in a work area.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-370-55015, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 03-10-068, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03)

WAC 296-307-55030   Inform and train your employees about hazardous chemicals in your workplace.  

Note: The employer chemical hazard communication information and training requirements also apply to pesticides. Employers who have employees who are exposed to pesticides must be in compliance with this rule and the worker protection standards, WAC 296-307-12040.
     You must:

     • Provide employees with effective information on hazardous chemicals in their work area at the time of their initial job assignment. Whenever a new physical or health hazard related to chemical exposure is introduced into their employees' work areas, information must be provided.

     – Inform employees of:

     ♦ The requirements of this rule.

     ♦ Any operations in their work area where hazardous chemicals are present.

     ♦ The location and availability of your written Chemical Hazard Communication Program, including the list(s) of hazardous chemicals and material safety data sheets (MSDSs) required by this rule.

     • Provide employees with effective training about hazardous chemicals in their work area at the time of their initial job assignment. Whenever a new physical or health hazard related to chemical exposure is introduced, the employees must be trained.

     • Make sure that employee training includes:

     – Methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical in the work area. Examples of these methods and observations may include:

     ♦ Monitoring conducted by you

     ♦ Continuous monitoring devices

     ♦ Visual appearance or odor of hazardous chemicals when being released

     – Physical and health hazards of the chemicals in the work area, including the likely physical symptoms or effects of overexposure

     – Steps employees can take to protect themselves from the chemical hazards in your workplace, including specific procedures implemented by you to protect employees from exposure to hazardous chemicals. Specific procedures may include:

     ▪ Appropriate work practices

     ▪ Engineering controls

     ▪ Emergency procedures

     ▪ Personal protective equipment to be used

     – Details of the Chemical Hazard Communication Program developed by you, including an explanation of the labeling system and the MSDS, and how employees can obtain and use the appropriate hazard information.

     • Tailor information and training to the types of hazards to which employees will be exposed. The information and training may be designed to cover categories of hazards, such as flammability or cancer-causing potential, or it may address specific chemicals. Chemical-specific information must always be available through labels and MSDSs.

     • Make reasonable efforts to post notices in your employees' native languages (as provided by the department) if those employees have trouble communicating in English.

Note:
• Interactive computer-based training or training videos can be used provided they are effective.
• Your MSDSs may not have WISHA permissible exposure limits (PELs) listed. In some cases, WISHA PELs are stricter than the OSHA PELs and other exposure limits listed on the MSDSs you receive. If this is the case, you must refer to the WISHA PEL table, WAC ((296-62-075)) 296-307-62625, for the appropriate exposure limits to be covered during training.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. 03-10-068, § 296-307-55030, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-307-55030, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 01-17-033, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01)

WAC 296-307-55035   Follow these rules for laboratories using hazardous chemicals.  

Note: Laboratories are required to have a written Chemical Hygiene Plan under WAC 296-62-400, if applicable. They are not required to have a written Chemical Hazard Communication Program.
You may combine your Accident Prevention Program and Chemical Hazard Communication Program to assist you in developing a Chemical Hygiene Plan for your laboratory.
     You must:

     (1) Make sure that labels on incoming containers of hazardous chemicals are in place and readable.

     (2) Maintain material safety data sheets (MSDSs) received with incoming shipments of hazardous chemicals and make them available to laboratory employees when they are in their work areas.

     (3) Provide laboratory employees with information and training as described in: "Inform and train your employees about hazardous chemicals in your workplace," WAC 296-307-55030, except for the part about the location and availability of the written Chemical Hazard Communication Program.

Note: Laboratory employers that ship hazardous chemicals are considered to be either chemical manufacturers or distributors. When laboratory employers ship hazardous chemicals they must comply with the rule, (("Hazard communication standards for chemical manufacturers, importers and distributors," WAC 296-62-054)) Material safety data sheets and label preparation, WAC 296-307-560 through 296-307-56050.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-307-55035, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 01-17-033, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01)

WAC 296-307-55060   Definitions.  

     Chemical

     ((Any element, chemical compound, or mixture of elements and/or compounds.)) • An element or mixture of elements

     OR

     • A compound or mixture of compounds

     OR

     • A mixture of elements and compounds

     Included are manufactured items (such as bricks, welding rods, and sheet metal) that are not exempt as an article.

     Chemical manufacturer

     An employer with a workplace where one or more chemicals are produced for use or distribution.

     Chemical name

     • The scientific designation of a chemical ((in accordance with one of the following)) developed by the:

     ((• The nomenclature system developed by the)) – International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)

     OR

     ((• The)) – Chemical abstracts service (CAS) rules of nomenclature

     OR

     ((•)) – A name ((which will)) that clearly ((identify)) identifies the chemical for the purpose of conducting a hazard evaluation.

     Combustible liquid

     ((A combustible liquid has)) Liquids with a flashpoint of at least 100°F (37.8°C) and below 200°F (93.3°C). A mixture((s)) with at least 99% of ((their)) its components having flashpoints of 200°F (93.3°C), or higher ((are)), is not considered a combustible liquid((s)).

     Commercial account

     An arrangement ((in which a retail distributor sells hazardous chemical(s) to an employer, generally in large quantities over time, and/or at costs that are below the regular retail price.)) where a retailer is selling hazardous chemicals to an employer

     • Generally in large quantities over time

     OR

     • At costs below regular retail price.

     Common name

     Any designation or identification used to identify a chemical other than the chemical name, such as a:

     • Code name or number

     ((• Code number)) OR

     • Trade or brand name

     ((• Brand name)) OR

     • Generic name ((used to identify a chemical other than by its chemical name)).

     Compressed gas

     A contained gas or mixture of gases ((that, when in a container, has)) with an absolute pressure ((exceeding)) greater than:

     • 40 psi at 70°F (21.1°C)

     OR

     • 104 psi at 130°F (54.4°C) regardless of the pressure at 70°F (21.1°C)

     OR

     ((Compressed gas can also mean)) A liquid with a vapor pressure ((that exceeds)) greater than 40 psi at 100°F (37.8°C) as determined by ASTM D323-72.

     Container

     ((Any container, except for)) A vessel, other than a pipe((s)) or piping system((s)), that ((contains)) holds a hazardous chemical. ((It can be any of the following)) Examples include:

     • Bags

     • Barrels

     • Bottles

     • Boxes

     • Cans

     • Cylinders

     • Drums

     • Rail cars

     • Reaction vessels

     • Storage tanks.

     Designated representative

     • ((Any)) An individual or organization ((to which an employee gives)) with written authorization from an employee.

     OR

     • A recognized or certified collective bargaining agent ((without regard to written employee authorization)) (not necessarily authorized by an employee).

     OR

     • ((The)) A legal representative of a deceased or legally incapacitated employee.

     Director

     The director means the director of the department of labor and industries or their designee.

     Distributor

     A business, other than a chemical manufacturer or importer, that supplies hazardous chemicals to other distributors or to employers. See WAC ((296-62-054)) 296-307-560 through 296-307-56050 for requirements dealing with manufacturers, distributors and importers - hazard communication.

     Employee

     The term employee and other terms of like meaning, unless the context of the provision containing such term indicates otherwise, means an employee of an employer who is employed in the business of his or her employer whether by way of manual labor or otherwise and every person in this state who is engaged in the employment of or who is working under an independent contract the essence of which is personal labor for an employer under this standard whether by way of manual labor or otherwise.

     Employer

     An employer is any person, firm, corporation, partnership, business trust, legal representative, or other business entity which engages in any business, industry, profession, or activity in this state and employs one or more employees or who contracts with one or more persons, the essence of which is the personal labor of such person or persons and includes the state, counties, cities, and all municipal corporations, public corporations, political subdivisions of the state, and charitable organizations: Provided, That any persons, partnership, or business entity not having employees, and who is covered by the Industrial Insurance Act must be considered both an employer and an employee.

     Explosive

     A chemical that causes a sudden, almost instant release of pressure, gas, and heat when exposed to a sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature.

     Exposure or exposed

     An employee has been, or may have possibly been, subjected to a hazardous chemical, toxic substance or harmful physical agent while working. An employee could have been exposed to hazardous chemicals, toxic substances, or harmful physical agents in any of the following ways:

     • Inhalation

     • Ingestion

     • Skin contact

     • Absorption

     • Related means.

     The terms exposure and exposed only cover workplace exposure involving a toxic substance or harmful physical agent in the workplace different from typical nonoccupational situations in the way it is:

     • Used

     • Handled

     • Stored

     • Generated

     OR

     • Present.

     Flammable

     A chemical ((covered by)) in one of the following categories:

     ((• Aerosol flammable means an aerosol that, when tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.45 yields either a flame projection more than 18 inches at full valve opening or a flashback (a flame extending back to the valve) at any degree of valve opening;

     • Gas, flammable means:

     – A gas that, at temperature and pressure of the surrounding area, forms a flammable mixture with air at a concentration of 13% by volume or less; or

     – A gas that, at temperature and pressure of the surrounding area, forms a range of flammable mixtures with air wider than 12% by volume, regardless of the lower limit;

     • Liquid, flammable means any liquid having a flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C), except any mixture having components with flashpoints of 100°F (37.8°C) or higher, the total of which make up 99% or more of the total volume of the mixture.

     • Solid, flammable means a solid, other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in WAC 296-52-417 or 29 CFR 1910.109(a), that is likely to cause fire through friction, moisture absorption, spontaneous chemical change, or retained heat from manufacturing or processing, or which can be ignited readily. Solid, inflammable also means that when the substance is ignited, it burns so powerfully and persistently that it creates a serious hazard. A chemical must be considered to be a flammable solid if, when tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.44, it ignites and burns with a self-sustained flame at a rate greater than one-tenth of an inch per second along its major axis.)) • Aerosols that, when tested using a method described in 16 CFR 1500.45, yield either a:

     – Flame projection of more than eighteen inches at full valve opening

     OR

     – A flashback (a flame extending back to the valve) at any degree of valve opening

     • Gases that, at the temperature and pressure of the surrounding area, form a:

     – Flammable mixture with air at a concentration of thirteen percent, by volume, or less

     OR

     – Range of flammable mixtures with air wider than twelve percent, by volume, regardless of the lower limit

     • Liquids with a flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C). A mixture with at least ninety-nine percent of its components having flashpoints of 100°F (37.8°C), or higher, is not considered a flammable liquid

     • Solids, other than blasting agents or explosives, as defined in WAC 296-52-417 or 29 CFR 1910.109(a), that:

     – Is likely to cause fire through friction, moisture, absorption, spontaneous chemical change or retained heat from manufacturing or processing

     OR

     – That can be readily ignited (and when ignited burns so vigorously and persistently that it creates a serious hazard)

     OR

     – When tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.44, ignite and burn with a self-sustained flame at a rate greater than one-tenth of an inch per second along its major axis.

     Flashpoint

     • The minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off ((a vapor in sufficient concentration to ignite)) an ignitable concentration of vapor, when tested by any of the following measurement methods:

     – Tagliabue closed tester((: (See American National Standard Method of Test for Flash Point by Tag Closed Tester, Z11.24-1979 (ASTM D 56-79)))). Use this for liquids with a viscosity ((of)) less than 45 Saybolt Universal Seconds (SUS) at 100°F (37.8°C), that do not contain suspended solids and do not ((have a tendency)) tend to form a surface film under test((; or)). See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Tag Closed Tester, Z11.24.1979 (ASTM D 56-79)

     – Pensky-Martens closed tester((: (See American National Standard Method of Test for Flash Point by Pensky-Martens Closed Tester, Z11.7-1979 (ASTM D 93-79)))) for liquids with a viscosity equal to, or greater than, 45 SUS at 100°F (37.8°C), or for liquids that contain suspended solids, or ((that)) have a tendency to form a surface film under test((; or)). See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Pensky-Martens Closed Tester, Z11.7.1979 (ASTM D 93-79)

     – Setaflash closed tester: ((())See American National Standard Method of Test for Flash Point by Setaflash Closed Tester (ASTM D 3278-78).(()))

     ((Note:)) Organic peroxides, which undergo auto accelerating thermal decomposition, are excluded from any of the flashpoint measurement methods specified above.

     Foreseeable emergency

     Any potential event that could result in an uncontrolled release of a hazardous chemical into the workplace. Examples of foreseeable emergencies include equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment.

     Hazardous chemical

     ((Any)) A chemical ((that)), which is a physical or health hazard.

     Hazard warning

     ((Can be a combination of)) Words, pictures, or symbols (alone or in combination), ((or combination appearing)) that appear on ((a)) labels (or other ((appropriate)) forms of warning ((which shows the)) such as placards or tags) that communicate specific physical and health hazard(s), (including target organ effects), ((of the)) associated with chemical(s) in ((the)) a container(((s))).

((Note: See definition for physical hazard and health hazard to determine which hazards must be covered.))
     Health hazard

     ((Any)) A chemical ((with the potential to cause acute or chronic)) that may cause health effects in short or long-term exposed employees((. The potential must be)) based on statistically significant ((based on)) evidence from ((at least one)) a single study conducted ((under)) by using established scientific principles. Health hazards include, but are not limited to, any of the following:

     • ((Chemicals which are)) Carcinogens

     • Toxic or highly toxic ((agents)) substances

     • Reproductive toxins

     • Irritants

     • Corrosives

     • Sensitizers

     • Hepatotoxins (liver toxins)

     • Nephrotoxins (kidney toxins)

     • Neurotoxins (nervous system toxins)

     • ((Agents which)) Substances that act on the hematopoietic system (blood or blood forming system)

     • ((Agents which)) Substances that can damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes.

     ((See WAC 296-62-054 for more definitions and explanations about the scope of health hazards covered by this part.

     See WAC 296-62-054 for the criteria used for determining whether or not a chemical is considered hazardous for purposes of this rule.))

     Identity

     ((Any)) A chemical or common name listed on the material safety data sheet (MSDS) ((for the specific chemical. Each identity used must allow cross-references among the:

     • Required list of hazardous chemicals

     • Chemical label

     • MSDSs)) and label.

     Importer

     The first business within the customs territory of the USA that:

     • Receives hazardous chemicals produced in other countries

     AND

     • Supplies them to manufacturers, distributors or employers within the USA.

     ((See WAC 296-62-054 for requirements dealing with manufacturers, importers and distributors - hazard communication.))

     Material safety data sheet (MSDS)

     Written ((or)), printed ((material)) or electronic information (on paper, microfiche, or on-screen) that ((tells you about the chemical(s), what it can do to and how to protect yourself, others, or the environment.

     For requirements for developing MSDSs see WAC 296-62-054 -- manufacturers, importers, and distributors - hazard communication)) informs manufacturers, distributors or employers about the chemical, its hazards and protective measures as required by this rule.

     Mixture

     ((Any)) A combination of 2 or more chemicals (((if that combination did not result from a chemical reaction))) that retain their chemical identity after being combined.

     Organic peroxide

     ((This is)) An organic compound containing the bivalent-0-0-structure. It may be considered a structural derivative of hydrogen peroxide if one or both of the hydrogen atoms has been replaced by an organic radical.

     Oxidizer

     A chemical, other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in WAC 296-52-417 or CFR 1910.109(a), that starts or promotes combustion in other materials, causing fire either of itself or through the release of oxygen or other gases.

     Permissible exposure limits (PELs)

     ((PELs are airborne concentrations of substances measured by their concentration in the air no matter what amount is breathed by the employee. The permissible exposure limits (PELs) must include the following four categories:

     • Permissible exposure limits - Time-weighted average (PEL-TWA) is the time-weighted average airborne exposure to any 8-hour work shift of a 40-hour work week and must not be exceeded.

     • Permissible exposure limits - Short-term exposure limit (PEL-STEL) is the employee's 15-minute time-weighted average exposure which must not be exceeded at any time during a work day unless another time limit is specified in a parenthetical notation below the limit. If another time period is specified, the time-weighted average exposure over that time period must not be exceeded at any time during the working day.

     • Permissible exposure limits - Ceiling (PEL-C) is the employee's exposure which must not be exceeded during any part of the work day. If instantaneous monitoring is not feasible, then the ceiling must be assessed as a 15-minute time-weighted average exposure which must not be exceeded at any time over a working day.

     • Skin notation is the potential contribution to the overall employee exposure by the cutaneous route including mucous membranes and eye, either by airborne, or more particularly, by direct contact with the substance. These substances are identified as having a skin notation in the OSHA and WISHA PEL tables (29 CFR Part 1910 Subpart Z and WAC 296-62-075, respectively).)) See WAC 296-307-628 for the definition of this term.

     Physical hazard

     A chemical that has scientifically valid evidence to show it is one of the following:

     • A combustible liquid

     • A compressed gas

     • Explosive

     • Flammable

     • An organic peroxide

     • An oxidizer

     • Pyrophoric

     • Unstable (reactive)

     • Water reactive.

     Produce

     ((Any)) To do one or more of the following:

     • Manufacture

     • Process

     • Formulate

     • Blend

     • Extract

     • Generate

     • Emit

     • Repackage.

     Purchaser

     An employer who buys one or more hazardous chemicals to use in their workplace.

     Pyrophoric

     ((A)) Chemicals ((is pyrophoric if it will)) that ignite spontaneously in the air ((when the)) at a temperature ((is)) of 130°F (54.4°C) or below.

     Responsible party

     Someone who can provide ((appropriate)) more information about the hazardous chemical and appropriate emergency procedures.

     Specific chemical identity

     This term applies to chemical substances. It can mean the:

     • Chemical name

     • Chemical abstracts service (CAS) registry number

     • Any other information that reveals the precise chemical designation of the substance.

     Trade secret

     Any confidential:

     • Formula

     • Pattern

     • Process

     • Device

     • Information

     • Collection of information.

     The trade secret is used in an employer's business and gives an opportunity to gain an advantage over competitors who do not know or use it.

     See WAC 296-62-053 for requirements dealing with trade secrets.

     Unstable (reactive)

     ((An unstable or reactive)) A chemical ((is one that)) in its pure state, or as produced or transported, that will vigorously polymerize, decompose, condense, or ((will)) become self-reactive under conditions of shocks, pressure or temperature.

     Use

     ((Means to)) To do one or more of the following:

     • Package

     • Handle

     • React

     • Emit

     • Extract

     • Generate as a by-product

     • Transfer.

     Water-reactive

     A ((water-reactive)) chemical that reacts with water to release a gas that is either flammable or presents a health hazard.

     Work area

     A room or defined space in a workplace where hazardous chemicals are produced or used, and where employees are present.

     Workplace

     The term workplace means an establishment, job site, or project, at one geographical location containing one or more work areas.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. 01-17-033, § 296-307-55060, filed 8/8/01, effective 9/1/01.]

Part Y-2

Material Safety Data Sheets and Label Preparation
AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 03-10-068, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03)

WAC 296-307-560   Scope.   This chapter sets minimum requirements for content and distribution of material safety data sheets (MSDSs) and labels for hazardous chemicals.

     • This chapter applies when you do one or more of the following:

     – Import, produce, or repackage chemicals, including manufactured items (such as bricks, welding rods, and sheet metal) that are not exempt as articles

     – Sell or distribute hazardous chemicals to manufacturers, distributors or employers

     – Choose not to rely on material safety data sheets (MSDSs) provided by the importer, manufacturer or distributor.

Note: • You are not required to evaluate chemicals or create MSDSs for chemicals you did not produce or import. If you decide to evaluate chemicals or create MSDSs, then the requirements of this chapter will apply to you.
• Use Table 2 to determine which sections in this chapter apply to your workplace.
Exemptions: • All of the following are always exempt from this chapter:
– Ionizing and nonionizing radiation
– Biological hazards
– Tobacco and tobacco products
• The chemicals and items listed in Table 1 are exempt from this chapter under the conditions specified.

Table 1

Conditional Exemptions From This Chapter

This chapter does NOT apply to When
• Alcoholic beverages

OR

• Foods

• Sold, used, or prepared in a retail establishment (such as a grocery store, restaurant, bar, or tavern)
• An article (manufactured item) • It is not a fluid or particle
AND
• It is formed to a specific shape or design during manufacture for a particular end use function1
AND
• It releases only trace amounts of a hazardous chemical during normal use AND does not pose a physical or health risk to employees
• Consumer products • Both criteria apply:
– Produced or distributed for sale meeting the definition of "consumer products" in the Consumer Product Safety Act (see U.S. Code, Title 15, Chapter 47, section 20522) – They are used in the workplace for the same purpose as intended by the manufacturer or importer
OR


• Hazardous household products

– The duration and frequency of an employee's exposure is no more than the range of exposures that consumers might reasonably experience
– Meeting the definition of "hazardous substances" in the Federal Hazardous Substance Act (see U.S. Code, Title 15, Chapter 30, section 12612)
• Cosmetics • Packaged and sold in retail establishments
• Drugs • In solid, final form (for example, tablets, or pills) for direct administration to the patient
– Meeting the definition for "drugs" in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (see U.S. Code, Title 21, Chapter 9, Subchapter II, section 3212) OR
• Packaged and sold in retail establishments (for example, over-the-counter drugs)
OR
• Intended for employee consumption while in the workplace (for example, first-aid supplies)
• Hazardous solid wastes • Subject to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations3
– Meeting the definition of "hazardous wastes" in the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (see U.S. Code, Title 42, Chapter 82, Subchapter I, section 69032)
• Hazardous substances
– Released into the environment, meeting the definition of "hazardous substances" in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) (see U.S. Code, Title 42, Chapter 103, Subchapter I, section 96012) • They are the focus of remedial or removal action being conducted under CERCLA in accordance with EPA regulations (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)3)
• Hazardous wastes • Subject to department of ecology regulations, chapter 173-303 WAC5, that address the accumulation, handling and management of hazardous waste, and describe all of the following:
– Meeting the definition of "dangerous wastes" in the Hazardous Waste Management Act (see chapter 70.105 RCW4) – Safety

– Labeling

– Personnel training

– And other related requirements

• Solid wood • All of the following apply:
OR – The material is not treated with hazardous chemicals
• Wood products (for example, lumber, and paper) – The only hazard is potential flammability or combustibility
– The product is not expected to be processed (for example, by sanding or sawing)

1End use is dependent in whole, or in part, upon maintaining the item's original shape or design. If the item will be significantly altered from its original form, it can no longer be considered a manufactured item.
2This federal act is included in the United States Code. See http://www.access.gpo.gov/uscode/uscmain.html.
3EPA regulations are included in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). See http://www.epa.gov.
4This state act is included in the Revised Code of Washington (RCW). The RCW compiles all permanent laws of the state. See http://www.leg.wa.gov/wsladm/default.htm.
5See http://www.ecy.wa.gov.

     Use Table 2 to find out which sections of this ((chapter)) part apply to you. For example, if you import AND sell hazardous chemicals ALL sections apply. WAC 296-307-56050 applies to all employers covered by the scope of this ((chapter)) part.


Table 2

Section Application

If you Then the sections marked with an "X" apply
56010 - 56015 56025 56030 - 56035 56045
• Import or produce chemicals X X
• Sell or distribute hazardous chemicals to
– Manufacturers
OR
– Distributors
OR
– Employers (includes retail or wholesale transactions) X X
• Choose to NOT rely on MSDSs provided by the importer, manufacturer or distributor X X

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. 03-10-068, § 296-307-560, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 03-10-068, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03)

WAC 296-307-56025   Develop or obtain material safety data sheets (MSDSs).  

     You must:

     • Develop or obtain a complete and accurate material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each hazardous chemical or mixture according to ALL of the following:

     – ALL information in Table 8 must be completed. If there is no relevant information for a required item, this must be noted. Blank spaces are not permitted.

Note: • No specific format is required for MSDSs; however, an example format (OSHA form 174) can be found online at: http://www.osha.gov
• One MSDS can be developed for a group of complex mixtures (for example, jet fuels or crude oil) IF the health and physical hazards of the mixtures are similar (the amounts of chemicals in the mixture may vary).
     – Content of MSDSs must accurately represent the available scientific evidence.

Note: You may report results of scientifically valid studies that tend to refute findings of hazards.
     – MSDSs must be in English.

Note: You may develop copies of MSDSs in other languages.
     You must:

     • Revise an MSDS when you become aware of new and significant information regarding the hazards of a chemical, or how to protect against the hazards

     – Within three months after you first become aware of the information

     OR

     – Before the chemical is reintroduced into the workplace if the chemical is no longer being used, produced or imported.

Table 8

Information Required on MSDSs

• The chemical's identity as it appears on the label
• The date the MSDS was prepared or updated
• A contact for additional information about the hazardous chemical and appropriate emergency procedures
Include all of the following:
– Name
– Address
– Telephone number of the responsible party preparing or distributing the MSDS
• The chemical's hazardous ingredients1 as determined by your hazard evaluation
– For a single substance chemical, include the chemical and common name(s) of the substance
– For mixtures tested as a whole
▪ Include the common name(s) of the mixture
AND
▪ List the chemical and common name(s) of ingredients that contribute to the known hazards
– For mixtures NOT tested as a whole, list the chemical and common name(s) of hazardous ingredients
▪ That make up 1% or more of the mixture, by weight or volume, including carcinogens (if 0.1% concentration or more, by weight or volume)
– If ingredients are less than the above concentrations but may present a health risk to employees (for example, allergic reaction or exposure could exceed the permissible exposure limits, or PEL) they must be listed here
• Exposure limits for airborne concentrations. Include ALL of the following, when they exist:
– WISHA or OSHA PELs2
▪ The 8-hour time weighted average (TWA)
▪ The short-term exposure limit (STEL), if available
▪ Ceiling values, if available
– Threshold limit values (TLVs) including 8-hour TWAs, STELs, and ceiling values
– Other exposure limits used or recommended by the employer preparing the MSDS
• Physical and chemical characteristics
– For example, boiling point, vapor pressure, and odor
• Fire, explosion data, and related information
– For example, flashpoint, flammable and explosion limits, extinguishing media, and unusual fire or explosion hazards
• Physical hazards of the chemical including reactivity information
– For example, incompatibilities, decomposition products, by-products, and conditions to avoid
• Health hazard information including ALL of the following:
– Primary routes of exposure
• For example, inhalation, ingestion, and skin absorption or other contact3
– Health effects (or hazards) associated with:
▪ Short-term exposure4
AND
▪ Long-term exposure4
– Whether the chemical is listed or described as a carcinogen or potential carcinogen in the latest editions of each of the following:
▪ The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Annual Report on Carcinogens
OR
▪ The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs as a potential carcinogen
OR
▪ WISHA or OSHA rules
– Signs and symptoms of exposure5
– Medical conditions generally recognized as being aggravated by exposure
• Emergency and first-aid procedures
• Generally applicable precautions for safe handling and use known to the employer preparing the MSDS
– For example, appropriate procedures for clean-up of spills and leaks, waste disposal method, precautions during handling and storing
• Generally applicable and appropriate control measures known to the employer preparing the MSDS, including ALL of the following:
– Engineering controls (for example, general or local exhaust ventilation)
– Work practices
– Personal protective equipment (PPE)
– Personal hygiene practices
– Protective measures during repair and maintenance of contaminated equipment

1The identities of some chemicals may be protected as trade secret information (see chapter 296-62 WAC, Part B-1, Trade secrets).
2WISHA PEL categories are defined, and values are provided, in chapter ((296-62 WAC, Part H)) 296-307 WAC, Part Y-6.
3A "skin notation" listed with either an ACGIH TLV or WISHA/OSHA PEL indicates that skin absorption is a primary route of exposure.
4Examples of:
• Short-term health effects (or hazards) include eye irritation, skin damage caused by contact with corrosives, narcosis, sensitization, and lethal dose.
• Long-term health effects (or hazards) include cancer, liver degeneration, and silicosis.
5Signs and symptoms of exposure to hazardous substances include those that:
• Can be measured such as decreased pulmonary function
AND
• Are subjective such as feeling short of breath.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. 03-10-068, § 296-307-56025, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03.]


AMENDATORY SECTION(Amending WSR 03-10-068, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03)

WAC 296-307-56050   Definitions.   The following definitions apply to this chapter:

     Article (manufactured item)

     A manufactured item that

     • Is not a fluid or particle

     AND

     • Is formed to a specific shape or design during manufacture for a particular end use function

     AND

     • Releases only trace amounts of a hazardous chemical during normal use and does not pose a physical or health risk to employees.

     Chemical

     • An element or mixture of elements

     OR

     • A compound or mixture of compounds

     OR

     • A mixture of elements and compounds

     Included are manufactured items (such as bricks, welding rods and sheet metal) that are not exempt as an article.

     Chemical name

     • The scientific designation of a chemical developed by the

     – International union of pure and applied chemistry (IUPAC)

     OR

     – Chemical abstracts service (CAS) rules of nomenclature

     OR

     • A name that clearly identifies the chemical for the purpose of conducting a hazard evaluation.

     Combustible liquid

     Liquids with a flashpoint of at least 100°F (37.8°C) and below 200°F (93.3°C). A mixture with at least 99% of its components having flashpoints of 200°F (93.3°C), or higher, is not considered a combustible liquid.

     Commercial account

     An arrangement where a retailer is selling hazardous chemicals to an employer

     • Generally in large quantities over time

     OR

     • At costs below regular retail price.

     Common name

     Any designation or identification used to identify a chemical other than the chemical name, such as a

     • Code name or number

     OR

     • Trade or brand name

     OR

     • Generic name.

     Compressed gas

     • A contained gas or mixture of gases with an absolute pressure greater than:

     – 40 psi at 70°F (21.1°C)

     OR

     – 104 psi at 130°F (54.4°C) regardless of the pressure at 70°F (21.1°C)

     OR

     • A liquid with a vapor pressure greater than 40 psi at 100°F (37.8°C), as determined by ASTM D323-72.

     Container

     A vessel, other than a pipe or piping system, that holds a hazardous chemical. Examples include:

     • Bags

     • Barrels

     • Bottles

     • Boxes

     • Cans

     • Cylinders

     • Drums

     • Reaction vessels

     • Storage tanks

     • Rail cars.

     Designated representative

     • An individual or organization with written authorization from an employee

     OR

     • A recognized or certified collective bargaining agent (not necessarily authorized by an employee)

     OR

     • A legal representative of a deceased or legally incapacitated employee.

     Distributor

     A business that supplies hazardous chemicals to other employers. Included are employers who conduct retail and wholesale transactions.

     Explosive

     A chemical that causes a sudden, almost instant release of pressure, gas, and heat when exposed to a sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature.

     Flammable

     A chemical in one of the following categories:

     • Aerosols that, when tested using a method described in 16 CFR 1500.45, yield either a:

     – Flame projection of more than eighteen inches at full valve opening

     OR

     – A flashback (a flame extending back to the valve) at any degree of valve opening

     • Gases that, at the temperature and pressure of the surrounding area, form a:

     – Flammable mixture with air at a concentration of thirteen percent, by volume, or less

     OR

     – Range of flammable mixtures with air wider than twelve percent, by volume, regardless of the lower limit

     • Liquids with a flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C). A mixture with at least ninety-nine percent of its components having flashpoints of 100°F (37.8°C), or higher, is not considered a flammable liquid

     • Solids, other than blasting agents or explosives, as defined in WAC 296-52-417 or 29 CFR 1910.109(a), that:

     – Is likely to cause fire through friction, moisture, absorption, spontaneous chemical change or retained heat from manufacturing or processing

     OR

     – That can be readily ignited (and when ignited burns so vigorously and persistently that it creates a serious hazard)

     OR

     – When tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.44, ignite and burn with a self-sustained flame at a rate greater than 1/10th of an inch per second along its major axis.

     Flashpoint

     The minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off an ignitable concentration of vapor, when tested by any of the following measurement methods:

     • Tagliabue closed tester. Use this for liquids with a viscosity less than 45 Saybolt Universal Seconds (SUS) at 100°F (37.8°C), that do not contain suspended solids and do not tend to form a surface film under test. See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Tag Closed Tester, Z11.24-1979 (ASTM D 56-79)

     • Pensky-Martens closed tester. Use this for liquids with a viscosity equal to, or greater than, 45 SUS at 100°F (37.8°C) or for liquids that contain suspended solids or have a tendency to form a surface film under test. See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Pensky-Martens Closed Tester, Z11.7-1979 (ASTM D 93-79)

     • Setaflash closed tester. See American National Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Setaflash Closed Tester (ASTM D 3278-78)

     Organic peroxides, which undergo auto accelerating thermal decomposition, are excluded from any of the flashpoint measurement methods specified above.

     Hazardous chemical

     A chemical, which is a physical or health hazard.

     Hazard warning

     Words, pictures or symbols (alone or in combination) that appear on labels (or other forms of warning such as placards or tags) that communicate specific physical and health hazards (including target organ effects) associated with chemicals in a container.

     Health hazard

     A chemical that may cause health effects in short or long-term exposed employees based on statistically significant evidence from a single study conducted by using established scientific principles.

     Health hazards include, but are not limited to, any of the following:

     • Carcinogens

     • Toxic or highly toxic substances

     • Reproductive toxins

     • Irritants

     • Corrosives

     • Sensitizers

     • Hepatotoxins (liver toxins)

     • Nephrotoxins (kidney toxins)

     • Neurotoxins (nervous system toxins)

     • Substances that act on the hematopoietic system (blood or blood forming system)

     • Substances that can damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes.

     Identity

     A chemical or common name listed on the material safety data sheet (MSDS) and label.

     Importer

     The first business, within the Customs Territory of the United States, that receives hazardous chemicals produced in other countries and supplies them to manufacturers, distributors or employers within the United States.

     Label

     Written, printed, or graphic material displayed on, or attached to, a container of hazardous chemicals.

     Manufacturer

     An employer with a workplace where one or more chemicals (including items not exempt as "articles," see Table 1 in this ((chapter)) part) are produced for use or distribution.

     Material safety data sheet (MSDS)

     Written, printed or electronic information (on paper, microfiche, or on-screen) that informs manufacturers, distributors or employers about the chemical, its hazards and protective measures as required by this rule.

     Mixture

     A combination of two or more chemicals that retain their chemical identify after being combined.

     Organic peroxide

     An organic compound containing the bivalent-O-O-structure. It may be considered a structural derivative of hydrogen peroxide if one or both of the hydrogen atoms has been replaced by an organic radical.

     Oxidizer

     A chemical, other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in WAC 296-52-417 or 29 CFR 1910.109(a), that starts or promotes combustion in other materials, causing fire either of itself or through the release of oxygen or other gases.

     Permissible exposure limits

     See ((chapter 296-62 WAC Part H)) WAC 296-307-628, for definition of this term.

     Physical hazards

     A chemical that has scientifically valid evidence to show it is one of the following:

     • A combustible liquid

     • A compressed gas

     • Explosive

     • Flammable

     • An organic peroxide

     • An oxidizer

     • Pyrophoric

     • Unstable (reactive)

     • Water-reactive.

     Produce

     To do one or more of the following:

     • Manufacture

     • Process

     • Formulate

     • Blend

     • Extract

     • Generate

     • Emit

     • Repackage.

     Pyrophoric

     Chemicals that ignite spontaneously in the air at a temperature of 130°F (54.4°C) or below.

     Responsible party

     Someone who can provide more information about the hazardous chemical and appropriate emergency procedures.

     Retailer

     See "distributor."

     Threshold limit values (TLVs)

     Airborne concentrations of substances established by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), and represent conditions under which it is believed that nearly all workers may be repeatedly exposed day after day without adverse health effects.

     TLVs are specified in the most recent edition of the Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices and include the following categories:

     • Threshold limit value-time-weighted average (TLV-TWA)

     • Threshold limit value-short-term exposure limit (TLV-STEL)

     • Threshold limit value-ceiling (TLV-C).

     Unstable (reactive)

     A chemical in its pure state, or as produced or transported, that will vigorously polymerize, decompose, condense, or become self-reactive under conditions of shocks, pressure or temperature.

     Use

     To do one or more of the following:

     • Package

     • Handle

     • React

     • Emit

     • Extract

     • Generate as a by-product

     • Transfer.

     Water-reactive

     A chemical that reacts with water to release a gas that is either flammable or presents a heath hazard.

     Wholesaler

     See "distributor."

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. 03-10-068, § 296-307-56050, filed 5/6/03, effective 8/1/03.]

Part Y-3

LightingPart Y-4

Environmental Tobacco Smoke in the Office

OTS-7358.1

Part Y-5

Respirators
NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-594   Scope.   This part applies to all use of respirators at work.

     IMPORTANT:

     Before you decide to use respirators, you are required to evaluate respiratory hazards and implement control methods as outlined in WAC 296-307-624 through 296-307-628, Respiratory hazards.

     The term "respiratory hazards" will be used throughout this part to refer to oxygen deficient conditions and harmful airborne hazards.

     Definition:

     Respirators are a type of personal protective equipment designed to protect the wearer from respiratory hazards.

     You can use Table 1 for general guidance on which sections apply to you.

Table 1
Sections that apply to your workplace

If employees...

Then the sections marked with an "X" apply...
596 598 600 602-618 620 622
Request and are permitted to voluntarily use filtering-facepiece respirators, and are not exposed to a respiratory hazard X X
Request and are permitted to voluntarily use respirators that are NOT filtering-facepiece respirators, and are not exposed to a respiratory hazard X X X X
Are required to use any respirator by WISHA or the employer X X X X X
Would use an escape respirator in an emergency X X X X X

Reference: See WAC 296-307-100, Personal protective equipment (PPE) to find requirements for other types of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as eye, hand, and head protection.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-596   Respirator program administrator.  

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure a capable individual is in charge of respirator program development and management.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-59605   Designate a program administrator.  

Exemption: You do not need to designate a program administrator if employees use only filtering-facepiece respirators and do so only as voluntary use.
     Definition:

     Voluntary use is respirator use that is requested by the employee AND permitted by the employer when NO respiratory hazard exists.

     You must:

     • Designate a program administrator who has overall responsibility for your program and has sufficient training or experience to:

     – Oversee program development and coordinate implementation

     – Conduct required evaluations of program effectiveness outlined in WAC 296-307-60005.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-598   Voluntary respirator use requirements.        Your responsibility:

     To make sure voluntary use of respirators by employees does not create job safety or health hazards.

     You must:

     Make sure voluntary use of respirators is safe

     WAC 296-307-59805

     Keep voluntary use respirator program records

     WAC 296-307-59810.

     IMPORTANT:

     • Respirator use is NOT voluntary if a respiratory hazard, such as exposure to a substance over the permissible exposure limit (PEL) or hazardous exposure to an airborne biological hazard, is present.

     • To evaluate respiratory hazards in your workplace, see WAC 296-307-624, Respiratory hazards.

     • Some requirements in this section do not apply if only filtering-facepiece respirators are used voluntarily. Some filtering-facepiece respirators are equipped with a sorbent layer for absorbing "nuisance" organic vapors. These can be used for voluntary use, but are not NIOSH certified for protection against hazardous concentrations of organic vapor.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-59805   Make sure voluntary use of respirators is safe.  

     Definition:

     Voluntary use is respirator use that is requested by the employee AND permitted by the employer when NO respiratory hazard exists.

     IMPORTANT: If you choose to require respirator use, use is NOT voluntary and the required use sections of this part apply.

     You must:

     (1) Make sure voluntary respirator use does NOT:

     • Interfere with an employee's ability to work safely, such as restricting necessary vision or radio communication

     OR

     • Create health hazards.

    
Note: Examples of health hazards include:
• Skin irritation, dermatitis, or other health effects caused by using a dirty respirator
• Illness created by sharing contaminated respirators
• Health effects caused by use of an unsafe air supply, such as carbon monoxide poisoning.
     You must:

     (2) Provide all voluntary respirator users with the advisory information in Table 2 at no cost to them.

Note: If you have provided employees with the advisory information required in the previous section, WAC 296-307-598, you do not need to provide the additional information in Table 2 to those employees.
     You must:

     (3) Develop and maintain a written program that includes the following:

     • Medical evaluation provisions as specified in WAC 296-307-604.

     • Procedures to properly clean and disinfect respirators, according to WAC 296-307-62015, if they are reused.

     • How to properly store respirators, according to WAC 296-307-61010, so that using them does not create hazards.

     • Procedures to make sure there is a safe air supply, according to WAC 296-307-616, when using air-line respirators and SCBAs.

     • Training according to WAC 296-307-608 when necessary to ensure respirator use does NOT create a hazard.

    
Note: • Pay for medical evaluations, training, travel related costs, and wages. You do NOT need to pay for respirators employees use only voluntarily.
• If you have both voluntary and required respirator users, you may choose to treat voluntary users as required users. Doing this exceeds the requirements in this section.
Exemption: If employees use only filtering-facepiece respirators and do so only voluntarily, you do not need to develop and maintain a written program.
     Use Table 2 to provide information to employees who voluntarily use any type of respirator.

Table 2

Advisory Information for Employees Who Voluntarily Use Respirators
• Respirators protect against airborne hazards when properly selected and used. WISHA recommends voluntary use of respirators when exposure to substances is below WISHA permissible exposure limits (PELs) because respirators can provide you an additional level of comfort and protection.
• If you choose to voluntarily use a respirator (whether it is provided by you or your employer) be aware that respirators can create hazards for you, the user. You can avoid these hazards if you know how to use your respirator properly AND how to keep it clean. Take these steps:
– Read and follow all instructions provided by the manufacturer about use, maintenance (cleaning and care), and warnings regarding the respirator's limitations.
– Choose respirators that have been certified for use to protect against the substance of concern. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certifies respirators. If a respirator is not certified by NIOSH, you have no guarantee that it meets minimum design and performance standards for workplace use.
▪ A NIOSH approval label will appear on or in the respirator packaging. It will tell you what protection the respirator provides.
– Keep track of your respirator so you do not mistakenly use someone else's.
– DO NOT wear your respirator into:
▪ Atmospheres containing hazards that your respirator is not designed to protect against.
For example, a respirator designed to filter dust particles will not protect you against solvent vapor, smoke or oxygen deficiency.
▪ Situations where respirator use is required.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-59810   Keep voluntary use program records.  

Exemption: If employees use only filtering-facepiece respirators voluntarily, you do not need to follow these recordkeeping requirements.
     You must:

     • Keep copies of:

     – Your current written respirator program

     – Written recommendations from the LHCP

     • Allow records required by this section to be examined and copied by affected employees and their representatives.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-600   Written respirator program and recordkeeping.  

     Your responsibility:

     To develop, implement, and maintain a written program that provides clear instruction for safe and reliable respirator use.

     You must:

     Develop and maintain a written program

     WAC 296-307-60005

     Keep respirator program records

     WAC 296-307-60010.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-60005   Develop and maintain a written program.  
Exemption: This section does NOT apply to respirator use that is voluntary. See WAC 296-307-59805 for voluntary use program requirements.
     You must:

     (1) Develop a complete worksite-specific written respiratory protection program that includes the applicable elements listed in Table 3.

Note: Pay for respirators, medical evaluations, fit testing, training, maintenance, travel costs, and wages.
     You must:

     (2) Keep your program current and effective by evaluating it and making corrections. Do ALL of the following:

     • Make sure procedures and program specifications are followed and appropriate.

     • Make sure selected respirators continue to be effective in protecting employees. For example:

     – If changes in work area conditions, level of employee exposure, or employee physical stress have occurred, you need to reevaluate your respirator selection.

     • Have supervisors periodically monitor employee respirator use to make sure employees are using them properly.

     • Regularly ask employees required to use respirators about their views concerning program effectiveness and whether they have problems with:

     – Respirator fit during use

     – Any effects of respirator use on work performance

     – Respirators being appropriate for the hazards encountered

     – Proper use under current worksite conditions

     – Proper maintenance.

     When developing your written program include applicable elements listed in Table 3.

Table 3

Required Elements for Required-Use Respirator Programs
• Selection:
– Procedures for respirator selection
– A list specifying the appropriate respirator for each respiratory hazard in your workplace
– Procedures for issuing the proper type of respirator, if appropriate
• Medical evaluation provisions
• Fit-test provisions and procedures, if tight-fitting respirators are selected
• Training provisions that address:
– Respiratory hazards encountered during:
▪ Routine activities
▪ Infrequent activities, for example, bimonthly cleaning of equipment
▪ Reasonably foreseeable emergencies, for example, rescue, spill response, or escape situations
– Proper use of respirators, for example, how to put on or remove respirators, and use limitations.
Note: You do NOT need to repeat training on respiratory hazards if employees have been trained on this in compliance with other rules such as WAC 296-307-550, employer chemical hazard communication.
• Respirator use procedures for:
– Routine activities
– Infrequent activities
– Reasonably foreseeable emergencies
• Maintenance:
– Procedures and schedules for respirator maintenance covering:
▪ Cleaning and disinfecting
▪ Storage
▪ Inspection and repair
▪ When to discard respirators
– A cartridge or canister change schedule IF air-purifying respirators are selected for use against gas or vapor contaminants AND an end-of-service-life-indicator (ESLI) is not available. In addition, provide:
▪ The data and other information you relied on to calculate change schedule values (for example, highest contaminant concentration estimates, duration of employee respirator use, expected maximum humidity levels, user breathing rates, and safety factors)
• Procedures to ensure a safe air quantity and quality IF atmosphere-supplying respirators (air-line or SCBA) are selected
• Procedures for evaluating program effectiveness on a regular basis

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-60010   Keep respirator program records.  

     You must:

     • Keep the following records:

     – Your current respirator program

     – Each employee's current fit test record, if fit testing is conducted. Fit test records must include:

     ▪ Employee name

     ▪ Test date

     ▪ Type of fit-test performed

     ▪ Description (type, manufacturer, model, style, and size) of the respirator tested

     ▪ Results of fit tests, for example, for quantitative fit tests include the overall fit factor AND a print out, or other recording of the test.

     – Training records that include employee's names and the dates trained

     – Written recommendations from the LHCP.

     • Allow records required by this section to be examined and copied by affected employees and their representatives.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-602   Respirator selection.  

     Your responsibility:

     To select and provide respirators that are appropriate for the hazard, user, and worksite conditions.

Exemption: This section does NOT apply to voluntary respirator use. See WAC 296-307-598 of this part for voluntary use program requirements.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-60205   Select and provide appropriate respirators.  

     IMPORTANT:

     See WAC 296-307-624, Respiratory hazards, for:

     • Hazard evaluation requirements. Evaluation results are necessary for respirator selection.

     • A list of substance-specific rules that may also apply to you. Those listed rules have additional respirator selection requirements.

     You must:

     • Select and provide, at no cost to employees, appropriate respirators for routine use, infrequent use, and reasonably foreseeable emergencies (such as escape, emergency, and spill response situations) by completing the following process:

Respirator Selection Process
     Step 1: If your only respirator use is for escape, skip to Step 8 to select appropriate respirators.

     Step 2: If the respiratory hazard is a biological aerosol, such as TB (tuberculosis), anthrax, psittacosis (parrot fever), or hanta virus, select a respirator appropriate for nonemergency activities recognized to present a health risk to workers AND skip to Step 8.

     • If respirator use will occur during emergencies, skip to Step 8 and document the analysis used to select the appropriate respirator.

     • Use Centers for Disease Control (CDC) selection guidance for exposures to specific biological agents when this guidance exists. Visit http://www.cdc.gov.

     Step 3: If the respiratory hazard is a pesticide, follow the respirator specification on the pesticide label AND skip to Step 9.

     Step 4: Determine the expected exposure concentration for each respiratory hazard of concern. Use the results from the evaluation required by WAC 296-307-624, Respiratory hazards.

     Step 5: Determine if the respiratory hazard is classified as IDLH; if it is NOT IDLH skip to Step 7.    

     • The respiratory hazard IS classified as IDLH if:

     – The atmosphere is oxygen deficient or oxygen enriched

     OR

     – You CANNOT measure or estimate your expected exposure concentration    

     OR

     – Your measured or estimated expected exposure concentration is greater or equal to the IDLH value in the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards

Note: • WISHA uses the IDLH values in the 1990 edition of the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Hazardous Chemicals to determine the existence of IDLH conditions. You may use more recent editions of this guide. Visit www.cdc.gov/niosh for more information.
• If your measured or estimated expected exposure concentration is below NIOSH's IDLH values, proceed to Step 7.
     Step 6: Select an appropriate respirator from one of the following respirators for IDLH conditions and skip to Step 8:     • Full-facepiece, pressure demand, self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) certified by NIOSH for a minimum service life of thirty minutes

     OR

     • Full-facepiece, pressure demand air-line respirator equipped with an auxiliary self-contained air supply

Exception: If the respiratory hazard is oxygen deficiency AND you can show oxygen concentrations can be controlled within the ranges listed in Table 4 under ALL foreseeable conditions, you are allowed to select ANY type of SCBA or air-line respirator.

Table 4
Concentration Ranges for Oxygen Deficiency

Altitude

(as ft. above sea level)

Oxygen Concentration Range

(as percent oxygen)

Below 3,001 16.0 - 19.5
3,001 - 4,000 16.4 - 19.5
4,001 - 5,000 17.1 - 19.5
5,001 - 6,000 17.8 - 19.5
6,001 - 8,000 19.3 - 19.5
Above 8,000 feet the exception does not apply.

     Step 7: Identify respirator types with assigned protection factors (APFs) from Table 5 that are appropriate to protect employees from the expected exposure concentration.

     Step 8: Consider hazards that could require selection of specific respirator types. For example, select full-facepiece respirators to prevent eye irritation or abrasive blasting helmets to provide particle rebound protection.

     Step 9: Evaluate user and workplace factors that might compromise respirator performance, reliability or safety.

     • If the respiratory hazard is a pesticide, follow the requirements on the pesticide label and skip to Step 11.

     Examples:

     • High humidity or temperature extremes in the workplace.

     • Necessary voice communication.

     • High traffic areas and moving machinery.

     • Time or distance for escape.

     Step 10: Follow Table 6 requirements to select an air-purifying respirator.

     • If Table 6 requirements cannot be met, you must select an air-line respirator or an SCBA.

     Step 11: Make sure respirators you select are certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

     • To maintain certification, make sure the respirator is used according to cautions and limitations specified on the NIOSH approval label.

Note: While selecting respirators, you will need to select a sufficient number of types, models or sizes to provide for fit testing. You can also consider other respirator use issues, such as accommodating facial hair with a loose fitting respirator.
     Use Table 5 to identify the assigned protection factor for different types of respirators.


Table 5
Assigned Protection Factors (APF) for Respirator Types

If the respirator is a(n) . . . Then the APF is . . .
Air-purifying respirator with a:
• Half-facepiece . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
• Full-facepiece . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Note: Half-facepiece includes 1/4 masks, filtering facepieces, and elastomeric facepieces.
Powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) with a:
• Loose-fitting facepiece . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
• Half-facepiece . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
• Full-facepiece, equipped with HEPA filters, chemical cartridges or canisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000
• Hood or helmet, equipped with HEPA filters, chemical cartridges or canisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000
Air-line respirator with a:
• Half-facepiece and designed to operate in demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
• Loose-fitting facepiece and designed to operate in continuous flow mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
• Half-facepiece and designed to operate in continuous-flow, or pressure-demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
• Full-facepiece and designed to operate in demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
• Full-facepiece and designed to operate in continuous-flow OR pressure-demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000
• Helmet or hood and designed to operate in continuous-flow mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000
Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a tight fitting:
• Half-facepiece and designed to operate in demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
• Full-facepiece and designed to operate in demand mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
• Full-facepiece and designed to operate in pressure-demand

mode . . . . . . . . . . . .

10,000
Combination respirators:
• Find the APF for each type of respirator in the combination. The lowest value
• Use the lower APF to represent the combination.

     Use Table 6 to select air-purifying respirators for particle, vapor, or gas contaminants.

Table 6
Requirements for Selecting Any Air-purifying Respirator

If the contaminant is a . . . Then . . .
• Gas OR vapor • Provide a respirator with canisters or cartridges equipped with a NIOSH-certified, end-of-service-life indicator (ESLI)
OR
• If a canister or cartridge with an ESLI is NOT available, develop a cartridge change schedule to make sure the canisters or cartridges are replaced before they are no longer effective
OR
• Select an atmosphere-supplying respirator
• Particle, such as a dust, spray, mist, fog, fume, or aerosol • Select respirators with filters certified to be at least 95% efficient by NIOSH
– For example, N95s, R99s, P100s, or High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA)
OR
• You may select respirators NIOSH certified as "dust and mist," "dust, fume, or mist," OR "pesticides." You can only use these respirators if particles primarily have a mass median aerodynamic diameter of at least two micrometers.
Note: These respirators are no longer sold for occupational use.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-604   Medical evaluations.  

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure a respirator used under your specific worksite conditions is not a health risk to employees.

Exemption: This section does NOT apply to employees who only use:
• Filtering-facepiece respirators voluntarily. See WAC 296-307-598 of this part for voluntary use requirements
OR
• Escape-only respirators that are mouthpiece, loose-fitting, or hooded respirators.
     IMPORTANT:

     • Using a respirator can create physical risks for an employee each time it is worn. The extent of these risks depends on these factors:

     – Type of respirator

     – Environmental conditions at the worksite

     – Physical demands of the work

     – Use of other protective clothing

     – Employee's health status.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-60405   Provide medical evaluations.  

     IMPORTANT:

     If you have provided an employee with a medical evaluation addressing respirator use, as required by another chapter, that evaluation will meet the requirements of this section.

     You must:

     • Follow the medical evaluation process, Steps 1 through 7 in this section, to provide medical evaluations for employees at no cost to them.

Medical Evaluation Process
     Step 1: Identify employees who need medical evaluations AND determine the frequency of evaluations from Table 7. Include employees who:

     • Are required to use respirators

     OR

     • Voluntarily use respirators that are not filtering-facepiece respirators

Note: You may use a previous employer's medical evaluation for an employee if you can:
• Show the employee's previous work and use conditions were substantially similar to yours
AND
• Obtain a copy of the licensed healthcare professional's (LHCP's) written recommendation approving the employee's use of the respirator chosen by you.
     Step 2: Identify a licensed healthcare professional (LHCP) to perform your medical evaluations.

Note: If you select a different LHCP, you do not need to have new medical evaluations done.
     Step 3: Make sure your LHCP has the following information before the evaluation is completed:

     • Information describing the respirators employees may use, including the weight and type.

     • How the respirators will be used, including:

     – How often the respirator will be used, for example, daily, or once a month

     – The duration of respirator use, for example, a minimum of one hour, or up to twelve hours

     – The employee's expected physical work effort

     – Additional personal protective clothing and equipment to be worn

     – Temperature and humidity extremes expected during use

     • A copy of your written respiratory protection program and this part.

Note: • You may choose to send the questionnaire to the LHCP ahead of time, giving time to review it and add any necessary questions
• The LHCP determines what questions to add to the questionnaire, if any; however, questions in Parts 1-3 may not be deleted or substantially altered.
     Step 4: Administer the medical questionnaire in WAC 296-307-61605 to employees, OR provide them a medical exam that obtains the same information.

Note: You may use on-line questionnaires if the questions are the same and requirements of this section are met.
     • Administer the examination or questionnaire at no cost to employees:

     – During the employee's normal working hours

     OR

     – At a time and place convenient to the employee

     • Maintain employee confidentiality during examination or questionnaire administration:

     – Do not view employee's answers on the questionnaire

     – Do not act in a manner that may be considered a breach of confidentiality

Note: Providing confidentiality is important for securing successful medical evaluations. It helps make sure the LHCP gets complete and dependable answers on the questionnaire.
     • Make sure employees understand the content of the questionnaire.

     • Provide the employee with an opportunity to discuss the questionnaire or exam results with the LHCP.

     Step 5: Provide follow-up evaluation for employees when:

     • The LHCP needs more information to make a final recommendation

     OR

     • An employee gives any positive response to questions 1-8 in Part 2 OR to questions 1-6 in Part 3 of the WISHA medical evaluation questionnaire in WAC 296-307-61605.

Note: Follow-up may include:
• Employee consultation with the LHCP such as a telephone conversation to evaluate positive questionnaire responses
• Medical exams
• Medical tests or other diagnostic procedures.
     Step 6: Obtain a written recommendation from the LHCP that contains only the following medical information:

     • Whether or not the employee is medically able to use the respirator

     • Any limitations of respirator use for the employee

     • What future medical evaluations, if any, are needed

     • A statement that the employee has been provided a copy of the written recommendation.

     Step 7: Provide a powered, air-purifying respirator (PAPR) when the LHCP determines the employee should not wear a negative-pressure air-purifying respirator AND is able to wear a PAPR.

Reference: See WAC 296-307-602 for requirements regarding selection of air-purifying respirators.
Note: • You may discontinue medical evaluations for an employee when the employee no longer uses a respirator.
• If you have staff conducting your medical evaluations, they may keep completed questionnaires and findings as confidential medical records, if they are maintained separately from other records.
     Use Table 7 to determine medical evaluation frequency.

Table 7
Evaluation Frequency

Type of Evaluation: When required:
Initial medical evaluations • Before respirators are fit-tested or used in the workplace.
Subsequent medical evaluations • If any of these occur:
– Your licensed healthcare professional (LHCP) recommends them; for example, periodic evaluations at specified intervals.
– A respirator program administrator or supervisor informs you that an employee needs reevaluation.
– Medical signs or symptoms (such as breathing difficulties) are:
▪ Observed during fit-testing or program evaluation
OR
▪ Reported by the employee
– Changes in worksite conditions such as physical work effort, personal protective clothing, or temperature that could substantially increase the employee's physiological stress.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-606   Fit testing.  

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure negative and positive-pressure tight-fitting respirators can provide an adequate fit and acceptable level of comfort to employees.

Exemption: This section does NOT apply to any respirators that are:
• Voluntarily used. See WAC 296-307-598 for voluntary use requirements.
• Mouthpiece respirators.
     IMPORTANT:

     • Fit testing is an activity where the seal of a respirator is tested to determine if it is adequate.

     • This section covers general requirements for fit testing. Fit-testing procedures are covered in WAC 296-307-62010 of this part.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-60605   Conduct fit testing.  

     You must:

     • Provide, at no cost to the employee, fit tests for ALL tight fitting respirators on the following schedule:

     – Before employees are assigned duties that may require the use of respirators

     – At least every twelve months after initial testing

     – Whenever any of the following occurs:

     ▪ A different respirator facepiece is chosen such as a different type, model, style, or size

     ▪ You become aware of a physical change in an employee that could affect respirator fit. For example, you may observe, or be told about, facial scarring, dental changes, cosmetic surgery, or obvious weight changes

     ▪ An employee notifies you, or your LHCP, that the respirator fit is unacceptable. During the retest, you must give an employee reasonable opportunity to select a different respirator facepiece (size, model, etc.).

Note: You may accept a fit test completed by a previous employer IF:
• You obtain written documentation of the fit test
AND
• The results of the fit test are not more than twelve months old
AND
• The employee will use the same respirator (the same type, model, style, and size)
AND
• The fit test was conducted in a way that meets the requirements of WAC 296-307-606 and 296-307-62010.
     You must:

     • Select an appropriate fit-testing procedure from WAC 296-307-62010 of this part AND:

     – Use quantitative fit-test methods when a negative pressure respirator will be used in concentrations requiring a protection factor greater than 10. This includes:

     ▪ Full facepiece air-purifying respirators

     ▪ SCBAs operated in demand (negative pressure) mode

     ▪ Air-line respirators operated in demand mode.

     – Make sure PAPRs, SCBAs, or air-line respirators are fit tested in negative-pressure mode.

     • Make sure the person conducting fit testing is able to do ALL of the following:

     – Prepare test solutions if required

     – Make sure equipment works properly

     – Perform tests properly

     – Recognize invalid tests

     – Calculate fit factors properly if required.

Note: • No specific training program or certification is required for those who conduct fit tests.
• You should consider evaluating these individuals to determine their proficiency in the fit-testing method to be used.
• You can use an evaluation form such as the form included in the American National Standard for Respirator Fit Testing Methods, ANSI/AIHA Z88.10-2001 to determine if the individual meets these requirements. Visit www.ansi.org or www.aiha.org.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-608   Training.  

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure employees who are required to use respirators understand and can demonstrate proper respirator use and maintenance.

     IMPORTANT:

     This section applies to employees who voluntarily use respirators only when training is necessary to prevent the respirator from creating a hazard. See WAC 296-307-598 for voluntary use requirements.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-60805   Provide effective training.  

     You must:

     • Train employees, based on their duties, if they do any of the following:

     – Use respirators

     – Supervise respirator users

     – Issue, repair, or adjust respirators

     • Present effective training in a way that employees understand.

Note: • Training may be provided using audiovisuals, slide presentations, formal classroom instruction, informal discussions during safety meetings, training programs conducted by outside sources, or a combination of these methods.
• You may want to have instructors available when using video or automated training methods to:
– Encourage and provide responses to questions for the benefit of employees
– Evaluate employees' understanding of the material
– Provide other instructional interaction to employees.
     You must:

     • Make sure a qualified instructor provides training

     • Provide training, at no cost to the employee, at these times:

     – Initially, before worksite respirator use begins

     – Periodically, within twelve months of the previous training

     – Additionally, when the following occur:

     ▪ The employee has not retained knowledge or skills

     OR

     ▪ Changes in the worksite, or type of respirator make previous training incomplete or obsolete.

Note: • You may accept an employee's previous training, such as training provided by another employer, to satisfy the initial training requirement if:
– You can demonstrate the employee received training within the past twelve months
AND
– The employee can demonstrate the knowledge and skills to use required respirators effectively.
• If you accept an employee's previous training to satisfy the initial training requirement, you are still responsible for providing periodic, and additional training when needed. Periodic training would need to be provided within twelve months of the employee's previous training.
     You must:

     • Make sure employees can demonstrate the following knowledge and skills as required by their duties:

     – Why the respirator is necessary. Include, for example, information identifying respiratory hazards such as hazardous chemicals, the extent of the employee's exposure, and potential health effects and symptoms

     – The respirator's capabilities and limitations. Include, for example, how the respirator provides protection and why air-purifying respirators cannot be used in oxygen-deficient conditions

     – How improper fit, use, or maintenance can compromise the respirator's effectiveness and reliability

     – How to properly inspect, put on, seal check, use, and remove the respirator

     – How to clean, disinfect, repair, and store the respirator, or how to get this done by someone else

     – How to use the respirator effectively in emergency situations; including what to do when a respirator fails and where emergency respirators are stored

     – Medical signs and symptoms that may limit or prevent the effective use of respirators such as shortness of breath or dizziness

     – The employer's general obligations under this part. For example, developing a written program, selecting appropriate respirators, and providing medical evaluations.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-610   Maintenance.  

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure respirators are maintained so they will function properly and not create health hazards such as skin irritation.

     You must:

     Maintain respirators in a clean and reliable condition

     WAC 296-307-61005

     Store respirators properly

     WAC 296-307-61010

     Inspect and repair respirators

     WAC 296-307-61015

     IMPORTANT:

     This section applies to employees who voluntarily use respirators only when maintenance is necessary to prevent the respirator from creating a hazard. See WAC 296-307-598 for voluntary use requirements.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61005   Maintain respirators in a clean and reliable condition.  

     You must:

     • Make sure respirators are kept, at no cost to the employee, clean, sanitary and in good working order. Do at least the following:

     – Clean and disinfect respirators as often as specified in Table 8 of this section.

Note: • Use required cleaning and disinfecting procedures in WAC 296-307-62015, or the manufacturer's procedures that:
– Result in a clean and sanitary respirator
– Do not damage the respirator
– Do not harm the user
• Automated cleaning and disinfecting are permitted
• Cleaning and disinfecting may be done by a central facility as long as you make sure respirators provided are clean, sanitary, and function properly.
     You must:

     • Make sure respirators are assembled properly after cleaning or disinfecting.

     Use Table 8 to determine how often to clean and disinfect respirators.

Table 8
Required Frequencies for Cleaning and Disinfecting Respirators

If, the respirator will

be . . .

Then, clean and disinfect the respirator . . .
• Used exclusively by one employee • As often as needed to:
– Keep it clean and functional
AND
– To prevent health hazards such as skin irritation
• Shared for nonemergency use • Before it is worn by another employee
OR
• Used for fit-testing or training
• Shared for emergency use • After each use so the respirator is immediately ready for use at all times

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61010   Store respirators properly.  

     You must:

     • Store respirators to protect them from ALL of the following:

     – Deformation of the facepiece or exhalation valve

     – Sunlight or extreme temperatures or other conditions

     – Contamination such as dust or damaging chemicals

     – Excessive moisture.

Note: Use coffee cans, sealable plastic bags, or other suitable means of protection.
     You must:

     • Follow these additional requirements for emergency respirators:

     – Keep respirators accessible to the work area

     – Store respirators in compartments or with covers clearly marked as containing emergency respirators

     – Follow additional storage instructions from the respirator manufacturer

     – Store an adequate number of emergency respirators in each area where they may be needed.

Note: Emergency respirators include mouthpiece respirators and other respirators that are limited to escape-only use by their NIOSH certification.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61015   Inspect and repair respirators.  

     You must:

     • Conduct respirator inspections as often as specified in Table 9.

     • Make sure respirator inspections cover all of the following:

     – Respirator function

     – Tightness of connections

     – The condition of the facepiece, head straps, valves, connecting tubes, and cartridge, canisters or filters

     – Pliability and deterioration of elastomeric parts

     – Maintenance of air or oxygen cylinders

     – Making sure SCBA air cylinders are at ninety percent of the manufacturer's recommended pressure level

     – Proper functioning of SCBA regulators when air-flow is activated

     – Proper functioning of SCBA low-pressure warning devices when activated

     • Certify inspections for emergency respirators by documenting the following:

     – Inspection date

     – Serial number of each respirator or other identifying information

     – Inspector's name or signature

     – Inspection findings

     – Required action, if problems are found.

Note: • When documenting inspections you may either:
– Provide the information on a tag or label and attach it to the respirator compartment
OR
– Include the information in an inspection report stored in paper or electronic files accessible to employees.
     You must:

     • Repair or replace any respirator that is not functioning properly before the employee returns to a situation where respirators are required.

     – If respirators fail inspection or are not functioning properly during use due to problems such as leakage, vapor or gas breakthrough, or increased breathing resistance, ALL of the following apply:

     ▪ Do NOT permit such respirators to be used until properly repaired or adjusted

     ▪ Use only NIOSH-certified parts

     ▪ Make sure repairs and adjustments are made by appropriately trained individuals

     – Use the manufacturer or a technician trained by the manufacturer to repair or adjust reducing and admission valves, regulators, and warning devices on SCBAs or air-line respirators.

     ▪ Follow the manufacturer's recommendations and specifications for the type and extent of repairs.

     Use Table 9 to determine how often to inspect respirators.

Table 9
Required Frequencies for Respirator Inspections

If the respirator is . . . Then inspect . . .
A SCBA in any use • Before each use
AND
• During cleaning
OR
• Monthly if NOT used
Used for nonemergencies, including day-to-day or infrequent use • Inspect before each use

AND

• During cleaning

Used only for emergencies • Check for proper function before and after each use
AND
• Inspect at least monthly as instructed by the manufacturer
Used for escape-only purposes • Before carrying into a work place for use

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-612   Safe use and removal of respirators.  

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure respirator use and removal is safe.

Exemption: These sections do NOT apply to employees who voluntarily use any type of respirator. See WAC 296-307-598 for voluntary use requirements.
     You must:

     Prevent sealing problems with tight-fitting respirators

     WAC 296-307-61205

     Make sure employees leave the use area before removing respirators

     WAC 296-307-61210.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61205   Prevent sealing problems with tight-fitting respirators.  

     You must:

     • Make sure employees use the procedure in WAC 296-307-62020 to perform a user seal check each time they put on their tight-fitting respirator.

     • Make sure you do NOT permit respirator use if employees have a characteristic that interferes with the respirator facepiece seal or valve function. For example, stubble, moustaches, sideburns, bangs, hairlines, or scars between the face and the sealing surface of the respirator will affect the seal.

     • Make sure corrective glasses or personal protective equipment (PPE) do NOT interfere with the facepiece seal. Examples of PPE include safety glasses, goggles, faceshields, clothing, and hard hats.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61210   Make sure employees leave the use area before removing respirators.  

     You must:

     • Make sure employees leave the use area for any of these reasons:

     – To replace air-purifying filters, cartridges, or canisters

     – When they smell or taste (detect) vapor or gas leakage from, for example, cartridges, canister, or the facepiece seal

     – When they detect changes in breathing resistance

     – To readjust their respirators

     – To wash their faces and respirators as necessary to prevent skin or eye irritation

     – If they become ill

     – If they experience sensations of dizziness, nausea, weakness, breathing difficulty, coughing, sneezing, vomiting, fever, or chills.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-614   Standby requirements for immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) conditions.  

     Your responsibility:

     To provide adequate assistance to employees using respirators in conditions immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH).

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61405   Provide standby assistance in immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) conditions.  

     IMPORTANT:

     WISHA currently uses the IDLH values in the 1990 NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards to determine the existence of IDLH conditions. You may use more recent editions of this guide. Visit www.cdc.gov/niosh for more information.

     You must:

     • Provide at least two standby employees outside the IDLH area.

Note: You need only one standby employee if the IDLH condition is well characterized, will remain stable AND you can show one employee can adequately do ALL of the following:
• Monitor employees in the IDLH area
• Implement communication
• Initiate rescue duties.
     • Train and equip standby employees to provide effective emergency rescue. Equip them with:

     – A pressure-demand SCBA or a pressure-demand air-line respirator with an auxiliary SCBA, for each standby employee

     – Appropriate retrieval equipment, when it would help with the effective rescue of the entrant, or an equivalent means of rescue

     • Make sure standby employees maintain visual, voice, or signal line communication with employees in the IDLH area

     • Make sure that in the event of an emergency:

     – Standby employees notify you or your designee before they enter the IDLH area to provide emergency rescue

     – You provide necessary assistance when notified.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-616   Air quality for self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) and air-line respirators.  

     Your responsibility:

     To provide employees who use SCBAs or air-line respirators with an acceptable air supply.

     You must:

     Make sure breathing air and oxygen meet established specifications

     WAC 296-307-61605

     Prevent conditions that could create a hazardous breathing air supply

     WAC 296-307-61610

     Make sure compressors do not create a hazardous breathing air supply

     WAC 296-307-61615.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61605   Make sure breathing air and oxygen meet established specifications.  

     You must:

     • Make sure that all SCBAs and air-line respirators are provided with safe breathing air and oxygen according to the following:

     – Compressed breathing air must meet the following specifications for Grade D air:

     ▪ Oxygen (volume/volume) within 19.5-23.5%

     ▪ Hydrocarbon (condensed): NO MORE than five milligrams per cubic meter of air

     ▪ Carbon monoxide (CO): NO MORE than ten parts per million (ppm)

     ▪ Carbon dioxide (CO2): NO MORE than 1,000 ppm

     ▪ No noticeable odor

Reference: See the American National Standards Institute - Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification for Air (G-7.1.1989) for more information. Contact your local library to access a copy.
     You must:

     • Make sure the moisture content of the air supplied meets the following:

     – Air supplied to respirators from cylinders must NOT exceed a dew point of -50°F (or -45.6°C) at 1 atmospheric pressure.

     – Compressor supplied air must NOT exceed a dew point of 10°F (or 5.56°C) BELOW the use temperature at 1 atmospheric pressure.

     • Cylinders obtained from a supplier of breathing air must have a certificate of analysis that verifies each cylinder's contents meet Grade D and dew point standards.

     • Compressed and liquid oxygen must meet the United States Pharmacopoeia requirements for medical or breathing oxygen.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61610   Prevent conditions that could create a hazardous breathing air supply.  

     You must:

     • Use SCBA and air-line respirators safely:

     – Do NOT supply compressed oxygen to SCBAs or air-line respirators that previously used compressed air.

Note: Compressed air leaves residues containing hydrocarbons such as oil or grease. Fire or explosion can occur if compressed oxygen makes contact with these residues.
     You must:

     • Use breathing air couplings on air-line respirators that are NOT compatible with couplings for nonrespirable air or other gas systems, for example, utility air used for manufacturing purposes.

     • Do NOT allow asphyxiating substances to enter breathing air lines; for example, do not flush nitrogen through worksite air lines also used for breathing air.

     • Use equipment specifically designed for oxygen service or distribution IF oxygen concentrations greater than 23.5% are used.

Note: Respiratory equipment NOT designed for oxygen service or distribution can create fire or explosion hazards in oxygen concentrations higher than 23.5%.
     You must:

     • Make sure cylinders used to supply breathing air for SCBAs or air-line respirators are tested and maintained as described in the federal Department of Transportation's (DOT) Shipping Container Specification Regulations, Title 49 CFR Parts 173 and 178.

Note: • Use only cylinders marked (with serial number, cylinder pressure, DOT exemption number, and test dates) according to these DOT regulations
• To find any Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) visit: www.access.gpo.gov.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61615   Make sure compressors do not create a hazardous breathing air supply.  

     IMPORTANT:

     • Ambient-air movers (or pumps) used to supply air to respirators must be used according to the manufacturer's instructions.

     • Respirators used with ambient-air movers must be approved by NIOSH to operate within the pressure ranges of the air mover.

     You must:

     (1) Locate or modify compressor intakes so they will not pick up contaminated air OR exhaust gases such as carbon monoxide from:

     • Fuel-powered vehicles

     OR

     • The internal combustion motor of the compressor

     OR

     • Other contaminant sources in the area, for example, a ventilation system discharge.

Note: • You may need to reposition or extend the compressor's intake or engine exhaust pipe or outlet, especially if they are located near each other.
• Be aware that exhaust gases may not adequately disperse when the compressor is operated in:
– An enclosed space such as a small room, a corner, or near a wall
OR
– In turbulent wind conditions.
     You must:

     (2) Equip compressors with suitable air-purifying filters, water traps, and sorbents (such as charcoal beds) and maintain them as follows:

     • Periodically change or clean them according to the manufacturer or supplier's instructions

     • Keep a tag at the compressor with the following information:

     – When the sorbent and filters were last replaced or cleaned

     – The date of the most recent changes or cleaning

     – The signature of the person authorized by the employer to perform changes or cleaning.

Note: To be sure you are providing the recommended operating pressure for respirators, you may need to install a delivery pressure gauge at the point where the manifold respirator hose is attached.
     You must:

     (3) Make sure the carbon monoxide (CO) level in breathing air from compressors does NOT exceed ten parts per million (ppm).

Note: If you do not have a reliable CO-free area available for locating your compressor intake, consider these examples of methods to prevent CO contamination of the air supply:
• Use of continuous and effective carbon monoxide alarms and filters
• Conduct frequent monitoring of air quality
• Use a CO converter (converts CO to carbon dioxide).
     You must:

     • Maintain CO levels in oil lubricated compressors by using at least one of the following:

     – An effective CO alarm

     – An effective high temperature alarm AND testing the air supply often enough to see if CO levels exceed ten ppm.

Note: • How often to test depends on a number of considerations, for example:
– Compressor age
– Maintenance history of the compressor
– Stability of CO readings
• If the CO or high temperature alarm cannot be heard by the employee, a flashing light or other effective alternative to an audio alarm needs to be used
• Safeguards, such as alarms, are necessary to prevent CO contamination resulting from compressor overheating
• Any type of oil-lubricated compressor, such as screw or piston types, may produce dangerous levels of CO if overheating occurs
– Old compressors are known to leak oil due to worn parts, increasing the possibility for overheating. Newer compressors may also overheat if maintenance practices are poor. For example, poor maintenance practices may lead to disconnected or incorrectly set alarms, inoperative shut-offs, or an impaired cooling system
• You need to instruct employees to move to a safe area when the alarm sounds AND to stop using respirators.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-618   Labeling of air-purifying respirator filters, cartridges, and canisters.  

     Your responsibility:

     To make sure employees, their supervisors, and program administrators can easily check for the correct air-purifying filters, cartridges, and canisters on respirators.

Exemption: This section does NOT apply to filtering-facepiece respirators when used voluntarily. See WAC 296-307-598 for voluntary use requirements.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-61805   Keep labels readable on respirator filters, cartridges, and canisters during use.  

     You must:

     • Make sure the NIOSH certification labeling and color-coding on air-purifying respirator filters, cartridges, and canisters remains readable and intact during use.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-620   Required procedures for respiratory protection program.  

     Your responsibility:

     To use the procedures and questionnaire provided in this section when implementing your respiratory protection program.      You must:

     Use this medical questionnaire for medical evaluations

     WAC 296-307-62005

     Follow these fit-testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators

     WAC 296-307-62010

     Follow procedures established for cleaning and disinfecting respirators

     WAC 296-307-62015

     Follow procedures established for seal checking respirators

     WAC 296-307-62020.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-62005   Use this medical questionnaire for medical evaluations.  

     You must:

     • Use the medical questionnaire in Table 10 when conducting medical evaluations.

Note: • You may use a physical exam instead of this questionnaire if the exam covers the same information as the questionnaire.
• You may use on-line questionnaires if the questions are the same and the requirements in WAC 296-307-604 of this part are met.
• You may choose to send the questionnaire to the LCHP ahead of time, giving time to review it and add any necessary questions.
• The LHCP determines what questions to add to the questionnaire, if any; however, questions in Parts 1-3 may not be deleted or substantially altered.

Table 10

WISHA Medical Evaluation Questionnaire
Employer instructions:
• You may use on-line questionnaires if the requirements in WAC 296-307-60405 are met.
• You must tell your employee how to deliver or send the completed questionnaire to the healthcare provider you have selected.
• You must NOT review employees' questionnaires.
Healthcare provider's instructions:
• Review the information in this questionnaire and any additional information provided to you by the employer.
• You may add questions to this questionnaire at your discretion; HOWEVER, questions in Parts 1-3 may not be deleted or substantially altered.
• Follow-up evaluation is required for any positive response to questions 1-8 in Part 2, or questions 1-6 in Part 3. This might include: Phone consultations to evaluate positive responses, medical tests, and diagnostic procedures.
• When your evaluation is complete, send a copy of your written recommendation to the employer AND employee.
Employee information and instructions:
• Your employer must allow you to answer this questionnaire during normal working hours, or at a time and place that's convenient to you.
• Your employer or supervisor must not look at or review your answers at any time.

Part 1 - Employee Background Information
ALL employees must complete this part
Please print
1. Today's date:
2. Your name:
3. Your age (to nearest year):
4. Sex (circle one): Male / Female
5. Your height: ft. in.
6. Your weight: lbs.
7. Your job title:
8. A phone number where you can be reached by the healthcare professional who reviews this questionnaire (include Area Code):
9. The best time to call you at this number:
10. Has your employer told you how to contact the healthcare professional who will review this questionnaire? Yes / No
11. Check the type of respirator(s) you will be using:
a. N, R, or P filtering-facepiece respirator (for example, a dust mask, OR an N95 filtering-facepiece respirator).
b. Check all that apply.
Half mask Full facepiece mask Helmet hood Escape
Nonpowered cartridge or canister Powered air-purifying cartridge respirator (PAPR)
Supplied-air or Air-line
Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA): Demand or Pressure demand
Other:
12. Have you previously worn a respirator? Yes / No
If "yes," describe what type(s):
Part 2 - General Health Information
ALL employees must complete this part
Please circle "Yes" or "No"
1. Do you currently smoke tobacco, or have you smoked tobacco in the last month? Yes / No
2. Have you ever had any of the following conditions?
a. Seizures (fits): Yes / No
b. Diabetes (sugar disease): Yes / No
c. Allergic reactions that interfere with your breathing: Yes / No
d. Claustrophobia (fear of closed-in places): Yes / No
e. Trouble smelling odors: Yes / No
3. Have you ever had any of the following pulmonary or lung problems?
a. Asbestosis: Yes / No
b. Asthma: Yes / No
c. Chronic bronchitis: Yes / No
d. Emphysema: Yes / No
e. Pneumonia: Yes / No
f. Tuberculosis: Yes / No
g. Silicosis: Yes / No
h. Pneumothorax (collapsed lung): Yes / No
i. Lung cancer: Yes / No
j. Broken ribs: Yes / No
k. Any chest injuries or surgeries: Yes / No
l. Any other lung problem that you have been told about: Yes / No
4. Do you currently have any of the following symptoms of pulmonary or lung illness?
a. Shortness of breath: Yes / No
b. Shortness of breath when walking fast on level ground or walking up a slight hill or incline: Yes / No
c. Shortness of breath when walking with other people at an ordinary pace on level ground: Yes / No
d. Have to stop for breath when walking at your own pace on level ground: Yes / No
e. Shortness of breath when washing or dressing yourself: Yes / No
f. Shortness of breath that interferes with your job: Yes / No
g. Coughing that produces phlegm (thick sputum): Yes / No
h. Coughing that wakes you early in the morning: Yes / No
i. Coughing that occurs mostly when you are lying down: Yes / No
j. Coughing up blood in the last month: Yes / No
k. Wheezing: Yes / No
l. Wheezing that interferes with your job: Yes / No
m. Chest pain when you breathe deeply: Yes / No
n. Any other symptoms that you think may be related to lung problems: Yes / No
5. Have you ever had any of the following cardiovascular or heart problems? Yes / No
a. Heart attack: Yes / No
b. Stroke: Yes / No
c. Angina: Yes / No
d. Heart failure: Yes / No
e. Swelling in your legs or feet (not caused by walking): Yes / No
f. Heart arrhythmia (heart beating irregularly): Yes / No
g. High blood pressure: Yes / No
h. Any other heart problem that you have been told about: Yes / No
6. Have you ever had any of the following cardiovascular or heart symptoms?
a. Frequent pain or tightness in your chest: Yes / No
b. Pain or tightness in your chest during physical activity: Yes / No
c. Pain or tightness in your chest that interferes with your job: Yes / No
d. In the past 2 years, have you noticed your heart skipping or missing a beat: Yes / No
e. Heartburn or indigestion that's not related to eating: Yes / No
f. Any other symptoms that you think may be related to heart or circulation problems: Yes / No
7. Do you currently take medication for any of the following problems? Yes / No
a. Breathing or lung problems: Yes / No
b. Heart trouble: Yes / No
c. Blood pressure: Yes / No
d. Seizures (fits): Yes / No
8. If you have used a respirator, have you ever had any of the following problems? (If you have never used a respirator, check the following space and go to question 9):
a. Eye irritation: Yes / No
b. Skin allergies or rashes: Yes / No
c. Anxiety: Yes / No
d. General weakness or fatigue: Yes / No
e. Any other problem that interferes with your use of a respirator? Yes / No
9. Would you like to talk to the healthcare professional who will review this questionnaire about your answers? Yes / No
Part 3 - Additional Questions for Users of Full-Facepiece Respirators or SCBAs
Please circle "Yes" or "No"
1. Have you ever lost vision in either eye (temporarily or permanently)? Yes / No
2. Do you currently have any of these vision problems?
a. Need to wear contact lenses: Yes / No
b. Need to wear glasses: Yes / No
c. Color blindness: Yes / No
d. Any other eye or vision problem: Yes / No
3. Have you ever had an injury to your ears, including a broken ear drum? Yes / No
4. Do you currently have any of these hearing problems?
a. Difficulty hearing: Yes / No
b. Need to wear a hearing aid: Yes / No
c. Any other hearing or ear problem: Yes / No
5. Have you ever had a back injury? Yes / No
6. Do you currently have any of the following musculoskeletal problems?
a. Weakness in any of your arms, hands, legs, or feet: Yes / No
b. Back pain: Yes / No
c. Difficulty fully moving your arms and legs: Yes / No
d. Pain or stiffness when you lean forward or backward at the waist: Yes / No
e. Difficulty fully moving your head up or down: Yes / No
f. Difficulty fully moving your head side to side: Yes / No
g. Difficulty bending at your knees: Yes / No
h. Difficulty squatting to the ground: Yes / No
i. Climbing a flight of stairs or a ladder carrying more than 25 lbs: Yes / No
j. Any other muscle or skeletal problem that interferes with using a respirator: Yes / No
Part 4 - Discretionary Questions
Complete questions in this part ONLY IF your employer's healthcare provider says they are necessary
1. In your present job, are you working at high altitudes (over 5,000 feet) or in a place that has lower than normal amounts of oxygen? Yes / No
If "yes," do you have feelings of dizziness, shortness of breath, pounding in your chest, or other symptoms when you are working under these conditions: Yes / No
2. Have you ever been exposed (at work or home) to hazardous solvents, hazardous airborne chemicals (such as gases, fumes, or dust), OR have you come into skin contact with hazardous chemicals? Yes / No
If "yes," name the chemicals, if you know them:
3. Have you ever worked with any of the materials, or under any of the conditions, listed below:
a. Asbestos? Yes / No
b. Silica (for example, in sandblasting)? Yes / No
c. Tungsten/cobalt (for example, grinding or welding this material)? Yes / No
d. Beryllium? Yes / No
e. Aluminum? Yes / No
f. Coal (for example, mining)? Yes / No
g. Iron? Yes / No
h. Tin? Yes / No
i. Dusty environments? Yes / No
j. Any other hazardous exposures? Yes / No
If "yes," describe these exposures:
4. List any second jobs or side businesses you have:
5. List your previous occupations:
6. List your current and previous hobbies:
7. Have you been in the military services? Yes / No
If "yes," were you exposed to biological or chemical agents (either in training or combat)? Yes / No
8. Have you ever worked on a HAZMAT team? Yes / No
9. Other than medications for breathing and lung problems, heart trouble, blood pressure, and seizures mentioned earlier in this questionnaire, are you taking any other medications for any reason (including over-the-counter medications)? Yes / No
If "yes," name the medications if you know them:
10. Will you be using any of the following items with your respirator(s)?
a. HEPA filters: Yes / No
b. Canisters (for example, gas masks): Yes / No
c. Cartridges: Yes / No
11. How often are you expected to use the respirator(s)?
a. Escape-only (no rescue): Yes / No
b. Emergency rescue only: Yes / No
c. Less than 5 hours per week: Yes / No
d. Less than 2 hours per day: Yes / No
e. 2 to 4 hours per day: Yes / No
f. Over 4 hours per day:
12. During the period you are using the respirator(s), is your work effort:
a. Light (less than 200 kcal per hour): Yes / No
If "yes," how long does this period last during the average

shift: hrs. mins.

Examples of a light work effort are sitting while writing, typing, drafting, or performing light assembly work; or standing while operating a drill press (1-3 lbs.) or controlling machines.
b. Moderate (200 to 350 kcal per hour): Yes / No
If "yes," how long does this period last during the average

shift: hrs. mins.

Examples of moderate work effort are sitting while nailing or filing; driving a truck or bus in urban traffic; standing while drilling, nailing, performing assembly work, or transferring a moderate load (about 35 lbs.) at trunk level; walking on a level surface about 2 mph or down a 5-degree grade about 3 mph; or pushing a wheelbarrow with a heavy load (about 100 lbs.) on a level surface.
c. Heavy (above 350 kcal per hour): Yes / No
If "yes," how long does this period last during the average

shift: hrs. mins.

Examples of heavy work are lifting a heavy load (about 50 lbs.) from the floor to your waist or shoulder; working on a loading dock; shoveling; standing while bricklaying or chipping castings; walking up an 8-degree grade about 2 mph; climbing stairs with a heavy load (about 50 lbs.).
13. Will you be wearing protective clothing and/or equipment (other than the respirator) when you are using your respirator? Yes / No
If "yes," describe this protective clothing and/or equipment:
14. Will you be working under hot conditions (temperature exceeding 77°F): Yes / No
15. Will you be working under humid conditions: Yes / No
16. Describe the work you will be doing while using your respirator(s):
17. Describe any special or hazardous conditions you might encounter when you are using your respirator(s) (for example, confined spaces, life-threatening gases):
18. Provide the following information, if you know it, for each toxic substance that you will be exposed to when you are using your respirator(s):
Name of the first toxic substance:
Estimated maximum exposure level per shift:
Duration of exposure per shift:
Name of the second toxic substance:
Estimated maximum exposure level per shift:
Duration of exposure per shift:
Name of the third toxic substance:
Estimated maximum exposure level per shift:
Duration of exposure per shift:
The name of any other toxic substances that you will be exposed to while using your respirator:
19. Describe any special responsibilities you will have while using your respirator(s) that may affect the safety and well-being of others (for example, rescue, security).

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-62010   Follow these fit-testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators.  

     IMPORTANT:

     • This section contains procedural requirements that apply during actual fit testing.

     • See WAC 296-307-606 of this part for fit-testing requirements that apply to your overall program.

Exemptions: This section does NOT apply to employees who:
• Voluntarily use respirators
OR
• Are required to use mouthpiece respirators.
     You must:

     • Conduct fit testing according to all of the following:

     – Follow the procedure in Table 11 to choose a respirator for fit testing:

     ▪ Prior to conducting fit tests

     AND

     ▪ Any time your employee must select a different respirator such as when a previously selected respirator fails a test

     – Select and follow at least one of the following fit test procedures:

     ▪ Qualitative fit-test procedures:

     ♦ Isoamyl acetate vapor (IAA, banana oil) in Table 12

     ♦ Saccharine aerosol in Table 13

     ♦ Bitrex™ aerosol in Table 14

     ♦ Irritant smoke in Table 15

     ▪ Quantitative fit-test procedures:

     ♦ Ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter such as the Portacount™, in Table 16

     ♦ Controlled negative pressure (CNP) such as the FitTester 3000™, in Table 17

     ♦ Generated aerosol in Table 18

     – Make sure employees perform the appropriate fit-test exercises listed in Table 19.

     – Clean and maintain equipment according to the manufacturer's instructions.

     – Make sure during fit testing employees wear any safety equipment that could:

     ▪ Interfere with respirator fit

     AND

     ▪ Be worn in the workplace. For example, chemical splash goggles.

     – Check, prior to fit testing, for conditions that may interfere with the respirator seal or valve functions. If you find such conditions, do NOT conduct fit testing for that individual.

Note: Examples of conditions that may interfere with the respirator seal or valve functions include:
• Moustache, stubble, sideburns, bangs, hairline, and other types of facial hair in areas where the respirator facepiece seals or that interfere with valve function
• Temple bars of corrective eyewear or headgear that extend through the face seal area.

Table 11

Procedure for Choosing a Respirator for Fit Testing
1. Inform the employee:
• To choose the most comfortable respirator that provides an adequate fit
• That each respirator sample represents a different size and, if more than one model is supplied, a different shape
• That if fitted and used properly, the respirator chosen will provide adequate protection
2. Provide a mirror and show the employee how to:
• Put on the respirator
• Position the respirator on the face
• Set strap tension.
Note:

This instruction does NOT take the place of the employee's formal training since it is only a review.

3. Review with the employee how to check for a comfortable fit around the nose, cheeks and other areas on the face.
• Tell the employee the respirator should be comfortable while talking or wearing eye protection.
4. Have the employee hold each facepiece against the face, taking enough time to compare the fit of each. The employee can then either:
• Reject any facepiece that clearly does not feel comfortable or fit adequately
OR
• Choose which facepiece is most acceptable and which is less acceptable, if any.
Note:

• Supply as many respirator models and sizes as needed to make sure the employee finds a respirator that's acceptable and fits correctly

• To save time later, during this step note the more acceptable facepieces in case the one chosen fails the fit test or proves unacceptable later.

5. Have the employee wear the most acceptable respirator for AT LEAST 5 minutes to evaluate comfort and fit. Do ALL of the following during this time:
• Ask the employee to observe and comment about the comfort and fit:
– Around the nose, cheeks, and other areas on the face
– When talking or wearing eye protection
• Have the employee put on the respirator and adjust the straps until they show proficiency
• Evaluate the respirator's general fit by checking:
– Proper chin placement
– Properly tightened straps (do NOT over tighten)
– Acceptable fit across the nose bridge
– Respirator size; it must span the distance from nose to chin
– To see if the respirator stays in position
• Have the employee complete a successful seal check as specified in WAC 296-307-62020 of this chapter
– Prior to the seal check they must settle the respirator on their face by taking a few slow deep breaths WHILE SLOWLY:
▪ Moving their head from side-to-side
AND
▪ Up and down.
6. If the employee finds the respirator unacceptable, allow the employee to select another one and return to Step 5. Otherwise, proceed to Step 7.
7. Before starting the fit test, you must:
• Describe the fit test including screening procedures, employee responsibilities, and test exercises
AND
• Make sure the employee wears the respirator AT LEAST five minutes.

Table 12

Isoamyl Acetate (Banana Oil) Vapor Test Procedure
Important:
• This is a qualitative fit-test (QLFT) procedure
• The success of this test depends on preserving the employee's odor sensitivity to isoamyl acetate (IAA) vapor
– Vapor accumulations in ambient air can decrease odor sensitivity. To prevent this:
▪ Prepare ALL solutions in a location separate from screening and test areas
▪ Conduct screening and tests in separate well-ventilated rooms. For example, use an exhaust fan or laboratory hood to prevent IAA vapor from accumulating in the room air
– Always use odor-free water, for example, distilled or spring water that's 25°C (77°F).
• Isoamyl acetate is also known as isopentyl acetate.
Screening Preparations
Important:
Odor threshold screening determines if the employee can detect weak concentrations of IAA vapor.
1. Choose an appropriate location to conduct screening.
• Conduct screening and tests in separate well-ventilated rooms.
2. Prepare a stock solution AT LEAST weekly as follows:
• Add one milliliter (ml) of pure IAA to 800 ml of odor-free water in a one-liter glass jar with a metal lid using a measuring dropper or pipette
• Seal the jar with the lid and shake it for 30 seconds
• Clean the dropper or pipette.
3. Prepare the odor test solution daily as follows:
• Add 0.4 ml from the stock solution to 500 ml of water in a one liter glass jar with a metal lid using a clean pipette or dropper
• Seal the jar with the lid and shake it for 30 seconds
• Let this solution stand for 2-3 minutes so the IAA concentration above the liquid reaches equilibrium
• Label this jar so you know the contents but the employee cannot know its contents, for example, "1."
Note:

To maintain the integrity of the test, use labels that peel off easily AND periodically switch the labels.

4. Prepare a "test blank" solution as follows:
• Add 500 ml of odor-free water to a one liter glass jar with a metal lid
• Seal the jar
• Label the jar so you know the contents but the employee cannot know its contents.
5. Type or neatly print the following instructions on a card and place it on the table in front of the two test jars:
"The purpose of this test is to find out if you can smell banana oil at a low concentration. While both jars contain water, one ALSO contains a small amount of banana oil.
Make sure the lid is secure then pick up a jar and shake it for two seconds. Open the jar and sniff at the opening. Repeat this for the second jar.
Tell the individual conducting the fit test which jar contains banana oil."
Test Preparations
6. Choose an appropriate location to conduct fit testing.
• Conduct screening and tests in separate well-ventilated rooms.
7. Assemble the fit test enclosure in the room.
• Invert a clear 55-gallon drum liner over a circular 2-foot diameter frame made of plywood or other lightweight rigid material OR construct a similar enclosure using plastic sheeting
• Hang the frame with the plastic covering so the top of the enclosure is about six inches above the employee's head
• Attach a small hook inside top center of the enclosure
• Tape a copy of the test exercises (see Table 28) to the inside of the test enclosure where the employee can read it.
8. Have organic vapor cartridges or equivalent on hand for each employee's chosen respirator.
9. Have ready a 6 x 5-inch piece of paper towel or other porous absorbent single-ply material AND 0.75 ml of pure IAA. Do NOT apply IAA yet.
Note:

As an alternative to using the paper towel, you may use an IAA test swab OR ampoule if it has been demonstrated to generate an equivalent test concentration.

Screening
10. Have the employee, while NOT wearing a respirator, follow the instructions on the card provided.
• If the employee correctly identifies the jar containing IAA, proceed to conduct testing (Step 11)
• If the employee is NOT able to correctly identify the jar containing IAA, you must STOP and use a different fit test protocol.
Test
11. BEFORE entering the fit test room, have the employee attach cartridges, put on, properly adjust, and seal check the respirator. Have the employee enter the test enclosure.
12. Wet the paper towel with 0.75 ml of pure IAA AND fold it in half.
13. Pass the paper towel to the employee inside the enclosure AND instruct the employee to hang it on the hook at the top of the enclosure.
14. Wait two minutes for the IAA vapor to fill the enclosure.
• While waiting, explain the fit test, including the purpose of the test exercises, the importance of cooperation, and that you must be informed if a banana-like odor is detected during the test
• You may also demonstrate the test exercises.
15. Have the employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises in Table 19.
• If the employee does NOT detect IAA while performing test exercises, the fit test has been PASSED. Proceed as follows:
– BEFORE leaving the enclosure, have the employee break the respirator seal and inhale. If they detect IAA, the test is valid
– When exiting the employee must remove the paper towel and give it to the individual conducting the fit test. This prevents IAA vapor from building up in the enclosure during subsequent tests
– The individual conducting the fit test must keep used paper towels in a self-sealing plastic bag to prevent area contamination
• If the employee detects IAA during any test exercise, the fit test has FAILED. STOP and have the employee do the following:
– Quickly return to the selection room to remove the respirator. This avoids decreasing the employee's odor sensitivity
– Select another respirator
– Repeat screening and testing
▪ At this stage, if the employee fails the screening part of this procedure, the employee can repeat it AFTER waiting at least five minutes for odor sensitivity to return.

Table 13

Saccharin Aerosol Test Procedure
Screening Preparations
Important:
• This is a qualitative fit-test (QLFT) procedure
• Taste threshold screening determines whether the employee being tested can detect the taste of saccharin
– The employee must NOT eat, smoke, chew gum or drink anything but plain water for at least fifteen minutes BEFORE the fit test. Sweet foods or drink consumed before the test may make the employee unable to detect saccharin during screening
– Nebulizers must be thoroughly rinsed in water and shaken dry:
▪ Each morning and afternoon
OR
▪ At least every four hours.
• You may use commercially prepared solutions if they meet the requirements in this procedure.
1. Obtain a test enclosure (hood) that meets the following specifications:
• Twelve inches in diameter by fourteen inches tall
• A clear front portion
• Enough space inside to allow free movement of the head when a respirator is worn
• A 3/4 inch (or 1.9 centimeter) hole to accommodate the nebulizer nozzle. The hole must line up in front of the wearer's nose and mouth.
Note:

• An enclosure similar to the 3M hood assembly, parts #FT 14 and #FT 15 combined, meets these specifications

• This enclosure can also be used for testing.

2. Obtain and assemble two clean DeVilbiss Model 40 Inhalation Medication Nebulizers OR equivalent.
3. Prepare the screening solution as follows:
• Dissolve 83.0 milligrams of sodium saccharin USP in 100 ml of warm distilled water
OR
• IF you have already prepared the fit-test solution, you can make the screening solution by adding 1 ml of this solution to 100 ml of distilled water.
4. Add about 1 ml of the screening solution to one of the nebulizers.
• Mark this nebulizer to distinguish it from the one to be used for fit testing.
Test Preparations
5. Prepare the fit-test solution as follows:
• Add 83.0 grams of sodium saccharin to 100 ml of warm water.
6. Add about 1 ml of the test solution to the second nebulizer.
• Mark this nebulizer to distinguish it from the one used for screening
7. Have particulate filters ready for the employee's chosen respirator or have filtering-facepiece respirators ready.
Screening
8. Have the employee, while NOT wearing a respirator, put on the test enclosure.
9. Instruct the employee to:
• Breath through a slightly open mouth with tongue extended during screening AND testing
• Immediately report when a sweet taste is detected.
10. Insert the nebulizer into the front hole of the test enclosure AND administer saccharin as follows:
• Direct the nozzle away from the employee's nose and mouth
• Complete 10 squeezes in rapid succession
• Each time firmly squeeze the bulb so it collapses completely, then release and allow it to fully expand.
11. Ask the employee if a sweet taste is detected.
• If YES, screening is completed. Proceed to conduct testing, Step 14, AFTER you:
– Ask the employee to remember the taste for reference during the fit test
– Note the employee's taste threshold as "10" regardless of the number of squeezes actually completed
• If NO, screening must continue. Proceed to Step 12.
12. Repeat with 10 more squeezes. Then follow Step 11 again; EXCEPT this time note the employee's taste threshold as "20" IF a sweet taste is reported.
• If a sweet taste is still NOT detected, repeat with 10 more squeezes and follow Step 11 one last time; EXCEPT this time note "30" for the taste threshold IF a sweet taste is reported.
13. If NO sweet taste is reported after 30 squeezes, you must STOP and choose a different fit-test protocol for the employee.
Test
Important!
• Periodically check nebulizers to make sure they do not clog during use. A test is NOT valid if the nebulizer is clogged at the end of the test.
14. Have the employee attach particulate filters, put on, properly adjust, and seal check the respirator. Have the employee put on the test enclosure (hood).
15. Instruct the employee to immediately report if a sweet taste is detected.
16. Insert the nebulizer into the front hole of the test enclosure AND administer the same number of squeezes, either 10, 20, or 30, as noted during screening.
17. Have the employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises as described in Table 19. During this step:
• Replenish the aerosol in the hood EVERY 30 seconds using 1/2 the number of squeezes used in Step 16, either 5, 10, or 15
• The employee must report if a sweet taste is detected:
– If NO saccharin is tasted, the test has been PASSED
▪ If saccharin is tasted the test has FAILED, have the employee select another respirator
AND
▪ Repeat screening and testing.

Table 14

Bitrex™ Aerosol Test Procedure
Important!
• This is a qualitative fit-test (QLFT) procedure
• Bitrex™ (denatonium benzoate) is routinely used as a taste aversion agent in household liquids that children shouldn't drink and is endorsed by the American Medical Association, the National Safety Council, and the American Association of Poison Control Centers
• The employee must NOT eat, smoke, chew gum or drink anything but plain water for at least fifteen minutes BEFORE the fit test.
Screening Preparations
Important!
• Taste threshold screening determines whether the employee being tested can detect the taste of Bitrex™
• Nebulizers must be thoroughly rinsed in water and shaken dry:
– Each morning and afternoon
OR
– At least every four hours.
• You may use commercially prepared solutions if they meet the requirements in this procedure.
1. Obtain a test enclosure that meets the following specifications:
• Twelve inches in diameter by fourteen inches tall
• A clear front portion
• Enough space inside the front to allow free movement of the head when a respirator is worn
• 3/4 inch (or 1.9 centimeter) hole to accommodate the nebulizer nozzle. The hole must line up in front of the wearer's nose and mouth.
Note:

• An enclosure similar to the 3M hood assembly, parts #FT 14 and #FT 15 combined, meets these specifications

• This enclosure can also be used for testing.

2. Obtain and assemble two clean DeVilbiss Model 40 Inhalation Medication Nebulizers OR equivalent:
3. Prepare the screening solution as follows:
• Make up a 5% salt solution by dissolving 5.0 grams of salt (sodium chloride) into 100 ml of distilled water
• Dissolve 13.5 milligrams of Bitrex™ in the salt solution.
4. Add about 1 ml of the screening solution to one of the nebulizers.
• Mark this nebulizer to distinguish it from the one to be used for fit testing.
Test Preparations
5. Prepare the fit test solution.
• Dissolve 10.0 grams of salt (sodium chloride) into 200 ml of distilled water
• Add 337.5 milligrams of Bitrex™ to the warmed salt solution.
6. Add about 1 ml of the test solution to the second nebulizer.
• Mark this nebulizer to distinguish it from the one used for screening.
7. Have particulate filters ready for the employee's chosen respirator or have filtering-facepiece respirators ready.
Screening
Important:

The employee must NOT eat, smoke, chew gum or drink anything but plain water for at least fifteen minutes BEFORE the screening and test

8. Have the employee, while NOT wearing a respirator, put on the test enclosure.
9. Instruct the employee to:
• Breath through a slightly opened mouth with tongue extended during screening AND testing
• Immediately report when a bitter taste is detected.
10. Insert the nebulizer into the front hole of the test enclosure AND administer Bitrex™ as follows:
• Direct the nozzle away from the employee's nose and mouth
• Complete 10 squeezes in rapid succession
• Each time firmly squeeze the bulb so it collapses completely, then release and allow it to fully expand.
11. Ask the employee whether a bitter taste is detected.
• If YES, screening is completed. Proceed to conduct testing, Step 14, AFTER you:
– Ask the employee to remember the taste for reference during the fit test
– Note the employee's taste threshold as "10," regardless of the number of squeezes actually completed
• If NO, screening must continue. Proceed to Step 12.
12. Repeat with 10 more squeezes. Then follow Step 11 again; EXCEPT this time note the employee's taste threshold as "20" IF a bitter taste is reported.
• If a bitter taste is still NOT detected repeat with 10 more squeezes and follow Step 11 one last time; EXCEPT this time note "30" for the taste threshold IF a bitter taste is reported.
13. If NO bitter taste is reported after 30 squeezes, you must STOP and choose a different fit-test protocol for the employee.
Test
14. Have the employee attach particulate filters, put on, properly adjust, and seal check the respirator. Have the employee put on the test enclosure.
15. Instruct the employee to:
• Breathe through a slightly opened mouth with tongue extended during screening AND testing
• Immediately report when a bitter taste is detected.
16. Insert the nebulizer into the front hole of the test enclosure AND administer the same number of squeezes, either 10, 20, or 30, as noted during screening.
17. Have the employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises as described in Table 19. During this step:
• Replenish the aerosol in the hood EVERY 30 seconds using 1/2 the number of squeezes used in Step 16, either 5, 10, or 15
• The employee must report if a bitter taste is detected:
– If NO Bitrex™ is tasted, the test has been PASSED
– If Bitrex™ is tasted the test has FAILED. Have the employee:
▪ Select another respirator
AND
▪ Repeat all screening and testing steps.

Table 15

Irritant Smoke (Stannic Chloride) Test Procedure
Important:
• DO NOT USE A TEST ENCLOSURE OR HOOD FOR THIS FIT TEST!
• This is a qualitative fit-test (QLFT) procedure
• During this test an employee is exposed to irritating smoke containing hydrochloric acid produced by a stannic chloride ventilation smoke tube to detect leakage. The smoke will irritate eyes, lungs, and nasal passages
• Employee sensitivity varies, and certain employees may respond more intensely than others exposed to irritant smoke. The individual conducting the fit test must take precautions to minimize the employees' exposure to irritant smoke
• Conduct fit testing in an area with adequate ventilation to prevent exposure of the individual conducting the fit test and build-up of irritant smoke in the ambient air.
Screening AND Test Preparations
Important:
Sensitivity screening is necessary to determine whether the employee can detect a weak concentration of irritant smoke AND whether any gross facepiece leakage is detected.
1. Obtain only stannic chloride (ventilation) smoke tubes, AND an aspirator squeeze bulb OR use a low-flow air pump set to deliver 200 milliliters of air flow per minute.
2. Equip the employee's chosen respirator with P100 series filters if a negative pressure air-purifying respirator will be tested. If a powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) will be tested equip the respirator with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters.
Screening
Important!
When performing sensitivity screening checks use only the MINIMUM amount of smoke necessary to elicit a response from the employee.
3. Advise the employee that the smoke can be irritating to eyes, lungs, and nasal passages AND instruct the employee to keep eyes closed while exposed.
4. Break both ends of the ventilation smoke tube AND fit a short piece of plastic tubing, for example, two-to-six inches of tygon tubing, over one end to prevent exposure to the sharp end of the tube. Connect the other end to an aspirator bulb or a low-flow air pump set to deliver a flow of 200 ml per minute.
5. While the employee is NOT wearing a respirator, have the employee smell a weak concentration of irritant smoke to become familiar with its irritating properties.
• Carefully direct a small amount of irritant smoke toward the employee.
Test
Test 6. Have the employee attach respirator filters, put on, adjust, and seal check the respirator without assistance. The employee must be proficient at these tasks.
7. Remind the employee to keep eyes closed during testing.
8. Direct a stream of irritant smoke toward the respirator's face seal area as follows:
• Begin at least 12 inches from the facepiece AND move the smoke around the whole perimeter of the mask
• Gradually make two more passes around the perimeter of the facepiece, moving to within 6 inches of the respirator
• STOP at any time the employee detects smoke in the facepiece. If this occurs a different respirator will need to be chosen and tested, beginning with sensitivity screening.
9. Have the employee perform appropriate fit-test exercises in Table 19 IF the employee has NOT had an involuntary response such as evidence of coughing, flinching, or other response, OR detected smoke in the facepiece.
• Continue to direct smoke from a distance of 6 inches around the facepiece perimeter
– If smoke is detected at any time the test has FAILED. A different respirator must be chosen and tested, starting with sensitivity screening
– If NO smoke is detected proceed to Step 10.
10. Have the employee remove the respirator AND perform another sensitivity screening check as follows:
• Continue to use the smoke tube used for fit testing
• Carefully direct a SMALL amount of irritant smoke toward the employee
– The test has been PASSED IF the employee responds to the smoke
– The fit test is VOIDED IF the employee does NOT respond to the smoke.

Table 16

Ambient Aerosol Condensation Nuclei Counter (Portacount™) Test Procedure
Important:
• This is a quantitative (QNFT) fit-test procedure
• This method uses a particle counting instrument that measures and compares the particle concentration both inside and outside the respirator facepiece while the employee performs a series of test exercises
• Particles in the ambient air are used as the test aerosol.
Test Preparations
1. Obtain a test instrument such as a Portacount™.
2. Have probed respirators available for each respirator model and size the employer uses, OR have a sampling adapter available if the employee's actual or chosen respirator will be tested.
Note:

• A probed respirator has a special fitting installed on the facepiece designed to connect with the end of the test instrument's plastic sampling tube so that air samples can be taken inside the facepiece. Probed respirators can be obtained from the respirator manufacturer, or distributor, AND can only be used for fit-testing purposes

• Contact TSI Inc., OR the respirator's manufacturer to obtain probed respirators or facepiece sampling adapters.

3. Follow the test instrument manufacturer's instructions for test preparation, including particle, zero, and system checks. Make sure the instrument's pass OR fail criterion is programmed to the following MINIMUM performance levels:
• For half-facepiece respirators, an overall minimum fit factor of 100 as a passing level
• For full-facepiece respirators, an overall minimum fit factor of 500 as a passing level
4. Have high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, OR other respirator filters available that are capable of preventing significant penetration by particles generated by the test instrument such as, P100 or N95 series filters.
• If you'll use a sampling adapter instead of probed respirators be sure to have the correct type for the respirators chosen.
Test
5. Properly attach the sampling line to the facepiece probe or sampling adapter.
6. Have the employee attach respirator filters, put on, properly adjust, and wear the respirator five minutes BEFORE the fit test. During this time you and the employee must evaluate the respirator's general fit by checking:
• Proper chin placement
• Properly tightened straps (do NOT over tighten)
• Acceptable fit across the nose bridge
• Respirator size. It must span the distance from nose to chin
• To see if the respirator stays in position.
Note:

Wearing the respirator for five minutes permits the employee to make certain the respirator is comfortable AND allows for purging of ambient particles trapped inside the facepiece.

7. Have the employee perform a seal check. Make sure the sampling line is crimped to avoid leakage during the seal check. If NO leakage is detected, proceed to Step 8. If leakage is detected:
• Determine the cause
AND
• If leakage is due to a poorly fitting facepiece, have the employee:
– Choose another respirator size or model
AND
– Start again at Step 6.
8. Start the fit test cycle.
• Follow the manufacturer's instructions for operating the test instrument
• Have the employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises in Table 19
– The test instrument will automatically stop and calculate the overall fit factor. Use this result to determine whether or not the test is passed
▪ The test has been PASSED if the overall fit factor is at least 100 for a half facepiece, OR 500 for a full facepiece
▪ The test has FAILED if the overall fit factor is below 100 for a half facepiece or 500 for a full facepiece.
Note:

If the test has failed, have the employee select another respirator model or size following Table 11 AND repeat this procedure.


Table 17

Controlled Negative Pressure (CNP) Test Procedure
Important!
• This is a quantitative fit-test (QNFT) procedure
• This method determines respirator fit by measuring how much the facepiece leaks when it is subject to a slight negative pressure AFTER various premeasurement activities
• Measurements occur while employees remain still AND hold their breath for 10 seconds
• No test aerosols are used. Respirator cartridges aren't needed for this test.
Test Preparations
1. Make sure the individual conducting the fit test is thoroughly trained to perform this test.
2. Obtain a CNP test instrument such as a FitTester 3000™. Make sure:
• Defaults are set at:
– -15mm (-0.58 inches) of water test pressure
AND
– A modeled inspiratory flow rate of 53.8 liters per minute
• It has an effective audio warning device that signals when employees fail to hold their breath.
Note:

• You are not required to obtain test recording and printing equipment such as computers OR printers. Hand recording results is acceptable

• To see default settings, check the instrument's "REDON protocol."

3. Obtain facepiece adapters appropriate for each test respirator.
Note:

• Adapters are either a one-piece (for SCBA facepieces), OR two-piece (for dual cartridge facepieces) device providing a manifold and breathing valve system. For positive pressure respirators, you will need to obtain an additional fitting, available from the respirator manufacturer, to convert the facepiece to negative pressure

• To obtain adapters, contact the CNP instrument's distributor, Occupational Health Dynamics, OR the respirator manufacturer.

Test
Important!
After the test, you must ask the employee about the comfort of the respirator AND if the respirator has become unacceptable, another size or model must be chosen and tested.
4. Explain the test procedure to the employee.
5. Train the employee on how to hold a breath for at least 20 seconds.
6. Prepare the respirator for the fit test as follows:
• Remove or prop open the inhalation valves. If a breathing tube is present, disconnect it
• Replace cartridges, if present, with the manifold and breathing valve adapter
– For positive pressure facepieces, mount the manufacturer's additional fitting followed by the manifold-breathing valve adapter
• Connect the respirator to the CNP device according to the CNP instrument manufacturer's directions.
7. Have the employee put on, adjust, and seal check the respirator.
8. Turn on the instrument AND have the employee stand and perform the fit-test exercises in Table 19.
9. Interpret the test results:
• The test is PASSED IF the overall fit factor obtained is at least 100 for a half facepiece, or at least 500 for a full facepiece
• The test has FAILED IF the fit factor is less than 100 for a half facepiece; 500 for a full facepiece
– If the test has FAILED you must have the employee select another respirator model or size following the steps in Table 11 AND repeat this procedure, starting at Step 6.

Table 18

Generated Aerosol Test Procedure
Important:
• This is a quantitative (QNFT) fit-test procedure
• In this method, a test aerosol is used to challenge the facepiece seal while aerosol concentrations inside and outside the facepiece are measured during test exercises
• Special equipment is needed to generate, disperse, detect, and measure test aerosols.
Test Preparations
1. Test aerosol.
• Use a particulate, for example, corn oil, polyethylene glycol 400, di-2-ethyl hexyl sebacate, or sodium chloride.
2. Instrumentation.
• Do ALL the following:
– Obtain and use aerosol generation, dilution, and measurement systems appropriate for particulates
– Use an aerosol-generating instrument that will maintain test concentrations within a 10% variation
– Select a sampling instrument that allows for a computer record or strip chart record to be created
▪ The record must show the rise and fall of test agent concentration during each inhalation and exhalation at fit factors of at least 2000.
Note: Integrators, or computers that integrate the amount of test agent penetration leakage into the respirator for each exercise, may be used if a record of the readings is made.
– Minimize the time interval between the activity and the recording of the activity so you can clearly connect what you see to what is being recorded. For example, use a small diameter and length of sampling line.
3. Test enclosure.
• Do ALL the following:
– Make sure the enclosure is equipped and constructed to effectively:
▪ Maintain a uniform concentration of the test agent inside the enclosure. For example, the enclosure must be large enough to allow ALL employees freedom of movement during testing WITHOUT disturbing the test concentration or measurement instrument
▪ Keep the test agent from contaminating the air outside the enclosure. For example, use a HEPA filter to purify exhausted air
▪ Allow the individual conducting the fit test to view the employee during the test
– Make sure the tubing used to collect samples from the enclosure AND respirator is the same material, diameter, AND length. This makes the effect of aerosol loss caused by deposition in each sample line equal
– If sodium chloride is used, relative humidity inside the enclosure must be kept below 50%.
4. Prepare test respirators.
• Do ALL the following:
– Inspect test respirators regularly for missing parts AND damage
– Keep test respirators in proper working order
– Make sure in-mask sampling probes are:
▪ Designed and installed so the air sample will be drawn from the employee's breathing zone; midway between the nose and mouth
AND
▪ The probe extends inside the facepiece at least 1/4 inch
– Make sure sampling ports such as probes, or adapters on respirators are constructed and installed so they do NOT:
▪ Block air flow into the sampling line
▪ Leak
▪ Interfere with the respirator's fit or performance
• Have high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters OR P100 series filter available
– Replace filters when increased breathing resistance is detected OR when the test agent has altered the filter material's integrity.
Test
Important!
• Throughout the test, maintain the employee's exposure to any test agent below the established exposure limit. Exposures allowed must be based on exposure time and exposure limit duration
• If a single peak penetration exceeds 5% for half facepieces OR 1% for full facepieces:
– STOP the test
AND
– Have the employee select another respirator for testing.
5. Have the employee attach filters, put on, adjust, and seal check the respirator.
• Be sure to crimp the sampling line to avoid pressure leaks during the seal check
AND
• Have the employee adjust the respirator straps, without assistance, so the fit is comfortable. Do NOT over tighten.
6. OPTIONAL Step. To save time conduct a screening test to quickly identify poorly fitting respirators.
Note:     You may use a qualitative screening test OR an ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter instrument in the count mode.
7. Make sure test aerosol concentration is reasonably stable.
• If a canopy or shower curtain enclosure is used, determine stability of the test aerosol concentration AFTER the employee enters the enclosure.
8. Have the employee enter the test enclosure and connect the respirator to the sample lines.
9. Immediately after entering the enclosure measure test aerosol concentration inside the respirator.
• Make sure the peak penetration does NOT exceed 5% for half facepieces, OR 1% for full facepieces.
10. Have employee perform the appropriate fit-test exercises in Table 19.
• Do NOT adjust the respirator once exercises begin.
11. Calculate the overall fit factor as specified in Steps 12-13. The fit test is:
• PASSED IF the minimum fit factor of 100 for half facepieces OR 500 for full facepieces is obtained
OR
• IF a passing fit factor is NOT obtained, the test has FAILED and you must have the employee select and test another respirator.
Calculations
Important!
• Do NOT count the grimace exercise measurements during these calculations
• Take into account the limitations of instrument detection when determining fit factors.
12. Calculate individual fit factors for EACH exercise by applying the following:
Exercise fit factor (ffE) = Average test enclosure concentration

Test aerosol concentration inside the respirator
• To determine the average test enclosure concentration use one of the following methods:
– Arithmetic average of the concentration before and after each test (an average of two values per entire test)
– Arithmetic average of concentration before and after each exercise (an average of two values per exercise)
– True average measured continuously during the respirator sample
• Determine the test aerosol concentration inside the respirator in one of the following ways:
– Average peak penetration values. Determine aerosol penetration for each exercise by:
▪ Using integrators or computers that calculate the actual test agent penetration
OR
▪ Average the peak heights shown on the strip chart recording, graph, or by computer integration
– Maximum peak penetration. Use strip chart recordings to determine the highest peak penetration for each exercise and use this value
– Area under the peaks. Use computerized integration or other appropriate calculations to integrate the area under individual peaks for each exercise.
13. Using individual exercise fit factors (ffE) calculate the overall fit factor by doing ALL of the following:
• Convert each exercise fit factor to a penetration value
• Determine the average penetration value
• Convert the average penetration value back to a fit factor
OR
• Use this equation to calculate the overall fit factor:
Overall fit factor = n

1/ffE1 + 1/ffE2 + 1/ffE3. . . + 1/ffEn

Table 19

Fit-Test Exercises
Important:
• This list applies when you use any fit test
• Employees tested must perform ALL exercises marked with an "X" as described for the fit-test procedure used
– Once exercises begin, any adjustments made void the test AND you must begin again
– After test exercises are completed, you must ask the employee about the comfort of the respirator. If it has become unacceptable, have the employee choose another one for testing
• When the controlled negative pressure procedure is used, STOP and repeat the test if the employee adjusts the respirator OR takes a breath and fails to hold it for 10 seconds
• Controlled negative pressure tests conducted according to the method published in 29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix A are an acceptable alternative to the method outlined below.
Description of Required Fit-Test Exercises Fit-Test Procedures
Qualitative Procedures Quantitative Procedures; EXCEPT the CNPP Controlled Negative Pressure Procedure (CNPP)
• Normal breathing
– Breathe normally, while standing for one minute X X
• Deep breathing
– Breathe slowly and deeply while standing for one minute X X
– Take caution to avoid hyperventilating
• Head side to side
– Slowly turn head from side to side while standing for one minute, pausing at each extreme position to inhale X X
– Be careful to NOT bump the respirator
• Head up and down
– Slowly move head up and down while standing for one minute, inhaling in the up position X X
– Be careful to NOT bump the respirator
• Talking
– Talk slowly and loud enough to be heard clearly by the individual conducting fit testing for one minute. Choose ONE of the following:
▪ Read from a prepared text such as the Rainbow Passage1 X X
▪ Count backward from 100
▪ Recite a memorized poem or song.
• Grimace
– Smile or frown for fifteen seconds. X
• Bending over
– Bend over to touch toes while standing. Repeat at a comfortable pace for one minute
OR X X
– Jog in place for one minute if the test enclosure, such as a hood, does not permit bending over
• Normal breathing
– Breathe normally while standing for one minute X X
• Face forward
– Premeasurement activity: Stand and breath normally, without talking X
– Measurement position: Face forward while holding breath for 10 seconds
• Bending over
– Premeasurement activity: While standing, bend over to touch toes X
– Measurement position: Hold the bending position with face parallel to the floor while holding breath for 10 seconds
• Head shaking
– Premeasurement activity: Vigorously shake head from side to side for 3 seconds while shouting or making the sound of "BRRRR" loudly X
– Measurement position: Face forward, while holding breath for 10 seconds
• Redon-1
– Premeasurement activity: Remove the respirator completely and put it back on X
– Measurement position: Face forward while holding breath for 10 seconds
• Redon-2
– Repeat the premeasurement activity and measurement position described in Redon-1 X

1The Rainbow Passage:
"When the sunlight strikes raindrops in the air, they act like a prism and form a rainbow. The rainbow is a division of white light into many beautiful colors. These take the shape of a long round arch, with its path high above, and its two ends apparently beyond the horizon. There is, according to legend, a boiling pot of gold at one end. People look, but no one ever finds it. When a man looks for something beyond reach, his friends say he is looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow."

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-62015   Follow procedures established for cleaning and disinfecting respirators.  

     You must:

     • Follow the procedure in Table 20 for cleaning and disinfecting respirators.

Table 20
Respirator Cleaning Procedure

Step Task
1. Remove filters, cartridges, canisters, speaking diaphragms, demand and pressure valve assemblies, hoses, or any components recommended by the manufacturer.
• Discard or repair any defective parts.
2. Wash components in warm (43°C (110°F) maximum) water with a mild detergent or with a cleaner recommended by the manufacturer
• A stiff bristle (not wire) brush may be used to help remove the dirt
• If the detergent or cleaner does not contain a disinfecting agent, respirator components should be immersed for two minutes in one of the following:
– A bleach solution (concentration of 50 parts per million of chlorine). Make this by adding approximately one milliliter of laundry bleach to one liter of water at 43°C (110°F)
– A solution of iodine (50 parts per million iodine). Make this in two steps:
▪ First, make a tincture of iodine by adding 6-8 grams of solid ammonium iodide and/or potassium iodide to 100 cc of 45% alcohol approximately
▪ Second, add 0.8 milliliters of the tincture to one liter of water at 43°C (110°F) to get the final solution
– Other commercially available cleansers of equivalent disinfectant quality when used as directed, if their use is recommended or approved by the respirator manufacturer.
3. Rinse components thoroughly in clean, warm (43°C (110°F) maximum), preferably, running water.
Note: The importance of thorough rinsing cannot be overemphasized. Detergents or disinfectants that dry on facepieces could cause dermatitis. In addition, some disinfectants may cause deterioration of rubber or corrosion of metal parts, if not completely removed.
4. Drain components.
5. Air-dry components or hand dry components with a clean, lint-free cloth.
6. Reassemble the facepiece components.
• Replace filters, cartridges, and canisters, if necessary (for testing).
7. Test the respirator to make sure all components work properly.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-62020   Follow procedures established for seal checking respirators.  

     IMPORTANT:

     • User seal checks are NOT a substitute for fit tests. See WAC 296-307-62010 for fit test procedures.

     • You may use a seal check procedure recommended by the respirator manufacturer INSTEAD of the procedure outlined in Table 21 if you can demonstrate the procedure is based on a scientific study that, for example, demonstrates the procedure effectively identifies respirators that fit poorly when put on or adjusted.

     You must:

     • Make sure employees perform a user seal check as outlined in Table 21, EACH TIME the respirator is worn, to make sure the seal is adequate.

Table 21

User Seal Check Procedure
Important information for employees:
• You need to conduct a seal check each time you put your respirator on BEFORE you enter the respirator use area. The purpose of a seal check is to make sure your respirator (which has been previously fit tested by your employer) is properly positioned on your face to prevent leakage during use and to detect functional problems
• The procedure below has two parts; a positive pressure check and a negative pressure check. You must complete both parts each time. It should only take a few seconds to perform, once you learn it
– If you cannot pass both parts, your respirator is NOT functioning properly, see your supervisor for further instruction.
Positive pressure check:
1. Remove exhalation valve cover, if removable.
2. Cover the exhalation valve completely with the palm of your hand WHILE exhaling gently to inflate the facepiece slightly.
3. The respirator facepiece should remain inflated (indicating a build-up of positive pressure and NO outward leakage).
• If you detect NO leakage, replace the exhalation valve cover (if removed), and proceed to conduct the negative pressure check
• If you detect evidence of leakage, reposition the respirator (after removing and inspecting it), and try the positive pressure check again.
Negative pressure check:
4. Completely cover the inhalation opening(s) on the cartridges or canister with the palm(s) of your hands WHILE inhaling gently to collapse the facepiece slightly.
• If you cannot use the palm(s) of your hands to effectively cover the inhalation openings on cartridges or canisters, you may use:
– Filter seal(s) (if available)
OR
– Thin rubber gloves.
5. Once the facepiece is collapsed, hold your breath for 10 seconds WHILE keeping the inhalation openings covered.
6. The facepiece should remain slightly collapsed (indicating negative pressure and NO inward leakage).
• If you detect NO evidence of leakage, the tightness of the facepiece is considered adequate, the procedure is completed, and you may now use the respirator
• If you detect leakage, reposition the respirator (after removing and inspecting it) and repeat BOTH the positive and negative fit checks.

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NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-622   Definitions.  

     Air-purifying respirator (APR)

     A respirator equipped with an air-purifying element such as a filter, cartridge, or canister, OR having a filtering facepiece, for example, a dust mask.

     The element or filtering facepiece is designed to remove specific contaminants, such as particles, vapors, or gases, from air that passes through it.

     Air-line respirator

     An atmosphere-supplying respirator for which breathing air is drawn from a source separate from and not worn by the user, such as:

     • A cylinder or a tank

     • A compressor

     • An uncontaminated environment.

     Air supplied respirator (see air-line respirator)

     Assigned protection factor (APF)

     Indicates the expected level of workplace respiratory protection WHEN the respirator is:

     • Functioning properly

     AND

     • Fitted to the user

     AND

     • Worn by trained individuals

     AND

     • Used with the limitations specified on the NIOSH approval label.

     Atmosphere-supplying respirator

     A respirator that supplies the user with breathing air from sources, such as:

     • A cylinder or a tank

     • A compressor

     • An uncontaminated environment.

     Breathing air

     Air supplied to an atmosphere-supplying respirator. This air meets the specifications found in WAC 296-307-616.

     Canister or cartridge (air-purifying)

     Part of an air-purifying respirator that consists of a container holding materials such as fiber, treated charcoal, or a combination of the two, that removes contaminants from the air passing through the cartridge or canister.

     Cartridge respirator (see also air-purifying respirator)

     An air-purifying respirator equipped with one or more cartridges. These respirators have a facepiece made from silicone, rubber OR other plastic-like materials.

     Demand respirator

     An atmosphere-supplying respirator that sends breathing air to the facepiece only when suction (negative pressure) is created inside the facepiece by inhalation. Demand respirators are "negative pressure" respirators.

     Dust mask

     A name used to refer to filtering-facepiece respirators. Dust masks may or may not be NIOSH certified. See filtering facepiece.

     Emergency respirator

     Respirators suitable for rescue, escape, or other activities during emergency situations.

     Emergency situation

     Any occurrence that could OR does result in a significant uncontrolled release of an airborne contaminant. Causes of emergency situations include, but are not limited to, equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment.

     End-of-service-life indicator (ESLI)

     A system that warns the air-purifying respirator user that cartridges or canisters must be changed. An example of an ESLI is a dot on the respirator cartridge that changes color.

     Escape-only respirator

     A respirator that can only be used to exit during emergencies. Look for this use limitation on the respirator's NIOSH approval label.

     Exposed, or exposure

     The contact an employee has with a toxic substance, harmful physical agent, or oxygen deficient condition. Exposure can occur through various routes of entry, such as inhalation, ingestion, skin contact, or skin absorption.

     Filter

     Fibrous material that removes dust, spray, mist, fume, fog, smoke particles, OR other aerosols from the air.

     Filtering-facepiece respirator

     A tight-fitting, half-facepiece, negative-pressure, particulate air-purifying respirator with the facepiece MAINLY composed of filter material. These respirators do not use cartridges or canisters and may have sealing surfaces composed of rubber, silicone or other plastic-like materials. They are sometimes referred to as "dust masks."

     Fit factor

     A number providing an estimate of fit for a particular respiratory inlet covering to a specific individual during quantitative fit testing.

     Fit test (see also qualitative fit test and quantitative fit test)

     Fit testing is an activity where the facepiece seal of a respirator is challenged, using a WISHA accepted procedure, to determine if the respirator provides an adequate seal.

     Full-facepiece respirator

     A tight-fitting respirator that covers the wearer's nose, mouth, and eyes.

     Gas mask

     An air-purifying respirator equipped with one or more canisters. These respirators have a facepiece made from silicone, rubber OR other plastic-like materials.

     Half-facepiece respirator

     A tight-fitting respirator that only covers the wearer's nose and mouth.

     Helmet

     The rigid part of a respirator that covers the wearer's head AND also provides head protection against impact or penetration.

     High-efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA)

     A powered air purifying respirator (PAPR) filter that removes at least 99.97% of monodisperse dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles with a mean particle diameter of 0.3 micrometer from contaminated air.

Note: Filters designated, under 42 CFR Part 84, as an "N100," "R100," or "P100" provide the same filter efficiency (99.97%) as HEPA filters.
     Hood

     The part of a respirator that completely covers the wearer's head and neck AND may also cover some or all of the shoulders and torso.

     Immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH)

     An atmospheric condition that would:

     • Cause an immediate threat to life

     OR

     • Cause permanent or delayed adverse health effects

     OR

     • Interfere with an employee's ability to escape.

     Licensed healthcare professional (LHCP)

     An individual whose legally permitted scope of medical practice allows him or her to provide SOME OR ALL of the healthcare services required for respirator users' medical evaluations.

     Loose-fitting facepiece

     A respiratory inlet covering that is designed to form a partial seal with the face.

     Negative-pressure respirator

     Any tight-fitting respirator in which the air pressure inside the facepiece is less than the air pressure outside the respirator during inhalation.

     NIOSH

     The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. NIOSH is the federal agency that certifies respirators for occupational use.

     Oxygen deficient

     An atmosphere with an oxygen content below 19.5% by volume.

     Permissible exposure limit (PEL)

     Permissible exposure limits (PELs) are employee exposures to toxic substances or harmful agents that must not be exceeded. PELs are specified in applicable WISHA chapters.

     Positive-pressure respirator

     A respirator in which the air pressure inside the respiratory-inlet covering is greater than the air pressure outside the respirator.

     Powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs)

     An air-purifying respirator equipped with a blower that draws ambient air through cartridges or canisters. These respirators, as a group, are NOT classified as positive pressure respirators and must not be used as such.

     Pressure-demand respirator

     A positive-pressure atmosphere-supplying respirator that sends breathing air to the respiratory inlet covering when the positive pressure is reduced inside the facepiece by inhalation or leakage.

     Qualitative fit test (QLFT)

     A test that determines the adequacy of respirator fit for an individual. The test relies on the employee's ability to detect a test substance. Test results are either "pass" or "fail."

     Quantitative fit test (QNFT)

     A test that determines the adequacy of respirator fit for an individual. The test relies on specialized equipment that performs numeric measurements of leakage into the respiratory inlet covering. Test results are used to calculate a "fit factor."

     Respiratory hazard

     Harmful airborne hazards and oxygen deficiency that are addressed in WAC 296-307-624, Identifying and controlling airborne hazards and oxygen deficiency.

     Required use

     Respirator use:

     • That is necessary to protect employees from respiratory hazards

     OR

     • That the employer decides to require for his or her own reasons. For example, the employer decides to follow more rigorous exposure limits

     • The employer for his or her own reasons. For example, the employer decides to follow more rigorous exposure limits, OR the employer is required to follow a medical recommendation.

     Respirator

     A type of personal protective equipment designed to protect the wearer from harmful airborne hazards, oxygen deficiency, or both.

     Respiratory inlet covering

     The part of a respirator that forms the protective barrier between the user's respiratory tract and an air-purifying device or breathing air source or both. The respiratory inlet covering may be a facepiece, helmet, hood, suit, or mouthpiece respirator with nose clamp.

     Seal check

     Actions conducted by the respirator user each time the respirator is put on, to determine if the respirator is properly seated on the face.

     Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)

     An atmosphere-supplying respirator designed for the breathing air source, to be carried by the user.

     Service-life

     The period of time that a respirator, filter or sorbent, or other respiratory equipment provides adequate protection to the wearer. For example, the period of time that sorbent cartridge is effective for removing a harmful substance from the air.

     Sorbent

     Rigid, porous material, such as charcoal, used to remove vapor or gas from the air.

     Supplied-air respirator (see air-line respirator)

     Tight-fitting facepiece

     A respiratory inlet covering forming a complete seal with the face OR neck. Mouthpiece respirators aren't tight-fitting facepieces.

     Voluntary use

     Respirator use that is requested by the employee AND permitted by the employer when NO respiratory hazard exists.

[]

OTS-7359.1

Part Y-6

Respiratory Hazards
NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-624   Scope.  

     This part applies only if your employees:

     • Are exposed to a respiratory hazard

     OR

     • Could be exposed to one of the specific hazards listed below.

     This part applies to any workplace with potential or actual employee exposure to respiratory hazards. It requires you to protect employees from respiratory hazards by applying this protection strategy:

     • Evaluate employee exposures to determine if controls are needed

     • Use feasible controls. For example, enclose or confine the operation, use ventilation systems, or substitute with less toxic material

     • Use respirators if controls are not feasible or if they cannot completely remove the hazard.

     Definition:

     Exposed or exposure:

     The contact an employee has with a toxic substance, harmful physical agent or oxygen deficient condition, whether or not protection is provided by respirators or other personal protective equipment (PPE). Exposure can occur through various routes of entry, such as inhalation, ingestion, skin contact, or skin absorption.

Note: Examples of substances that may be respiratory hazards when airborne include:
• Chemicals listed in Table 3
• Any substance
– Listed in the latest edition of the NIOSH Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances
– For which positive evidence of an acute or chronic health hazard exists through tests conducted by, or known to, the employer
– That may pose a hazard to human health as stated on a material safety data sheet kept by, or known to, the employer
• Atmospheres considered oxygen deficient
• Biological agents such as harmful bacteria, viruses or fungi
– Examples include airborne TB aerosols and anthrax
• Pesticides with a label requirement for respirator use
• Chemicals used as crowd control agents such as pepper spray
• Chemicals present at clandestine drug labs.
These substances can be airborne as dusts, fibers, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smoke, sprays, vapors, or aerosols.
Reference: • Substances in Table 3 that are marked with an X in the "skin" column may require personal protective equipment (PPE). See WAC 296-307-100, Personal protective equipment, for additional information and requirements.
• If any of the following hazards are present in your workplace, you will need both this part and any of the following specific rules that apply:

Hazard Rule that applies
Acrylonitrile WAC 296-62-07336
Arsenic (inorganic) WAC 296-62-07347
Asbestos WAC 296-62-077
Benzene WAC 296-62-07523
Butadiene WAC 296-62-07460
Cadmium WAC 296-62-074 through 296-62-07449 or 296-155-174
Carcinogens Chapter 296-62 WAC, Part F
Coke ovens Chapter 296-62 WAC, Part O
Cotton dust Chapter 296-62 WAC, Part N
1,2-Dibromo-3-

chloropropane

WAC 296-62-07342
Ethylene oxide WAC 296-62-07355
Formaldehyde WAC 296-62-07540
Lead WAC 296-62-07521 or 296-155-176
Methylene chloride WAC 296-62-07470
Methylenedianiline WAC 296-62-076 or 296-155-173
Thiram WAC 296-62-07519
Vinyl chloride WAC 296-62-07329

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-626   Evaluate and control employee exposures.  

     Summary:

     Your responsibility:

     To protect your employees from exposure to respiratory hazards in the workplace by identifying and controlling the hazards.

     You must:

     Identify and evaluate employee exposures

     WAC 296-307-62605

     Control employee exposures

     WAC 296-307-62610

     Use respirators

     WAC 296-307-62615

     Notify employees

     WAC 296-307-62620

     Permissible exposure limits of air contaminants

     WAC 296-307-62625.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-62605   Identify and evaluate respiratory hazards.  

     You must:

     • Make sure employees are protected from potentially hazardous exposure while you perform your evaluation

     • Perform your evaluation without considering the protection provided to employees by a respirator

     • Determine the form of the hazard, such as dust, mist, gas, oxygen deficiency, or biological agent

     • Make sure you consider:

     – Potential emergency and rescue situations that may occur, such as equipment or power failures, uncontrolled chemical reactions, fire, explosion, or human error

     – Workplace conditions such as work processes, types of material, control methods, work practices and environmental conditions.

     • Determine or reasonably estimate whether any employee is or could be exposed to any of the following:

     – Any airborne substance above a permissible exposure limit (PEL) listed in Table 3

     – A substance at or above the action level (AL) specified in the rule for that substance

     – Any other respiratory hazard.

     • Use any of the following to determine employee exposure:

     – Information that would allow an estimate of the level of employee exposure, such as MSDSs or pesticide labels, observations, measurements or calculations

     – Data demonstrating that a particular product, material or activity cannot result in employee exposure at or above the AL or PEL

     – Personal air samples that represent an employee's usual or worst case exposure for the entire shift.

Note: • Rules for specific substances may contain additional requirements for determining employee exposure.
• Use methods of sampling and analysis that have been validated by the laboratory performing the analysis.
• Samples from a representative group of employees may be used for other employees performing the same work activities when the duration and level of exposure are similar.
     You must:

     • Consider the atmosphere to be immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) when you cannot determine or reasonably estimate employee exposure

     • Make sure employee exposure, to 2 or more substances with additive health effects, is evaluated using this formula:
Em = C1

L1

+ C2

L2

+ ... + Cn

Ln

The symbol Is the . . .
E Equivalent exposure for the mixture. When the value of E is greater than 1, a respiratory hazard is present.
C Concentration of a particular substance.
L TWA, STEL, or ceiling for that substance from Table 3.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-62610   Control employee exposures.  

     You must:

     • Use feasible controls to protect employees from exposure to respiratory hazards by:

     – Reducing employee exposure to a level that removes the respiratory hazard, such as to a level below the permissible exposure limit (PEL) in Table 3;

     OR

     – Reducing the exposure to the lowest achievable level, when the respiratory hazard cannot be removed.

Note: The following table gives you examples of control methods.

Table 1
Examples of Possible Controls

Control: For example:
Using a different chemical (substitution) • Choose a chemical with a lower evaporation rate or vapor pressure.
• Choose a chemical without hazardous ingredients.
Changing a process to lessen emissions • Use hand rolling or paint dipping instead of paint spraying.
• Bolt items instead of welding them.
Separating employees from emissions areas and sources • Use control rooms.
• Build an enclosure around process machinery or other emissions sources.
• Automate a process.
Removing emissions at or near the source (local exhaust ventilation) • Install exhaust hoods or slots to capture emissions.
• Use an exhausted enclosure (like a blasting cabinet or laboratory hood).
Diluting and removing emissions in the work area (general exhaust ventilation) • Allow natural air movement to create an adequate airflow through an area.
• Use mechanical fans.
Modify work practices • Change the position of the worker relative to the work so fumes, vapors, or smoke do not go into their face.
Rotate employees

– Some specific rules prohibit the use of this control method

• Move employees to another job that is without exposure, on a schedule to keep their total exposure below the permissible exposure limit.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-62615   Use respirators.  

     You must:

     • Require employees to use respiratory protection when respiratory hazards have not been removed using feasible controls. For example, use respirators at any of the following times:

     – While controls are being evaluated or put in place

     – When the respiratory hazard is not completely removed

     – When controls are not feasible.

Reference: See WAC 296-307-594, Respirators, for respirator program requirements.

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-62620   Notify employees.  

     You must:

     • Notify employees who are or may be exposed to respiratory hazards, as specified in Table 2.

Note: • The notification may be provided either individually, to a group, or by posting of results in an appropriate location that's accessible to affected employees.

Table 2
Notification Requirements

Notify employees of: As follows:
Any exposure result above a permissible exposure limit (PEL) Within five business days, after the employee's exposure result is known to the employer
The corrective action being taken to reduce employee exposure to or below the PEL Within fifteen business days, after the employee's exposure result is known to the employer
AND
The schedule for completion of the corrective action and any reasons why exposures cannot be lowered to below the PEL
An exposure to these substances: In writing, as specified in the rule specific to the substance
• Acrylonitrile
• Arsenic (inorganic)
• Asbestos
• Benzene
• Butadiene
• Cadmium
• Coke oven emissions
• Cotton dust
• 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane
• Ethylene oxide
• Formaldehyde
• Lead
• Methylene chloride
• Methylenedianiline
• Vinyl chloride

[]


NEW SECTION
WAC 296-307-62625   Permissible exposure limits of air contaminants.  

     IMPORTANT:

     The following information applies to Table 3, Permissible Exposure Limits for Air Contaminants.

     • Exposure needs to be determined from personal air samples taken in the breathing zone or from monitoring representative of the employee's breathing zone.

     • Ppm refers to parts of vapor or gas per million parts of air by volume, at 25 degrees C and 760 mm Hg pressure.

     • Mg/m3 refers to milligrams of substance per cubic meter of air.

     • For a metal that is measured as the metal itself, only the CAS number for the metal is given. The CAS numbers for individual compounds of the metal are not provided. For more information about CAS registry numbers see the website: http://www.cas.org.

     • Time weighted averages (TWA8) represent the maximum allowed average exposure for any 8-hour time period. For work periods longer than 8 hours the TWA8 needs to be determined using the 8 continuous hours with the highest average concentration.

     • Short-term exposure limits (STEL) represent maximum allowed average exposure for any fifteen-minute period, unless another time period is noted in Table 3.

     • The ceiling represents the maximum allowed exposure for the shortest time period that can feasibly be measured.

     • An "X" in the "skin" column indicates the substance can be absorbed through the skin, either by airborne or direct contact.

     • Requirements for the use of gloves, coveralls, goggles, and other personal protective equipment can be found in WAC 296-307-100.

     • The respirable fraction of particulate is measured by sampling with a size-selector having the following characteristics:


Mean aerodynamic diameter in micrometers Percent passing the selector
1 97
2 91
3 74
4 50
5 30
6 17
7 9
8 5
10 1

Table 3 "Permissible Exposure Limits for Air Contaminants"

Substance CAS TWA8 STEL Ceiling Skin
Abate (Temephos) 3383-96-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Acetic acid 64-19-7 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 ---- ---- 5 ppm ----
Acetone 67-64-1 750 ppm 1,000 ppm ---- ----
Acetonitrile 75-05-8 40 ppm 60 ppm ---- ----
2-Acetylaminofluorene

     (see WAC 296-62-073)

53-96-3 ---- ---- ---- ----
Acetylene 74-86-2 Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Acetylene dichloride

     (1,2-Dichloroethylene)

540-59-0 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Acetylene tetrabromide 79-27-6 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Acetylsalicylic acid

     (Aspirin)

50-78-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Acrolein 107-02-8 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Acrylamide 79-06-1 0.03 mg/m3 0.09 mg/m3 ---- X
Acrylic acid 79-10-7 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Acrylonitrile (Vinyl cyanide)

     (see WAC 296-62-07336)

107-13-1 2 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Aldrin 309-00-2 0.25 mg/m3 0.75 mg/m3 ---- X
Allyl alcohol 107-18-6 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Allyl chloride 107-05-1 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Allyl glycidyl ether (AGE) 106-92-3 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Allyl propyl disulfide 2179-59-1 2 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
alpha-Alumina

     (Aluminum oxide)

1344-28-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Aluminum (as Al) 7429-90-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Pyro powders ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Welding fumes ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Soluble salts ---- 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Alkyls (NOC) ---- 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Aluminum oxide (Alundum,

     Corundum)

7429-90-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
4-Aminodiphenyl

     (see WAC 296-62-073)

92-67-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
2-Aminoethanol

     (Ethanolamine)

141-43-5 3 ppm 6 ppm ---- ----
2-Aminopyridine 504-29-0 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
Amitrole 61-82-5 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Ammonia 7664-41-7 25 ppm 35 ppm ---- ----
Ammonium chloride, fume 12125-02-9 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Ammonium sulfamate (Ammate) 7773-06-0 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5.0 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
n-Amyl acetate 628-63-7 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
sec-Amyl acetate 626-38-0 125 ppm 156 ppm ---- ----
Aniline and homologues 62-53-3 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Anisidine (o, p-isomers) 29191-52-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Antimony and compounds (as Sb) 7440-36-0 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
ANTU

     (alpha Naphthyl thiourea)

86-88-4 0.3 mg/m3 0.9 mg/m3 ---- ----
Argon 7440-37-1 Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Arsenic,

     organic compounds (as As)

7440-38-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Arsenic, inorganic

     compounds (as As) (when

     use is covered by WAC

     296-62-07347)

7440-38-2 0.01 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Arsenic, inorganic

     compounds (as As)

     (when use is not

     covered by WAC

     296-62-07347)

7440-38-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Arsine 7784-42-1 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Asbestos

     (see WAC 296-62-077)

---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Asphalt (Petroleum fumes) 8052-42-4 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Atrazine 1912-24-9 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Azinphos methyl (Guthion) 86-50-0 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Azodrin (Monocrotophos) 6923-22-4 0.25 mg/m3 0.75 mg/m3 ---- ----
Barium, soluble

     compounds (as Ba)

7440-39-3 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Barium sulfate 7727-43-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Baygon (Propoxur) 114-26-1 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Benomyl 17804-35-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Benzene

     (see WAC

     296-62-07523)

71-43-2 1 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Benzidine

     (see WAC 296-62-073)

92-87-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
p-Benzoquinone

     (Quinone)

106-51-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Benzo(a) pyrene

     (Coal tar pitch volatiles)

65996-93-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Benzoyl peroxide 94-36-0 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Benzyl chloride 100-44-7 1ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Beryllium and beryllium

     compounds (as Be)

7440-41-7 0.002 mg/m3 0.005 mg/m3

(30 min.)

0.025 mg/m3 ----
Biphenyl (Diphenyl) 92-52-4 0.2 ppm 0.6 ppm ---- ----
Bismuth telluride, undoped 1304-82-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Bismuth telluride, Se-doped ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Borates, tetra, sodium salts ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Anhydrous 1330-43-4 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Decahydrate 1303-96-4 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Pentahydrate 12179-04-3 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Boron oxide 1303-86-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Boron tribromide 10294-33-4 ---- ---- 1 ppm ----
Boron trifluoride 6737-07-2 ---- ---- 1 ppm ----
Bromacil 314-40-9 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Bromine 7726-95-6 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Bromine pentafluoride 7789-30-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Bromochloromethane

     (Chlorobromomthane)

74-97-5 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Bromoform 15-25-2 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- X
Butadiene

     (1,3-butadiene)

106-99-0 1 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Butane 106-97-8 800 ppm 1,000 ppm ---- ----
Butanethiol

     (Butyl mercaptan)

109-79-5 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
2-Butanone

     (Methyl ethyl ketone)

78-93-3 200 ppm 300 ppm ---- ----
2-Butoxy ethanol

     (Butyl cellosolve)

111-76-2 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- X
n-Butyl acetate 123-86-4 150 ppm 200 ppm ---- ----
sec-Butyl acetate 105-46-4 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
tert-Butyl acetate 540-88-5 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Butyl acrylate 141-32-2 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
n-Butyl alcohol 71-36-3 ---- ---- 50 ppm X
sec-Butyl alcohol 78-92-2 100 ppm 150 ppm -- -- ----
tert-Butyl alcohol 75-65-0 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Butylamine 109-73-9 ---- ---- 5 ppm X
Butyl cellosolve (2-Butoxy ethanol) 111-76-2 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
tert-Butyl chromate

     (as CrOs)

1189-85-1 ---- ---- 0.1 mg/m3 X
n-Butyl glycidyl ether (BGE) 2426-08-6 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
n-Butyl lactate 138-22-7 5 ppm 10 ppm --- ----
Butyl mercaptan 109-79-5 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
o-sec-Butylphenol 89-72-5 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
p-tert-Butyl-toluene 98-51-1 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Cadmium oxide fume (as Cd)

     (see WAC 296-62-074)

1306-19-0 0.005 mg/m3 ---- -- -- ----
Cadmium dust and salts (as Cd)

     (see WAC 296-62-074)

7440-43-9 0.005 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Calcium arsenate

     (see WAC 296-62-07347)

---- 0.01 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Calcium carbonate 1317-65-3 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium cyanamide 156-62-7 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium hydroxide 1305-62-0 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium oxide 1305-78-8 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium silicate 1344-95-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Calcium sulfate 7778-18-9 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Camphor (synthetic) 76-22-2 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Caprolactam 105-60-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Dust ---- 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Vapor ---- 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Captafol

     (Difolatan)

2425-06-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Captan 133-06-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Carbaryl (Sevin) 63-25-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Carbofuran (Furadon) 1563-66-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Carbon black 1333-86-4 3.5 mg/m3 7 mg/m3 ---- ----
Carbon dioxide 124-38-9 5,000 ppm 30,000 ppm ---- ----
Carbon disulfide 75-15-0 4 ppm 12 ppm ---- X
Carbon monoxide 630-08-0 35 ppm 200 ppm (5 min.) 1,500 ppm ----
Carbon tetrabromide 558-13-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Carbon tetrachloride

     (Tetrachloromethane)

56-23-5 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Carbonyl chloride

     (Phosgene)

7803-51-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Carbonyl fluoride 353-50-4 2 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Catechol (Pyrocatechol) 120-80-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Cellosolve acetate

     (2-Ethoxyethylacetate)

111-15-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Cellulose (paper fiber) 9004-34-6 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cesium hydroxide 21351-79-1 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chlordane 57-74-9 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Chlorinated camphene

     (Toxaphen)

8001-35-2 0.5 mg/m3 1 mg/m3 ---- X
Chlorinated diphenyl oxide 55720-99-5 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chlorine 7782-50-5 0.5 ppm ---- 1 ppm ----
Chlorine dioxide 10049-04-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Chlorine trifluoride 7790-91-2 ---- ---- 0.1 ppm ----
Chloroacetaldehyde 107-20-0 ---- ---- 1 ppm ----
a-Chloroacetophenone

     (Phenacyl chloride)

532-21-4 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Chloroacetyl chloride 79-04-9 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Chlorobenzene

     (Monochlorobenzene)

108-90-7 75 ppm 113 ppm ---- ----
o-Chlorobenzylidene

     malononitrile (OCBM)

2698-41-1 ---- ---- 0.05 ppm X
Chlorobromomethane 74-97-5 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
2-Chloro-1, 3-butadiene

     (beta-Chloroprene)

126-99-8 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Chlorodifluoromethane 75-45-6 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Chlorodiphenyl

     (42% Chlorine) (PCB)

     (Polychlorobiphenyls)

53469-21-9 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
Chlorodiphenyl

     (54% Chlorine)

     (Polychlorobiphenyls

     (PCB))

11097-69-1 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
1-Chloro-2, 3-epoxypropane

     (Epichlorhydrin)

106-89-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
2-Chloroethanol

     (Ethylene chlorohydrin)

107-07-3 ---- ---- 1 ppm X
Chloroethylene

     (vinyl chloride)

     (See WAC 296-62-07329)

75-01-4 1 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Chloroform (Trichloromethane) 67-66-3 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
1-Chloro-1-nitropropane 600-25-9 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
bis-Chloromethyl ether

     (see WAC 296-62-073)

542-88-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
Chloromethyl methyl ether

     (Methyl chloromethyl

     ether)

     (see WAC 296-62-073)

107-30-2 ---- ---- ---- ----
Chloropentafluoroethane 76-15-3 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Chloropicrin (Nitrotrichloromethane) 76-06-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
beta-Chloroprene (2-Chloro-1,

     3-butadiene)

126-99-8 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
o-Chlorostyrene 2039-87-4 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
o-Chlorotoluene 95-49-8 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
2-Chloro-6-trichloromethyl

     pyridine (Nitrapyrin)

1929-82-4 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chlorpyrifos 2921-88-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Chromic acid and chromates

     (as CrO3)

Varies with

compound

0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chromium, soluble, chromic and

     chromous salts (as Cr)

7440-47-3 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- -- --
Chromium (VI) compounds

     (as Cr)

---- 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chromium metal

     and insoluble salts

7440-47-3 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Chromyl chloride 14977-61-8 0.025 ppm 0.075 ppm ---- ----
Chrysene (Coal tar

     pitch volatiles)

65996-93-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Clopidol 2971-90-6 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Coal dust (less than 5% SiO2) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Coal dust (greater than or

     equal to 5% SiO2)

---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Coal tar pitch volatiles

     (benzene soluble fraction)

     (Particulate polycyclic

     aromatic hydrocarbons)

65996-93-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cobalt, metal fume & dust

     (as Co)

7440-48-4 0.05 mg/m3 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cobalt carbonyl (as Co) 10210-68-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cobalt hydrocarbonyl (as Co) 16842-03-8 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Coke oven emissions

     (see WAC 296-62-200)

---- 0.15 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Copper (as Cu) 7440-50-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Fume ---- 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dusts and mists ---- 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cotton dust (raw) (waste sorting, blending, cleaning, willowing and garetting) (see WAC 296-62-14533) ---- 1 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Corundum (Aluminum oxide) 7429-90-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Crag herbicide (Sesone, Sodium-2,

     4-dichloro-phenoxyethyl

     sulfate)

136-78-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cresol (all isomers) 1319-77-3 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Crotonaldehyde

    

123-73-9;

4170-30-3

2 ppm 4 ppm ---- ----
Crufomate 299-86-5 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cumene 98-82-8 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- X
Cyanamide 420-04-2 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Cyanide (as CN) Varies with

compound

5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- X
Cyanogen 460-19-5 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Cyanogen chloride 506-77-4 ---- ---- 0.3 ppm ----
Cyclohexane 110-82-7 300 ppm 375 ppm ---- ----
Cyclohexanol 108-93-0 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- X
Cyclohexanone 108-94-1 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- X
Cyclohexene 110-83-8 300 ppm 375 ppm ---- ----
Cyclohexylamine 108-91-8 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Cyclonite (RDX) 121-82-4 1.5 mg/m3 3.0 mg/m3 ---- X
Cyclopentadiene 542-92-7 75 ppm 113 ppm ---- ----
Cyclopentane 287-92-3 600 ppm 750 ppm ---- ----
Cyhexatin (Tricyclohexyltin

     hydroxide)

13121-70-5 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
2,4-D (Dichlorophenoxy-

     acetic acid)

94-75-7 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
DBCP (1,2-Dibromo-3-

     chloropropane)

     (See WAC 296-62-07342)

96-12-8 0.001 ppm ---- 0.005 ppm ----
DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltri-

     chloroethane)

50-29-3 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
DDVP, (Dichlorvos) 62-73-7 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Dasanit

     (Fensulfothion)

115-90-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Decaborane 17702-41-9 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- X
Demeton 8065-48-3 0.01 ppm 0.03 ppm ---- X
Diacetone alcohol

     (4-hydroxy-4-methyl-

     2-pentanone)

123-42-2 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
1, 2-Diaminoethane

     (Ethylenediamine)

107-15-3 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Diazinon 333-41-5 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Diazomethane 334-88-3 0.2 ppm 0.6 ppm ---- ----
Diborane 19287-45-7 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Dibrom (see Naled) 300-76-5 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- X
1, 2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane

     (DBCP)

     (see WAC

     296-62-07342)

96-12-8 0.001 ppm ---- 0.005 ppm ----
2-N-Dibutylamino ethanol 102-81-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Dibutyl phosphate 107-66-4 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Dibutyl phthalate 84-74-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dichloroacetylene 7572-29-4 ---- ----- 0.1 ppm ----
o-Dichlorobenzene 95-50-1 ---- ---- 50 ppm ----
p-Dichlorobenzene 106-46-7 75 ppm 110 ppm ---- ----
3, 3'-Dichlorobenzidine

     (see WAC 296-62-073)

91-94-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
Dichlorodiphenyltri-

     chloroethane (DDT)

50-29-3 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
Dichlorodifluoromethane 75-71-8 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
1, 3-Dichloro-5, 5-dimethyl

     hydantoin

118-52-5 0.2 mg/m3 0.4 mg/m3 ---- ----
1, 1-Dichloroethane

     (Ethylidine chloride)

75-34-3 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
1, 2-Dichloroethane

     (Ethylene dichloride)

107-06-2 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
1, 1-Dichloroethylene

     (Vinylidene chloride)

75-35-4 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
1, 2-Dichloroethylene (Acetylene

     dichloride)

540-59-0 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Dichloroethyl ether 111-44-4 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Dichlorofluoromethane 75-43-4 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Dichloromethane

     (Methylene chloride)

     (See WAC 296-62-07470)

75-09-2 25 ppm 125 ppm ---- ----
1, 1-Dichloro-1-nitroethane 594-72-9 2 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

     (2, 4-D)

94-75-7 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
1, 2-Dichloropropane

     (Propylene dichloride)

78-87-5 75 ppm 110 ppm ---- ----
Dichloropropene 542-75-6 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
2, 2-Dichloropropionic acid 75-99-0 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Dichlorotetrafluoroethane 76-14-2 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Dichlorvos (DDVP) 62-73-7 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Dicrotophos 141-66-2 0.25 mg/m3 0.75 mg/m3 ---- X
Dicyclopentadiene 77-73-6 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Dicyclopentadienyl iron 102-54-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dieldrin 60-57-1 0.25 mg/m3 0.75 mg/m3 ---- X
Diethanolamine 111-42-2 3 ppm 6 ppm ---- ----
Diethylamine 109-89-7 10 ppm 25 ppm ---- ----
2-Diethylaminoethanol 100-37-8 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Diethylene triamine 111-40-0 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
Diethyl ether (Ethyl ether) 60-29-7 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Diethyl ketone 96-22-0 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Diethyl phthalate 84-66-2 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Difluorodibromomethane 75-61-6 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Difolatan (Captafol) 2425-06-1 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Diglycidyl ether (DGE) 2238-07-5 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Dihydroxybenzene

     (Hydroquinone)

123-31-9 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 -- -- ----
Diisobutyl ketone (2, 6-

     Dimethylheptanone)

108-83-8 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Diisopropylamine 108-18-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Dimethoxymethane (Methylal) 109-87-5 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Dimethyl acetamide 127-19-5 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Dimethylamine 124-40-3 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
4-Dimethylaminoazo benzene

     (see WAC 296-62-073)

60-11-7 ---- ---- ---- ----
Dimethylaminobenzene

     (Xylidene)

1300-73-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Dimethylaniline

     (N, N-Dimethylaniline)

121-69-7 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Dimethylbenzene (Xylene) 1300-73-8 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Dimethyl-1, 2-dibromo-2,

     2-dichloroethyl phosphate

     (Naled)

300-76-5 3 mg/m3 6 mg/m3 ---- X
Dimethylformamide 68-12-2 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
2, 6-Dimethylheptanone

     (Diisobutyl ketone)

108-83-8 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
1, 1-Dimethylhydrazine 57-14-7 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- X
Dimethyl phthalate 131-11-3 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dimethyl sulfate 77-78-1 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Dinitolmide

     (3, 5-Dinitro-o-toluamide)

148-01-6 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dinitrobenzene (all isomers -

     alpha, meta and para)

528-29-0;

99-65-0;

100-25-4

0.15 ppm 0.45 ppm ---- X
Dinitro-o-cresol 534-52-1 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
3, 5-Dinitro-o-toluamide

     (Dinitolmide)

148-01-6 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Dinitrotoluene 25321-14-6 1.5 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- X
Dioxane (Diethylene dioxide) 123-91-1 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- X
Dioxathion 78-34-2 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Diphenyl (Biphenyl) 92-52-4 0.2 ppm 0.6 ppm ---- ----
Diphenylamine 122-39-4 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Diphenylmethane diisocyanate

     (Methylene bisphenyl           isocyanate (MDI))

101-68-8 ---- ---- 0.02 ppm ----
Dipropylene glycol methyl ether 34590-94-8 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- X
Dipropyl ketone 123-19-3 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Diquat 85-00-7 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Di-sec, Octyl phthalate

     (Di-2-ethylhexylphthalate)

117-81-7 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Disulfram 97-77-8 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
Disulfoton 298-04-4 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
2, 6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol 128-37-0 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Diuron 330-54-1 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Divinyl benzene 1321-74-0 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Emery 12415-34-8 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Endosulfan (Thiodan) 115-29-7 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Endrin 72-20-8 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Epichlorhydrin (1-Chloro-2,

     3-epoxypropane)

106-89-8 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
EPN 2104-64-5 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
1, 2-Epoxypropane

     (Propylene oxide)

75-56-9 20 ppm 30 ppm ---- ----
2, 3-Epoxy-1-propanol

     (Glycidol)

556-52-5 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Ethane ---- Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Ethanethiol

     (Ethyl mercaptan)

75-08-1 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
Ethanol

     (Ethyl alcohol)

64-17-5 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Ethanolamine (2-Aminoethanol) 141-43-5 3 ppm 6 ppm ---- ----
Ethion 563-12-2 0.4 mg/m3 1.2 mg/m3 ---- X
2-Ethoxyethanol (Glycol

     monoethyl ether)

110-80-5 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
2-Ethoxyethyl acetate

     (Cellosolve acetate)

111-15-9 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Ethyl acetate 141-78-6 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl acrylate 140-88-5 5 ppm 25 ppm ---- X
Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) 64-17-5 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Ethylamine 75-04-07 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl amyl ketone

     (5-Methyl-3-hepatone)

541-85-5 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl benzene 100-41-4 100 ppm 125 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl bromide 74-96-4 200 ppm 250 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl butyl ketone

     (3-Heptanone)

106-35-4 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl chloride 75-00-3 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Ethylene 74-85-1 Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Ethylene chlorohydrin

     (2-Chloroethanol)

107-07-3 ---- ---- 1 ppm X
Ethylenediamine (1,2-

     Diaminoethane)

107-15-3 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- X
Ethylene dibromide 106-93-4 0.1 ppm 0.5 ppm ---- ----
Ethylene dichloride

     (1,2-Dichloroethane)

107-06-2 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Ethylene glycol 107-21-1 ---- ---- 50 ppm ----
Ethylene glycol dinitrate 628-96-6 ---- 0.1 mg/m3 ---- X
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether

     acetate (Methyl cellosolve           acetate)

---- 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Ethyleneimine

     (see WAC 296-62-073)

151-56-4 ---- ---- ---- X
Ethylene oxide

     (see WAC

     296-62-07359)

75-21-8 1 ppm 5 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl ether (Diethyl ether) 60-29-7 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl formate 109-94-4 100 ppm 125 ppm ---- ----
Ethylidine chloride

     (1, 1-Dichloroethane)

107-06-2 1 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Ethylidene norbornene 16219-75-3 ---- ---- 5.0 ppm ----
Ethyl mercaptan (Ethanethiol) 75-08-1 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
n-Ethylmorpholine 100-74-3 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Ethyl sec-amyl ketone

     (5-methyl-3-heptanone)

541-85-5 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Ethyl silicate 78-10-4 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Fenamiphos 22224-92-6 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Fensulfothion (Dasanit) 115-90-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Fenthion 55-38-9 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Ferbam ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate 14484-64-1 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Ferrovanadium dust 12604-58-9 1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Fluorides (as F) Varies with

compound

2.5 mg/m3 5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Fluorine 7782-41-4 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- ----
Fluorotrichloromethane

     (see Trichlorofluoro methane)

75-69-4 ---- ---- 1,000 ppm ----
Fonofos 944-22-9 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- X
Formaldehyde

     (see WAC 296-62-07540)

50-00-0 0.75 ppm 2 ppm ---- ----
Formamide 75-12-7 20 ppm 30 ppm ---- ----
Formic acid 64-18-6 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Furadon

     (carbofuran)

1563-66-2 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Furfural 98-01-1 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Furfuryl alcohol 98-00-0 10 ppm 15 ppm ---- X
Gasoline 8006-61-9 300 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Germanium tetrahydride 7782-65-2 0.2 ppm 0.6 ppm ---- ----
Glass, fibrous or dust ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Gluteraldehyde 111-30-8 ---- ---- 0.2 ppm ----
Glycerin mist 56-81-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Glycidol

     (2, 3-Epoxy-1-propanol)

556-52-5 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Glycol monoethyl ether

     (2-Ethoxyethanol)

110-80-5 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- X
Grain dust (oat, wheat, barley) ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
Graphite, natural 7782-42-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Respirable particulate ---- 2.5 mg/m3 5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Graphite, synthetic ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Guthion

     (Azinphosmethyl)

86-50-0 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Gypsum 13397-24-5 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Hafnium 7440-58-6 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Helium ---- Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Heptachlor 76-44-8 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Heptane (n-heptane) 142-82-5 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
2-Heptanone

     (Methyl n-amyl ketone)

110-43-0 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
3-Heptanone

     (Ethyl butyl ketone)

106-35-4 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Hexachlorobutadiene 87-68-3 0.02 ppm 0.06 ppm ---- X
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene 77-47-4 0.01 ppm 0.03 ppm ---- ----
Hexachloroethane 67-72-1 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- X
Hexachloronaphthalene 1335-87-1 0.2 mg/m3 0.6 mg/m3 ---- X
Hexafluoroacetone 684-16-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Hexane ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     n-hexane 110-54-3 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
     other isomers Varies with

compound

500 ppm 1,000 ppm ---- ----
2-Hexanone

     (Methyl-n-butyl ketone)

591-78-6 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
Hexone

     (Methyl isobutyl ketone)

108-10-1 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
sec-Hexyl acetate 108-84-9 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Hexylene glycol 107-41-5 ---- ---- 25 ppm ----
Hydrazine 302-01-2 0.1 ppm 0.3 ppm ---- X
Hydrogen ---- Simple asphyxiant ---- ---- ----
Hydrogenated terphenyls 61788-32-7 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- ----
Hydrogen bromide 10035-10-6 ---- ---- 3.0 ppm ----
Hydrogen chloride 7647-01-0 ---- ---- 5.0 ppm ----
Hydrogen cyanide 74-90-8 ---- 4.7 ppm ---- X
Hydrogen fluoride 7664-39-3 ---- ---- 3 ppm ----
Hydrogen peroxide 7722-84-1 1 ppm 3 ppm ---- ----
Hydrogen selenide (as Se) 7783-07-5 0.05 ppm 0.15 ppm ---- ----
Hydrogen sulfide 7783-06-4 10 ppm 15 ppm ---- ----
Hydroquinone

     (Dihydroxybenzene)

123-31-9 2 mg/m3 4 mg/m3 ---- ----
4-Hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone

     (Diacetone alcohol)

123-42-2 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
2-Hydroxypropyl acrylate 99-61-1 0.5 ppm 1.5 ppm ---- X
Indene 95-13-6 10 ppm 20 ppm ---- ----
Indium and compounds (as In) 7440-74-6 0.1 mg/m3 0.3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Iodine 7553-56-2 ---- ---- 0.1 ppm ----
Iodoform 75-47-8 0.6 ppm 1.8 ppm ---- ----
Iron oxide dust and fume (as Fe) 1309-37-1 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Iron pentacarbonyl (as Fe) 13463-40-6 0.1 ppm 0.2 ppm ---- ----
Iron salts, soluble (as Fe) Varies with

compound

1 mg/m3 3 mg/m3 ---- ----
Isoamyl acetate 123-92-2 100 ppm 150 ppm ---- ----
Isoamyl alcohol

     (primary and secondary)

123-51-3 100 ppm 125 ppm ---- ----
Isobutyl acetate 110-19-0 150 ppm 188 ppm ---- ----
Isobutyl alcohol 78-83-1 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- ----
Isooctyl alcohol 26952-21-6 50 ppm 75 ppm ---- X
Isophorone 78-59-1 4 ppm ---- 5 ppm ----
Isophorone diisocyanate 4098-71-9 0.005 ppm 0.02 ppm ---- X
Isopropoxyethanol 109-59-1 25 ppm 38 ppm ---- ----
Isopropyl acetate 108-21-4 250 ppm 310 ppm ---- ----
Isopropyl alcohol 67-63-0 400 ppm 500 ppm ---- ----
Isopropylamine 75-31-0 5 ppm 10 ppm ---- ----
N-Isopropylaniline 768-52-5 2 ppm 4 ppm ---- X
Isopropyl ether 108-20-3 250 ppm 313 ppm ---- ----
Isopropyl glycidyl ether (IGE) 4016-14-2 50 ppm 75 ppm ----- ----
Kaolin ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Ketene 463-51-4 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Lannate

     (Methomyl)

16752-77-5 2.5 mg/m3 5 mg/m3 ---- ----
Lead, inorganic (as Pb)

     (see WAC 296-62-07521

     and 296-155-176)

7439-92-1 0.05 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Lead arsenate (as Pb)

     (see WAC 296-62-07347)

3687-31-8 0.05 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Lead chromate (as Pb) 7758-97-6 0.05 mg/m3 ---- ---- ----
Limestone 1317-65-3 ---- ---- ---- ----
     Total particulate ---- 10 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 ---- ----
     Respirable fraction ---- 5 mg/m3 10 mg/m3 ---- ----
Lindane 58-89-9 0.5 mg/m3 1.5 mg/m3 ---- X
Lithium hydride 7580-67-8 0.025 mg/m3 0.075 mg/m3 ---- ----
L.P.G.

     (liquified petroleum gas)

68476-85-7 1,000 ppm 1,250 ppm ---- ----
Magnesite 546-93-0 ---- ---- </